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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
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Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 001. 1999-12-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7536.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-03). Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7536

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999 - File 001, 1999-12-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7565/show/7536.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 997, December 3, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 3, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSUE 997 Reform Party candidate Pat Buchanan welcomes gays to his campaign, while John Mccain is attacked for meeting with gay Republicans. Page 6 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YO UR STYLE. Mayor declares 'AIDS emergency' Houston Mayor Lee Brown announces ambit ious f ive-year plan t o combat rising HIV infections among blacks, though the $3 million initiative comes with little funding in place by MADI IEW A. l !Li\<NIE l louston Mayor Lee Brown marked World AIDS Day Wednesday by announc­ing J nearly five-year, $3 million effort to battle a growing AIDS epidemic in the city's black communitr. Brown was flanked by local elected offi­oals, AIDS activists and service providers in declaring a state of emergency in l louston's bl,ick community over AIDS, two Wl·eks aftl'r the Ryan White Planning Council, the area's leading funding source for AIDS c;m•, criticized Brown for not spe.iking out on the issue. City hl'alth officials had repeatedly said they first wanted to de\'elop a compre­hensive approach to addressing startling new statistics that show 61 percent of new "' l llV m fer lions in the Houston area this ~ year are among African-Americans. ~ "Gay white males have traditionally ~ been the face of AIDS. Today we recog- J: nize AIDS affects a cross section of our ~ rnlture," Brown told a packed press con- " ._ ___ ._ _ _ ~=--..:._. . . . .. fcrence. "'J hl' new statistics show an Mayor Lee Brown announced on Wednesday an ambitious five-year, $3 m1lhon effort to combat alarmmg, undeniable increase m the HIV in the city's black community. African-Ammcan community. We need ty to enlist their help in stemming HIV leaders in the black community, which to address this problem and we must do infections. sometimes views homosexuality, sex and so aggressively." "I call on all of Houston to work with illegal drug use as taboos that shouldn't Brown also pledged to use the mayor's us to make sure we have a state of emer- be discussed. office .is a bully pulpit, speaking out on gency," Brown s.iid. Among the metro Houston's new cases l IIV pren•ntion during his public appear- City health officials hope to apply some in 1999, African-Americans account for •lnCl's .ind speeches, and to convene a of the lessons learned in the gay commu- nearly 61 percent of the heterosexual summit m·xt month of business, political nity about education and prevention: transmissions of HIV, 66 percent of the and clergy ll•aders in the black communi- Over a 16-year period, new HIV infec- cases transmitted by drug use and 23 per-tions among gay men have dropped from cent of male-to-male sexual transmis- 88 percent to 31 percent of all new infec- sions, the council said. U.S Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee said blacks must combat illegal drug use as part of stemming HIV infections among African­Americans. lions, m part because of strategically tar- • Past discrimination m the health cart> grted funding and pr~vention efforts. systrm, which may lead many African- "To the gay community, let me say this: Americans to distrust the medical estab- 1 want to thank you for first putting a face lishment and cause some with HIV to on I !IV/ AIDS," U.S. Congresswoman forego testing and treatment until they ::ire >~::: Sheila Jackson Leehsaid dduring 1 1thVe/Apr1lDS's~ i1 n the later stages of AIDS, combined with confl•n•ncl'. "You s owe me I ower income lewis and less access to is not the other person's problem. We affordable health care may also contribute i!j ncl'd to travel the road you all ha\·e to the higher infection and death rates. ~ already trawled " • Once infected, African-Americans are "' more likdy to die of the disease than their A plan without funding'? white and llispamc counterparts. AIDS Brown and citv health officials face a death rates in 1998, the most recent statts-daunting task · lic.s available, showed African-Americans • 111\' I AIDS is not often mentioned by :.- Continued on Page 12 A hit in Sweden, a new romantic coming-of-age film about a girl (Alexandra Dahlstrom) falling for another girl is finding limited success in U.S. theaters. Page 15 DECEMBER 3, 1999 Noted researcher and college professor David Sexton was brutally killed in his New Orleans home. Brutal killing shocks the Big Easy In the early morning of Nov. 20, David Sexton was repeatedly stabbed by someone he knew; the kill ing of this respected researcher has sent shock waves through the city's gay community by MELl'.'o)OA SHELTON !\:EW ORLEA:'\S--Colleagues and friends knew ~mething \\as terribly wrong when Dr. Oa\id Sexton mbsed an 8 a.m. meeting late last month at the l..SU Health Sciences Center. A co-worker's calls went unanswered on :"\ov. 22, so she went to his home at 1221 I fagan Aw., dL'>Covered his car and three days of newspapers, and called a neighbor and friend, Steve Loria. Loria, who oflt.'ll took care of S..>xton's home during the researcher's frt>quent ab~nccs, grabbed a key and called another friend, Randy Scott, for support. Their worst fears \\ere realized when Lona unlocked a x'Cllrity gate and found several bloodied footpnnb on the porch. Their horror ;... Continued on Page 10 2 ~,7<~ '7/? (Up, ~ff k; jenJe ~ N ---==:::t&c:~=--­Pre- arranged funeral Plans Available 281 -445-0050 Ashland F, Burchwell, II I 0710 Veterans Memorial Drive Houston, Texas 77038 s249/sO/s16,499 PER MOIVTH1 DOVVN! StklB00105 !Only SalePrice$17749-5 0•$16,499 Pmtbasedon SOdown+TI&L 48 nmts of $249 .r.th fi S 620 0 7 5"f. APR WAC RIGHT ON TARGET PRICING! • 11 RANuD METRO MAIDA DWH IN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN THE U.S. • WINNER OF THE 1991 PRESIDENT'S AWARD • IUD>A C1mFUD Sws Stm! • KIND, F111NDLY PRonsstoNAL Sws PlasoNNll NEW 1999 MAZDA B2500 · 990525 • 1 Only SaleP1 S .4 ' ·S15 R1bale Contact Vic King ilM'AR£Hi'R;S ~44 5·6440 ~ mazdausa.com • www.archermazda.com 8455 1·45 North BdWeen Shepherd & Gulf Bank z~~U:.::.~..-."":!.";, ~~ -w• O CfV!JglU DECEMBER 3, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE MUSCLE PERSONAL TRAINING STUD I O 4316 Yupon - By Appointment - 713•523•5330 ~!jDAEW00 0.9°10 rorormmp Affordable L-uxury! · /nrroductnr Daewoo. You'll be Surprised At How Much You Can Ger: For Your Money! 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HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 INSIDE NEWS Around the Notion .••• . . . .•..•.••.. . . 5 Advocacy group flunks Bush on AIDS report cord . • • • . • • . . . • • . .. . 5 Calif. anti-gay marriage initiative renamed •. 5 Supreme Court to rule on hate crime sentences • . . . • . . • . .•.....•.•.. . 5 High school students sue to form alliance •. . 5 Prosecutors will seek deoth penalty in killings 5 McCain attacked for meeting with gay GOP .. 6 VOICES & ECHOES Kubiak: A profile in courage ... 8 Plant: Resolutions for o new year . • • • • . .• 9 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . •. . ...•••.. 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Happy Holliday! . .... • . .15 Just between ir; girls . . . • • • . . . . . . • • • .15 Out in Print: 'Crisis of Desire' . . . . . . • • . .16 Bestsellers . • . . . . . • . • . . .. ....• •. 16 Eating Out: Inside charm turns unappetizing 19 On Stage: Slice of life is 'bong on' • . . . • .21 Community Calendar . . . . • . . • . • • • • .22 Occasions . . . • ••.. . . . .••...•. .. •.. 22 Post Out: Intimate 'Boston marriages' • .23 My Stars! . . . • • .. ... ...•...•..•. . 27 CLASSIFIEDS •.....•.••. . .•..•• •......• 24 CARMA RT ........ 25 BUSINESS DIRECTORY ...... . 26 Issue 997 Al ma1onal In Hou~lon Voice Is protected by federal copyngtit law and may not be repro· duced withoul tho written consent of Houston Voice. Tho soxual orlen1a11on of advertisers, photographers, wrllers and cartoonists pub· hshcd herein IS ne Iller inferred or 1mphed The appearance of names or pictorial repre· i.entalion does '101 neccssan1y 1ndica1e the sexual onenialion of lhal person or persons. HouMon Volco accepls unsofic1tcd editorlal ma1er1a1 bul canno1 take respons1b1hty for 11s relum. The editor reserves tho tight to accept, •ejecl or ed11 any submission. All nghls revert to authors upon publication. Gu1del!nos for lroolance contnbutors are avatlabfe upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 LOCAL NEWS 3 Woman robbed, shot after leaving Montrose bar by MATTHEW A. HENNIE I louston police are asking for the pub­lic's help in identifying two suspects in the robbery and shooting of a 31-year-old woman Sunday a few hours after she left a \1ontrose bJr. • Tracey Lynn Deal, 31, remains in fair con­dition at Ben Taub General Hospital after being shot several times in the face, chC!>t and hands sometime after she left Chances, 1100 Westheimer, part of a complex of mghtcluhs pnmanly for lesbians, police said. Robbl•ry apparently motivated the attack, s.1id john Cannon, a Houston Police Dl·partment spokesman. There is no evi­dence that the incident took place because Deal was at a bar for lesbians, he said. "It's way too early to say it was anything otht.'r than a robbery," Cannon said. Today, investigators were expectt.'d to release a videotape of two men who used Deal's debit card at two local banks after she was abducted, shot and dumped m the 10,000 block of East Haven somehme after 230 a.m. Sunday, pohce said. Dea l's family was also expected to post a ~5.000 reward for the arrest and indictment of her attackers during today's briefing at police headquarters on Travis Street, authorities said. CrimeStoppers has also offered a $1,000 reward •n the case. "These suspects are cold and bold," said hom1ade Sgt. LD Foltz, a case im estlga· tor. "\\'l' need to get them off the streets. Someone will recognize the men on the \'tdeotape. Someone has seen her car Call us, please " Deal called a friend about 2:30 a.m. Sunday and satd she was at Chances, which was prepanng to close, police said. About two hours later, Deal-\\hO had been shot sewral times-managed to crawl more than 300 vards to awaken residents of an apartment ~omplex at 10280 Windmill Lakes and ask for help. Police would not comment on where Deal lives. Her assailants allegedly forced Dl'al, driving her 1996 Honda Accord, to Whataburger on South Shepard about 4 am. They ordered $9 in food, police said. Less than an hour later, Deal was di.,CO\· ered by residents of the Windmill Lakes apartment complex. Her Honda Accord, descnbed as a white 4-door with license plate VCB 71C and with a Green Bay Packers sticker on the wind­shield, is still missing. police said. LC'ss than two hours later, pohce said, two suspC'Cts in the case were videotaped at two banks withdrawing money from an An.I using Deal's debit card Some $400 was taken, authorities said. Investigators \\ere expected to release segments of the videotape during the bnef­ing today to help identity the two men. A third suspect m the robbery has used Ol'al's credit card, pohce said. Houston Police Department Homicide Division 713-308-3600 CrimeStoppers 713·222-TIPS UH wants to rehire prof it fired before lawsuit Jury verdict prompts school to revise sexual harassment policy in case that was first for Texas by (,IP Pl.ASTLR What a diffcrl'nce a few weeks makes. ,\ dental department chairman at the Umversity of Texas J louston Health Science Ccnll•r found guilty last month of sexually harassing a male professor who \\Orked for him now faces termination after refusing the school's request for his res1gnatton. The harassed employee, who was fired by the school after he complained about the liarassmcnt, has been offered his old 1ob. Fonner dental emplovee Luis Mota, who is gay, "as awarded $448,000 last month after a fcdcral jury found that the he w.is Sl'Xually harassed by the Dr. Raul Caffesse, the acting dean ot his department. The 1ury also found that the university failed to take prompt action to stop thl' harnssmrnt, then retaliated against Mot.1 by firing him when he complained to school officials. The university askl>d Caffesse to resign last week and gave him the Thanksgiving holiday weekmd to consider his decision. When the professor refused to rl>s1gn, the university launched termination prcxl'C<l· ings, according to David Bates, a university spokesman. If Cafbse fights the firing, the process could take as long as a year, but he could resign at any time. He is now on paid administrative leave. "I le ts not being dismissed simply bl'Cause he was part of a lawsuit the univer­sitv lost," Batl>s said. The proceedings are based on testimony from the tri.il that suggests Caffessc lied to his supem sors and concealed important information from them, school officiab said. And the university has offered to rehire Mota. Joe Ahmad, om• of ~Iota's attorneys, said the job offer came in the form of a terse letter attached to a court motion The lrtter, according to Ahmad, does not sprafy what type of job IS being offered or whether it would be a comparable, tenure track po i­tlon. \1ota has not decided \\hether he will accept the offer, Ahmad said. He IS currently employed at the Umvers1ty of Pittsburgh Ahmad said that although Caffesse \\ 111 likely be gone from the school, other Unt\ er­' tty officials are responsible for the way the complaint was handled, and those officials remain al their jobs. Before he can make a deasion about the offer, Ahmad said t-.1ota will need to know 1f he \\ill "report to the same dllains in the case minus Caffesse" "1lus is a umvef!i1ty that basically treated him as an outcast from the moment he com­plained. They took a rather disdainful view of ~oml'<Jnl' complauung of same-,ex sexual h.irassment," Ahmad said The job offer could be a cost sa\~ng meas· urc for the university If the offer is dt>emt'<i by the judge to be "in good faith, it could replace $130,000 in front pay that Mota won in the case. If Mota refuses an offer made in good faith, he will lose the money, Ahmad satd. Ahmad expressed concern that nothing has changL'<I at the university except the removal of Caffesse. But university officials say changes are being made · "The one thing that is underway that would make Mota's situation better is that the sexual harassment pohcr under \\ hich he made his complaint IS under review and bemg revised," Bates said. Uniwrs1ty of Tex.is s)"stem offiaals \\ere concerned wllh the school's timeliness m resolving the situation and with making sure a method of separating emplo\ ee' invoh ed in complaints IS establ.shed he said. The unl\er;1ty denies th.it it retaliated against Mota and is appealing that part of the judge's verdict. The school docs not plan to appeal the verdict of sexual haras meflt Mota ts being offered the same poSitton he left, Bates said. But 50me of the perks that previously accomparued his postlton arc no longer available because they \\ere funded by grants which have smce expired Bates would not elaborate A lawyer for Caffesse told the Hou~ton Chrorucle th.it the verdict is not cause for the university to breach its contract \\1th Caffesse. Caffosse testified during the trial that he had a sexual encounter with Mota, a native of Venezuela, at a June 1996 dental confer­ence in MeXIco, but Caffesse promised Mota then that it would not happen again. But in August, Caffes.