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Montrose Voice, No. 157, October 28, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 157, October 28, 1983 - File 001. 1983-10-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/751/show/722.

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(1983-10-28). Montrose Voice, No. 157, October 28, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/751/show/722

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 157, October 28, 1983 - File 001, 1983-10-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/751/show/722.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 157, October 28, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 28, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript MONTROSE v 0 I c The Newspaper of Montrose Oct. 28, 1983 Issue .. 157 Published Every Friday Witches, Spooks, Goblins and Fairies-It's Halloween By Don Ritz Hallowf.'f'n is the night for witches, spooks, goblins and, much more common in the gay ghettos, men dressed as women to come out of their hiding places and haunt the otherwise peaceful and serene communities. According to Encyclopedia Americana, Halloween is a festival of Scotish-Irish origin held on All Hallow' a Eve. The ritual may be traced to a Druid ceremony in pre­Christian times. A Celtic festival honoring the god of the dead and beginning the Celtic New Year was held on November l. This festival was gradually incorporated into Christian rit­ual, and in the 9th century, November 1 became a day to honor all of the saints (All Hallows). During medieval times, elves, fairies and witches who were believed to be able to take the form of cats took to the sky on All daJlow'B Eve. In ordt"r t-0 "ward er· theBe epirite, bonfire• were lit. This night before the day of All Hallows also became a time of fortune telling and young people trying to determine their marital pros­pects. The Scottish and Irish brought the Hal­loween tradition to America. Late in the 19th century, the Irish belief that fairies played pranks on Halloween led boys and young men to carry out practical jokes. Consequently, thia led to the whole con­cept of utrick or treat" in the 20th century. Halloween is a special day for gay men and women. Halloween, more so than any other day (except perhaps Mardi Gras), representa a time in which members of the gay community can "let their hair down" and be almost as uninhibited as they desire. On this day, no one must worry about the rest of the world "sneering" at what would otherwise be considered "odd" behavior. Get Out the Skirts, Men By Robert Hyde All over Montrose this weekend-while witches are celebrating their Sabbat and children are bobbing for apples-many men in the community will aseume the roles of ladies of the evening in celebration of the one time of the year when they can collectively indulge their feminine fanta­sies for all the world to see. Many businessmen, bartenders and men in between will make a run on the area drug storee this weekend for every· thing from nail polish to the latest scream­ing shade of mascara in their attempts to put Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe to ahame. Throughout the commu.nity, glittered beards will appear under mch­long eyelashe1, and Mary's Cassa!1dra will be giving lessons in how to act like a re~u~~~~·~·blame the lady, fellas, if the black cats of the neighborhood his~ at you thi1 weekend instead of at the goblins that will be roaming the 1treets-they're use to them-you're a whole different breed. Yes, it's drag time again, and since Hal· loween falls on a Monday this year, the area's bawdy broads will be seen all wee­kend until the saints claim their day on Tuesday. There will be many parties and coatume balls and competitions honoring the loveliest of the gentlemen, some of whom will have spent months getting their gowna pressed, fitted and sequined and their boas fluffed to the hilt. Mark Doe, a Houston businessman who wishes to remain anonymous, has been looking forward to this weekend for weeks when he will chunk hia bueineBB suit for a yellow chiffon gown. "It's outrageous," he says of doing drag. "Totally outrageous. It'a like, 'Why do drugs when you can do drag?' You feel like going wild." This will be Mark's fourth Halloween in drag, although he mentioned that he did it for one of Houston's garden parties two years ago. ''Butwhenlfiretdidit.,itwasaomething continued pagt! 6 0 0 E Gay Alcoholic Center Fi,ghts for Life Hollis Hood, p.8 0 2 MONTROSE VOICE I O CT. 28, 1983 2702 Kirby-524-6272 IN THE CABARET Appearing Nov. 1-12 Direct from New Yoril, Provincetown, "Hello Dolly," "Wv::irne," "Addler on the Roof," "Bye, Bye Birdie" HARRIET LEIDER, "THE DIVA," and Ed Underman DlmerlW:Jo-Thurs~ll Fr1 &Sot~HI reseivotlons requested JOIN US FOR HAPPY HOUR Monday thru Friday 4 to 8pm Complimentary hors d'oeuvres in the lounge with Undo Hefner at the piano Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 Police Violence Investigation Requested B7 Holll•Hood TheNC<Ontoboocinsol•thm!_..,..in l!..Monc.roM•-byotr\cer K.R. Pa ttor­""" h .. prompled the Polioo Advi8or}o Committeo, a citi..,, and mayo,.l a ppoin· ""'"""P.to .. k for anlnva<ia'ati°"ollhe inq.UJY pn>«<iure -ultin,s .. i..n"" offlorrohoot. .om"°"a .. We a ,. ohidyin.polioo ... of d• dly forno," .. id MariaCa.,..11-noo, aW>rney and rico chairolthesr<H>P· "'I'hoHocuDvo oommitteo it recommendin1 IO the sro<>P thatapub~chffrin1boheldtoclarif7 and publici..,tho in-~!'toeyprocoodu.-. tria onthojob. Thiieioao .. tereqinr..-nt,•NI u.r_,,.Smithoflhepoliooacad....,.. "We t.,.10dOlermineiftheyareol1ood ch~.~l>eWd. Howev«r,tho ... ,.hav• onlybominoti· tuledov•lhe -l!v.~.oo""r­hired bef°"'lhatti""'didr><>t .. kothom O.vid J on• . ..:\ivioi who bu Ion.I' r,.c:i ~;!'::-:.::ii!..~!~:;~!::'. i.r.,.... Hohu""1llffledlha11heattor­ney- alin...,1...,bi-1finthocaM and&i.o opocWlilisa ofon~ "lt'o anetron .. takolheOiotnetAtcot- OCT. 28, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose Mouth The community'• Ch .. rch o! Chrl1tlan Fai1n ,,.;Ml'H)IOlll!ourthannua!Hallo­weenc. rn1>allhi•&ltu•d.IY6-10pmali1• newloca!lon a1 21 7fal....-, w11h g•me&. lood, piil•and91ltltf't.lln,,....t. Thia will beMoldlncon]unctlon wlththeir"opint­ual r...war now In prog,... 1hrough Oct.30. F orlllOfeln ! ormation,c.ll~ ~ TIMOeySw~chbOar<l wil!ot>ortlybelle • · lno;1egarageNl<lbu1rigMnow•,.-"'· lno;1i,en. fromlhecommunilytortlle! Ul<l. lf you lle .. t-Otnelhlngtodone!e, c.ll!heSwl!ChbO•r<lat529-3211 Nice Guys Finish Last Feio <y.•ra' Umen ,.ti ,.. J>«>piomv ~on ~~=!:'!:ti~:=-ahK':'ndtfS:..'; e<>mmunicationo profonor Oom1n1c lnfantei.Da...,.., t l.Muoofthollnn/.t n ..... o. Aa:ordinllto lnfanie,pooplowho .,.....,.i...,ooenuic, mottCftOltive andbouer probltmoolvenihanti.-who doft'lS..C..heNr-,\hero'o •hilfdilfo~ botWfffl.....Un•andv .. balq~OD. Arpon_he~•U.CkpMitiono, idNO ar...,.i,port.....,....., . v.,.balq~ s<>•l\orother-l•on a ponoon.11l lcvel. ·v .. i..1 .....,..;on ia b.d," be NJ"O ~ i\rglll ... ia,....d ." 4 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT 28, 1983 us. Gay Political Caucus Citizens For Human Equality Greater Montrose Business Guild Mayor Kathryn]. Whitmire City Councilmember Eleanor Tinsley City Councilmember George Greanias State Representative Debra Danburg "We support a new downtown convention center because it's the best way to get Houston on the go again. A new convention center will create 9,900 permanent jobs and 1,200 construction jobs. And, by law, no Houstonian's tax dollars will be used to build or operate the center. Visitors will pay for it when they pay a tax on their hotel bills. A new downtown convention center is a common sense way to stimu­late Houston's economic recovery. We hope you'll support it." The New Downtown Convention Center. Houston Gets The Benefits. Visitors Pay The Bills. And That's A Fact. Vote For Proposition A. PO .\ l>\ P\I 1RB' f ll"•I ( m [)(N,H.J'a,(()'\'H'"no ... (f,ffR 'UI \I.Al'"' Ii.I Tfl6H HOl .. TO'l/.TIXA., ..... 001 OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Mayoral Candidates, Sans Whitmire, Tell Us What We Need By Hollis Hood Bureaucratic efficiency, water manage­ment and transportation were issues addressed by eight of the nine mayoral candidates in the Nov. 8 election at a forum hooted by the League of Women Voters on Wednesday, Oct. 24, at Stouffer's Hotel, Greenway. Dick Slemmer, Jack Terence, Lawrence Simms, Nicholas Benton, James Free­man, Tony Austin, Bill Wright and Don Geil all said that efficiency in government is mandatory in the face of a sagging econ­omy. Mase transportation solutions and increasing the tax base were also high on the list of priorities. Incumbent Mayor Kathy Whitmire did not attend the forum. Slemmer, 53, a retired Air Force colonel and chief executive of CONSULTECH, said issues must be defined, and voters must decide which of the candidates has the "bearing, poise and human sensitiv­ity," as well as governmental and man­agement experience, to meet the challenge of the mayoral position. Simms, 37, transportation operator, entrepreneur, president of Back to Work and previous candidate, said Houston is on the verge of total "extinction" unless there is strong leadership and an effort made to put people back to work. Terence, 45, editor and publisher of The Houstonian, also a previous candidate, questioned why the present administra­tion taxed the Rice Hotel downtown only $8.40 when an overdue parking ticket coots $30. He asked why the fire chief picked up for DWI was only penalized one week's work, and why two tax appraisers were fired for allegedly refusing to take property off the tax roles belonging to Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Montr~1~~fjt.:¥~11,.!1•ngCo MontrOM Vo"* 11.000 copi• WMkly 01lluGayNews,&,OOOcopl•weekty tot1lTe11 .. 1r..,11.000C091eaweekty Contentscopyright•t983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Hen,Zbl~~urg ~~.:;~ Jeff Bray gr1ph1a ~=n~,:is Robert Hyde m1n1gmgec/llor ~~~:~~d Ch:':!!"4!~ith JonCheetwood ent~r'::m~a!~~ter1 lytHams ed'f'lf141ngd11ec1or Mark Drago edvefl4mg Jon Cheetwood CIN••f1eclad¥1rt1.s1ng =::.'!!1:'!!' GrMlll' Montroee BUllMA Guild. Gay =~c!.nftCN lnlem•Uon.I G•y New• Agency. Pacll1c NM• Aut11r18urHuC1pltolNew1Servlce ~~:,~:::.:::.'u!:=::,!.:;~:_,~~tt;:~:::~ R1ndy Altr9d, Slonewell FHturea Syndic1te, Brl•n McN1ught,Joe81k•r POSTMASTER 5-ndlddr .. 1con .. ctlon110 3317 Monlron 130&.Hou1ton.TX77008 Sublcripllonr1telnUSln•HJedennlop1 $49pery .. r(52 luuw),S29per11xmonth1(26~).orl125perweek( .... thin 2tl lllOM) BICk lllUN $2 00 NCh N•l~nlllld"9rt11lng,.preH11t1t/tle JoeD1Sabtlto,R1....,..deU M1rttetong,W&thAvenue.NewYork1001t,(212)24~ AdVwl,.lngdllldlm• Tueedl)',5;30fHn.lorluuer .... MdFr1- dly.....nlng N°'ic.toldverfi.