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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
File 002
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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 002. 1999-12-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7537.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-03). Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7537

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 002, 1999-12-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7537.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 3, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript 17 tTT!TTtt71 voice A hit in Sweden, a new romantic coming-of-age film about a girl (Alexandra Dahlstrom) falling for another girl is finding limited success in U.S. theaters. Page 15 ISSUE 997 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 3, 1999 Mayor declares 'AIDS emergency' Houston Mayor Lee Brown announces ambitious five-year plan to combat rising HIV infections among blacks, though the $3 million initiative comes with little funding in place by MATTHEW A. HENNIE Houston Mayor Lee Brown marked World AIDS Day Wednesday by announcing a nearly five-year, $3 million effort to battle a growing AIDS epidemic in the city's black community. Brown was flanked by local elected officials, AIDS activists and service providers in declaring a state of emergency in Houston's black community over AIDS, two weeks after the Ryan White Planning Council, the area's leading funding source for AIDS care, criticized Brown for not speaking out on the issue. City health officials had repeatedly said they first wanted to develop a comprehensive approach to addressing startling new statistics that show 61 percent of new w HIV infections in the Houston area this | year are among African-Americans. x "Gay white males have traditionally g been the face of AIDS. Today we recog- p ni-Ze AIDS affects a cross section of our | culture," Brown told a packed press conference. "The new statistics show an alarming, undeniable increase in the African-American community. We need to address this problem and we must do so aggressively." Brown also pledged to use the mayor's office as a bully pulpit, speaking out on HIV prevention during his public appearances and speeches, and to convene a summit next month of business, political and clergy leaders in the black communi- j9^. I 111 j Wil kmWW a*«j8l&S all/i mmmW/i/kn i U.S Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee said blacks must combat illegal drug use as part of stemming HIV infections among African- Americans. Mayor Lee Brown announced on Wednesday an HIV in the city's black community. ty to enlist their help in stemming HIV infections. "I call on all of Houston to work with us to make sure we have a state of emergency," Brown said. City health officials hope to apply some of the lessons learned in the gay community about education and prevention: Over a 16-year period, new HIV infections among gay men have dropped from 88 percent to 31 percent of all new infections, in part because of strategically targeted funding and prevention efforts. "To the gay community, let me say this: I want to thank you for first putting a face on HIV/AIDS," U.S. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee said during the press conference. "You showed me HIV/AIDS is not the other person's problem. We need to travel the road you all have already traveled." A plan without funding? Brown and city health officials face a daunting task: • IIIV/AIDS is not often mentioned by ambitious five-year, $3 million effort to combat leaders in the black community, which sometimes views homosexuality, sex and illegal drug use as taboos that shouldn't be discussed. Among the metro Houston's new cases in 1999, African-Americans account for nearly 61 percent of the heterosexual transmissions of HIV, 66 percent of the cases transmitted by drug use and 23 percent of male-to-male sexual transmissions, the council said. • Past discrimination in the health care system, which may lead many African- Americans to distrust the medical establishment and cause some with HIV to forego testing and treatment until they are in the later stages of AIDS, combined with lower income levels and less access to affordable health care may also contribute to the higher infection and death rates. • Once infected, A frican-Americans are more likely to die of the disease than their white and Hispanic counterparts. AIDS death rates in 1998, the most recent statistics available, showed African-Americans -*•* Continued on Page 12 Noted researcher and college professor David Sexton was brutally killed in his New Orleans home. Brutal killing shocks the Big Easy In the early morning of Nov. 20, David Sexton was repeatedly stabbed by someone he knew; the killing of this respected researcher has sent shock waves through the city's gay community by MELINDA SHELTON NEW ORLEANS—Colleagues and friends knew something was terribly wrong when Dr. David Sexton missed an 8 a.m. meeting late last month at the LSU Health Sciences Center. A co-worker's calls went unanswered on Nov. 22, so she went to his home at 1221 Hagan Ave., discovered his car and three days of newspapers, and called a neighbor and friend, Steve Loria. Loria, who often took care of Sexton's home during the researcher's frequent absences, grabbed a key and called another friend, Randy Scott, for support. Their worst fears were realized when Loria unlocked a security gate and found several bloodied footprints on the porch. Their horror > Continued on Page 10
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