-.e booked the two into only one hotel room for another confer­ence, forcing them to share. Caffes!'e asked Mota to join him in bed during that trip and during a later trip to Orlando. Caffc~se IL>stified that he was joking t>.1ota canccll'<I future dental trips to arnid staymg in the same room with him. Because Caffe:"e appro\'ed Meta's teach­ing contract, Mota said he felt pressured by the advance'. 4 If you are seriously ill, money shouldn't be an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. M. 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Our Dp • .-rt tll\i1Al n't '\{X"l·1ah\t mc:ludc­Shannon Schrdder. M. U. lhtnh!f A Hamn1UJ. M ll M1l"hRcl Vcnatl!r. H ~ Services Include: ~Screcnins: ~tctlic:af cxaminatio1i.s Pl"rlodic L:.boratory ~"Ork Mcdicauou assistance ll'l"utmrnt coun"SCling Rdcrralslp!a<.-emcnt for speoal.ized care U huun an'S\~~nng Sl't\ ace Prenatal and po.s.1 natal UR" G)TIC<."Ol<>t<icul cxamln:mons t:anul) pbnrun~ 1-ollow up home \bits C hJW can· on prem1 liCS. and mo~• llome h3!ot"d mf'th ('al cart! I'- a \ ~lh1.ble for n:akknts of Chambt:n •nd UM-rt)' C'.ountih l-oradditio11al i11forma1io11 or for an appoi111me111. calf A\'ES United Clinic 713/572-3768 800/981-2837 DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE NEWS Around the Nation Advocacy group flunks Bush, gives Gore 'C' on AIDS report card NEW YORK Texas Gov. George W Bush flunkt'Cl and Vice President Al Gore did JUSt slight­ly better on the annual World AIDS Day Report Card that Lambda Legal Defense and Education fund released Sunday. "This year, we find hope in a national resurgence of activism. But pt'Ople's lives continue to be endangered by callous and compromising public officials," said Kevin M Cathcart, Lambda's executive director. For the last four years, the nation's oldest and largest gay rights legal organization has issued the report card, grading public policy efforts and highlighting trends in treatment, prevention and civil rights. Gov. Bush received an "F" on the report card for his push of "abstinence education," a "Just Say No" approach to sex that Lambda s.1ys is based on subjective moralizing rather than effective techniques designed to help young people avoid HIV infection. Gore received a "C" for retreating from his strong record on AIDS issues and siding with pharmaceutical companies out to block South Africa from producing affordable, generic versions of I IIV treatments for its citizens, the report said. In total, Lambda handed out 22 grades to a wide range of groups and individuals working on AIDS-related issues. Calif. anti-gay marriage initiative renamed by attorney general SACRAMENTO, Cahf.-Attorney General Bill Lockyer has ordered the name of a March bal­lot measure that would ban same-sex marriages in Califorrua changed from "Definition of Mamage" to "Limit on Mamage." Lockyer made his ruling, which affects the measure's title on the ballot and in other official election materials, on Nov. 23 in response to a complaint by opp<r nents who said the original title was misleading. The initiative states that "only marriage betwl>cn a man and a woman b valid or recognized in California." A recent poll by the San fra11c1.~o Examiner and KTVU showed support for the measure, which is known as the Kmght Initiative bl'Cause of pnnetpal author GOP state Sen. William "Pete" Knight, had slipped from 54 percent in June to 51 percent. Meanwhile, two California brothers, one a high school teacher and the other an attorney, have startt•d c1rculatmg petitions to legalize same-sex marriage, the San Francisco Exammcr rq1orted The measure, which may be the first attempt to legalize same-~x marriage through a ballot initiative, would change the state constitution to allow gay couples to marry in Californiil, but 1t would not require churches or religious groups to perform the ceremonies. Tom and John I Ienning will have to collect at least one million signatures in the next 150 days to plact• the measure on the November 2000 ballot. Supreme Court to rule on harsher sentences under hate crime laws WASl ll~GTON In a cao;e that could have 1mplic.1hon.~ for hate rnmes laws that II1l:lude ~xu­al onmtation and other categoncs, the Supreme Court agn>t..U Nm'. '19 to dmde whether judges can impose longl·r sentences under state h;ite-crime laws ba~.U on their own determination that som<" one WilS motivatL.U by bia~ to commit a mme. The court said 1t will hc,u a New Jersey man's argu­ment that a jury; not the iudge, mtL~t detide whether rati,11 b~1s was a moti\'e when he fired shots into a black family's home. Calif. high school students sue to form gay-straight alliance SANTA ANA, C11if. (AP}-Two gay students fill'd a fr.Ueral lawsuit NO\·. 24, accusing the Orange Unifit'Cl Sl:hool District of violahng their right to frl't' speech by refusing to let their Gay­Straight Alliann• Club mL>ct on campus. The suit also cbims thl· district violated the federal Equ.11 Accl'ss Act, which requires that sch,x>ls treat non-curricular student groups the same reg.irdbs of the religious, political or philo~phicJI content of Spl'l'Ch at their meetings. Students Anthony Cohn, 15, and f leather Zetin, 16, proposl'd thl• club in September as a place for all stu­dmts ,It Fl Mcxlena I hgh School in Orange to discuss issues rt'latl'Cl to sexual orimtation. The !Khoo! district initially refused to allow thl• club to ml'd on campus, but the school board vot1.'Cl 7-0 two Wl'd<s ago to publicly consider the m.1tter on D1.>t.'. 7 Thl' suit, which names the school district. its board membl·rs and the high school's principal, was a preemptive strike of wrts, according to thl' tl'm-.igers' attorneys. Prosecutors will seek death penalty in killing of Calif. gay couple REDDING. Calif. -Citing the "significant ilmount of plannmg that went into two murders," Distm:t Attoml'y McGregor !X·ott s..1id last Wt'l'k he will seek the dc;ith penalty for two brothers ;iccuscd of murd1.•nng a g;iy couple. 0:0 tri.11 tbte has b<!en set for the dl'fl'ndants, ll•mpmin M.itthl'w Williams, 31, and J.1mes Tyler W"tlhams, 29. lhl')' are ,musrd of robbing .rnd sh<x)ting to d1.•,1th Cary :-.1atson, 50, and Winfidd f\.1owdl'r, 40, on July I at tlw coupll'\ 11.ippy V.1Iley hom1.'. Benj,1mm Willi.um adrmtt1..U in ii J.iilhousc mteniew earlier I.1st month that ht• •hot the men because he beb1.>Vcd their homosexu-hty \'101.:itcd God's law. lmestig.itors also susp1.'Ct the brothers of parhc1patmg m the June fircbornb­mgs of three 5.icra'llento '>}11agogues. o charges have been filed m those attacks. Benjamin Matthew Wdl'K1111s (left) and James Tyler Wilriams (right) face the death penalty for a murder Be"1min admitted was motivated by 111ti-gay hate. For Auto, Home & Health Regina !I Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Busintss J;i_ .ranct • Workus Ct mptnsation Group Jltalth • Lift lnsuranct • much mart 6575 W. Loop Soutl1, Suite 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 Everything you want Right Here! Right Now! Sales Hours: 9-9 M-F • 9-9 Sat. Service Hours: 7-7 M-F • 8-2 Sat. 12230 Southwest Freeway• Stafford, TX• 281-243-8600 • FAX 281-243-8635 Jlou'i/011 's Newest Ni<:sa11-0ldsmobile Dealer 5 6 NEWS DECEMBER 3, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE McCain attacked for meeting with gay Republicans Bush campaign denies responsibility for S.C. flyer, while Buchanan says he welcomes gays GREENVll l E, S.C.-Ofhaals with Republican rre51derhal front-runner George < W Bu"h '> G!IT'pa1gn .ire denying respons1b1li­tv for a ma1Img that attacked opponent John lcCam for mcctmi; with th Log Cabm Republicans, the nat oral group for gay C.OP supporters Meanwhile, fall-out conhnucd last week o\ er Bush's statement that he would not meet with the Log Cabm Republicans becau~e it would prove to be a "huge political scene" South Carolina supporter5 of \'kCain, the Anzona senator currently trailmg Bush m the race for the Republican nomination, received m the mat! last week anonymous copies of a \\ashmgton limes story about McCain's recent meetiPg with Log Cabm leader.-. The Tunes, a conservative D.C newspaper, descnbcd the tcCain's 30-mmute meeting with the group as "going after the homosexu­al Republican vote as no other senous pnsi­denhal nominatmn contender has m his party m recent memOI) " A paper slip with the typed word, "l lmmm," was attachrd to the limes arhcle sent to McC1in' South Carolina supporters, s;ud House Spe;iker Pro Tern Terry 1 laskms, Mc'Clin's state co-chairman. I-1, Gay Men's Chorus ~of Houston Dr. J. David Faber, Artistic Director Jn t~e Ongmal artwork b)· Dan e. Lun Reform Party presidential candidate Pat Buchanan said last week that gays are wel­come to join his campaign if they 'endorse me and support our agenda.' The Grl'Cnville Republican said he talked with MrCain about the meeting and "he made 11 dear he doesn't agree with their objectives or theu lifestyle " ''Why IS 1t bad to meet with a gmup you don't agree with'" 1 Iaskins said. McCain's South Carolina campaign d1rL'Ctor stopped short of accusmg Bush's campaign of mailing the letter. Bush said last week he would be angry if he found anyone in lus campaign questiorung nval tvkuin's temper and fitne-s for office as a former Vietnam prisoner of war. "I don't thmk that's taking place," Bush said. "I rertamly hope not" Although Bush currently has a large lead in the ran~. McCain s.i1d the appaf('nt attack was • ,, the spl1'1l • a corcel"l teat<JT'1n9 a .., <:le va,. ely oF Sac,.ed music ce1ebt "9 the wintet' ho. do~s and !:.he be eF that oil People are One 1n 1:.heSp""t Saturday, December 4 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, December 5 at 3 p.m. The Kaplan Theatre at the JCC's I. W Marks Theatre Center 5601 South Braeswood All seats reserved Tickets: $18 at the door www.gmch.org 713-521-7464 The Montrose Slllgets Inc. db.a. the Gay Men's Chorus ol H ::ston is a SOl(c)(3) non·prolit arts orgamzatK>n part of the mcreased scrutiny that comes when a candidate demonstrates he is a legitimate challenger for the no nination. "Six months ago, when nobody "as with me, I could have sa.d the moon 1s made of green chc.-ese.'' McCain said "I've 1ust got to move on with my ca npa1gn." Log Cabin leaders have said they used the meeting to "brief" ~ lrCain on 1SSues of con­cern to their members. \Vhile McCain did not announce new po! cy pos1hons on these issues, Log Cabin spok=an Kem1 Ivers said McCam made "his general abiding prinaple very clear." "He saJd, 'I have a \isceral dislike for d1s­cnnunabon .. I will work to ehmmate dis­mmmahon.'" according to Ivers. Sl!ll, \kCam has not suppl>rtl'd thl' Employment Non-Discnmmation Act th.it would ban job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and said he supports the "Don't A~k. Don't Tell" pohcy that bans mili­tary scnice by openly gay men and lesbians, Ivers s.11d. At the time, Ivers said Bush had also agrt'Cd to meet with Log Cabin. but a date for the meeting h.id not been set. But in a No\'. 21 interview on the NBC News program "Meet the Press," Bush said he would "probably not" meet "ith the gay Republican group. in part because he 1s ''someone who 1s a uniter, not a divider." Asked by the San Francisco Chronicle last WL'l'k how the meeting would divide pl'()ple, a spokesman at Bush's headquartt•rs in Austin, Texas, s.11d it would prompt a deb.1tc on issues flush opposes like ;;..1ml'-SCX m.image, adop­tion by i;ays and hate mmes ll'gislation. But Bush would take money or .m endorSl'­mcnt from Log Cabin, spokesman Scott 1cClellan said when asked. "f le welcomes the support of all people. [But) I can't imagine that they would want to (endorse him]," he said. "They differ on a number of 1SSues." Log Cabin Executive Director Rich Tafel has since descnbed Bush's decision not to meet with lus group as "a dumb m .stakl•" "Ten years ago his father met with gays m the White I louse Pat Buchan.in announcrd he's welcoming gays to support his campaign m the Reform Party. Jerry Falwell met "ith gays down in Lynchburg, Va. It's just not .i big de.ii." 1:1fel told the New York Times in ,1 Nm'. 29 inten·iew. "We are way beyond ml'dings.'' In the wake of the contron•rsy O\W flush, Republican candidate Ste\·e Forbt!'-who has courted votes from the religious right-said he would also be willing to med with Log Cabin, although he disagrees with many of the group's positions, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Vleanwhile, even arch social conscn·ahve Pat Buchanan-who de:;erted the Republican Party to seek thl' Reform Party presidential nomination has said th.it he wants support from gay voters. "As long as they endor.;e me and support our .igenda and help us out, they're welcome," Buch.1mn said after a ~-p<.'L'Ch Nov. 2.1in01ic,1go. Community GocSpel '/4 ~ '8eu:U <UtL<We., Reverend Sam Kader author of "Openly Gay, Openly Christian" Guest Speaker at Services Friday • Saturday • Sunday December 3-5 Daily Services 7:30pm Sunday Services ll:OOam and 7:00pm BOOK SIGNING Saturday • December 4 • lpm 'til 3pm LOBO Bookstore • 3939 Montrose 4305 Lillian Street 713.880.9235 www.communitygospel.org HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 IT'S YOUR VISION ... ... MAKE AN INFORMED DECISION In the era of powerful anti-HIV therapy, HIV I AIDS and CMV retinitis patients. and their doctors. may be tempted to eliminate their anti-CMV medication. But will this be the right choice for you? CONFLICTING OPINIONS Medical opinions are divided on this question. Although the numbers of patients studied are small. the implications are important to consider. On the one hand. early results from some studies appear to support the view that some people with CMV retinitis, whose HIV is being controlled by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), can safely stop taking their anti-CMV maintenance therapy.' In contrast other studies show that CMV retinitis can still occur, even in people with a good response to HAART.2 Furthermore, there is no test commercially available that can accurately determine if your immune system has regained its ability to fight CMV. EXPERTS ADVISE STAYING ON THERAPY Remember, HAART is not indicated for the tr0atment or prevention of CMV retinitis. The bottom line is that even when HAART is working well against HIV. it does not always protect people against the progression of CMV retinitis. HAART can also fail! If it does, people with HIV/ AIDS will be vulnerable to CMV and other opportunistic infections. In response to these concerns, a panel of experts convened by the International AIDS Society (IAS) has recommended continuing anti-CMV maintenance therapy in people receiving HAART. According to the IAS panel. "Generally, patients in whom CMV disease has been diagnosed should be advised to continue their anti-CMV maintenance therapy as indicated because the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy on the course of CMV disease is still poorly understood. H 3 IT'S UP TO YOU ... If you are thinking about stopping your anti-CMV maintenance therapy, talk to your doctor. And consider this: Are the benefits really worth the risks? After all, it's your vision. Be sure to talk to your doctor if you have any questions about your condition or therapy. References: 1. Jabs DA et al Am J Ophthalmol December 1998;126:817 822. 