•r1LOC1l~rt1alngr1te1tehlduflS1•·A wMeffect1veJuty1, 1983 1fMpoN10#1ty "MontroM vok:e· dOel not aaume l'MPOf\U­blllty tot~no cillma. Reedeni lhoulcl •Mrt·MonlroH vok:lll•1oanydlceipC1Yeld¥ef1ll'l'IO members of the present administration. "We need to raise efficiency and have strict control of fanchises," Terence said. He also suggested turning transporation and garbage collection back to private enterprise. Freeman, 33, a citizen activist involved in tightening building codes and beautify­ing Buffalo Bayou, said Houston faces the same problems with water ithad in 1941- not clean enough and not enough of it. Something must be done immediately to expand and clean up the bayou system, he said. He proposes interconnecting the sys­tem with channels and connecting Buf­falo Bayou with the Brazos River. He said that the city needs 300 miles of monorail, possibly a1ong the bayou rout.es, to solve the mass transit problems. He also said Houston needs more public restrooms. Benton, 39, is Texas co-director of the National Democratic Policy Committee headed by Lyndon LaRouche. His plat­form stressed Houston as being a pivot.al city in determining national policy regarding beam weaponry, international finance and trade. "We are not on a nationwide economic recovery," he said, "we are on the verge of a collapse." Hous­ton's politics are subsumed by greater issues, he said, and he urged voters to think of Houston as part of a world, assuming its proper leadership role. Wright, 39, chief exe<;utive officer of August Financial Printing, said that dur­ing his campaigning since February, he has heard deep concern from citizens about rising costs and lessening services. He voiced concern that the city budget has not yet passed, and it is the fourth month of the budget cycle. "We need to encourage citizen participation," he said. Geil, 55, "a printer by trade" and pre­vious mayora1 candidate, said he has observed City Hall for the past three months, "just to see what actually goes on. We don't need more human beings at City Hall," he said, "we need more that actu­ally work eighthoure a day." He said that some employees go grocery shopping on city time, use city vehicles for personal use, etc., to cite some abuses. He said that although the city would be bankrupt if all debts were called in today, taxation is not the answer, trimming the dead weight is. Austin, 31, is chairman of the Socialist Workers Party. He asserted that govern­ment needs to be run by the people and not by big business. "The people that earn the wealth are not in control of the spending,'' he said. He propounded to make govern­ment serve the people addressing "human needs before profits, jobs not war." "! think we should quit borrowing and live within our means," said Slemmer, who reportedly was involved in preparing and defending the first NATO budget at that organization's inception. He spoke as a member of the municipal financial planners organization, saying that the city nP.eds to set priorities and "do with what we have." Simms proposed joint venturing to cure Houston's financial woes by citizens pur­chasing bonds to finance the convention center, transit alternatives, a paramutal race track, amusement park and coopera­tive housing. Terence attacked MTA's spending hab­its as an example of monumental govern­mental waste. ''MTA was allowed to spend $75 million before the people were allowed to vote the proposal down," he said, refer­ring to the spring heavy rail referendum. He also said the city is using part of the hotel/motel tax (which is proposed to be dedicated for the downtown convention center) to fund the police cadet program. He questioned what would happen to the program if that money was yanked. Freeman said he favored giving MTA a tax decrease, and tax incentives to people who grew plants "because it cleans the air." He said he would favor a property tax increase of possibly one half cent, which would be dedicated to rebuilding the wards and depressed areas. Benton's solution to money problems was to increase the tax base through a revamping of the national financial pro­gram and operating Houston's ship chan­nel at its full capacity, not33percentas it was two years ago. Wright said if he is left a balanced budget, which he doubted, he would not favor a property tax increase. Otherwise it might be necessary. Deterring needed pro­jects was not the way to cut expenses, he said, "because it costs more in the long run." Geil said the city cannot afford a prop­erty tax increase, because any increase would scare industrialists away. "It would be so expensive, they'd know they couldn't afford to stay here, 80 they won't locate here, and we'll lose that tax." Austin said government should be accountable to the people it services, and that the city should open its books 80 the people know exactly what is going on with their money. Freeman posed constructive use of Houston's waterways-making them nav­agible "like the ones in Europe," as one solution to people moving. Geil told theaudiencenottothinkthatif they voted for any of the candidates besides the most notable-Wright or Whitmire-that their vote was wasted. 0 The only reason you don't hear as much abqut us other fellows is because we don't have the big money behind us. But that means we don't owe big money when we get into offi~nly the people." The forum was taped and will be shown several times before the election on cable. Candidate Speaks Out on Homeless Young Gays Richard Slemmer, Houston mayoral can­didate and one of six delegates to the recent Parents FLAG convention in New York, said that he has decided to help gay young people. The president of a computer manage­ment consulting firm has five sons, two are gay, and he has adopted five more eons, all homosexual. He said thatin Texaogaylridsarecalled deviants and considered unadoptable. In Houston more than 100 such youngsten are in detention now because they can't find sponsors. Slemmer said he was an orphan and had been on his own since the age of 11. This is what motivated. him to become con­cerned about the problem. Computers Becoming Collectors' Items The computer age has barely arrived, but already people are hoarding old hardware as collectibles. A 1974 "Altair" built from a kit sells for $500-if you can find one. A 1976 "Apple One" coots almost as much, but the first floppy disks from 1972 are a steal at only a few bucks apiece, reports the San Francisco Chronick. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT 28, 1983 So Many Men, So Many Dresses continued from page I that waa real taboo," he saya. "I thought I was going to go out on the streets and get killed." He recalls his first Halloween when he put on hia mother's clothes, and his mother stopped him at the door. "You're not going out like that. You look too damn good," Mark'• mother told him. He returned to his room and changed into jeans and a shirt. But now, like many men, Mark really enjoye it. He says that men's clothes are so drab and so consistent that "it's fun to screw around with jewelry and heels and juat go crazy." Then Mark also likes working with make-up, something he began to enjoy during his high school days when he was in the drama department "It's fun to experiment on yourself." Yet Mark says that all is not delightful, particularly when it comes to wearing women'a ahoes. "I admire women for wearing high heels. It's painful. After one Halloween, I couldn't feel my toes for two weeks." This year, in particular, drag seems to be in vogue, and not only within the gay community. Not since Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis paraded along side Marilyn Monroe in Some Like It Hot has there been so much nationwide attention on the sub. ject The current wave began last year when Julie Andrews posed as a man posing as a woman in Victor Victoria and exposed Robert Preston in one of the campiest bits on film. The wave wiB peak in December when Barbra Streisand's new movie, Yentl, appears wherein she will dh~guise herself as a young man. Also, drag is taking over Broadway: This year' a Tony Award for drama went to Torch Song Trilog y, a play about a popu· lar drag queen, and the biggest drag show of them all, La Cage aux Foiles, is selling atanding·room-onJy tickets on the Great White Way . .. It's been going on for years in Europe,'' Mark says, "and people think nothing of it. It's Bennie Hill everywhere. Sometimes you even see green afros and some god.­awful things "But in Tex&B, the men take it so seriously, when it's supposed to be fun. And Halloween is the time of the year when a man can be anything he wants." On a slightly more serious note. Mont· roae paychotherapist David McGee agrees. ''Halloween is a recognized day of permiasion to go and enjoy your fanta­aiea." he says, feeling that fantasies are healthy and fun . '"And Hallow~n is the one holiday in our BOCiety that gives peo­ple that right to explore." A. a psychotherapist, McGee is a great believer in androgyny, a concept which purports that all human beings ha~e within them male and female charactens­tics. "And in this light, drag becomes much, much more apparent because it allows persons to explore different sides of themselves." And this is one reason for enjoying drag, especially for the first time, McGee says. "It's a formalized way of giving yourself permission to look at another side of your· self. And one of the real advantages to it is the ability to explore the full range of your Counseling Center Elects New l\1ernbers, Officers The Montrose Counseling Center elected new board membera and officers for 1984 at its annual board meeting Oct. 13. The center, which has 15 board memben, 13 staff members and aix com­munity volunteen, elected new members Eric Liston, Phil Randolph and Jon Reck Since it.a inception, the center has extended its services to gaya, bisexuals, gay couples, parents and children of gays, married couples with one bisexual partner and nongay people. personality from aspects that are tradi· tionally considered feminine to aspects that are traditionally considered mascu­line. "And I see this as a real plus, as a defi­nite advantage, because it can lead to a very well-rounded, mature and insightful individual." But, girl, wait! Hold on there, Mary Louise! For inevitably with drag comes the high camp that goes along with it. Some men get nicknamed Sue Ellen on Halloween and the name remains with them foi- the rest of the year. And this can be good or bad, especially after the guys have sold their dresses back to Purple Heart or put them away in moth balls. "Camp has a lot more meaning than people realize," McGee says. "In dealing 402Lovett 527-9866 with my clients, I've found it extremely important to examine motives behind camp. Camp can easily be used as a very subtle way of emphasizing and reinforc­ing not only negativeattitudesaboutone's self, but also about their friends and being gay as a whole," McGee cautions. "There­fore, when camp is used in this manner, it is definitely homophobic. "However, when camp is utilized in a more constructive and healthy manner," McGee a88ures us, " it's simply a way of poking fun at one's self and one's friends and enjoying the totality of one's person· ality." So have fun, men, and have a safe Hallo­ween. And, Louise! If you get into my lipstick one more time, l'Jl knock your ... brains out! DWI CRIMINAL D EFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE, SUITE 318 (713) !523-!5006 unday Midnight The Rocky Horror Show Monday Costume Night Prizes for Best Costume and Best Drag! Happy Hour Prices All Night And don't forget ... Dynasty on Wednesday Nights 7 ~~~~~~~ER 526-6557 8 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 28, 1983 Alcoholics' Recovery Center Fighting for Life By HolliaHood The sunlight crashed down on Joe, and he wiped his eyes with a soiled cuff. He jumped from his garbag<Hlumpater haven and began the daily trek to forage a sub­sistence in the urban jungle. "If I could only get a drink," he thought aa he ambled down the street in womdown shoes, "I could figure all this out." Joe is only one of the several million alcoholics in the U.S. who get up every morning to start on their first of several bottles per day "just to stay well." Joe is a gay alcoholic, and alcoholism among gays is three times that of any other group nationwide. Alcohol was killing gays, not only physically but emotionally and psy­chologically, long before AIDS was thought about. said a representative of the Montrose Guest Recovery House, 401 Avondale. There is a definitive need for some kind of treatmenVcare center in Montrose for gay alcoholics - a place where they can feel comfortable about their sexual orien­tation and be given the breathing space to begin to put thefr lives back together - and up until this month, that place was the recovery house. But it's existence is severely threatened at this moment by the enemy of all public service programs - lack of funds. Initial funding has run out, and although grant applications are in pro­cess, nothing as yet has been forthcoming. The center can no longer afford to pay its otaff, and the next thing to go will be the house, itself, and with it the positive foun­dation for the many livea it has touched. It has been oupported through dona· tions, resident fees, 1parse grants and per· petual garage sales, but the funds for on·going work are exhausted, and the cen· ter facea a financial crisis situation. An appeal to the community is the last resort, but neceaaary, said the director. "I had one man come in off the street," said dfrector Suzanne Baggett, "and all he had was his college diploma. No clothes except what he was wearing. No identifi· cation. No money. Nothing. Just this diploma that he held on to to prove that he was somebody. When people have been sick with alcoholism and have literally lost everything - family, friends, all material goods - they have nothing to start over with . The house helps fill that gap." The house accepta people off the street who want to atop drinking and take con· trol of their lives again. Some of them come in sick and drunk and stay foronJy a matter of days, said Baggett, but some remain. These attend meetings, stay sober, begin the oftentimes painful pro­cess of learning to know themselves-fac­ing their weak:neues and learning to accept them - eat regularly, sleep regu­larly in decent! unha88eled surroundings, and after recovering enough of their health and pride to face the world, seek employment. The center is always full, the director said, with persons in different phase& - just coming in, looking for work, prepar­ing to leave. It has served some 48 men and women, and of that number (the per­sona that have stayed in touch), 34 are still living aober. The house takes persons in off the otreet that want help, persona that can no longer cope with there own drink­ing problems in a home atmosphere and peraone on referral. It currently has a pop­ulation of 13. "Alcoholism is chronic and results in rapid physical deterioration," said Bag· gett. "If these people don't come for he''" some of them are literally going to die from it." And once the disease of alcoholism takeo charge of a person's life, the picture that is painted is usually not a pretty one. "I knew I drank too much," said Laura (not her real name), "but I didn't know how to deal with it. I thought I was des· tined to wake up under bridges. I woke up one morning (when otaying with friends) and my shirt was all ripped up. I didn't know why." .Aa it blrned eut, Laura had been involved in a fight with an ex-lover. "Drunka are extremely emotional," she said. "You always think you are thinking your best when you have been drinking. But all my beat thinking I've usually ignored anyway. It's like, 'don't confuse me with facts.' I really didn't think I had a choice. I'd pray. Even when Iwasa junky I'd pray. 'God, please, I've got to have this fix in five minutes' or 4God., please, let this person next to me buy me another drink.' And I'd always get what I prayed for. I never let myself have more than five days at a time without drugs or alcohol," she said. Now Laura is making a new beginning. The first month at thecentercoata$50, she said, and after the resident gets a job it jumps to $50 per week, which includes room, board and a supportive atmosphere for a drying-out alcoholic/ drug abuser. When Joe arrived at the center, he'd spent the past three nights passed out drunk in back of a bar. His last roommate had kept his clothes and had thrown him out, screaming, 0 You drink too much." The people at the recovery houaegave him clean clothes and said they could show him how to live without alcohol. There he saw Ralph. He'd known Ralph from living in the streets, but Ralph looked different­he'd been sober eight days. That wao 60 days ago for Ralph, and he is now planning to get an efficiency apart­ment, and he has his old job back. 0 This place is exactly what I needed," he said. He said the atmosphere, because it is for gay1, took away some of the stigma and pres1ure which would pol8ibly be encoun­tered in a nongay alocholic recovery cen­ter. Alcoholism is only the symptom of a greater psychological trauma. Part of the treatment by attending Alcoholic Ano­nymous meetings at the house and work· ing through the 12 steps to becoming a person who has control of the disease, instead of the other way around, helps the deeper individual problems. Jerry came to the center from the street, a prostitute, still not 2l ·yeara-old, who had been in fo1ter homes and adolescent cen­ters oince childhood. "I want to learn to live independently with aobnety,"heaaid. "Drinking like I did is just insanity. I thought my live wae at the rock bottom and could never be anything but that, but I realize now it doesn't have to be. I still have a lot of resentment, a lot of confusion, and I'm looking for a job, but I think I can work through it. When I came in here, I was just the classic drag queen, and I have to do a lot of work on that and analyze my sexuality. I'm letting my eyebrows grow out," he said with a smile. "Nobody can do for gays exactly what this center is doing the way they do it. We really need it for all the others out there like ua. The people here are fair." For Jim, the center was another step in discovering himself. "I had always been involved in relationships, never had a chance to just be me. The last one I was in, I drank too much, and my lover shot speed. Needless to say, it didn't work. Now I can be with myself and be okay, and I have a deep feeling of spirituality. I pray a lot. Some people think, •wen, we're all going to hell anyway,' when life gets that bad, but it's not true. God is forgiving of the things we do to ourselves. And I'm grateful that I have found a higher power, whatever I choose it to be that can get me through.'' Getting through is the moot important part for a recovering alcoholic. As the cen· ter'a AA philosophy states, one day at a time. Unfortunately, however, that is how it ia presently being funded - one day at a time. One of the seven board of directors said that funds are expected after the first of the year from a grant, but for the present, "I told them if we can stay together long enough to put up the donated Christmas tree, maybe we can make it." The center has all the neceBBary certifications and licenses to serve in the capacity it does. .. We have Iota of encouragement, we know there i1 a need, we know the treatment is succeHful, we have referrals. This p~ gram is run on the lowest conceivable budget.'' Right now, the center needafood, clothing, office supplies, linens, garage sale item•, jobs for the residents and the biggy - money. Anyone who would like to assist in the work or who haa a desire to quit drinking ohould contact the Montroa• Gue1t Recov­ery House, 401 AV'Ondale, 52'1-881 3. West Hollywood Strikes Back: N ongays Organize ~r. ~~~i;E~t!~1ce Many posters announcing the first public rally of the newly formed Heterosexual Society of West Hollywood were ripped down from utility poles by county sheriffs and gays prior to the Oct. 9 event in this highly concentrated gay neighborhood of Los Angeles. The sheriffs were concerned about defacing public property, and the gays of what sounded like an anti·gay group in the making. That was not the case according to the group's founder, Larry Carpenter, a West Hollywood graphic designer. "We just want to see a balance in our community," said Carpenter. "West Hollywood has become a gay Disneyland attracting a lot of outsiders into hanky codes and unusual behavior. The financial and political for­ces here strongly lean towards the gays. There are no bars or restaurants here for u1 straight people." Carpenter spoke with the hurting pangs of an isolated man in an all-gay ghetto. uwe need to set up social alternatives for heterosexuals in West Hollywood,'' he said. 14I would like to see a coexisting with gays; we just want to see a balance. The gays have stepped out of their closet, now we want to help the otraighta set out of their front dooro, but many are frightened. A lot of them fear and hate fags. Gays affront the sensibilities of a lot of elderly people here. Many parents are concerned about their teenage kids being propositi­oned on the streets. They tell me they're tired of seeing faggots in the alleys and all over the park. I understand their concerns, and I think the West Hollywood Hetero­sexual Society can help lighten them up.'' The rally turned out to be more of a social outing. A buffet lunch was served, a couple of speeches were presented, and three rock bands, plus a woman musician , provided entertainment. There was also an information table and a softball game to round off the event. Two hundred people were on hand, buttons and t-shirts were sold, and a newsletter, the "Hetero Herald," with several gay community advertisers, was distributed free. "Straight people are part of this com­munity, too," said Carpenter, "that's why we've already approached the Gay Pride organizers to have our own fl oat in next year's parade. As far as I know, they said , .. e'd be welcome." Italians Lighten Up on Gays ~r. ~i~h:r:! ~~~te Italians are tolerant in the abstract towards the fact of gay men and lesbians, according to a recent nationwide survey­but don't want their beat friends or their daughter• or eons to be one. A joint survey conducted by the city of Turin and by the Sandro Penna Founda­tion (a gay studies group) found that while 70 percent of the adult population believed Italian society was too harsh in its atti· tudea towarde homosexuals, and 50 per· cent believed uthe plight ofhomoaexuals" should be eased, three of every four Ital­ians said they would do anything neces· aary to change the sexual orientation of their offspring from gay to straight. In other response&, only half of those surveyed could define the word homosex­ual properly, but 80 percent knew what 0 eay" meant. And in a country whose Po~in·residence: continues to condemn homosexuality, only 4 percent of Italians opposed the Pontiff'• attitude. The survey, firatofita kind in Italy,alao found that while an overall majority equated gay life with drug abuse, sexual ~nda;;~.~~~~o~~l:s~:~~'t:"o1f::;,"nhl ents under 30 yeara of age thought homo­=~~ i~r:1aaT~ptable and a normal OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 .. All Rights Reserved@ 1983 • Halloween Costume Contest 12 Midnight-Saturday, Oct. 29 1st Prize, Best Costume: Trip to Acapulco 2nd Prize ????, 3rd Prize ???? 1022 Westheimer NEW D.J. WAYNE BARTON J 528-8851 10 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 28, 1983 Gay Lobby Head Resigns ~~~~;e.,o~.., Following many months of criticism by Aduocau publisher David Goodstein and Washington's syndicated gay columnist Larry Buah, the Gay Rights National Lob­by's executive director Steve Endean haa handed in hia resignation and will be Jeav· ing hia office sometime between the next three to six months, allowing for a smooth transition for his replacement. GRNL's board of directors established a search committee to look for Endean's replace­ment and announced they would also look into the organization's structure to see if it will continue in its current form. One po&· sibility, supported by GRNL board member Jean O'Leary, might involve a merger with the National Gay Task Force. In a lengthy letter handed over to GRNL'a board Oct. !Sin Chicago, Endean explained how the heavy barrage of criti· ciam leveled at him by Bush and the Advo­cate hampered hie effectiveness in continuing as executive director. The charges of incompetence weren't readily accepted by many observers, who cited what they thought was an apparent lack of concrete evidence. Nevertheless, Endean told the GPA that he was continu­ally receiving phone calls and letters from Advocate readers and others asking for explanations of his performance. Some observers think it has been excel­lent. In the five years since Endean has held GRNL'1 top poeition, the organiza­tion roee from a desk in someone else's office to a three-story town house on Capitol Hill, from one employee to 10, and from a bank balance of $9 to an annual AIDS Federation Sets Agenda The steering committee of the Federation of AIDS Related Organizations met in New York recently to determine the pur­pose, structure and program implementa­tion of the group, as well as hear progress reports and plan future agendas. The fed­eration was formed at the Second Annual AIDS Forum in Denver, June 1983, and represents some 53 organizations nation­wide. The committee members reaffirmed the federation's purposes, including information-sharing at all levels to avoid duplication of efforts and formation of pol­icy guidelines for unified lobbying action nationwide. No additional programs will be undertaken, according to a spokesman, and the goals will be accomplished through the Lobby Project and the Resource Clearinghouse, as determined in Denver. The committee affirmed its com­mitment to gender parity, representation of persona with AIDS at all levels and open, nondiscriminatory membership. The committee elected Matt Redman and Bernice Goodman to chair the federa­tion. Redman is director of the AIDS Project/Los Angeles, and Goodman is preoident of the National Gay Health and Education Foundation. In addition, a five-member coordinating committee was formed, composed of the co-chairo, Lobby Project Committee Chair Paul Popham, Resource Cleannghouse Committee Chair Caitlin Ryan and an as­yet- unnamed person to represent persons with AIDS. The committee voted to remain a loose coalition and would not issue statements on policy, other than federal funding. A plan for regional representation was adopted enabling the membership to grow to 11. At present, seven local AIDS organi­uttions from throughout the country sit on the committee and represent seven geo­graphic areas The Lobby Project hired Gerald Connor to act on the federation's behalf for sub­otantial increases in federal spending for AIDS rO<!