2. Michelet C et al. AIDS. October 1998;12:1815-1822. 3. Whitley RJ et al Arch Intern Med. May 1998;158:957 969. Roche Laboratories lnc.-leaders in the management of CMV disease. @ Pharmaceuticals Roche Laboratories Inc. 340 Kingsland Street Nutley, New Jersey 07110· 1199 www.rocheusa.com Cowi&td C 1999 by Roche lJboratones Inc All n&fl!S l!SeMd. 7 8 STAFF Associate Publisher M1'ke fleming m k~h~tonvo1ce com Editor Matthew A Henn1e ~1tor@houstonvo1ce com Production Bethany Bartran - Graphic Des.gner M ke Swenson - Graphic D.,.;1gner Contributors Rich Arensct-1eldt. Kay Y D.l)'U', Trayce Disk n. Earl Dittman, D • Groover, Robert B Henderson, C: p Plaster. El a Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart. K m Thol':'pson. ,..erry Sulhvan Advertising Sales Richard B Hayes Office Administrator Marshal Ra rwate' Classifieds & Directory carolyn A Roberts carolyn White National Advertising Representilltive Rivendel Marketing Company. Inc 2•1 242-6863 A Publishers Ctr.s Cran Rick El sasser CHARTER MEMIER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER Of COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Hounon. Tel<ds 77006 (713) 529-3490 (800) 729-8490 filJt (713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1999 Offa:e hours: 9 a m. to 5:30 p.m weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 word<. We r.,.;erve the right to ~1t for content and length We will withhold names upon request. but you must include your name and phone number for verification. Plea«• send mad to H~ton Voice. 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77006, fax (713) 529-9531 or ,,_,,,ail to editorGhouston· voice com. Opinions expressed therein do not ref ect those of the Houston Voice VOICES AND ECHOES DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE VIEWPOINT A profile in courage chooses to fight by GREG KUBIAK Perhaps you've wondered how a gay fnerd could choose to serve in the mili­tary, the Republican Party or a religious domination that officially withdraws the wdcomc m.it for gays At times I think what a waste 1t 1s for these lesbians and gay men to work in institutions where hope for our integra­tion 1s futile. But most of the time, I stay thankful we have our own on the inside, fighting for ch.inge and doing what they believe Steven Baines 1s executive (oordinator of Equal Partners in Faith, a Washington-based network of religious leaders committed to equality and diversity He was born and raised m Charleston, S.C., where he attended the oldest Southern Baptist church m the country. One da)', when he was six, his preach­er w.ilkt'd him up into the large, raised pulpit of that historic sanctuary Unable to see over the lectern, the young boy tugged at the preacher's robe, telling the minister, "I want to see!" As he lifted the young Baines up to sec the magnificence of the empty church, the boy knew he wanted be a prc.icher. But as he grew older, Baines learned another thing about his life I le was gay. Despite the nagging reality of his sexual onentahon, Steven eventually became Rev Baines, an ordained minister in one of the nation's most homophobic denominations. He desperately wanted to make "his life right." So he attended an ex-gay ministry in Raleigh, N.C., under an assumed name soon after taking his first preaching Job. After a year in the pro-gram, Baines found only one lesson was being taught: that he should hate him­self for his homosexual tendenCJcs. But one day, Baines looked m the mir­ror and heard an inner voice telling him he was as God intended and changing that God-given nature was futile. The self-acceptance came hard for ing "homosexuals arc incompatible with community standards," Rev. Baines could no l~nger stay silent. He spoke at a protest rally and came out. Fearing that word of this provocation, and of being gay, would make its w;iy to his fundamentalist parents, Baines told them later that week, on Thanksgiving The next time you think what a waste it is for gays to work within anti-gay institutions like the Southern Baptist denomination, remember Rev. Steven Baines. Baines, but not as difficult as what was to come in his congregation some hme later in Greenville, S.C. He had devel­oped a mutual, romantic relationship with a church organist, who was strug­gling with the same self-hatred from which Baines was now free. Incapable of enduring the difficult relationship, Baines ended it. But in a retaliatory act, the jilted lover ou!t'd the young minister to church leaders. Very quickly, a few of them confronted Barnes with the charge. Rather than he and per­haps save his job, Baines told the truth, "Yes, 1 am gay" On the spot, Baines was told he had "four months to find another Job", and was asked to go quietly so that the "scandal" would not impair the church's ability to hire a replacement. But when Greenville passed an ordinance decl.:ir-day. His mother did not speak .ind left the room His father, after expressing shame and disgust, demanded his son to give back his house key. "No words could ever express the dcv.istation that 1 ft'lt when my father told me he wanted the keys to the fami­ly house back," Baines said. "'!he unspo­ken message he gave then was, 'You're no longer my son."' Since that time, h1~ chilled, family relationship has thawed somewhat But not so with his church Baines, like many of our profiles of courngc, has turned his personal tragedy into an activist calling. He now works in an important national ministry at bqual Partners in Faith_. lie organizes and speaks at rallies and conferences that challenge the sexist, ranal and homophobic forces in the church and society-the same forces that saw him fired from his job and near­ly disowned by his family. Baines leads "Equality Summits" that highlight progressive values in response to the Promise Keepers, the arch-conser­vative group that conducts large, anti­gay crusades in football stadiums. De:;pitc his new work and the reach of his ministry, Baines has not renounced his denominational roots or his ministe­rial credentials. Instead, he intends to be "a thorn in the side" of a church he sees as out of touch with the true meaning of Christian love. By his own admission, Baines may never live to fu lfi ll his d ream of being an openly gay minister in the Southern Baptist church. But maybe one day, he'll again climb into that pulpit of the coun­try's oldest Baptist church and preach the word. In the meantime, he's still tug­ging at church robes. Greg 0 . Kubiak 1s a Washington -bastd public policy analyst, author and syndicated writer; lte can be reachtd via this publica­tion or by t-mail, GKubiak@aol.com HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 PLANT LIFE Resolutions for a new year and a new millennium by DREW PLANT At least once e\'ery vear, I write a list aimed at rl·solutions for self-betterment. Now I suspect I am supposed to write about changing the world or myself for the new millmnium. I'm all for any signal flan~ that creates ,1 chance for bona fide introspection. We're a self-,1bsorbcd lot. me mcluded, and Wl' lo\ e to dl•cide what we'll do next for self hl'lp. I 1ust wish we could be moti\'alt·d to such on our own, and at some rl•al 1unc­turP of ch.mge. (I ley, the new millennium starts with 2001, not 2000; could wt• .1t IP.isl obsess about it in the right year?) Well, instead of being a compll'le p.irty pooper, I intend to drag my datell'ss sl'lf to a :\l'w \ear's Evc fund-raising gala with my fine lesbian friend Abby on my arm and party like it's, well, 1999. In the mean­time, I chose to stake my claim on World AIDS Day-that was Dec. 1-as a time of promised change and self-reflection. of yourself"; and (2) call someone you know who is HIV-negati\'e and say, "I am so g!Jd you have been able to avoid this terrible pandemic; keep yourself healthy." As for the Y2K, you make your wish­and- self-help hst, and I'll make mine: Take more tub baths. One week short of the six-month mark in mv new low­slung ranch housl', I finally iook a long. hot b,1th. It was blissful. Wlw m the hell did I wait this long? I looked at catalogs, rl•ad a bit of Va111ty Fair and didn't touch myself once. Rt•ally. Rt'.1d each issue of Vanity Fmr with the ft•rvor of .1 stalking fan. I know it's trash, but it b st.1r-fucking, intriguing trash. It's the People magazine of the academic, semi-informed wannabes. EscJpe to Palm Beath, monl'red people with fehsh­es and the rumors of people who ha\·e bl'tter bodies than anyone you or I could e\'en hope to sleep with. Watch CBS' Sunday Morn111g (with melodic-voiced Charles Osgood•) on a regular basis. On Halloween weekend, I was ensconced at my sister's Nash\'ille home alone, all Sunday morning from 7:30 a.m. until the troops got back from an Episcopalian attempt at faith. I worked on my laptop (computer'), perused the New York Time:; and watched the best hour and a half of tele\ision since an episode of Dynasty ran long in the 1980s. I plan to proselytize for HGT\'. '\o, I'm not going to sell my body for sex. I want everyone to know how addictive I lome and. Garden Television is. Okay, I know they ha\•e the insanel) cr.ifty shows, but they abo can hone. tly teach you to rl•do your foyer in marble and still host a dinnl'r party thl• saml' mght Is this 1 \'-by-and-for-fags, or what? I plan to work in thl' yard mon• I don't earl' if it has been d1ggmg up a half·burit•d and rusted-out toaster own (no kidding), planting abel :i or domg basic lawn mamtenancl', the lime I ha' e spent in my new old house's }ard has been gratifymg beyond de~ription. Did I pay for all of that therapy before I had a yard? When I am in the yard, I don't ewn care if the neighborhood children come around. This is bliss. I've said it before, but I am really, real· ly, really gomg to say "no" more. Okay, maybe not to the tragic men in my hfc. but to commitments I shouldn't be mak-mg. It 1s indescribably freeing to let go of the need to do e\·erythmg. I suspect 1t \\ill take a centun- of World AIDS D.ivs to do so, but I will learn not to take ~n e\'erything. and I am starting now. :\o. I plan to actually get to know Helpful Larry from the Storehouse Clearance Center. 1 plan to not apologize for shop­ping at Storehouse I plan to unapologel!call) adopt the neighborhood stray cat. feed it well and t.ike 1t for regular veterinary care Startmg nm\, her name is "Lunchmeat " As for) ou, I hope you will write and tcll me what you are doing for the new milkn­mum. \\'hill' you're at 11, tell me what you did to help make this one of the la't \\orld AIDS DJys we nl'l'<l to have her. I gaw the I.me of :-.ty Lile and several of my OO;t lnL'llds to thb d1~a..'il.', and I am all gi\·en out. In whatewr wavs work for vou, com­mit to celebratmg ~ real holiday that's a cau~ none of us can ignore. Drew Plant 1:; an Atlanta writer wlw work.< 111 corporate communrazlwns for a11 111s11ra11re n11d vzaliro/ company. He manls 11011 lo nclunlly do something about AIDS. He can be readied al drert'plant@sotl().com. You Sl't.?, I think we've become a little too blase about the disease that the AIDS Czar herself-Atlanta's own Sandy Thurman-recognizes as "no longer chic." If you didn't wear a red ribbon or write a chl'Ck (and, by God, what more import.int thing could you write a check for?), I hope you JI least stopped on the one paltry day Wl' sl'I Jsidt• for the Pandemic of Modern Generahons to do the following: Let us know what you think (I) Cnll someone vou know who is I llV-pos11lve to say, "I :im so glad you .ire he,1lthy and 1>hll with us; please take c.ire LETTERS Some films do trans well To the Editor: When :-.lark J. l lu1sman wrote about nl·ga­tive movie characll'nzations of tr,msgendered people ("On tht• oul,idc," Nov. 19), which 1s unfortunatdy too oftm the case, he quoll's Ros.1lyne Blumensll'in, the executive dirL'Ctor of the Gl'llder Identity Project ils saying, "There's ne\U h<'<'n a movie who ha5 1ust allowed J pm;on of tmns experience to just be that pl•rson v.1thout pathology or ridicull'." I am morl' dis.1ppomll'd and surprised that apparently ncither of them is aware of two films I can rl'Call which did. '1ust Like A V\'oman" and "Differl'nt for Girls," both c1f which played m ! louston, were set in l'.ngl.1nd. In the fin.I, a male, hell'rosrxu· al tr.1ns\'cstill' is thrown out of tht• houS<' by his wife who rdurns from ,-.ic.ition early to find his st.bh of female clothing scattl'red ,1bout their fl,11 and assumes he is having an affair. Tht• film portrays the triab and tribulations he endu~, induding bt·ing .mrsted and humili­.11l'd by the police, the knowll>dgeable am·pt­ance by his business colle.1gue, and his ulti­mate v1rtory owr his transphob1c boss. In ''()jfft0 1l'nt for Girls," a post-<Jperatiw transsexuJI ml'ets and falls in lo\'e with a high school class m.1te who 1s now a motorcycle messengl'r dPli\'l'ry person. Again 1t deals with hl·r pl'rsonal relationship and career issues in a sympathetic manner Both films had male actors who portrayed the tr.msgendert'Cl rok'S effecti\'ely. Both were low visibility films that should haw, but ne\'l'r got, the distribution the sub1ect matter dt'Sff\'l><l. More of this sort of portrayal will go ,1 long way toward demystifying tran.sgm­derl'd peopk•. fnckAdmns Houston Buslt c.a11 lean1 from Buduman To thl' Editor: lhe dl'Cision of Gl'Orge W. Bush to refuse to spmk to the Log Cabin Republicans ("Bush says no to mtl'ting with gay Republicans," No\'. 26) suggl'Sls that he is a homophobK bigot pandering to a religious group fueled by ignorance, hatrL>d and superstition. Pat BuchJnan, whose \\T1tings dl'aling with homosexuality may haw been fuell>d by ii \'isceral homophobia, apparently has had his t•p1phany. This cvmt occum'Cl, of course, on thl' road which he hopes will reach to the White I lou.c;e. (story, page 6) The ma1or contender for the Rl'form Party pr>s1dential nomination has urged gap to Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions must Include a name and phone number for verification. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 • e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com enter the Reform Party and to support hb can­didacy. Dol'S this represent intelk'Ctual growth in a person who has bet~n called a ''bigot" and a ''Nazi" by many in the media? Or L' this sht\.'r political opportunism in the mannl'r of George W. Bush? Whatever it is, Buchanan cannot help but experience a measure of soul-searching and look upon some of his gay bashing of J"CCl'lll year~ with regret. As for George W. Bush, he has exposed himself as the bigot that he is. One can oppose the concept of gay mamage \\ithout being a bigott>d homophobe. But for Bush to refuse to speak to loyal members of his own political party becau.