~~r~h Connor is also the FARO lobbY1$t e.n4 \till 'Wbr for tl\e Libby Pro' ject on• comdtant. Dani. income well over $300,000. The active involvement in the political campaigns of friends and the lobbying for sponsors of gay rights legialation has been especially effective. Recently Senator Ernest Hol­Jinga of South Carolina became the eighth co-sponsor of the Senate's gay righta bill, and Representative Mo Udall of Arizona became the 73rd co-sponsor of the house version. Among Endean's major achievements was the creation of the National Conven­tion Project in 1980 which coordinaled a nationwide plan to involve open more gay men and women in both Republic and Democratic conventions. One miatake Endean probably did make, according to one source, was the letting go of David Goodstein'• friend Jim Foster from his GRNL position. It had been speculated that Foster is probably Goodstein'& candidate to replace Endean. Commenting on the Endean resigns~ tion, Larry Bush said, "Endean unques­tionably put a focus on Washington that was not there before he arrived. His own drive was to build support for the federal gay righta bill. As more immediate needs emerged, such as AIDS, he was unable to reset his priorities. At the same time, the emergence of the gay community made it important for gay leaders to take the com­munity into their confidence and repres­ent them. And Steve was unable to do that as well." Bush expre88ed concern for GRNL's present financial situation. He said they are currently $55,000 in debt, owe $12,000 in back payroll taxes and are faced with having to lay off three people from the support otaff. He also felt the moat impor­tant agenda for GRNL righta now should be lobbying for AIDS funding and that Endean was not responding to that. Thia reporter also spoke with a field dep­uty for Congresoman Edward Roybal (D­Calif.) who, ao a member of the Appropriations subcommittee, drafted a successful proposal to increase federal AIDS spending by 66 percent in 1984. The deputy, Erin Lorber, said he has tried unsucceBSfully on a number of occasions to aolicit help from GRNL in lobbying Congress for the AIDS proposal. "I think at that time AIDS was not high on their agenda," said Lorber. "My calls to Endean were not returned, and it was very frustrating. We've had much better coop­eration from the Nation] Gay Task Force." Among the people upaet with the Bush and Goodstein campaign has been Phila­delphia Gay News editor Mark Segal who accused Bush of being a "payroll prosti­tute" of the Advocate. Bush's columns also appear in a number of other gay peri­odical•. He, in turn, has accused Segal of plagerism and pirating hie news coverage, while attacking the Gay News' defense of En dean. One board member, Frank Kameny of Waahington, D.C., hopes to talk Endean out of resigning. Another supporter is Los Angelea activiot Morris Kight who said,"! am launching a national telephone cam­paign to gay leaden to muster support and convince Endean to reverse his decision. He doesn't deserve the kinds of attacks he baa received. Not that I'm completely happy with the preaent otatus ofGRNI.. I would like to see it develop a nationwide dues-paying membership and democrat­ize itaelf, so the work of the lobby could be made that much easier." Goodotein hao been widely criticized for attempting to be a power broker in the gay community, of needing to control an organization in order to support it. It was Goodatein, however, who brought forth the idea of establiahing GRNL at the Chi­cago invitational conference in 1976. Shortly thereafter, Goodstein wrote in the Advocate that he could no longer support the organization that he had founded, because it was going in directions he didn't approve of. In the next few months, a great many people will be watching GRNL's executive .-rch and reeltaJllinat!on oomlnittee IO see what recommend~tions. they bring forth . SALUTE WIZARD '83 Friday, Oct. 28 Private Party 7-10pm Open to Everyone 10pm-till .. . HALLOWEEN WITCHES BREW SPECIAL All Day Sunday & Monday, Oct. 30& 31 Orange Well Drinks 50¢ Black Well Drinks 50¢ · HALLOWEEN COSTUME CONTEST Midnight Halloween, Monday, Oct. 31 $$ Cash Prizes $$ + Bottles of Champagne $1 Beer Bust 4-8pm Sunday, 8- 11pm Thursday 1318 Westheimer 521-3475 Open daily 10am-2am TEXAS RENECADES 2 Levels of Hot Men-2 Bars-Twice the Fun MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD Linda "Lulu" Simpson \ announces IJ(Q)lfl> (Q)[F 'iJI}=(]~ i}=(](Q)[L~ 0$ fM©W ©IP'~fM ~ ~ 3 Plus 2 Revue Featuring Show Director Ron Sioux with Robbie Roberts & Tracey starring Madelynne Garett Mitchell an'.:Vi=~!11'11i~.!d~ Diana Wright Sunday, 4pm MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL, Bpm HOURS Mon-Fri 10-2 HAPPY Saturday 7-2 HOURS Sunday 12_2 Mon-Fri 10-7 Saturday 7-: 1 . [!]_ -1!1 I MAGNIFIQUE I I Creative Ha ir Designs • European • Cosmopolitan • Nu-Wave • Free Consultation • Walk-Ins Welcome 1---2 FOR 1·---i I Bring this personal invitation with I I a friend and receive two haircuts I I for the price of one. I I expir?s 11-30-83. : L __ - -MAGNIFIQUE-- - _ ...J 2528 Kinaston at Westheimer (one Sl'ock west of Shepherd) Houston 524-0672 THE NEW FULL SERVICE SALON IN RMR OAKS m- ~_J_:l~~~:l_~ __ 1 0 Regular Subscription $30 D Trial Subscription $15 D Send me more information, please. Name _________________ ~ Addros"-----------------~ City.c__ ________ State __ Z1p ____ _ Type of Computer _ _____________ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 ..--G--R--E--E--K--- ~ . G EN ERAL REPAIR. AUTO ~ ISLAND ~ Open 11am-11pm Monday-Friday 6-11 Saturday Parking next door Fine Greek Food, Seafood & Steaks Cocktalla 522-7040 302 Tuam WE ACCEPT AMEX, MC & VISA z () -i c mz z C: 0 -:o: * Winterize iii Cooling s249s ~ ~ * Alllanment 52495 ~ o moatlJ.s . cars a: ag * Free ~ Front End Check~ ~ wM~~~ ~ ~ 1411 TAFT-522-2190 ~ e AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • ~ We feature ... • All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Vodka, 1.75 liter, $7.69 Jamie '08 Scotch, 1.75 liter, $11.79 McCormick Blended American Whiskey, 1 75 liter, $9.89 Rene Junot red or White French Wine, 750ML, $1 .79 1402 Welch at MAsrJi~AcARo Waugh Drive AMERICAN EXPRESS 529-9964 Join us for a GET ACQUAINTED BREAKFAST SPECIAL, 99¢, weekdays 2 eggs, bacon & toast 808 LOVETT ..._ ___ SOerpveinng WBereeakeknfadsst,, OLurdnecrhs, tDoi nGnoe r ____. . ..._ ______ ope5n2 17a-1m0-1150 pm 12 MONTROSE VOICE / OCT. 28, 1983 Verbal Abuser of Gay Women Sent to Prison Northampton, Ma ... (JGNA)-A 23-year­old man who admitted making threaten­ing telephone calls to gay women has been sentenced to a prison term under a state law forbidding violations of civil rights. Robert Kremensky received a one-year sentence in the Hampshire County House of Correction, but Judge Alvertus J. Morse suspended all butthreemonthsofthesent­ence. Kremensky had been found guilty of three charges of violating the civil rights of three women, after he admitted making a number of telephone calls to gay women He may be the first person sentenced to prison under the Massachusetts civil rights law passed in February 1980, said District Attorney W. Michael Ryan. "There is no way we were expecting this," said Sherman Boyson, a gay acti­vist who was present at the time of the sentencing. "For the first offense, with no prior record, we thought for sure he'd get off with a suspended sentence and cousel­ing. I'm elated." Kremensky was also placed on probe· tion for four years. Rejected AIDS Victim Dies in San Francisco ~(. fli~°w'l;e ~j:;s SAN FRANCISO-Morgan MacDonald, a gay man with AIDS whose abrupt transfer from a Florida hospital to San Francisco touched off a bitter controversy, died Oct. 20 at San Francisco General Hos­pital. He was '1:1, City health director Dr- Mervyn Silver­man said that MacDonald, who arrived here from Gainesville Oct. 4, died at 9:45 a.m. (12:45 p.m. EDT) at the hospital's recently-opened AIDS ward. "We are all saddened," Silverman told reporters, adding, however, that Maci)o. nald had apparently been near death when he arrived in San Francisco after a chartered flight from Florida. Shanda Hospital, affiliated with the University of F1orida at Gainesville, flew MacDonald by a private Lear jet "to make sure that he got the best possible treat­ment," according to hospital officials. Silverman and San Francisco Mayor Diane Feinstein, however, accused Shands officials of "dumping" MacDo­nald here and, by doing so, committed a breach of medical ethics, with Feinstein branding it "outrageous and inhuma ne." Silverman, who visited the patient Wed· nesday night at San Francisco General, described MacDonald at that time as being "barely able to talk., .. He was a shell of a man "It was clear from hie condition when he arrived," Silverman continued, "and then it worsened (and Silverman then knew) that he would not be leaving the hospital (alive)." The mayor's press secretary, Thomas Eastham, contacted Florida Governor Robert Graham by telephone to inform him of MacDonald's death. Eastham also notified Graham that Silverman will send a medical assessment of the case to Gra­ham's office. MacDonald was a resident of San Fran­cisco but was stricken with AIDS while visiting Florida. "I'm glad San Francisco was there to care for him," Britt continued. "I'm sure in his last days he got the kind of treatment his family would have wanted him to have." It was not immediately known whether family or fnenda of MacDonald had been informed of his death. Reporters covering the case were denied acce88 to MacDonald, apparimtly ~au-e Qf his deteriorating oondition Every Friday, Al/Over Montrose, The Voice Informs, Entertains Thousands. The Montrose Voice is read each week by nearly 30,000 in Houston. That's thousands more than any other gay or Montrose community publication. When you have a message to deliver to Montrose, put it in the Voice ... the professional, dedicated, community-involved Montrose Voice. number 1 in Montrose OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Local Witch Celebrates Sabbat; Creates Love Potion By Thomae-John Grieve& I once found myself listening to a talk show on KTRH where the host was lead­ing a discussion on homosexuals. A man called in, puzzled that the subject was worth air time since "there couldn't be more than five homosexuals in Houston." Mercy! But on the other hand, if! were to ask you, "How many witches do you sup­pose are in Houston?" you might answer "none" or "a few." Truth is, I know of over a hundred, and chances are there are sev­eral communities of witches lhaven'tmet. I am a practicing Houston witch, and Hal­loween (which is our religious Sabbat of Samhain) is literally our time to come out of the "broom closet." For many, witchcraft is a religion and for others a practice of an ancient Nature awareness which allows us to attune our­selves productively with the earth's ener­gies. Witchcraft has become increasingly popular among gays because of its empha· sis on the male and female aspects of God and its very healthy attitude toward sex. Sex is a wondrous sacrament to be respected, yet to be enjoyed. In ancient days, couples would make love in their fields to encourage the plants to grow! For women and men, the tradition of the God· dess helps us understand the female aspect of ourselves that traditional West· ern religions ignore. Of the eight Wiccan festivals of the year, Samhain (Halloween) is most important. It is the ending of our natural year and the beginning of the dark introspective time of Winter. It ia the time when we have found it moat easy to communicate with the "dead" who are, of course, truly alive but in another dimension. Seances and gentle meditations in remembrance will yield loving confirmations that our friends are very aware of us and are helping us still. This is a wonderful weekend to set aside some time to send our love to those gays who have died through the ignorance and fear of othera and to those who have made themselves pubJicly vulnerable to help gay rights. Witches believe in reincarna· tion and know that we consciously choose our sexual lifestyle. This is a time of year to send love to those who have died to aid them in making their decisions for their next life. One thing that witches are famous for is love potions. I am a very sane and respected person; besides teaching courses in the evening at my metaphysical center, I work in the day time at the University of Texas Medical School. So when I tell you that such things can actually be of use, perhaps you will decide to try it just for the experience. The potion involves a love wine. You may as well make a large jug of it, because it's very nice to share a cordial of it when close friends stop by to visit. Make three liters and mix in these herbs in this ratio: to one pint of red wine add one teaspoon of Juniper berries and one fourth teaspoon of basil. Prepare a clean dark place for it to sit during the next seven nights when you chant over it. Every evening, take out the jug and caress it while chanting: Jn this wide world there lives to· day/ S / he who makea my heart to play.!Where e're you are,/What e're you do/ Know ye deep my loue for you./The perfect time, the perfect place/ For us to meet,/Oh, pleaae make haate. (Chant three times at least.) Munching's a Billion Dollar Industry Twenty-two billion dollars may sound like a lot of money, but that's what we spent at the grocery store last year-on snack food al~e~t averages out to about $100 for every man, woman and .child-not includ· ing popcorn at the movies. Candy io the most popular munchy, fol ­lowed by cookies, potato chips and nut.A, reports Snack Food Magazine. On the seventh night. strain the wine and store in the refrigerator. On the night of the full moon, arrange for a few hours alone. Take a sensuous bath by candle-­light while fantasizing about the perfect lover. Pick the most sensuous name you've heard and call the person by that name. The name will become a symbol for the ideal lover. When you awake in the mom· ing, let yourfirstthoughtbe "Oh, (name), I hope you slept well. Hope you have a nice day and hope we meet soon. I love you." You will begin your relationship psychi­cally before you even meet. This encour­ages ulove at first sight." After your sensuous bath, dress in your best or remain naked and go to your bed· room which you have carefully cleaned and arranged. Pour a glaBB of the love wine and look into your eyes and toast yourself for being so loveable. Toast your new lover. Fantasize about how you met (begin to think in past-tense terms, as an accomplished fact). Make yourself comfor­table and really get into the reality of the fact that your ideal love is alive and on the earth and, like you, hungry for true love. .Then play a time game and project your-self five years into the future and replay the wonderful times you've had together and how it keeps improving. If you begin to feel very sexual during this time, go ahead and encourage it, but try your beet not to orgasm. Direct all this energy toward your ideal lover. A very serious note here: please do not direct this to anyone you already know. To do so would be very manipulative and slip into the world of black magic. If you are infatuated with someone, direct your thoughts in this fashion: "someone juat like (name), or better." After all, you want the ideal lover, and you have been wrong before! So let the perfect one find you thia time. You can do thia for two more nights, if you feel the urge. You will begin to attract some very interesting vibrations from peo­ple. Good luck! Have a good Halloween. Grieves teaches courses in "white witch· craft" and tarot plus leads moon medita· tiona in the Rice University Village area. His a tu.dents encompaSB many sexual and religious paths. He is auailable kJ the gay community to be of magical and spiritual service, and can be contacted at Box 20()()7, Houston, TX 77225, (713) 630-0966. Ventur&-N Presents the 7th Annual Freakers Balll Sunday, 30 Oct. 1983, from 5pm, 2923 Main St., Houston Hot Men. Music, Munchies and Madness .. Takes Its Toll! Also: Coming Up Monday. Nov. 7, a Venture-N Bus Trip to the Moody Blues Concert. Veal Party! 14 MONTROSE VOICE/ OCT. 28, 1983 Whitmire to Address Montrose Community Mayor Kathy Whitmire will hold a com· munity conference on Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m. at the Masterson Branch of the YWCA, 3615 Willia, near the comer of Memorial and Waugh Drive. This conference will be moderated by City Councilman George Greanias and is designed to provide citizens with an oppor­tunity to share with the Mayor any ques­tions, concerns or suggestions they may have regarding the "many challenges fac­ing the City of Houston," said her pre88 release. SF Killer of Gays Gets Jail Without Parole ~(.~)'.~~~~!!" AB the result of a recent murder trial in San Francisco, killers who prey on gay men may face a rougher day in court. Such crimes have frequently gone lightly pun· ished because of claims by the killer that he acted in self-defense after being sexu­ally molested by his victim. That is what defense attorneys claimed happened to Dana Holley. In July 1981, Holley, then 19, murdered 51-year-old banker William Sink in Sink's posh San Francisco apartment where the two had gone after meeting in a bar. The former boxer contended that the older man was attempting to force him into having sex. According to public defender attorney Peter Keane, Holley behaved as though he were being raped which drove him into a rage. Keane also demonstrated some sex­ual confusion in Holley that, he claim, set off a panic in the young man. The result was the beating and stabbing to death of William Sink. Holley also admitted to pre­vious attacks on gay men. The jury, however, didn't buy Keane's arguments which were dubbed the "homo­sexual panic" defense. Holley was con­victed of first degree murder with special circumstances-due to the brutality of the killing. On July 29, he was sentenced to life imprisonment without chance of oarole. Though it is expected that Holley's sent· ence will be appealed, Ron Huberman, investigator for prosecuting attorney Paul Cummins, stated that the c88esets a prece­dent nonetheless that could alter the legal profession's handling of such cases. "They tried the 'homosexual panic' defense, and it didn't work. Once a defense like that begins to fall apart, it simply becomes less effective, and all defending attorneys take notice." The case had from the start pitted San Francisco's gay community against the public defender's office over the issue of homophobia being exploited in the case. At first, the defense claimed a $15,000 sur· vey showed that a fair trial was not possi­ble in San Francisco with its large gay population. After change of venue was denied, the defense then attempted to dis­miu gay men from the jury. Defense attor­ney Keane denied that it was a move against gays as a group, but did admit that "gays were excluded from the jury because of the publicity this case had received." After seven gay men were dis· missed by the defense-not because they were gay but because they said they had read accounts of the killing in the local gay papers-prosecutor Cummins pro· tested. Though the judge approved of Keane'a queations to jurors, said Huber· man, who is himself gay, "the point was made and the issue of excluding gays from the jury went into the trial record." One gay man was then seated on the jury. Chief public defender Jeff Brown, who has long been respected and supported in gay political circles. denied that Holley's defense was .. homophobic." At any rate. in light of the courtroom challenges to jury selection and Holley's subsequent conviction, killers of gay men may no longer go routinely unpunished . IHJ~!L!L©W~~INI il®~33 People Gambling with Frozen Dead Cryonics may be all the rage for people seeking life after death, but one expert calls the concept a crock. A California firm called "Trans Time" is currently watching over 10 "patients," and another 90 people have signed up to be frozen when they die. If you can't afford the $21,000 charge to freeze your whole body, the firm will lop off just your head and pack it in ice for a cut rate. The problem, according to Dr. David Robinson of the National Institute of Health, is that it won't work. He says that once you're frozen, ice crystals destroy the body's cells. But Trans Time is sticking to its guns, claiming science may one dizy overcome these problems. Says a Trans Time official in the Seattk Times, "You can't eay 'die."' Returning Life to Graveyards? It's getting so even the dead can't rest in peace-a New Orleans' citizens' group has teamed with the Catholic Church in a drive to clean up and beautify the city's ... graveyards. "We want to bring more life to the cemeteries," says a church spokesman in the Los Angeks Times. New Orleans' cemeteries are popular tourist attractions because of their above-ground tombs, walled vaults and extensive brick, marble and ironwork. However, they're also attractive to practitioners of voodoo and black magic, who perform rituals in the graveyards. But the biggest problem is muggers. One anthropologist was recently held up and robbed while exploring the cemeteries. Psychic Seeks Legitimacy A California p~ychic says there's too much mumbo-jumbo in her business, so she's offering certification exams for qualified soothsayers, reports the San Jose Mercury. Mary Pale~o, founder of the National Association of Psychic Practitioners, says her written and oral ex8:ms will give palm readers, numerologists and spiritual counselors an aura of legitimacy. Her mission, which Palerm? says ':'81Ile to her in a dream several years ago, is to debunk the myths about psychics. Palermo claims clall'Voyance is a skill, just like playing the violin. "When I hear a practitioner who says 'It's a gift from God,"' Palermo notes, "I want to vomit." ' Dead Man Elected Mayor of Ghost Town Under Mayor Daley, dead Chicagoans were said to make up a sizable portion of the electorate. But the tiny rocky mountain town of Ward, Colo., has gone a step further: it elected a dead man mayor, reports the Denver Post. One voter, who described himself as a friend of the deceased, says it was a good choice. After all, she says, "We're a ghost town and decided to elect