<.e of their sexual orientation suggests that "~luub" 1s still hopelessly immature and a coward to boot for his f.iilure to rt.>Cognize the humanity of per.><ms simply btxausc thm ~xual orirn­tation is diffl'rent. Rev. Tom Hult, (Rel.) Meiuishn, Wisc Bradley a gay come-lately To the Editor; I rt'Jd your account of the contro\'ersy sur­rounding Bill Bradley's sugge.tion to amend the 1964 Civil Rights Act ("Gore, Bradley par O\'l'r gay rights," ~m·. 26), but I'm concerned it widely nu:,scd the mark I apw Bill Bradley L' a good and farr­minded man. I also behe\'e his commitment toda: to the gay community is real. Cnfortunatdy, his tJmmg, hLS n.'Cord and his 1udgmmt are not as real. In 1991. Bill Bradley had the chance to ro­spon!- Or legblation to do pn.'CiX"ly what he now advocates, but he did not. Most \oters probably don't realize that during his l~)ror Cl)"('(>r in the US Senate, Bill Bradley authored 573 b11b. ~ot one of them would ha\·e guaran­teed, expanded or e\·en addres..;ed the nghts of gay men and lesbian.,. He failed to ro-spon.--0r, com cruently mL-..'>t.-><l or \'Oted agamst bills of importance to us We wdcome Bill Bradley's newfowid pa...­sion. Just imagine hb leg1slative clout and hb vote in the Senate on behalf of gay roncclTh these pa:.t thll'(' years had he mstead dt'Clded to stay and fight m the Senate with other Democratic leaders. Paul Yandura Wa.,Jm1gto11, D.C E.dilor's rwte The letter wnter trorked tlzm: years as n prcsidentlill appointet.' m the Ointon/Goreadmzm;.lratwn and m::. National Gay and Lesbzan Outreadz Dm:clar far the Clinton/Gore '96 campa1g11. 10 NEWS DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Police tum to gay community to solve brutal New Orleans slaying ..- Continued from Page 1 deepened as they partially opened the front door and found Sexton's body on the other side-in a pool of blood. "David was right up against the door," Loria said. "It was pretty bad for us .. but I can't imagine what it was like for David. He must have put up quite a struggle." Pol ce and Orleans Parish Coroner Dr. Frank Minyard said that Sexton, an mtema­tJonally renowned researcher m early child­hood mterventJon and speaal educahon, had been v1oously stabbed at least 16 times. Following an autopsy, Minyard said Sexton suffered long, deep gashes to h1S arms, suggeshng that he attempted to fend off his attacker He was abo stabbed h-.1Ce in the heart, had several other chc.st and back wounds, and two wounds 111 the back of his head, authonhes said. In an attempt to allay the fears of neighbors m Sexton's quiet Bayou St. John neighborhood, Minyard told reporters that he was killed "by someone who knew Sexton and who he let m hlS house (or) pos.s1bly returned with to his home 1lus was not a random murder." Signs of a struggle extended from Sexton's bedroom to the front door, police said Minyard said that based on the condition of Sexton's nude body, the three days of news­papers on his doorstep, and reports from friend ,-Loria and Scott, who were among the last to see him ahve-that Sexton died in the early morning hours of Nov. 20. Oct. 1im Allen of the New Orie.ms Police Department said that Sexton's wallet and December 19, 10:30arn Special Worship Service in Story and Song to conclude the Advent season hou , l/S were stolen, bu• that nothing else appeared to be missing, nor were their signs of forced entry. He declined to say whether the murder weapon, believed to be a kitchen knife, was found. He also wouldn't confirm the pres­ence of blooched footprints on the porch or the discovery of fingerprints and a blood type other than Sexton's. "This investigation is in progress and I don't want to jeopardize the case by dis­cussing what we may or may not have as eV1- dence," Allen saJd Police ask for help, say attacker was hurt Allen said that the police investigation has hit a dead-end and police need the help of the gay community to solve Sexton's murder. "It looks like David did know the perpe­trator, based on what we found at th(' house," AllenS<lid. "For how long. we don't know. He m.iy h.ive met him that mght or longer before We 1ust don't know." Allen s.i1d that police went to several gay bars that Sexton's friends said the professor occas1or.illy frequenlt'd, including the Phoenix and the Friendly Bar in Faubourg Mangny. \r151ts to those and other Marigny and French Quarter bars turned up nothing, Allen said. ''We haven't found anyone at any [gay] bars who rccogruzed David and remember seemg him e.irly that morning," the detective said. But the perpetrator may be more easily identified th.in police initi.iUy thought, Allen Candle Light Service Sunday, December 24th at 7pm Reception to follow Nursery available for all services. For more information, call 713-528-6756 or email us at mararn=1tha@lconn.com. said. "We think he may have been injured in the course of the struggle," Allen said. "I can't say how, but if anyone, anyone, remembers see­ing someone last week with cuts and scratch­es on his arms, hands, neck, or to his head, or saw fn.>sh bandages, they should call us. "If someone seems to have just dropped out of sight, gone underground, or is acting unusual, people should call us. Or if they remember seeing someone [that Saturday morning] with bloodied clothes, or if they've noticed blood in someone's car, they should call." Sexton fondly remembered Loria said that he, Scott and Sexton enjoyed a Friday evening out that began with dmner, includ('d a play, and endL'<i with jovial conversation at the Friendly B.ir, a small nC'1ghborhood establishment in the Mangny. "W(' were there about two hours and never noticed anyon(' strange," Loria s.iid. "And David had only four drinks the entire night, so I know he wasn't impaired in any way." He said Sexton dropped them each off at their homes about 1 a.m. on NO\', 20, "but he didn't say anything about going anywhere C'lse. I assumed he was going home." Although they often exercised together at a gym on Saturday mornings, "D.iVJd told me he had a gr.int or something like that to work on that Saturday morning, so I didn't rail him." Loria said his friend, whom he had known for more than a decade, "must have really strug­gled" for his life. "David was tall-6 feet 3 inch· es----and although he was thin, he was re.illy strong and in great shape for a 51-year-<>ld m.m. He must have fought whoever killed him." Lona said that Sexton was not known to cruise bars, and mstead frequented smaller e;tablishments outside the busy French Quarter. "He wasn't the type to 1ust pick someone up, not at all," Loria said. "David was quite a talker, and very friendly, and would check someone out first." Loria said he first met Sexton and his part­ner, Jerry Robinson, about a decade ago. Sexton and Robinson wer(' together for more than 20 years. Robinson died two years ago from lung cancer, he said. In September, Loria and Sexton traveled to Gn..'CCe for 12 days "and we had an absolull'­ly wonderful time. In fact, we had such a good time we were a]r('ady planning to go again next September." Struggling to find the words to describe hb friend and Sexton's impact on people, Lori.1 said: "llalf of th(' professional people I know owe thl'ir work to David. f le encouragL'<i peo­ple to do more, even m('; I haw a master's [in soa.il work] ana 1e badgell'd me to g('t some­thing published, just one paper, until I did it. Sexton, who earned his doctorate from the University of T('nnessee, was a researcher and professor m the School of Allied Health Professions at 15U lle.ilth Sciences Center. Sexton was nationally recogniz('d as an expert in early childhood development and was president of the Council for Exceptional Children's Division of Early Childhood. HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 11 12 Dozens of ornaments were placed on the Tree of Remembrance during cere· monies Wednesday at the MetropoGtan Multiservice Center on West Gray. The somber event started 11 years ago by NAMES Project Houston as a way to focus on AIDS. NEWS DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Mayor declares 'AIDS emergency' :;.... Continued from Page 1 dymg at 10 times the rate of whites, according to a study released m August at the National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta. • The trend continued within the gay population: A study by the New York Department of Health showed that Afncan-American gay and bisexual men were almost twice as likely to die of AIDS as white and Hispanic gay and btSexual men. • The aty's five-year plan, developed by its health and human scmces department, costs an estimated $3 million, most oi which the city doesn't have to spend. Brown's call to action on Wednesday targets three groups for intensive HIV prevention efforts: Afncan­American women; ga)~ bise)(ual and non-gay identi­fying black men who have sex with men; and blacks m p1l or prison. The plan proposes community-based education and prevention programs, a public information cam­paign and one-on-one services to modify beh.iviors that put blacks at higher risk for HIV. Some aspects of the city's plan will be put into action next month, the overall effort may change d1rect10n or format as the black community ener­g12es around it, said Kathy Barton, spoke.-; woman for the city health department "Our techruque on reaching (blacks) may change as our community gets better at it," she said. Much of the oty's nearly $5 million annual HIV Pre\'enbon Program is already allocated, but officials hope to direct unused funds to the new initiative announced this week, Barton said. The rem,1inder of the program's funding has yet to be raised, she said. "We are actively looking for more money," Barton said. "We hope that the Afncan-Amencan communi­ty will nse to the occasion and help us with the money." Of the $3 million program, $861,000 is earmarked for an extended media campaign-advertisements on local radio stations, billboards and in:;ide movie theaters, and posters and brochures. The rest of the funds will be distributed to community-based pre­vention and education programs, Barton said. But the new m1tiat1ve will not sap money for exist­ing programs, or prevenhon and education efforts in the gay community, she said. "That would be the worst thing we could do. Will money be pulled from gay programs to fund these' Certainly we won't do that," Barton said. Discussion part of focused effort Brown said Wednesday that during future spl'ech­es .ind appearances, he will discuss HIV prevention to help combat the problem. There also must be an open discussion about sexual activity and an effort to counter "the millions of media messages that glorify unsafr sex," he said. Jackson Lee said the public must also be willing to talk .ibout 11legal drug use, which contributes to new HIV infections in the African-American community. "This is the roll your sleeves up day," Jackson Lee said. "I ask us all to be in the fight. As we roll up our slec\;;s• let no one tell you 1t is the other guy's prob­lem. Mary desVignes-Kendrick, city health department dirl'Ctor, said specifically targeted prevention and education efforts should blanket the area's black ~ A}an or an KL-.!+ 1T11•,,,, Grn.J u, Phone: 713-266-4304 Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview Houston, TX 77063 • One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer WESTHEIMER OAO 0 ~ CC CLAAKCREST W z w cc 0 *;;; 11'1 z 0 u.. RICHMON 0 a: u .. N HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 3, 1999 NEWS community. "No African-American in this communi­ty should not hJ\'e the education, the resources," Kendrick said. "We need to deploy our resou rces in a \'ery focused way." After Brown hosts his forum next month Jmong black leaders, Jackson Lee said Surgl'On Cl•m•ral D;l\·id Satcher will lead a n.itionJI summit in l louston on the issue. "l w,mt (S.1tchl·r) to asses the work we startl•d ,ind see what else we need to do," Jackson Lee said. "lie has committed to coming to this summit in February 2000 on HIV I AIDS. This is not going to be a one­month, two-month c,1mp.11gn." Mobilize like the civil rights movement On ful·sd,1y, Satcher called on the bl.:ick community to mobilize against AIDS tlw way 1t came togl•ther to fight for ci\'il rights in tlw 1960s. Dunng J teleconforence beamed to tradi· tionallv black medical schools, S.:itcher fornsl·d on what b!Jcks could do to slow the spread of the deadly disease in their community. Almost half of new AIDS cases in recent years haw been among black men, although they make up only 13 percent of the popula· lion, Satcher said. AIDS is the leading cause of death ,1mong black men ages 25-44 and the second behind heart disease among black womm in that sJme age group. "When you come to Atlanta you have to @~VJ"reolmenl Lll7e! presents think about how people were mobilized during the ci\·il rights mo\·ement," said Satcher, speaking to faculty and students at Morehouse School of Medicine there. "We need the same kind of mobilization." Satcher said he hoped the conference would help de\'elop partnerships between black organizations that would work to spread AIDS awareness. "We lll'l'd to find a wav within our com­munities to moti\·ate pt'Ople to change their beha\'ior," he said. "See, the go\·ernment t: c,m't do that. We c,m't sit up there in ~ Washington and find a way to molt\•ate ~ people to changt• their beha\1or. It has to be i:2 pl'ople who they respect, they trust, m tht•ir ~ loc.11 communities." The satl'llitl· conference focused on pre· \'l'ntion, resl'arch, the a\'ailability of safe, l'ffortiw treJtments Jnd the need for adher­l'nce to those treJtments. Satcher called on churches, fraternities, sororities and schools to get in\'ol\'ed. ! le said the number of new ,\JDS cJSl's continue~ to be higher among blacks bec,rnse AIDS started off as a white gay mall• disease and most education efforts were not directed toward blacks. "I think a lot of people in the Afriran· American community missed the first round of communication about this epi­demic," Satcher said. "I think we are paying the price now." ~ The surgl'On general. a native of Alabama, for- ~ merly headl'd the Centers for Disease Contml z and Pre\'cntion in Atlanti. ~ Tire Associated Press co11lrib11tcd lo l/11s story. ~ BOOSTING IMMUNE FUNCTION: THE NEXT STEP IN HIV THERAPY? A FREE INTERACTIVE TELEPHONE TELECONFERENCE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1999 5 PM Pacific• 6 PM Mountain• 7 PM Central• 8 PM Eastern Time TELECON,. F..E. .R..E,.N. .C..E, PANEL Ronald laker, PhD illodffoltl) Edilor in Chiel, HIV ond H1polilis.com Calvi• Cahn, MD lmorth Oimtor, Community hs1orch lnlfloliYI of New £11910.d and les10J1h (on1ultonf, Horvord Vanguard Medical Anociole1 In Boston Eric S. Rosuberg, MD lnslrU<lor of Mediline, HorYord Unimsily and Clinical Anillo1l in Medicine ol Mosmhusatts 61ntrol Ho1pllol Michael S. Saas. MD rrolessor al Medicine Oiv11ion of Infectious Oi1eo111, UniYersity of Alobomo al lirminghom IUAB) ' and Director ol th AIDS Oulpolienl Clinic of UAI ·~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--; To join -;he lelephone teleconference, you must register in advance (first names only). To make your reservation, please coll !his toll-free number Monday-Friday, 9 AM-S PM Eastern Time: 1 ·80Q-880·Sl2 Supportod ~y an u1rutrict1d 1du<1lion1I 9ranl lram Agouran Ph1111acnti<1ls 13 Dozens of people joined a candlelight vigil and dedication of new panels to the AIDS Memorial Quilt Wednesday at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The event was one of several organ· ized by NAMES Project Houston as a way to mark World AIDS Day. Chat I Personals I News I Travel I Entertainment People Pl~anet o ut-.com www.planetout.com I Aa. Ke-,word• l'lanelOlJt engage enjoy 14 Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Big City Video & Emporium 101 OS Gulf Freeway Houston, Texas 77034 Whv Pav More? All Rentals $1.99 Videos Priced to Sale! BLJliRWiTCH ~ Daddyj mespvwn1sh1aaedM1 '19.9s 21.95 s19.95 ._____ arge selections of previously viewed movies startin at $4. 