a dead man to represent the silent majority." British Ghost Hunt Underway It pays to have a ghost in the house. Teacher's, the British whiskey company, has begun a serious investigation of 12 English pubs that are reportedly haunted, reports Parapsycho/Qgy Review. The ghost hunter will talk to patrons about the supposed spirits and visit the places after midnight. If the claims are substantiated, the company will award the pub's ;iroprietor nearly $2000. Talking to Dead Now Possible Forget mystics and mediums. If you want to talk to the dead, all you need is a short wave radio and a tape recorder. So says West German physicist Ernst Senkowski, who's been experimenting with his technique for five years. Senkowski says you simply take the short wave and recorder into a quiet room, set the radio dial between two stations, start the tape at fast speed, and ask for the dead person you want to hear from. Senkowski is certain he's picked up voices from the hereafter: "What you hear will not sound like a message at first," he warns in Weekend Magazine, "but if you play back the tape at a slow speed, you'll find a perfectly clear message." Coffin Racing Becomes New Sport The tiny town of Goodwater, Ala., has come up with a promotional idea which is-well, a bit macabre. On Oct. 8th the city held its firsk!ver "Slalom Casket Carry," reports the Kansas City Star. Coffin-making used to be Goodwater's biggest industry, but business has been terrible in recent years-hence the casket race. Teams of six pall-bearers carried a coffin over an obstacle course. A seventh member rode in the casket, trying not to spill a glass of water. This may sound bizarre, but as one city official explained, "One of the former casket companies now makes shelving, but we couldn't have a shelf toss." Wooden Stakes Aren't Neccessary Whether you've got bats in your belfry or just in your attic, the government wants to help. The Federal Consumer lnfomation Center now sells a book called House Bat Management, reports the New York Times. To bat-proof your home, simply seal any holes in the attic or elsewhere in the house. If you've already got bats, wait until the evening when they've gone out to feed and then seal up the entry points. A wooden stake through the heart is not necessary. Creative Hair Designs For Appointment Call 526-4494 3220 Yoakum at Westheimer Open Monday thru Saturday & Late Evenings TRAVEL CONSULTANTS 'iim&~ll ~~~~ tr~~~ 'ir~&~[L ~~~~li'&[KI]~ 'ir~&~[L ~©~~~trk~~ m&~lb ~~S)[!)J~tr&~~ A Full-Service Travel Agency for the Gay Community Houston Phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 f il MICATEX VIDEO PROPERTY inc IN VEN TORY SERVICE A DISCREET SERVICE FOR HOME AND BUSINESS •Video Tape Invent o ries of Insured Valuables, Homes and Furniture, Antiques, Automobiles, Company Fixed Assets and Vehicle Fleets •Document Home Improvements ·Additions • Video Histories of Property Development •Proof of Real Estate Property Condition Prior to Leasing '713) 669. 9355 OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 FREE BEER-ALL DAY 7 Days, Oct. 29-Nov. 4 af WEST PLAYLAND (old Keyboard) Mon.- Sat. 10am-till; Sunday noon-till 528-6988 Pool & Video Games 3012 Milam off Elgin One HOH ''fllAllT-ID· /l/D&." THE MOST IN DRY CLEANING 16 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 28, 1983 National AIDS Vigil Drew Only 1500 ~[.~~;~;>~ce The Oct. 8th National AIDS Vigil in Washington was unique in that no politi· clans or recognized gay leaders took the podium to address the 1500 people assembled. Only persons with AIDS were heard, and their message was personal and powerful. Clint Hockenberry, a vigil co-ordinator, said they were initially shooting for a gathering of 25,000 but reafued a few weeks prior to the event the numbers would be much leas. 0 A sense of denial has taken over gays in the last few months," he said. ''They are not supporting AIDS fund.raisers as they were only last spring." He cited the clisappointing turnouts at the Hollywood Bowl concert, New York Rodeo and a Washington event that drew one. tenth as well as five months ago. Nevertheless, the vigil was stirring, and 10,000 petition signatures were delivered to N.Y. Congressman Ted Weiss endors· ing the vigil's stated goals, including a demand for increased federal funcling for AIDS related research and health care. On Friday, Oct. 7, the day before the vigil, the Washington Post reported that "Weekend Vigils Are Set in 16 Cities to Call Attention to AIDS; Thousands Expected to March from Ellipse to Capitol Tomorrow." That same day, Mike Walsh, of the Gay Rights National Lobby, was coordinating a lobbying effort in the Capitol. Despite sponsorship by Senators Kennedy and Weicker and Mayors Fein­stein of San Francisco and Barry of Washington, D.C., as well as a number of gay organizations, the thousands didn't materialize. By midweek, the national coordinating office was in the proce88 of shutting down and unable to report on any of the event.a planned for the other 16 cities. Hocken­berry clid say that, at the last minute, New Orleans activists got their city council to pass a resolution endorsing the vigil, and the mayor bad agreed to address a gather­ing of vigil supporters in that city. A twi­light vigil was scheduled at a San Diego church, and the San Franciso Chronicle covered a press conference held on the Federal Building steps. The Chronicle article included a moving interview with a mother who was mourning her son, dead of AlDS on bis 26th birthday. Loe Angeles Human Relations Commis­sioner Morris Kight was at the vigil and reported it to be a .. stunning affair." The march passed in front of the White House to the west portico of the Capitol, and the light of the candles in the reflecting pool of the mall was inspiring. Kight said the numbers were unimportant. What was sig­nificant was the fact that the persons with AIDS were speaking out for themselves and that, through the wide television cov­erage, million• were made to listen. Council Candidate Would Initiate Gay Rights Ordinance Attorney Paul Funderburk, canclidate for At-Large Poeition No. 5 in the Houston City Council race, announced in a news release that he is advocating an ordinance which would outlaw discrimination in employment againat gay persons. "Gay persons in white collar jobs ... may find that after years of expensive edu­cation and satisfactory job performance, they are fired and blackballed in the only profeSBion for which they are trained, but all gay persons are equally vulnerable to this form of cliscrimination," Funderbuck stated. The attorney is also advocating a state law to protect gay legal rights which he would present to Harris County legisla­ton upon his election to the City Council. Councilman ANTHONY HALL As Our Friend, He Deserves Our Continued Support In 1980, Hall voted to repeal Houston's Cross Dressing Ordinance AT LARGE POS. 4 Although not endorsed by the GPC, he was recommended as the best candidate to the GPC by its own Political Action Screening Committee Paid for by the Anthony Hall for City Council Committee, 2713 Main, Houston, Texas 77002, J.E. Middleton Sr .. Treasurer Okies Propose Gay Ordinance Via GPA Wire Service After several months of study, the Human Rights Commission of Norman, Okla­homa, has proposed a change to the city code adding "sexual/ affectional prefer· ence" to the list of protected citizens. Cur­rently, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, sex, age, place of birth and handicap persons belong to this group. Steve Keller at the University of Okla­homa and author of the bill said that this change was long overdue. At their Aug. 25 meeting, the commission unanimously approved the ordinance to be sent to the city council for approval, although several members of the commission did not hold much hope of it passing due to a great number of religious groups in Norman that were bound to be against it. The ordinance would protect gays from descrimination in employment, public housing and accomodations. A group calling themselves the Human Rights Coalition (HRC) was formed the night the ordinance passed the commis­sion. Secretary Cal Thixton said that the group was busy tracking down organiza­tions and businesses thathavestatements on record securing gay rights that have members or affiliations in Norman. "Currently we have about two dozen groups (that were) willing to speak at the city council Oct. 25. Groups like the National Organization for Women, Oklahomans for Human Rights, Womens' Political Caucus and more. We are also trying to get AT&T, 7111 and Shakelee. We have hundreds of flyers and letters out, but we are running out of time. We are trying to approach this rationally, although I know our opposition will be using 'scare tactics' like they have in the past." Mr. Thixton was hoping they would get enough support by the Oct. 25 deadline, but he was confident and said that if they lose, that they will just try again. Pediatrics Feel Doctors Should Still Try to 'Convert' Gays According to a recently released policy of the American Academy of Pediatrics, doc­tors should continue trying to "convert" adolescent.a who are troubled by their homosexuality. The new policy rekindled the debate as to whether homosexuals can become hete­rosexuals through treatment, although the group deemed to no longer consider homosexuality a "mental disorder," according to an Associated Press news story. Dr. David Kessler, a gay psychiatrist and professor at the University of Califor­nia at San Francisco, questioned why doc­tors think they can change a person's sexual orientation. He questioned if con­verting a gay person into a nongay person would be any easier than transforming a nongay person into a gay person. "That's exactly how easy it would be to do it the other way around," he said. He quoted that there is no known case in medical history of any gay successfully converting to heterosexuality. He further questioned why young people who are troubled with guilt about being gay should be "lead on a wild goose chase to convert, when that's not possible." Director of the Adolescent Medical Cen­ter in Levittown, Pa., Dr. Kenneth Slad­kin, predicted that some 29 million youngsters between 13 and 19 are gay and have yet to be heard from . He said their goal is to help the practi­tioner to understand gay persons as "nor mal." Researcher Seeking Abused Women Profeseionals working with sexually abused children estimate that one out of every three of four girls are sexually vic­timized by an adult male, said Dr. Pamela Cole, a University of Houston psycholo­gist who is studying the effects of child sexual abuse that may continue into wom­anhood. Cole reports that 57 percent of the women participating in her study were victimized by their own fathers or father­figures, and another 30 percent were Radio Censors OK Falwell's Demise ~[. ~~~ii1~e?