99 Paperback Romance Novels at $1.99 Greetin a 1 All Ratings Available Big City is Bigger and Better! Don't Settle for the WannaBees! Buy 2 Vid~os, get a 3rd FREE! HOUSTON VOICE •DECEMBER 3, 1999 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME Jennifer Holliday talks about making her Carnegie Hall debut in 'My Favorite Broadway: The Leading Ladies,' an extraordi­nary concert coming to PBS's 'Great Performances' on Monday by 11:\V IDl,OLD~tAN Tony Award-winner Jennifer Iiolliday is curiously low-key when discussing her appe.1rance in "My Favorite Broadway: The Leading Ladies." TI1e sold-out show, l'l'Cordcd last year at Carnegie J laU, is now avail· .iblc on CD and is also ainng nationwide this month on PBS's "Great Pl'rfonn.rnces" senl'S. "Tlus group of ladies may not be as fanuliar to ever; one, but this 1s a beautiful group," Hollida) said recently in a telephone interview from New York Gty ''We all really genumcly like each other and an• quite supportive of each other, .md we have ,1 lot of respect. CA>spite J lolbday's modest description, the c.ist of "My Favorite Broadway" includes legends of American musical theater-lJza Minnelli, Juhe Andrews, Andrea McArdle, Nell Carter, Elame Stritch, Bebe Neuwirth, Holliday and rising star Lea Ot:!L.aria­as well as others who are Jess well-known outside Manh,1ttan-Faith Prince, Karen Ziemba, Pnscilla Lopez, l.111da Eder, Audrd McDonald, Marm Mazzie, Judy Kuhn, Debra Monk and Dorothy Loudon. Also featured on the TV shO\\ (but not on the CD) are Anna Kendnck. the Kit .K.it Girls, the Rockettes, Rebecca Luker and ROSJe O'Donnell Was the atmosphere competitl\e baootage at the "So I call us the 'sccond-strmg divas,' in the sense diva-packed event' Nov. .iy, said Holliday. that we do not have entourages, but we are aw.1!'l' that we have J gift from God, our voices. We .ilso 1u~t enJO)' wh,1! we .ire doing; we look townrd the futun.'; ,uid we're rmlly supportive of e.1ch other." 'There were no catflghts '\Jo one\\ as woml'<I Jbout who was gomg to sing before who It was almost like, :i-- Continued on page 20 Jennifer HolDday performs in this week's 'My Favorite Broadway' show on PBS. Rebecca Liljeberg as Agnes and Alexandra Dahlstrom as Elin in 'Show Me Love,' a romantic coming-of-age story of two girls falling in love. A hit in Sweden, new romantic coming­of- age film about a girl falling for another girl is finding limited success in U.S. theaters by EARL DITT~1 AN In Sweden, the mega-successful box-office hit "Titanic" is the large.t-grossing film in that country's history. Surprising!)~ the film that holds the No. 2 spot is not anothtc"r epic romanctc" exported from Hollywood. Although it is a love story, the Swedbh· made ''Show ~1e Low" isn't your typical boy­gcts ·g1rl date mo\1e. Instead, the LuJ...as Moodysson film, which was selected as Sweden's official entry for the Best Foreign Film Academy Award, is a contemporary romantic talc about a girl falling head·o\·cr­heels- for anothtc"r girl. How has a movie about young lesbian love :- Continued on page 17 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Out In Print BOOK NEWS Fighting AIDS from beyond the grave by J.S. HALL The toll th.it AIDS has taken on the gay community 1s easiest measured by the hun­dll'ds of thousands of lives th!.' \ ,rus has claimed. But wh,1t other .onsl'quences, sub­tl!.' T and less r!.'ad1ly noticeable, has the p.m­demic inf.ictcd upon gay men' This 1s one of the central issues addressed in this series of essays wnttcn by the late Robm Hardy .ind edited .ind el.ibo­rated upon by David Groff A llreless, I llV­pos11tve AIDS ad1v1st, Hardy ironically died in a freak h:king accident m a remote part of his beloved Arizona m 1995. Frequently exasperating, Hardy never­theless po sess!.'d a keenly analytical mmd that, combined with a certain scholarly elo­quence, produced incisive work. Two of his brothl'rs battled cystic fibrosis, so perhaps he was better prepared than most when it came to fighting for his hfe "Although I live with 1t daily, I h,H·enever believed that 1 must die of AIDS. I believe only that I h:l\'e been told so," he wrote. Fiercely sex-pos11tve, Hardy feared what AIDS would do to the unique sexual expres­siveness of gay men, which he felt was a foundation to our "brotherhood " The "benign nl'glcct" that research scientists inflicted on people with AIDS enraged him, as did tho'e who believed that AIDS was over with the .ldvent of "glamorous" sounding protease cockta1 ' Early in th!.' first essay, "The Enemy of Love," his biting rhctonc all but leaps off the page "Only the virus endures, no longer a crisis, but lingNing like ~luzak in the background at ghetto parades, in com­mumlles narcolt1.ed with red ribbons, busy with sentimental notions and sym­bolic observations that conceal the evi· dence of the col'tmumg slaughter we rush to leaw behind They sing. AIDS is over Gay men lost" To Hardy, AIDS lurk.s like an omnipresent phantom, driving a wedge between us. Like the negative half of a mixed sero-st.itus relationship says, "For us, every fuck is a threesome." It lessens communication-as if by not invoking its name or presence, the virus will pass us by. In his opinion, it has fueled the drive for monogamy and gay marriage to replace "promiscuity" <md multiple sex partners as the desired norm. (Somehow this bond will magically protect us, apparently.) fl.:irdv believed AIDS robs us of the wisdom· and life expencnce~ of most of the "gay leadership" from the Stonewall Vtvttitv6U P~OPQGlOtvS Bec:IUstlf ul an urban falrwtale -r r \ \ r l ~ by Jonathan Harvey Opens Thursday, November 18 at 8 p.m. Plays Thursdays through Sundays until December 12 Tickets $20 Call 713-398-7577 for tickets and more information All shows at The Little Room Downstairs 2326 Bissonnet Produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc. days; makes us ashamed and mistrustful of our bodies; bolsters internalized homo­phobia; and divides us not only between the positive and the negative, but pits activists against other, more media-friend­ly people with AIDS. For anyone who thinks that AIDS is over-<>r even an espL'Cially manageable condihon-"The Crisis of Desire" will be as jolting as an unexpected slap across the face. It may be that in this case, a little fear (or a lot) is a good thing. After all, as Hardy writes, some strains of HIV can become drug-resistant if one tr!.'atment dose is missed. How can anyone read the chapter "Hope Inhibited" and not bl'come incensed at the lethargic official response to AIDS and the si:emingly half-hearted "solutions"? Granted, this is with 20/20 hindsight, but it's powerful stuff, espe­cially for those who don't know the full story or only lived on the periphery of activism at its height And after reading "Disposal," which chronicles the state-assisted suicide of Hardy's ex-lover, Hans, in Amsterdam, the reader will be hard-pressed not to feel more positive about having the choice of self­euthanasia. "Of all the deaths I have seen­and I have seen too many-<>nly his had dignity," Hardy wrote. For a community that has become understandably weary and numb to the car­nage, Robin Hardy reaches from beyond the grave with fiery passion to remind us not to let these deaths be in vain, not to let I IIV­" the antagonist of love"-win and lay ruin to everything that gay men have crafted for themselves. It's a multi-faceted wake-up call, erudite yet highly readable, that we'd do well to heed. 'Crisis of Desire: AIDS and the Fate of Gay Brotherhood' By Robin Hardy with David Groff What yo!'r neighbors are readnig . .. Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11.95 2 Strangers in the Night by Barbara Johnson, $11.QS 3 7th Heaven by Kate Calloway, $11 95 4 Every lime We Say Goodbye by Jane Maiman, $11 q5 5 Murder Undercover by Claire McNab, $11.95 6 The Book of Lies by Felice Pianco, $24.95 7 Innuendo by R.D Zimmerman, $21.95 8 Infidelity by William Rooney, $14.95 9 Comfort & Joy by Jim Grimsley, $21 95 10 The Long Firm by Jake Arnott, $25 Crossroads Market BOOKSTORE & CAFE 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick., $11.!:15 Falcon Best of Legends $8.95 Lawn boy by P.iul Lisicky, $13.95 7th Heaven by Kate Callowa}j $1195 Murder Undercover by Claire McNab, $11.95 Every lime We Say Goodbye by Jane Maiman, $11.95 Infidelity by William Rooney, $14.95 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 Hotel Lachapelle by David l..1chapelle, $60 A Woman Like That by Joan Larkin, $24 LOBO fi\"" 3939 Mon trose Boulevard 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 Lukas Moodysson, diredor of 'Show Me Love.' OUT ON THE BAYOU &l"aatbetween~ ~ :- Continued from page 15 bl'Come such a sensation in Sweden and in a number of other Scandinavian countries, when it 1s struggling to secure bookings at American art house thl'aters? According to its dirl'Ctor and writer, the answer is a sim­ple onl'---acceptancc "For ~omc reason, American mode-going audiences seem to ha,·e a hang-up \\ith mo,·ies that deal with gay or lesbian sub· jects. That's just not the case in Europe," Moodysson said in a telephone interview from Sweden. "I think the success of 'Show Me Lo,·e' demonstrates that Swedes and most Europeans aren't as homophobic a~ their Aml'ncan cousins. That mav sound likl' a gl'neralization, but it's tru~. 'Show Mc Love' is a bl'autiful romance that I think anyone could relate to. The fact th.it the lon•rs are both girls shouldn't make a difference.'' Starring film newcomers Ale\andra Dahlstrom ,1nd Rl>bccca Uljebcrg, ''Show Me Love" -wh1Ch L' now showing in I louston­is the story of Elm, a smalltown teenage girl who discovers she's a lesbian and bcgms to have feelings for Agnl>s. The film documcnl~ Elin's efforts to come to terms with her self and her budding lesbianism. When Moodysson first sat down to write the screenplay for "Show Me Love," the Swedish poet made himself a list of guide­lines. No. 1 on his list was making sure the story was set in the present. "I think people arc more moved by films that have contemporary settings," he said. "I like to write stories about liv­ing in the here and now Otherwise, you can be tempted to create a whole lot of false mwntions." Ensuring that the characters m the scrl'Cnplay rang true was lus next concern "When I look at rcalit\• around me, I sec stories," he said "I dori''t acti\'cly do anv research on th<.' streets, but I continualh' see tensions and emotions around me. But I do const,rntly find m\'s<.'lf going through neighborhoods, w,rndering about what might bl' going on in the how;l's there. I am ob~l'SSL'd bv houses and the live:; of the peo­ple m them. Th.1t's kind of how I came up with 'Show Me Lo\·e' For some n'ason, I wanted to explore the id<.'a of a teenager who comes to her parents and says, 'Gue-s what? I'm a lesbian.' For me, a crisis 1s always a good starting pomt for a story about feelings and emotions." :'vfoodysson admits he has always been fascinated with the way that women are always more apt to express themseh·cs in more <.'motional terms than men. "When I was a teenager myself, I can remember noticing how clearly teenage girls expressed their personal despera­tion and frustration ," he said. "But 'Show 17 !\le I on•' 1s not meant to be depressing. I feel that my one rcspons1b1hty as a wnter and director is to find happy endings to hea\'y and serious themes, like dbco\·er­ing your true -exual identity. Out of a cn­s1s or conflict, you can alwar find recon­c1hahon and hope" As !\foodysson sees it, the world, America in particular, could use more "feel good" mo\•1es about coming-out and embracing homosexuality. 'Tm so tired of seemg mo\ ics where a homosexual man or woman has to pay a big pnce for just being thcmsl'l\'es," he said. "American and Brihsh films ha\'e a tendl•ncy to want to punish characters for being gay. I think that's where a lot of the homophobia comes from - from films. Mo\•1es definitely influence our lives. But 1f you keep sho\\ing that bad thmgs are m store 1f) ou admit you are a lesbian or male homosexual, then people will get the idea that it b wrong. "I hope I ha\·e made a difference with 'Show Mc Love' In essence, 1t'::. a him that celebrates lo\•e, e\•cn if it's love between two young women. I hope that mort• American tilmmakers see It and take my lead. The more that filmmakers educate their audiences about real life, the better life will be for all ot us," Moodysson ~aid S an Antonio is a speoal place during the holidays. It's transformed mto an exotic mix of festive charm and extraordinary hospitality. Virtually something new and different to enjoy every day and rught. The Plaza San Antonio clearly captures this spirit. You'll appreciate our attentive, 4 Diamond semcc. The ambiance of superb dining, including cxtraV"agant ~ loliday Brunches. A resort atmosphere where you'll find a soothing massage followed by a warm, complimentary terry robe waiting in your lavish guestroom and oh, so much more. We cordially im~te you to experience San Antonio's holiday season at a very special value. The Plaza.Just steps from the Riverwalk and the only downtown resort for the holidays. 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Then sit back, relax and sip champagne ufole listening to some of Houston's finest jazz musicians. faery Sunday, 10:30-am • 2:0C'pm Adults: $22.50; Seniors: $20.50; Children 5-11: $12.50 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 Ea~i n g Out---'R--'-EST"-'-AU"-'--'-RA--'-'N-'-'T R.