~~ice Although no one felt the giant tremor, calls were coming in to Los Angeles radio station KHJ for more details on Oct. 11 when the station began broadcasting the results of a simulated earthquake that hit the city at 8.3 on the Richter scale. The fictitious report was staged to test the pre­paredness of various government depart­ments. What was unusual was the description of the damages. Two catastrophe coormnators from the Department of Civil Defense and the Los Angeles Fire Department were on the air. They reported on the collapse of the four­level freeway exchange downtown, and the liquification of a large area around the L.A. marina. Most startling was their report of an estimated 10,000 dead, including the Rev. Jerry Falwell, who was supposedly addressing 2000 members of the Moral Majority at the L.A. Convention Center when the roof collapsed killing everyone inside. GPA was unable to find out who wrote the scenario, but it was discovered that the prepared script had pa88ed through a number of the station's censors before air­ing. abused by men they knew well. However, to better understand how the degree of sexual experience contributes to long-term difficulties and succe&Bful adjustment, Cole is particularly in need of volunteers who, as children, had sexual experiences with men other than their fathers. She notes, uThe abuse may be a single episode of sexualized contact, such as being shown pornographic material, being 'peeped at' while dressing or bathing, kissing or stroking which made the child feel uncomfortable, as well as fondling and rape. "So many women call who think their experiences with a stranger, neighbor or distant relative won't interest us," Cole said. "But, on the contrary, their input is very valuable and necessary if we are to understand and tackle child abuse related issues in the community." Although the study cannot be completed until more women are interviewed, she already has found a number of similarities among sex abuse victims. "A large major­ity of these women have never told even their own mothers about their experiences because they felt ashamed and feared being blamed for participating," she said. "More emphasis, therefore, should be placed on alerting parents to their child· ren's vulnerability," notes Cole. "And more attention should be placed on the difficulties parents must face when they suspect or learn that their children are being sexually abused, particularly if the abusers are familiar to them. When the father is the perpetrator, the mother is all the more critical to preventing and ending the abuse, even though she may feel emo­tionally tom between protecting her hus­band and her child," Cole adds. The professor, who plans to use the study results to develop prevention strate­gies for this type of abuse, urges potential volunteers to call 749-1855 for more infor­mation. All inquiries and interviews are treated confidentially. CAROLYN DAY HOBSON HOU§~Olf CITY COUNCIL OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Corne cpQay with CU.s ti~b dfu.wthov1.1.-dlou.1ton 9u:tU 77006-':JZQ-SZQQ {)p.Ul ::;rffon.Ja!:/ ihtu ~aiu.,Ja!J 11am.-7pm. Dpw ti[[ 9pm on. :11l.,n.l..y E Clf.uud"!f CAROLYN DAY HOBSON is a Texas Southern graduate, Lawyer, Mother, Houstonian, as well as a former Law Clerk for the Federal Trade Commission, District Court Referee, and Lecturer at University of Houston Clearlake. CAROLYN DAY HOBSON is an Officer in the National Bar Association, former President of the Black Women Lawyers' Association, Treasurer of the Houston Lawyers' Association, and a Member of the Houston Commission on Education. CAROLYN DAY HOBSON is involved in our City, committed to defending our rights, and dedicated to bringing better representation to City Council, Position Two At Large. CAROLYN DAY HOBSON needs your vote and your help in her campaign ... please join us. CAROLYN DAY HOBSON CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS 3303 Louisiana, Suite 216, Houston 77006 TO VOLUNTEER ............ please call 741-2594 POSITION TWO AT LARGE 18 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 28, 1983 Communities Within the Gay Community By Brian McNaucht A Disturbed Peace 0 There's no auch thing as a gay and les­bian community," some people argue. "There are only men and women who share a sexual orientation and oppres­sion." It is true that our community is difft!rent than the black, Hispanic and Jewish com­munities. The frustration expressed by those who feel no sense of community reflects their expectations that we should have the same sense of bonding that they imagine blacks, Hispanics and Jews have. us grew up feeling isolated, most of us feel alienated from heterosexual expectations, and most of us know that our sexual orien­tation is enough to lose us a job, an apart­ment, an associate and a couple of teeth. We feel safe with other gay men and lesbi· ans when we are with them in neighbor­hoods, bars, restaurants, organizations and parties. That is community. Within that community, we form com­munities, based upon our sexual preferen­ces, our gender, our age, our race, our m 1!,~~~~~e~~~s:::.\0~!:e~:1~ Non-Alcoholic Beer then it would be fair to compare ourselves to the ethnic and racial communities. But gay men and lesbians are orphans, and our community is a collection of orphans. We have no patriarchy or matriarchy to proyjde us established leadership, as do those communities of people whose oppression is a family affair. We are like strangers who have been dropped on an island together. Because we have no tradi­tion, no relevant laws or no history of organized struggle, we have no basis for determining who will lead us and what our priorities will be. To further complicate our attempt at buiJding a community, our rejection by family-our orphaned status-prompts us to demand that we be each other's loving and supportive sister and brother, mother and father, doting aunt and accepting grandfather. When we hurt from a loss, we can't understand why we are not com­forted by those with whom we carried picket signs in the morning. When we seek to celebrate our joys, we can't understand why our gay brothers and sisters are not as excited as we are. And when we are criticized for something we do in service to the community, we feel betrayed by Hfam­ily" members who we think should applaud and thank us as we imagine our own brothen and sisters would do. When gay men and lesbians lament, ''There is no gay and lesbian community," they are frequently saying, "! expected more, and I am disappointed. There is no community as I would have it." Clearly, there is a community of gay men and lesbians, and there are gay and lesbian communities. We are a community because of our shared oppression. Most of The latest craze to hit the beer market tastes great, is leas filling and won't get you drunk. Non-alcoholic beers look and taste like the real thing, but the alcohol is removed after brewing. At least four brands of the benign brew are on the market, and they're selling well, reports USA Today. A Swiss import called "Mousey" has sold 3'h million bottles in 40 states since May. World War Three Will Not Be Sponsored ABC television is having a hard time lin­ing up sponsors for World War Three, reports the New York Post. The network says it hasn't been able to sign up even one advertiser for The Day After, a two-hour TV special graphically depicting life after a nucJear war. The show is scheduled to air November 20. And, according to ABC, it's one of the most horrifying things ever to appear on television. The network has gone to great lengths to sell commercial time-appealing directly to civic-minded corporate presi­dents and offering to run all the ads before the bomb drops. But the program has drawn fire from conservatives who view it as a communist-inspired plot to promote nuclear disarmament. One ABC executive admits the film is "not everyone's cup of tea," but says even without sponsors, the show will ao on. Cartoon Book for Christmas religion, our income, our politics, our pro­fession, our relational status, our taste, our family backgrounds and our location. There are tribes within the tribe. We become disappointed and disillusioned when tribal members fight with other tri· bal members. "Why is that low-income, athei.st, anarchist, boy-lover so critical of this middle-income, Catholic, liberal Democrat, genitally-exclusive member of a couple? Aren't we both gay?" Instead of recognizing our differences, we often become bitter that a gay man, who should know better, joins the ranks of Jerry Fal· well, Anita Bryant, the Church and all of the straight bullies from our youth who loom in our mind as "them." There is, however, as much cohesive­ne88 and vitality in the gay and lesbian community as there is in any other. It is our expectations which get in the way. Black, Hispanic and Jewish Americans have as many differences among them­selves as we do. Perhaps, though, they expect leu because they have a longer his­tory of building community. We too often expect that we will all love and support one another at all times in the battle against the homophobic menace. We expect that we will all agree upon our needs and work coHectively, generously and without criticism toward meeting those needs. We too often expect that any person who is gay or lesbian will support the cause by eating at our restaurants, buying our newspapers, donating money to our campaigns, patronizing our book­stores, marching in our parades and, at the very least, voting in the elections we deem critical. When we note that a full 10 percent of the general population is not eating, buying, donating, patronizing, marching and voting 0 the Gay Way," we become frustrated and bitter. I have felt that frustration and bitter· ness. On may occasions in the past, I have thrown up my hands with disgust, feeling that I had been wasting my time on a group of selfish, lazy, ignorant, heartless, spoiled people, many of whom took for granted the changes in gay and lesbian life they hadn't raised a finger to assist in. I too have lamented, "There is no gay and lesbian community." But I expected too much. I wanted a gay and lesbian Wal­ton's Mountain, and I felt I got a gay and lesbian Tower of Babel. Today, I celebrate our diversity and applaud our accomplishments. In 14 short years, we have created a strong, viable community which offers safety, support and hope, and we have created strong, via­ble communities which offer the freedom of individual expression in a family-like atmosphere. If a person is gay or lesbian, he or she can come out and be supported by a youth group, a colJege group, a parents group and a group for older gay men and women. You can be into leather, feathers, church, witchcraft, music, law, politics, anarchy, health, muscles or chubby peo­ple, and we have a group for you. There are gay and lesbian neighborhoods, restau­rants, bars, newspapers, recording stu­dios, bookstores and churches. If you like to march in the streets, the community provides that option. If you hate gay polit­ics, there are plenty of tribes who would welcome you. Our strength is in our diver­sity. When I first came out, I expected that every gay man and lesbian would love me and that I would love anyone who said they were gay. When I realized that not everyone thought I was the neatest thing since slice bread and that not everyone I met who was gay was someone I would want to hug, I changed my exj>ectations, and I began to build my own community. Is there a gay and lesbian community? It is what you make of it. 1983 by BrianM- - cN_a_ug-ht-, w-ho-li-ve-s -in Boston, and is a long.time gay activist in the Catholic Church. His monthly column appears here and in other gay publica­tions. Playboy Proposes Male Bunnies When New York's Playboy Club reopens early next year, some of the scantily-clad bunnies serving drinks may be men. Company executives are considering a proposal to add the male bunnies, and some old-timers are hopping mad about the idea. But many Playboy officials reportedly feel it's time to update the club's image, reports the New York Post. Alternate Publishing, the people who bring you Carlucci's works have appeared in Drummer and The collection is being released for the Christmas Drummer, the magazine for the S&M crowd, have The Advocate, and include, among other things, a look season. announced they'r~ publishing a book of cartoons by at the social differences in gay lifestyles, or as he titled Following are two of the cartoons which they Carlo Carlucci, titled He Ain't Heavy, He's My Louer. 