=.cEV~IEW~S Inside charm turns unappetizing by KATI !REEN LEE chilled mint sauce. The crabcakes were greasy, and the pulverized innards created When I discovered that CAFE NOIR is a much-too-mushy consistency. One would owned by Carl Lewis, l first imagined a expect crabcakcs to be thick and fluffy with sports bar, in the fash10n of Wilt bread crumbs lightly sheltering a heavy Chamberlain's theme restaurants, or any morsel, but the portions were too meager, other concept establishment owned by and the basil in the crabcakes was over-cclebnties who han~ no right to go any- done. where near other people's food. One redeeming feature, however, was While the surroundings of used car lots the three different sauces, chipolte, bucrre and dilapidated buildings did nothing to blanc, and poblano, which were served endear me to 1b isolated location, Cafe with the crabcakes. The three sauces out- Noir is charming inside with its cultivated stripped the crabcakes and made them and simple decor. more tolerable Caft! Noir is cleg.intly decoratl'd The Merguez was much more with black and white photo- agreeable, with the skewered graphs lining the key lime bite sized ~ausages grilled to paint1'd walls, helping to a perfect smoky flavor. cvokr a relaxed, sophisti- IJ While the spicy sc.1- c.it1•d atmosphere~~ somng brought out From the start, the ~ ··- ~ an extra tang in the service was impl'C· sausages, the mint cable, with the host, sauce that came with it wait staff and bus was disappointing. crew all disposed to answer I resorted to dipping the questions from my dining sausages in the three crab-companion or me, even to the cake sauces. spl'Cifics of the name of a particular for the entrees, my companion seasoning or sauce. and 1 did not get what we expected. For Our waiter had a trainee with him that instance, my companion ordered the evening, hence his eagerness to please and grilled tuna steak ($19.50), which our wait-impress I le summoned his copious regalia er extravagantly described as marinated in of waiting skills. Everything from deliver- herbs and servt·d with roasted vegetables ing the speoab-of·the-day spiel to deliver· and peppcrt•d rice. ing another Coke was done with a flourish. Much to her dismay, the tuna lacked My companion and I did appreciate the any seasoning and was so dry the taste prompt and thorough attention, despite the evaporated. My companion commented borderline obsequ1ence that the vegetables were overcooked and Unfortunatclv, we didn't find the food that the pt'ppercd rice had an "overly a~ pleasing as its' presentation nutty" flavor. She was not impressed. The e\·l'ning started with Crabcakes l ordert'd the Peppered Penne ($14.75), ($8.75) .md Ml'rguez ($7), a spicy Moroccan which 1s French Penne pasta tossed with l.1mb sausage, skewered and grilled with grilled salmon, roasted peppers, sun-dried Cafe Noir 2606 Fannin • 713-659-5409 Food: SJt-;)SJ Service: SJ~~SJ~ Value· 8:; S> ~ Scene: SJ ~ 'i-> ~ Fine for most , Wort'1 the drrve. so live a httle As good as It gets tomatoes and light lemon butter. But the supposedly "light" lemon butter ended up overpowering any other seasoning, and the salmon also retained its heavy fishy odor, which is usually not so pungent when cooked correctly. The combination of the two flavors were irrcconolable and made the entire dish rather unpalatable. With this rather unappetizing summation of our din­ner, Wl' dl'Cided to at least leave \\1th some­thing sweet For dcsSC'rt, we chose the Chocolate Pyramid ($7.95), a mixture of chocolate mousse, chocolate cake and a negligible amount of fresh fruit, all shaped into a pyramid with thin sides of milk chocolate. While the dessert was delicious. it did not justify the price we paid for the dabbling amount of mousse and cake, garnished with a mt•rt' singlt' spht strawberry Carl Lewis should stKk to wh;it he !-..nows. While other dishl'S at Cafe 'oir may f..ire bt'ttcr on your palate, we don't r1>commcnd that you sprint to find out any time soon. ... ..................... : f ldU ~ t : ..:. .....\..t..i .t.;.~.. .......: '-.f\fE TOOPEES 1830 W. Alabama (713)522-7662 1209 CAROLINE AT DALLAS 713.759.9323 ' FAX 713.759.6812 Lunch: M·F 11am · Spm Dinner: M-Th Spm - 9:30pm •Fri & Sat Spm 10pm "HOME COOKING - ITALIAN STYLE" Delivery to all lofts & apartments in Downtown Houston Catering available for lunch and dinner meetings, banquet facilities, and take-out available! Plan your Christmas party with 2i?~~s~'t> _.....,LFTJ,.,. o,~, ... it? f 'all l'apa ~lol111's! f71!S.H7~t-l!Htft ~ :12m .\lonlros•• Hh·d. . Better Ingredient5. Better Pizza. .., ·,. !r·s 7•0.•.. .. .,0 •. ., •"• Om• l.n1~r On..-Topppin~ Pi:l::l'.n. llnnd-Tos.'-"41 or Thin f 'rusl* \dd n :t-1.ilrr or f "ol.r ror onl.• s1.m• morr! ....... .......... -..0..-. ,,.. .. _ ... ~_ ... _ .......... ....... ,_,.. ................ " .................... - ............... \AA .... . -·- 20 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE ..- Continued from page 15 'OkJy, 1t's your tum-i;o, gul." There weren't J lot of rehe.irsJls, either, "because wc:'re all \cry busy, thank God. We only l'l'hear;ed about a week pnor to 1t," f lolliday said. "My Favorite Broadway The Leading Ladies" was recorded live at Carnegie Hall on Sept. 28, 199 . A portion of the proceeds from the event and the CD go to Broadway Cares­Equity Fights AIDS. The v.ar against the killer Yin.JS IS close to Hot iday's heart. "I think that any organization that IS devoted to AIDS IS dose to all of us in theater and dance In the fir;t major sweep of all ~ homble deaths, we were affected most-the Broadway commur: !y. the dance rnmmuruty, the art~. , "It got to the point where everyday, every time the phone would nng, somebody was dymg. So this 1s a cause that will never go away for any of us. "I took up the cause after the director of 'Dreamgirls,' Michacl Bennett, died m 1987. He left money to AIDS re,rorch, but he ddi­rutely had dreams that we would keep work­ing to find a cure,'' said Holliday, who noted that she has "a huge gay following." Holliday was born and ft.'ared 10 1 lou~ton, which she left m 1978. She m.1de hl'r Broadway debut in a ft.'Yival of "Your Arms Too Short lo Box With God." Then in 1981 came her big break: The 21- year-old Holliday created the role of Effie in :Vtichacl Bcrulett's "Dreamg1rls." Audiences flocked to Broadway's lmpenal Theater to share the joys and sorrows of the Dreams, a Supremes-like tno of vocalists. The show ran for 1.522 performances and brought Holliday a Tony Award. Broadway composers know that a strong first act closer 1s essential for a show's pacing, Henry Kneger and Tom Eyen penned a true roof-raiser for "Dreamgirls"-the defiant anthem "And Im Telling You." \-\'hen an artist and a song fit so well together, "11 becomes your signature," I lolliday s;ud Even today; 1 years after the show's premiere, 11 remains the song most associated with Holhdav. And it's the Holl day selecllon featured on both the TV and CD versions of the show. (1 lolhday also perfom1L>d the ballad ''If He Walked into My Uk Today" from Jerry Herman's "Mame,'' but tlus song is not included on the record· ings.) Absent from the recording studio for eight years, f lolliday hopes soon to return and add to her five-CD catalog. She has abo Jppean.'Cl on "Touched by an Angel" and "Ally McBcal,'' where she has a repeating role as the ch01r leader at Ally's church. Though thnlled at making her Carnegie l lall debut, Holliday was "disappointed" that the show wa~ not more "intimate" "I iust thought it was too much power, 10 tl'rms of loud music, for a place like that. I would love to go back and have less things, like me and a piano, a few small things-but . MY FAVORITE BROADWAY THE LEADING LADIES , >• ., . N '' .... ·'"'/ ' ' ' ' • . . . '1 i'' ·;•\·,· . '. .1 , • • p '9 ... a • I t • "'i~~ .. . ' .. . tr" fill'.,. . =... , . . :~ not like a whole big old orchestra of as many as we did" The large scale of the show, she said, forcl'<l the singers to "compete v.ith the orchestra." In true Broadway style, there's not shortage of "sell it to the balcony" vocalizing on the CD. Minnelli sounds more like Merman (Ethel) than "Mama" (Garland) as she roars through "Some People" from "Gypsy." In "I Can Cook, Too," Del.aria shows why her role as a female cabby in the recent revival of Bernstein's "On the Town" made her the talk of the town . And the CD and TV show both include Elaine Stritch's electrifying rendition of "The Ladies Who Lunch" from Stephen Sondheim's "Company." A tribute to afkr­noons whiled away in boozy indolence, the song was covered by Barbra Streisand in 1985 and has long been a gay brunch favorite. My Favorite Broadway: The Leading Ladies Dec. 6, 8:30 p.m KUHT Channel 8 . _,_ ee .,.e..,• .. g ca•eca magazi•n es pape•LaeLs smeL:ng :tems ADULT NOVELTIES • ADULT GAMES • PERSONAL ITEMS .go1t1ETPll'IC FOl( 4tt tlFE,gTYtEg VIDEOS RENTALS & SALES ALL RATINGS PRIVATE ROOMS SCREENS CONTINUOUSLY OPERATE • NO TOKENS NEEDED ADMISSION FEE REQUIRED STAY AS LONG AS YOU'D LIKE! DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 On St age ___ T_H=EA..:..:.T=ER.:...:.N..:..:E:...:..:W:...:..S-=&...:..:R.::...:EV:....:.:IE:..:.W:.:::S Slice of life is 'bang on' by D.l •. CROOVFR Simply put, go St~ this plav. You might be famihar with British play­wright Jonath,in Han-e)"s popular film "Beauhful l11ing" from 1996, but the pl<w­a hit m London and :\ew York and no~· m Houston-is more subtle and full of nuance The movie ga\'e a foce to the London area of Thamesmeade, but "opening 11 up" for the big screen didn't enhance 11 BEAU flfUL THING 1s a chamber pu:.w, and needs the small, rnnfinmg I mils ot the thr:iter to breathe lite mto lls fin• characters. The qumtl'l comprising this "urban fairy tall•" lives side by side in a public housing project in London's mdustrial southeast near Grcmwich Jamie, 16, hws with his divorced Mum, S.1ndra, a hard-working, hard-10\'lng bar maid 'Jot good at sports. "weird" and picked on at school for being different, Jami is too conflicted about his awakening scxual- 1tr to make sense of anything. His dreams, though, include his next door neighbor, Ste, a school chum Sandra h,15 dr.:>ams of nian.igmg a bigger. better pub and getting out of the projects where she can r.:>l:ix on a spiffy, new, mw· stuffed sofa. Ste dm1ms of working at the Sports Centl'r where he could swim underwater, alone and happy. But his daily hfe is far from idyllic, with be.-itings each e\'ening from h1!> father and oldl•r brother. Leah lives on the other side of Jamie and Sandra's ilpartmcnt Recently kicked out of school for a \'arll't)' of offenses, she's a good­time girl, unconcerned that her untethered life is drifting out of control. She dreams of il singing c;ireer like her idol, Mama Cas!>. And then there's Tony, Sandra's boyfrirnd "du jour," a pot-smoking hippie whose brain SL>ems fried, or at least stuck in the pl,1titudes of the '60's, an era he's too young to have lived through. I hese five are the only people we see. It's to I larvey's credit that we don't really miss anyone else. Their hard ~crabble li\'es arc enough for us. We're immediately drawn to these '\·ictims of the :;ystcm," as Leah says m one of her luod moments, these five who sit on thm apartml'nl walkwa}~ drink, fight, mock and (bclM'Cn Jamie and Ste) fall m love. Although rootL><l 111 kitchen sink realism (the program comes complete with a slang gloss.1ry), 1 larvey balances the frightening abuse and familial love/hate with genuine tender <;t"ntiment and rapid comic pacing. This 1s a fairy t.ile, and we're glad for it. We want thl>se pl'Ople to milke it, and if 1t seems all too unre,11, we don't care. Dodd Bates' hang-dog expression with head crooked and shoulders hunched, embodies Jamie's wary world view ilnd his yearning for "a quiet life ... Full of old movies and a love of "Cagney and Lacy," he comes alive when Ste's around and makes that most awkward age of 16 believilble. Gawky, yet assured of wh.1t he wants, when Ste g1\'es Dodd Bates and Laura Chapman in 'Beautiful Thing,' the theatrical take on a popular 1996 film. him a present of a baseball hat, Bates lights up like he's just been given keys to a Conette. Almost too young looking, Laura Ch.1pm,111 com inccs us she's J.im1e's mother by the timl' she's finished ~peaking her sec­ond lmc. I lard-boiled as a fin~·mmull' egg, rattling off rl'lorts to Leah or put-downs to Tony, or }'l'lling at the unset'n neighbors, ~hap~an's ~oui;h·love approach is played 1u~t nght. Shes one sohd good-hearted mother and isn't about to lose her son When she embraces him, she embraces us. Elizabeth Bannor plays Leah with the nght amount of d1tzy panache She's a tramp, but she knows 11. Her acid trip "ilcceptancc speech" is theatncal, comical and ovt>r the top. Without the romp-in-the-woods love scene from the film vcr.;ion to help ease the transition, Ste's character in the play must go from confused young jock to young jock in lo~e. Alfonso Chable handles this tricky part with assurance. His outburst at Jamie to !car~ how to "knock about" like a guy (whJCh 1s really his own self-doubt showing through) is quite effective. Tim Wrobel, the misplaced Tony, is slightly too stolid for such an air head and hasn't quite managed the accent or attitude of these Southea~t Londoners. He seems to have stumbled in from Staten Island. Fillt>d wit~ brittle humor, tangy one-Jin· ers, and !>l'emmg dead ends for all characters concerned, "Beautiful Thing" evolves into a SWl'Ct, most charmmg comedy. This piece of theater starts off being a slice of life but turns mto a slice of cake. It's most satisfying. Or, should I say, it's bang on, bloke? Beautiful Thing The Little Room Downstairs 0 Theater Through Dec.12 2326 Bissonnet 713-523-0791 Selling your life insurance is a maior decision. Shouldn't this option be discussed face-to-face? When you're gay, living wilh HIV and lh1nking of selling your life insurance, shouldn't you be given a foce-to·foce con~ultolion~ linked Vootical Benerits is proud to be the only gay owned ond operaled violiool hroker wdn o loco! office in houston. We believe in providing you the personal ollenlion you desenoe and getting you lhe mosl money 1n lhe shortest time! Call 1-800-275-3090 ! LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS 37C ~IRBY SUITE l03o HOUSTON BIENVENUE THEATRE PRESENTS Featunng: Andy Clements Kevin White <:~ff// 0//j,,/ :j Mikel Reaper and Christian DeVries ClllllSTMAS VllfSfNT f'/ ,Y'"/_ £,,;/~k/ / '11//lr//lf'f' ,;fj'('('/tY/-;; rrr h1/,J~~//I (!>I j,l';,J OPENS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3RD FOR 8 PERFORMANCES ONLY. Fridays: Dec. 3, 10 & 17 - 8:00pm Saturdays: Dec. 4, 11 & 18 - 8:00pm Sundays: Dec. 5 & 12 - 6:00pm For Reservations call (713) 426-2626 BIENVENUE THEATRE 3722 WASHINGTON, B ETWEEN HEIGHTS AND YALE "'rT...._A"~.c-0 . ... t1. ~~.-r .... ~ 22 COMMUNITY DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE community calendar saturday, dee. 4 After Houri. KPfT 90.1 FM. 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. 713·526-5738. Q-Patrol walks the streets at 8c45 p.m. 713 52B·SAFE Visual AtU Alliance. 10 a.m. 281 58J.-8408. Dignity mass at 7 30 p.m. for gay Catholics 713-880-2872 St Stephen's EP<scopal Church. Rosary at 8 am. 1805 W Alabama 713 528-6665 Montrose Writer's Gnup rneeu •t the Gay and lesbian Community Center 3 to 4 30 p m. S7 per sewon. 713-117 4 0655 Houston lesbian and Gay drop-m hoers from noon to 4 pm. 803 Hawthorne 113 524-3818. "In the Spmt• Gay Men's Chorus Concert at 8.00 p.m. 80(). 494·TIXS hJC (lesb ans Unrted "' Coaf1t10n) meeting 10 a.m. 714 529-4788. sunday, dee. 5 The Womens Group. 1°'45 am 711-529-8571 Houston Area Teen Coaht.an of Homosexuals meets. 713· 942 7002 Raonbow R1deri. A biqde dub for women. 71 Hl69· 1686 Church of the XII Apostle> Ang ICM\ Rrte Old C..thollc Church. Holy Commuruon 10 30 a m at 239 Westhe•mer 7131665-7903. St. Stephen's EposcQpal Church Holy Me Euch.lrost I at 7·45 •on.; Hoty Rite Euct\artSt n at 8 55 • o:n Education hour at 10 am Choral Euchar st at 11 • m. •BOS W Alabama 713 528-6665 Maranathol Fellowship Metropolrtan Church. •Preaching the Go>pel" at 10:30 a.m. Bible study at 9 30 pm. 713-528·6756. Metropofrtan Community Church of the ResurrectJon. SetVKH at 9 a.m. and 11 a m. 713-861 9 • 49 Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all age> at 9.30 am. S..rvice •t 10:30 am. 713-528-3269 f1nt Un.tanan Un.versahst Ch'6ch. Sttvicn ilt 9:30 a.m. and 11 30 a.m. Communrty Gospel s.,,..ce at 11 a.m 7 p m Sunday School for chddron. 4305 Lillian. 113 880-9235 °' www.communoty· gospel.erg. Houston M1U10n Church. S..rvico at 10:30 • m. 713·529-8225. Covenant S.pbst Church. SeMce at 1 30 p.m., education hour at 3 p.m 713-668-8830 Bonng Memorial Uruud Methodist Chutch. Services at Be 30 ._m.. 10:50 •.m Sunday school at 9,40 a.m. 713·526-1017 MCCR Handbell Chotr rehea...,l at 130p.m 713-861-9149. Unotarian FelloW\hlp of Galveston County 402 Church St 1n Galveston. S..nnce at 10:30 am. 409-765-8330. F.,tlund Hope Fellowshtp S.mce at 11 a.m. 713-52().7847. F1n:t Congregational Church ~Memonaf). ServKe at 11 a m 713-468·9543 or fcc-houston.org, Church of Kindred Spirits (Beaumont). Service at 7 p.m. 409· 835-4765. Un1tan•n FeJlows:htp of Houston Adult forum at 10 a.m. S..rvice at 11 a.m. and noon. ()pet' Ord• farruly Support at 12.30 pm. 1504 Wort. 713 686-5876 ln1erta1th Worsh•P C.lebratoon. 7 p.m 2515 Waugh Dr. 713· 528-3601. Houston Gay & lesbian Parent'S F•m1ty Thanks91\/'1ng Pot Lud< dmner 713-284-4939 Thoreau U01tanan UnaYttSah~t Congregataon: Adult discus­sion at 9 45 a rn.; semce- •t 11 am. 3945 Greenbnar. Stafford. 281-'177 8882 www.neosoft.com/-thoteau. Advent Senn at the Kolbe Proiect 6 p.m. 71 3·861-1800. "In the Spint" Gay Men's Chorus Concert at 3 p.m 800-494 rxs monday, dee. 6 Gay Fatherslfathen f1nt support group, 8 p.m. 713-861 618' Calondar/(omputer worbhop for Pride Wttk. 7 pm 113· 529·1221 Gay Men SufVlVOIS of Dom<stK Violence support group 713·'26-1017 Bering Suppan Network Gnef and Divorce GrO\:ps at 7 pm 713·526-1017 Frost Eye Om«. free eye exams for people wrth HIV 713· 83().3000. AIDS Car-rs' Support Group. 6 p.m. 713-732-4300. HN testing. Free from AVES from 1 p.m. to 6: 15 p.m. 713· 626-2837 FrontRunners. 6c30 pm. 713 522-8021 Kolbe Proiect Eucharost at 710 p.m. 713-861-1800. Integrity Houston. For gay •nd le.sbt:an fptS<opal1ans.. 7 30 p.m, Autry House, 6265 Moon. More ltght Presbyterians.. Meeting. 1110 loveon. 9:30 p.m. 281 ·444-8861 X309. Black Lesboan and Gay Coal1toon's weekly mttt•ng at 7 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713 524·3818. Houston lt'Sbian and Gay Communtty dtop-m hours from 6 to9 p.m.. 803 Hawtl'IOrne 713-524 3818. tuesday, dee. 7 Helping Cross Dr""'n Anonymous. 7 p.m.. 239 W~sthe1mer . 713,.9~ Gay Men HIV+ Psychotherapy Montrose Counseling Center at 430 pm. 713-529.0037 ~· ~· mp~~t~tef1 fap~f~ ~J P1tC1re Expert Grooming & Attentive Boarding Under New Ownership! Ask For Ruth Romero .. 908 w. Alabama 113.521.0101 •fl Insuring Commercial Real Estate? We're the Perfect Location. GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Kat1,I Freeway @ TC Jester • Houston. Texas 77007 713-961 -9455 fox: 713-850-0856 Youth·Rap. 6:30 p.m. 713-822-8511. Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counseling Center at 6 p.m. 713-529.00]7 AIDS A1hanc• of th• Bay Area 7 p.m. 713-488-4492. PROTECT. An HIV-negative support group at 7 p.m. 713-526- 1017. Women Surv1Yors of Chddhood Abuse. MontrCMe Couns<hng Cent<r at 6:30 p.m. 713·529-0>37. Berong Support Network. Lunch Bunch Gang at 11 a m. 713- 526· 1017 Gay Mt!n's Procen Group. 7 p.m.. 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713·526· 8390 Men's Network Discussion group for soc1.1I, educational denfopment of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Monttose Coun,.hng Ce-ter. 713·529-0>37. More on Relationships. Discuss.on group. 7 p.m. 415 W Gray 713 861·9149 Lambda Skating Cub skates at 8 pm. at the Tradewmds. 713·523-9620. Gay & B• Male Support Group support group forming Sporsored by AVES 713 626-2837. Houston lest>tan and Gay Communrty Ce,,ter drcp-10 hot.rs 6 to 9 pm. Lesb1t1t'I Com109 Out Group mttU at 7·30 pm. 803 Hawthorne 713-528·3818 wednesday, dee. 8 B1Net Howton. 7·30 pm. Social meeting at Cafe Toopees. 1830 W Alabama 713-467-4380 Women> Network 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center, 701 Richmond. 113-529.0037 HIV swvivor support group. 7 p.m. 113-782 4050. Mind/Body Connection: Alternative Approaches. 7 p.m. 1415 W Gray. 713·524 2374 Pto1ect Caesar 7 p.m. AFH, 3203 Weslayan 713-623-6796. Out Skate Rollenl;atong Cub, 8 to 10 pm. at 8075 Cook Road 281-933·5818. Hous1on Lesbian ar'KI Gay Community Center drop-tn hours noon to 9 p.m. Brown B<ig lunch at noon 803 Hawthorne. 713-524 1818 thursday, dee. 9 Art With•,·· Art League at 1 p.m. 713-225-9411, Gay Mrn's Chon.I) of Houston. O~n rehearsal •t 7 p.m. 713 521·7464 HIV+ Men Psychotherapy Montrose Counseling Center, 1 1 S p.m 713-529-0>37 Relapse Pre~nt1on Montrose Counseling Ceriter. 2 p.m. 71 l-529-0>37. Aftercare Group Treatment Montrose Counseling Center. 6 Occasions p.m. 713-529-0>37. Women's Therapy Group. Montrose Counseling Center, 5:30 p.m. 713-529-0037. Center for the Healing of Ramm. 7;30 p.m. 713·738·RACE. FrontRunnen at 6:30 p.m. 713-522-B021. HIV Art Counf"> Program. 1 to 4 p.m. Patrick Palmer at 713- 526-1118. Women's Chmc. Montrose Cmu:. 713-830-3000. Farth and Hope Fellowsh•p. Bobic study 7 p.m. 713·52().7847. Community Gospt-1. Chotr practice. 6:30 p.m .• \erv1ce at 7·30 p rn. 7 \ 3-880-9235 or www.commumtygospcl.org HIV/AIDS Suppcrt Grovp. 2·30 at Family Servace Cel"ter 713- 861-4849. Women'• HIV/AIDS Support Group, 4 30 p.m. Family S..rv1Ce Center. 713-247-3810. HIV/AIDS Support Gro1.1p. 7 p.m. fdm1ly Service Center 1n Conroe. 888·247·3810. Howton lesbian and Gay Community Center dro~n hours 6 to 9 p.m. 71 J-524 3818. friday, dee. 1 O Houston Area Teen Coal1t1on of Homosexuals (H.A T.C.H.) m .. u. 113·941· 7002. Aflc-rure Group Treatment. Montrose Counseling Center at 6 pm. 713-529-0037 Frost Eye Clinic Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713· 83().3000. lesbian Avengers. C.afe Toopees, 1830 W. Alabama at 7 pm. Q Patrol walks the streets at 8 45 p m. 713·528 SAFE Kolbe Project. Park Plaza Hospital VlSltat1on. 713·861 1800. PoS1t1ve Art Workshop. 1 p.m to 4 p.m. Patrick Palmer at 713-526· 1118. L"b1all and Gay Vo""· KPFT 90.1 FM, 7 p.m. 713-526· 5738. Movie Tune at the Kolbe Proiett 7:30 p.m. 713-522-8182 life Begins at 40. Pot luck dinner. 6:30 p.m. 1440 Harold 713-526-1017 M1shpachat Allz1m Shabbat Services. 8 p.m. 713·748·7079. Co-dependents Anonymous. 730 p.m. at MCCR. 713-861· 9149 Houston lub1an and Gay Community Center drop·in hours 6 to 9 p.m. 713-524·3818 Healing Eucharist at Chmt Church C.lthedral. 7 p.m. 1117 Texas. 713-222-2593. To 1'>t an event ca// Carolyn Ro~rts at ll1-S1U490. fax .lt 713-519·9531. or e-mail ttl1torOhoustonvo1Ce.com. Deadlme is Fflday at 5 p.m. Birthdays 'Mutlet' is looking forward to a stocking stuffed with Uboles frOll lis s..ta Daddy Rk lyrd. Brandon Woff <elebrates a bi'thdoy on Dec. 9. Happy btrthday to Uttle Richard on Dec. S. llappy birthdJy to "Amadl'us" stJr Tom Huke on Ot."C. 6. The totally terrific Hem1ai1 dons his favorite white outfit for his birthday on Dec. 7. Super Chef John (a.k.a. the Kountry Kidd) whisks in a birthday Dec. 7. Hc1ppy birthday to Sinead O'Connor on Dec. 8. Steve Kerbo adds a candle to his birthda>• cake on Dec.8. Brian Riedel toasts in his birthday on Dec. 9. Janke K. adds some birthday cheer on Dec. 12. HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 3, 1999 COMMUNITY Past Out 1879 GAY AND LESBIAN HISTORY by DAVID BIA:\CO Intimate 'Boston marriages' \\'hat "ere Boston marriages 1 In his Pow! "The Bo. tonians" (1886), Henry James modeled the relationship between his ch<iracters Olive and Verena on wh.1t he c.1lil•d "those friendships behwen women so common in ~cw England " Tu,• ~ ''frimdsh1ps" Jame' observed were intimate, ;::; long·term rel.1honships beh\'l'cn two unmar- 8 neJ womrn, who were often fominists. '° fhough dubbe J ''l>' <1ston marnages," these ~ rcl.1honsh1ps tKci1m'Cl throughout the country. ~ With the growth of cities and an urban oil middle d.bs 111 the mid-19th century; oppor· j !unities that had lwen previously unavailable to women blt;an to emerge. As women's col­legL'S Wl're found,•d and previously all-male schools lwg.m to admit women, many mid· dll~ and uppl·r-cl.bs women left their parenh;' homes, rl'CeivL'Cl an education, and embarkt'Cl on car,>crs. Many of these women also bl'Came politically motivat,•d. ":\ew Women," as they were c.11led, could for the first time chOOSt• to remain unmarried and pursue their own go.1ls ;ind inter,'!ils. Many of thl'SC women enjoyed circlt>s of likl~mindl'<.l female fiiends. Within these net· works, two women might pair off in a closl' rdahonship in which they shared housing. living l'Xf'l'nses, vacahons, and often a bed. Much more th.in roommJll's, thl'!il' womcn were soul·m,1tes and p.utners, m.1rril'Cl in spmt ,inJ mind. In ''The Bostonians"' Ohw "proposes" to VerenJ thb way: "Will you be my friend, my friend of friends, bt•yond c\'l'ryon,·, everything, forever and ever?" l'hese intimate friendships were soci.1lly accept.1ble, and women m Boston marriagL'S \\WC oftm rt'Cognized as couples by their famtlil'S, fril•nds and colleagut.>s. St1ml' of the most .iccomplished and promi­nent women of that era lived in Boston mar· riagl'.S Most ofll'n they were white, though ther,• are also rl'CorJs of African-American fl-male couples. For example, Lucy Diggs Slowe, the first dean of women at I loward University, shart"CI her life with writer Mary Powell Burrill, who had earlier bren intimate friends with J larlem Renaissance poet Angelin,1 Weld Gnmke. Many women 111 Boston marriages were prornim•nt in education, soc1.1l work, women', nghb, .:ind the arts. ~1. Carey 111om.1s bcc.1me the president of Bryn Mawr College when her wealthy philanthropist p.irmer, M.1ry Eh1.ibeth Garrett, offer,'Cl the trusll'l'!i of the school a hefty endowment to cntin• thl·m to appoint Thomas. Thom.is anJ C.ml'lt ~h.m-J a home on campus for more than 20 }'l'.lrs. ).ml' Addams co-foundt>J Chicago's l lull l lou. e, one of the countrv's first sl'ltkment houses, with Flll•n Gall'S Starr, her inttm.1tt• companion smcc colll•ge. When she .md Starr grew .1part, Add.1ms began a 40.year relahon· ship \\1th Jnother Hull I louse tollc.1guc, Mary Rozel Smith. Founder of the l .eaguc of Many women in 'Boston marriages' were prominent, including Martha Carey Thomas, who became the president of Bryn Mawr College and shared campus quarters with her partner for 20 years. Women Voters, C1rrie Olapman Catt out· li\'l>J two husb.1nd, and then shared the latter part of her lift• with Mary Garrl'lt Hay, a col· league from thL• suffr<1ge mO\·cmmt. Hay's death in 1928 "shook Mrs. Catt to the soul," one friend n'Calk'Cl. When Catt died 19 wars later, she was buril-d in the same ccmete~· plot as I lay under a ioint tombstone that reads, "I Jere lie two, umted in friendship for 38 years through constant 51.•rv1ce to a great cause." Pl•rhaps the bcst-kno\\n of all Boston mar· nagl>s 1s the relationship of Sarah Orne Jewett and Anme Adams Fields. Jewett, a fiction writer from ~1aine, was a de\'Oted feminist who e.irly on n'jected heterosexual marriage as dt'Slructive to a woman's identity and ~ ati\'ity. Her first no\'el, "0...'Cpha\'cn" (1877), depicted a romantic friendship bchwen two young women who dreamed about li\'ing together like the Ladies of Uangollen, an 18th· century Welsh couple. In Dl>cembt·r 1879, Jewett attended a liter· ary rl'Ception in Boston at which she met Fields, the wife of Atlantic Monthly editor James Fields. The two women became friends instantly, and when Fields's husband died in 1881, she and Jewett formed a Boston mar· riage. Jewett kept the family home she had inherill-J in Maine, and for fi\'e months out of the year, she stayed there alone, writing full time. The hvo women wrote letters back and forth almost daily, calling each other names like "dear love" and expressing their loncli­nt'S.~ for e.ich other. Whether thl>se relationships were typically scxu.11 in nature is unknown, though. among the wider SOCIL'ty they were (and generally contim1t• to be) prt'Sumed to be asexual. With th,• rise of sc1,·ntific and medical inquiry into sexu.1lity m tlw first dl•c-.1dl>s of the 20th Cl'n· hir>~ these clo~e, loving fnendships between wornm carne under sharp scrutiny and began to be paU10!11gill'Ci as "female 1mers1on." PllVid Bumco IS tlze a11t/10r of"Gay f.ssentuils," a collcrtio11 of !us !ztStory col11m11s. He am be rcac/red care of tlus p11bl1catro11 or at DaveBui11cofi.rlol com 23 " l ' •n DeLLA1s1"• • Pnces May Vary. Su Store For Details. 24 Classifieds Announcements Prism PRISM 1s an employee network for employees of Equilon Enterpnses LLC. ~1ot1va Enterpnses. LLC , Equl\·a Services UC, and Equ1va Trading Company l111s net'lliork 1s open to any cmploy~'C of these companies and includes Gay Lt.-sb1an. and Bisexual employ­ees and thc..,r friends. The mi>· s1on of PR ISM 1s to provide sup· pon for members and co-work· ers. promote equality for employees regardless of sexual onenlllllon or gender 1dent1fic1an and create awareness m manage­ment of issues and concerns affecting people in a diverse workplace inclusive of sexual onenlllllon and gender 1dcntifi canon. For more mformallon call Jim :it 281 544 81 l8. Roben al 711241 1238 or Dick al 281 544 87 30. JESSIE PRATHER Cornmunny A lcn Jessie Prather • 6·r • 17~-195 lbs. • Sandy hair • AKA lllinoLs • age 29 • Wanted by the Montgomery County Shenff Dept Oise # 99AOl6242 for theft ot Je'llielry Call Del. Buds al 281 577.8927 1f you know the when:abou1s ot this person ------- Place To Pia}? If you play bass/acousuc guuar, brass or keybo:uds, a gay Chnst1an pr:use and worship tc::im needs you Call 71'686771~ PROTECT PROTECT provides a s:ife place every Tuesday at Bering l\.lemonal Vmtcd ~lethod1st Church, 1440 Harold. for HIV negative people to share their expenences m a effon 10 under­stand and change behaviors that could lead to infection. V1s11ors and new members arc wekomc al every meeting For more information. call 71l5261017. ext 211 DO'.\IESTIC A Bl SE Gay Men Survl\ors o· : ' >To<: >T Abuse offers suppon for gay men who arc m a current or past rclJt1onsh1p wnh an .lbumc or vmlent panncr For informauon or asscssmcnt/s.:rec:nmg. call Ru s Rohinen at 71l ~26 IOl7. ext 211 Leave ycur name Jnd J safe telephone number where your call can be returned C-t'mmunuy Resale Shop, 515 Richmond has been pr°' 1dmg c othmg to people II\ mg w h AIDS. for 14 years. urrc 1tl) needs F~· clothes Open 11 am 10 5 r m except Sunday Purveyors of couture to sur.mg ani ts ( .ill ilks Independent 501 le) n17 jl 52 :~~~ Education Convc:rsauonal 'iparnsh • Be­gmmng Span• h • lntcnned1a:.: Spanish • ALFREDO SAMAt'><O B A /\1 A • Spanish College Instructor• lnd..idual or Groups classes • 711.521 7805 Entertainment ALl·REOO SAMANO BA I M A Pi:uuSl/Organist • llohday Pan1C$, Dmners, Company/Corporate Events • Weddings. Anmvcr>ancs. Rcccpuons. Over 10 ye;irs ex pen· cnce 7 n 521 7805 Help Wanted WAIT STAFF Wait Staff needed. Evenings 4 p .m 6 n1ghh • Mon·Sal •Apply in Person • Joscphine•s llahan R1sroran1e • 1209 Caroline @ Dallas • Behind the Four Se"'"'r- Ht>ld • 711759 9121 A lJNIQUE CAREER OPPORTUNITY If 'lliorlmg ma cn:auve cnvuon­mcnl and handling the world's most fa~h1onable merchandise sounds good: 1f dealing "1th a savvy, soph1s11ca1ed dientelc who Jpprec1ates and rewards good taste. professionalism and great ser.1ce m1erL"St you. let's talk If you're mto clothes, we 1nean really love the fashion and quality of great clothes. arc ere a11vc and highly moll\ atcd "uh sales and networking expcnencc m apparel home furnishing or other f.l h1on related businesses. 1h1s ts where you will 'lliant 10 work Our compensation bcne fits, and generous clothing allo\<ances .ire ;n the top of our industry Contact Murry Penner by phone 111 71 l 527 8100 or by fax 71 l 527 9648 or email to mpcnncr@mpcnner com MCCR Kesurrec11on MCC Houston. Texas 1s seeking a director of Admm1s1ra1ion and Accounting Please cont Jct U$ al 7 n 861 9149 for JOI> dcscnp· uon nnd apphc:mon WILL TRAIN Full time pos111on • \lon-Fn • 8 a.m to 5 p m • GreJt Bcnchts • 2 week paid vac<111on • 401 (k) • ~ lcdicJI Center • Dark Room Tech for busy Onhoped1c Depanment Call Walt Z1pprian• 7119 6 7122 ------- CARTER .'\: COOLI; Y Busy Heights Jrca d ' needs c.>unkr help • App y , pc:-o;on ill 175 \\ 19th Stn.'CI or c.i! llt ug :it 711864 Wi4 IU~<;t KKEc·rm' \ICC Exp.n:ra.<"ll •~) d1'tnl ru\'ld­ual IO 6JU.1 mJ .>:btlllSl.T tlr ":.tNC :nl w r.hlp pucr:un of Re ,\lllct .._ICC I lolNoo. Tc:= • FUil bin: • (onta:t DI us 71l 8tl 9149 or nurt tl.wllloombm~ N1ght1ngale Employment Services (01v1S1on of NADCJ h a non-profit organ11at1on that provides JOb seeking 'kills train· mg and placement ru.>1>1anee for persons wuh HIV. For mon: mforma11on call 713 981 1541 Christ Church Cathedral Ep1SCOpal 1s seeking a creative, organ11ed professional w11h com­petent a.:coun11ng skills lo per· form ru. Financ1'11 Admm1slrator Th" position will manage and m:untams and prcpanng financial repons to the p;insh. Knowledge of Excel & MS Word necessary. Shelby Windows would be help· ful. Submt a reswreand 3 prof~ :ii refi=lres IO Origopu Thorra;. 1117 Tex;i,, Ave. Housloo. Tex;i,, 77002orfax to 713.222.2412 EROS 1207 Houston ·s newest erotic bou 11que super store is now accept· mg apphcat1ons for energetic sales ;taff • Full/Pan lime. excellent opponunuy •Apply 1n person, 1207 Spencer Highway. South Hou ton. TX, IOA\1 10 2PM. Monday through Friday• 713 944 6010. Full-Tune Recep11on1~t/Secre · tary al Chnst Church Cathedral Vanous J<>b duties include answering phone.-., greeting vis nors, handling calendar for meetrngs. and 111arn1ainmg prayer hsllhosp11al hst Computer <kills necessary· ~IS \\ord specifically and good 1yp- 1ng skills Fax resume ' to 711222 2412 Alln · Judy Evercu or mail to 1117 Texas A\c;;J,, H . tnn TX 77001 BASIC BROTHERS N a1..,:t:j1trne.: .1pp1: •. :1 \1anagement pos111ons 11nd full/pan 11111e Retail cmploy- 1nen1 Pnor rcta11/s:1lcs expcn· encc and computer knowledge a plus • Come JOm our team and enJoy one of the best benefit packages around • Apply M F. 10-Jm 4pm. 1232 Westhe1mer • ,-.;o phone calls please Executive Director Houston based pnvate founda· t1on 1s lookmg for an ExecUtl\e Director position • Accountmg. "ntmg. propeny management slulls needed • For more mfor­ma11on call 711 861 7063 Home Improwme11t RE\IODELl1\G? C.irpenter dad with h1 bo) he ;icr have hammer ~1 d will rra'~~ 20 years expcnnce. ref ercnccs. r-.1son-"le Call lawrc-ce at 409 327 9400 Boogie & .Marcella fl ic repair ser.1ce • 4(1 ~- "" expencnce • C.111 us for all your repair needs. 71 ' 856 61 Moving Services American Movers Visll us on the web• www.amer· 1canmovers.org • 2412 A Taft• Houston. Texas. 77CYJ6 • Now Statewide Tx DOT# 005282035C • 711.52:! 1717 Licensed Massage Tim of L.A. Get on my table' 713-508-7896. All American Therapeu11c massage by Tim. Located m ,\1ontrose • Spons Swedish • Profcs.'1onal Ser.mg Montrose. the llc1ghl>. and River Oaks RMT # 21119 281 520.7610 Massage Therapy at us finest Swcd"h· Deep Tissue, Spons, Reflexology • Don '1 senle for less • In/Out. Hotels, 7 Days • Jeff #016074 (Na11onally Cen1fied) 713.524.5865 BODY TOUCH • Experience what experience can do for you 1 • Gallena Arca • Chaz Kolb <RMT#l3136). 713.712.0270. You Need Therapy! Ma~Jge therapy now available al Muscle Mechanics personal trarnmg & wellness studio spons massage, 1hcrapcu11c mas­sage. n:laxa11on therapy Call now for your appo1mmcn1' Muscle Mechanics 71l52J5330. Pets The Homeless Pct Placement League is a Houston area. non· profit an11nal welfare organ11a· t1on 11 PPL provides for the rcha· b1htauon of stray und Jbandoncd dogs nnd cats through 11S umque foster care program. All ammals arc spayed/neutered and have their first ser of shots. For more mforrnauon call 713 862 7 387 or VlCW website 31 www.HPPI..org The Spay :\curer Assistance Program will proHde FREE sp:iymg/ncutenng, rabies vacCJ· nations :ind cuy licenses tor ani­mals belonging lo qualifying low income dog nnd c:u guardums. For quahficarions and 1ran,pona11on mfonna11on please call 713.52:? 23l7 Professional Services BODY \\'AXI1'G Personal grooming by Dale Waxmi; spec1ahs1 & licensed Cosmctolog1s1 • Pnvate Loe auon m Montrose • Call for appointment 71 l 529 59'i2 Real Estate For Rettt '\III>TOWN/.\ll'SEl l\I f!J 'e dLjJlcX l I/I 5 llard\<ood/carpct • II ~h Cc1hng • \\ID • No pets • No more than three people • 2 year lease • S900 per month• 71 l ~26 614 II EIGHTS Updated Garage Effic1en9 $400 per ~('nth • Bills Paid Low Depo II • o pets Available now • No Lease DECEMBER 3, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE required• 711862.9775 MONTROSE Commercial & res1dcnt1al for lea<e • 2 suite> 675 & 875 sq ft(S700 & $900/mo). 211 1500 sq fl (S 1100/mo). J/2 875 sq fl ($900/moJ. All available now Reduced S for qualified non· profit orgs. Hollyfield Founda11on 7 I 35216900. MONTROSE Large 2 BR unit m 3 unu trop1· cal compound wuh pool Hot tub, sun room. centrals. Fresh paint. carpel & hardwoods Owner/agent 713.529 9104 1419 HYDE PARK Ett1c1enty apanm .. nts •All bills paid • SI 00 off I st months rent • Security gates • Call JD al 711528.0561 CONDO FOR RENT Downtown h1 ·me condo • I/ I • SI 025 per month • All bills paid • Call 7 ll647.8822 MONTROSE One bedroom m small gated complex • $450 plus ut1h11es • $200 deposit • Convenient 10 clubs and shopping 711524 t551 GREENWAY PLAZA 3308 Br:in;Trd "' Audky • I/I 8 5475 per month• Sl50 dcpo;1t • Fn:c lla~1c cahle • Move in spe­cial • Agent 71 3 524 9660 Apt. 4 Lease • Montrose New mini llhnd, /carf"'I • $495 per month wuh $150 dcposu • SI 00 oft move in spec 1al • Agent 713. 524 9660 HEIGHTS 2 bedroom • I bath • All bills paid mclud111g calllc • 1912 Victorian Couagc/lluplcx m de.rnable neighborhood • Lots ol windows • Hardwood floors • 5900 711 880 2740 Execull\"C office subleao;e S250 per month •One office m 11 very mcc bu1ldmg located West Loop 610 near lkllaire Hlvd. • Private entrance & suue numbcr. • Call Koh at 713 661.7700. Hills Paid • Med Ctr ilk Ilaire • S585 month • M1nu1es from ~ontrose/Musuem. convenient 10 flus-Mop • I/I och111d m:un house • Separate living and drn· mg rooms, secured olf-s11ec1 parking • New cc1hng funs. noonng and paint • \love-In Special 7 I 3 660 7390. Real Estate for Sale .\IO~TROSE S250's • 1 Bedroom • 2 bedroom • I bedroom • Lots of po1e-11al C Jll Alan Morlan or Bob Bezborn 11 l 520 88BS Ml SEl ~I 60'~ • I t-edroo;i1 • Nice Unu • ( 111 Ahn Mor .in <i 713 ~20 ~~8 ----- HEIGHTS Sl80's • 2 ' Bedroom • 2 112 hath • 2 •• 1r 'ar.rc • fo'llinhoL "-' • Pa110 and land caped courl)ard •Close w the Boulevard & 19th S1•ec1 shopping Call Alan Mori :i 71152(188~- LIVE/WORK LOFTS 1'on-1rad111onal lifestyle? Why not try a non-1rad111onal way 10 hve and work. New concept for Houston 1 Excellent South End locallons Call Alan Morlan CB Swilley Hudson 7135208888. REAL ESTATE Y2K Don't worry. Call Alan Morlan at CB Swilley Hudson 713.520 8888. Looking for a home on the Nonh side' • Call Bernie Johnson, Agent Keller-William> Realty your Real E>lale spcciahsl, 281 164.4862 Roommates MUSEUM SGWPM seeks trustwonhy GM 10 share old 3 bed· room house near Med Center & Rice $500 + 112 u1l111ies. hedges7662@'aol com (email) 1400 RICHMOND SGWM seeks roommate (non· smoker/drug user) 10 share 211 apartment • Includes cable, secunly gates. and pool • S375 month plus 1/2 of u11h11es • 711.520.7662 WESTBURY AREA GWM Westbury 'n~ar Meyerland) prefer non-smoker Large J bedroom house • Pnvate room and bath • Separate h\lng area ncgo11ahle. $435 per month • 112 u11h11es. 711726.87.16. Travel/Resorts- --- WAIKIKI Luxury ocean view • 18th noor • One llcdroom condo in Wa1k1ki • All amenities, fully furnished, mcludmg linens and remodeled l..nchen • l.ovely terrace looks out to Duunond Head • Secure huild111g, non­smoking • $99/mght (double), 10 day 111m1111um, security deposit plus cleaning fee • Available Oc1. '99 • Rotes for mid Dec '99 10 nud Jan '00 • S 199/night • For more mforrna­t1on email : glarp@e;irthhnk net or .:all ;11047:11871 (Los Angeles) The Ahbell Inn. Atlanta's newest gay·owned B&H 1~ also Atlanta's oldest, most authentic Victorian Inn www.ahhellrnn com or 404 767 l708 Volunteers Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Volunteers needed at the Gay & Lesb1iln Switchboard· Houston w w w gaysw11ch· boardhouston org To sign up please call 7115214390 \\i>b-sites w" w.hou~lon' oicc:.rom ---- ""W.S0\0,f.'Om "\\-",inip.1c.:tne~n - "~".m~>nlrosrst1rth';iii;a~ - ""'"'·~on.net """·g;t)S"ih;hh~ou~ _____ .org """·!'lltt."\C~-~ PET LOVERS l nlque Pet Products """·Path p•lproducrs.com -------·-----------~------·- ----- ---------- _ .. ____ ... ___________ .. HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 3, 1999 25 Car Mart miles. a super clean car v./ lots of extras. save a bundle • Only S 14,890 • Call Henry Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 281.445.6400. c1al $21,969 • Call l\1auric10 Hussmann-Advantage B~1W 7 I 3.653.8i00. '96 Saturn SC-I Soort Coupe • Gold e'tenor, only 45K miles, full pov.er sunro(\f, ;'i-speed, onl) I at 1h1s pncc • S7,995 • Saturn of Houston-North Frv.J .• 281&17.8700. $600 CASH '71 VW Supcrbectle Interior/body m good cond- 111on • Needs engine work • For more information call 7 D. 779.20'\2. '98 '96 N1ss.111 ~1ax11na GLE • Pearl Y<hllc, leather, Bose premium sound syMem1 •Only SB.977 • For details. call l.onc,tar N1ss.1n Oldsmoh1lc. 281 241 8(J(JO '98 Ford l~xrcd1t1on EJJ1e Bauer• Grc-en v./ saddle leather. all the extras • $24,795 • For more information. call Henry Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 28 I 445 6-l(K). '96 Jeep Grand Cherokee • PW. l'I •• tilt, cru"c and a whole lot more' • 514,995 • For details. c.111 Henry Craft at Archer .~1otor Sales, 281.445.6400. "18 Old"notnlc Delta 88 LS • Onl) 221.. n11lcs, Leather interior, don't nms 1h1s one' • 512,977 • For your tc>t dnvc, call Lonc,lar N1"an Oldsmoh1le. 281 24U6<X> ·97 Nissan MaX1ma • Wh11c, ,harp car w11h all the !>ells and whistles • S 16.920 • For more information, S<'e Henry Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 281 4456400. ·95 Ford Fl.'\O Extended Cah • Custom Conversion, don't miss this one! • $11.787 • For your test drive. sec Henry Craft al Archer Motor Sales, 2814456400 '96 Nissan Quest • PW. PL, Cruise, 111!, casscnc. nice' $11,977 • For more mforrnatwn and a test dmc. call Lone<;tar 1"1ssan - Oldsmoh1lc 281 24~ 8600 '97 To)ota limdCru1 er • The Best! ,\one of a kind bcautv • S29,905 •For all the 1k1:uls. ~all llcnr) Craft Ill Archer Motor Sale>. 28 I .445.64<X>. '97 llonda l'assport 4X4 • \'6, PW, Pl .. tilt, cruise, and much more' • Sale pnccd at only $15,760 • A'I.. for llenry Craft at Archc1 Motor Sales, 28 I .44H>4<Kl. '95 Pont1a.: Gr..ind Am• 4-Door, auto, ni<"C vch1dc, Wow! • Sale pnced at only S4,977 • To find out more, call Loncstar .S1ssan­OIJsmoh1k, 2812418600. ·97 Chry,lcr Schnng • Papnla. Super clean vehicle v./ lots of option" drive anyv. here S 11,760 • Call lien!") Craft nl Archer Motor Sale" 281 445.6400 ·97 Ford Fl 50 Extended Cah Lariat • Wh11e. 3-Doors, nice cond111on w/ lots of extras • S 18.295 • To dnvc today, ask for llenry Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 281.445.6-100. ·95 Toyota Corolla • 4·door. auto. great car, this one won't sla) around long' • Onl) $4,977 • For details. call Lone,tar N1ssnn-Oldsmoh1le, 21.> 1.243 8600 '98 Ford Explorer .XLT • Green, full pov.er package. ttlt. cruise. great \"Chide • Slh.980 • For more information. call llenry Cr,1ft nt Archer ~1otor Sales, 28144~6400 '97 Jeer Grand Chcrokl-c • ,\II the power options and man) extras • S 16,797 • For more mlormat1on and a test dmc call Hen!")' Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 281.445.M!Xl. '98 Pontiac Sunlire • 4-Door, auto, won't stay' • Pm:ed to ,c11 at only $7,977 • To dnve av.a) today, call Lonestar Nissan­Olds111ob1le, 281 243.8600. '99 Chrysler LHS • Lots of room and Lots of Style' Aflordahle lu•u!")' • SH.h50 • Call Henry Craft for details al Archer Motor Sak" 281.445.6400. '99 Plymouth Bn:c1e • Auto, PW, PL. cruise, tilt. fun to drive v.1th many e<e1tmg options • $I 0.977 • For further details, call Lonestar Nissan· Oldsmot>1le, 281 2438600. '99 Mazda 626 • Only 13K ·99 Dodge Intrepid • Silver. PW. PL. 1111. cruise. cassenc • Sale priced at only S 13.977 • To test dnve, call Lonestar Nissan­Old, mohile, 281 24l86<l0. •97 Ford Explorer XLT • Pov.er package. very nice dean vehicle v. 1th lots of options • S 15.980 • A'I.. for lknr) Craft :u Archer Motor Sales. 281 445.6400 '99 :-.lissan Ahuna GXE • Auto, PW Pl., plus a whole lot more A must sec to appreciate • Onl) S l.l.'177 • Contact Lonestar N1ssan-Oldsmoh1le. 28 l.24186<Xl. ·97 Che\ y Maht>u • Leather intenor. PW, PL. ttlt, snappy v~h1cle, drive an}whcre 1 • $11,280 • To test dnve, call llcnry Craft at Archer \1otor Sales. 281.44 5 6400 '99 Oldsmoh1lc Intrigue • 4 Door. auto, P\\. PL. must see to appreciate' • Only $14,977 • Call Lone star '>i>'an Oldsmoh1lc, 281 243.8600. '97 Che\) SI 0 Super Cab Stcp"dc • E•tra .sharp, rugged trucl.. • A great deal al only S9.8!Xl • For details. asl. for Henry Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 281.445.6400. '99 BMW .ll8T1 • Avus Blue. sunroof. cass . Stk.#30067 • MSRP $25.975. this week's spc- ·99 BMW ~B Roadster • While w/lmola interior, new• $39.900 • Call Maunc10 Hussman Aduntage BMW. 71J65l8300 ·9g B\1W Z3 Road,tcr • Nev. Program C~r • $25,900 • Call Maunc10 Hussmann Ad,antJge BM\\, 713 6'3 300. '% TO) ota Corolla LE • Loaded. clean • S 11 .99' • For details call Saturn of Houston Katy FR\\"I, 281 '\56 1400. '% C'hC\) ca,aher • Great car v./ v. arrant) • 9,995 •I-or details and a test dm e. call Saturn of Houston-GulfF"'Y· 7119+1..1'50 '% \'oils" agcn Pa.ssat • Only 15K mile' • '\lli, 'i9'i • For detail'. call Saturn of Hou-ion­Kai) Fm) , 2S I 556 1400. '96 Saturn SW-2 • Leather loaded. nKc car v. I v. arrant) • SI0.895 • For dc1.11b. call Saturn of Houston-Gulf Fr.') 71'1944 4;'i'i0 94 Butel LeSabre L1m1ted Series • One ov. ncr muoon. heav1h loaded, dual comfort controis. S2 K mis. hut looks hke 20K • SS,9'i0 Saturn of Houston !"orth FrY<) • 281 47 700. '97 Ford f- I 0 SuperCab XLT Lariat • Pn\lme condttton. loaded, leather, 46K miles • Onh SI S,4 50 • Call Saturn of Hou~ton-North Frv.) .. 21\1.47 8700. '97 Saturn SL-2 • Auto w/ 2 )r /24K m1 v.arrant), great car, dnve an)v.here. Stl. # .1~ 109A • $9595 • Call Saturn of Humble-HWY 'i9!\" 281 '40 ,, '97 GMC fa tended Cab 112-ton Pickup• Bedltner, alloy '\\heels AIC. much more • $12 9~0 • For more 1n'ormat1on call Saturn of Hu
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