1t, "The War Between the Machos and and the Sissies." allowed us to reprint. ·How dare you question our journalistic mtegnty and professional objectivity, you d1 gusttng httle perverted commie pinko fag?'" \1 f'E'r SUPPL I t<; "No, we don't have a pct Tom ju>t likes the smell of dog food on my breath y" British Boost Gay Rights By Lindsay Taylor International Gay New• Agency LONDON-Decisions made by the Social Democratic Party (SDP) at its conference in September leave the conservatives as the only British party without a policy on gay rights in England. The Council for Social Democracy, the SDP's ruling body, adopted a policy on citizen's rights which incorporates the European Convention of Human Rights and extends the provisions of the Conven­tion to cover discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation, age, lan­guage and physical or mental handicap. The Gay Socia.I Democrat Group, which has been working for the recognition of gay issues since the party was founded two years ago, was delighted at the deci­sion. A spokesman commented that "this is the climax of what we have been work­ing for. At last we have official recogni­tion . There is a lot more to do, but at least we have made our fint step." The SD P's partners in the alliance coali­tion, the Liberals, have had a policy on gay rights since 1975-the first time a major British party had adopted such a policy. But the issue had to be revived and reasserted at the Liberal Conference on Sept. 20 when Alex Carlile, the MP for Montgomery and the paty's new Home Affairs spokesman, disowned pe.rty pol­icy. The issue was raised when Rosemary Johnson, a member of the Campaign for Homosexual Equality National Execu­tive, asked why no mention of gay rights had been made in the party's last election manifesto. She further demanded to know what the party intended to do in the new Parliament in auppert of gay issues. Car­liJe a nswered that the Parliamentary Party had no policy on gay rights, and that gay i88ues were a matter for the con­sciences of individual MPs. He further out· raged pro·gay delegates by saying that the word "gay" was as much an "appalling misuse of the Eng1ish language" as the word 0 queer." Gay delegates, supported by the Young Liberals, immediately demanded an emer­gency discussion to reaffirm the party's position on gay rights. The assembly chairman said that he would need to see at least JOO delegates on their feet to per· suade him to discuss such a motion, whe­reupon more than 300 delegates rose in response. However, the motion for an emergency debate did not gain the necesssary two­thirds majority, but the iSBue showed the grass-roots suppert for gay rights within the party. Car and Jobs Creating Teenage Rebels Paclne New• Service A six.year study of nearly 60,000 people has come to some surprising conclusions about what does and does not turn kids into criminals. Among the findings: single-parent homes h~ve little to do with producing juvenile de_llnquents, ~nd J~v7 nile delinquency has httle to do with cnm1- nal behavior as an adult. The study did find two things that led young people astray: jobs and cars. Tee­nagers who hold afterschool jobs get into more scrapes than those who don't, and teens who start driving at an early age are more likely to have run-ins with the police. University of Iowa ProfeSBor Lyle Shan­non who conducted the study, adds that soci~l programs aimed at. deterrng juve­nile crime are rarely effecti~e: Wh8:t _turns teenage rebels into law-abiding ci~zen~, he says through a recen~ new~ serVIce:.~8 the realization that sowmg w1~d oats 1s no longer appropriate behavior as an adult." THE ALTERNATIVE We have a beuer way. A heller way of pulling you in louchwilh lhe people lha1 you wanl lo meel. People whose imereslS are compa1ible wilh yours, sensi1ive people. Auraclive people. Peo­ple who may be inleresled in lasling rela1ionships. People who undersland 1ha1 you can'I depend on lhe bars lo provide you wilh qualily companionship. We have a better way- and we'd like 10 show ii 10 you. Privale selee1ion offers a unique approach 10 video da1ing, combining s1a1e of lhe arl 1echnology wilh 1he dynamics of inlerpersonal rela1ionships. Call 1oday for your lree consuhation. 9 PRNATE ~ es. SELECTION 4200 Westheimer-Suite 250 (713) 961-9876 Please join MAYOR KATHY WHITMIRE at her COMMUNITY CONFERENCE (i! ~ WHEN: Wednesday, Nov. 2,. 7:30pm WHERE Masterson Branch , YWCA 3615 Willia, near the corner of Memorial and Waugh Drive =~~Whitmire MAYOR OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 SF Health Director Threatens Ban on Poppers ~(. :?!~V,...~,8f:!!i~:on Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO-The city's public bee.Ith director has called on Mayor Dianne Feinstein and the city's Board of Supervisors to impose tough controls on the ea.lee of amyl and butyl nitrate, known popularly as "poppers," inhe.led by many gays to enhance sexual pleasure. At the same time, a columnist for a gay newspaper quoted a leading AIDS physi­cian as charging poppers manufacturers with misleading the gay community into believing that the drug poses no health hazards. Hee.Ith Director Dr. Mervyn Silverman accused federal agencies of neglecting reg­ulation of peppers, which have been sus­pected of causing serious health problems-including what one doctor insisted was a possible ink to AIDS. Silverman recommended to the mayor and the supervisors that they put pressure on the federe.1 Food and Drug Administra· tion to regulate the sale and distribution of poppers, pending investigations on their safety. Poppers manufacturers have for years advertised butyl nitrate in gay newspap­ers nationwide as "room deodorizers" or "liquid incense," under such brand names as Rush, Locker Room, Thrust, Bolt and others. The peppers industry is believed to earn as much as $50 million a year. Marilyn Smulyan, legislative aide to Supervisor Nancy Walker, chairperson of the health committee of the Board of Supervisors, said that "manufacturers are advertising they (poppers) are being found to be tote.lly safe and (telling the public) not to worry about them." Silverman charged that the products are mislabled and that 11in essence, it is a fraud because it is not a room odorizer. I don't know how many people would want to odorize their room with smelly socks, which is what I'm told the stuff smells like." Silverman added that poppers are not being regulated by the FDA because they "are not being intended for the use by which they would affect the body." "But what is happening here is that it is being manufactured, labeled and sold with a purpose of being abused," he con­tinued. The health director warned that if the poppers are not regulated, he would be forced to impose a ban on their sale in San Francisco. Meanwhile, on the same day that Silver­man was caBing for regulation of poppers, Randy Alfred, a columnist for TM Sen· tin.el, one of the city's major gay newspap­ers, reported that Dr. James Curran, director of AIDS studies at the natione.I Center of Disease Control in Atlanta, sent an angrily·worded letter to Joseph Miller, president of Great Lakes Products, a major poppers distributor. In his letter, Alfred reported, Curran asserted that contrary to the industry's claims of no link between poppers and AIDS, "other health hazards from the mis· use of these drugs have been docu. mented." "Your press releases and advertise­menta . .. are misleading and misrepresent the CDC's findings and their implica· tions," Alfred quoted Curran as saying. "While it is unliltley that nitrites will be implicated as the primary cause of AIDS, their role as a co-factor in some of the illnesses found in the syndrome has not been ruled out," Alfred quoted Curran. The columnist added that Curran's let· ter .,may be the first time that a ranking government scientist hae directly termed amyl and butyl nitrite a drug." Let us hear from you Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montro.,, #306 Houston. TX 77006 20 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 28, 1983 What Happened to the A lief Students? From Lynn He"ick What happened to the students who stole, opened, read and broadcast James Frein's private mail? Were they "fired" from school, too? Who Is Gay Patron From Travis McClaugherty I feel it is my right as a Houston citizen to ask questions of any city council member and especially the candidate concerning my lifestyle. At a recent civic meeting I was refused to have my questions answered by Coun­cilperson Eleanor Tinsley .... Mn. Tinsley literally changed that warm smiling face to one of bitter outrage at me .... Since thia incident made me more aware of the capabilities of the members we have on city council; I met with Mn. Tinsley's opponent Mn. Carolyn D. Hobson . . . . How can anyone choose an endorse­ment without a fair cross-n.amination of the available candidates. J uat becauae they were the choice in past elections does not rule out the fact that there may be a Let us hear from you. Letters to the E d1tor Montrose Voice 3317 Montross #306 Houston, TX 77006 better choice? Do we not live in a demo­cracy? ..• In my visit with Mrs. Hobson we talked of my views and concerns on the upcom­ing elections. Mro Hobson told me of her stand on gay community issues and con­cerns. I learned that Mrs. Hobson is and has been an attorney for the past ten years here in Houston. She wilfully answered all my questions without any remonstration to me or the gay community. After my visit with Mn. Hobson, I felt as though I were a client of hers seeking advice and help, and yet, left receiving even more, an answer. I feel that Mrs. Hobson has the vision, intelligence, and knowledge of the issues facing our community to be considered as the new city councilperson for position 2 at-large ... Wheeler Deserves Community Support FromSIU!Louell In the controversies of this election. there is one candidate who unquestionably deeerves our support. In an election year when the overall emotion seems to be apathy, this race should be one which gen­erate. undivided support for our GPC­endorsed candidate, Anne Wheeler. The gay comm.unity has always sup­ported candidates who opposed those who have represented questionable ethics and loyalty. Examples of previous causes sup­ported by the gay community include Eleanor Tinaley in her underdog race against incumbent Frank Mann, and Kathy Whitmire in her race against Jack Heard. Again we have the chance to remove an incumbent who has demonstrated his will­ful disregard for people, not only of the gay community, but of the entire City of Hous­ton, Jim Westmoreland .. ent record of service to the community. While the gay community has not heard from Westmoreland during this election, Anne Wheeler has attended many com­munity functions .. . In an election where private interests are heavily supporting Jim Westmore­land, Anne Wheeler needs the grass root support which haa always been evident in the gay community. She is in need of funds and volunteers, as all campaigns are . . If you are interested in donating your time, money or services, call 520-0211. Vote 'No' on Convention Center From Jeff DaieU The~ are some facts Houatonians should know before voting on Proposition A, the authorization to build yet another conven­tion center: 1. The $147 million figure used by sup­porters is for Phase I only- there are three phases planned .... 2. The special interests who wiwt us to build yet another convention center say they will attract 700,000 new delegates and vifjitors a year beginning in 1988. That would take 50 conventions or trade shows averaging 14,000 delegates and vis­itors, or one virtually every week of the year .... 3. Advocates of yet another convention center claim a first-year windfall of $431 million in delegate spending. . . . That would be a per-delegate average of $615. Since, by their own figures, the 1982 aver­age wao just $304, the cost of living would If you are an avid fan of THE FAR SIDE cartoons, you'll have to have Gary Larson's newest collection ... And if you missed his first best seller, you'd better be sure you have .. . Order now if you Letters have to go up by some 15 percent per year for each of the next five yearo to boost the average to their claim. 4. Boosters of yet another convention center claim that no general fund revenue will be used. There are two points to con­sider here: ... Some $6 million per year from the hotel tax goes into the general fu nd. That will not be available once the third convention center begins to use all the hotel tax not reserved for the arts .... The ballot wording does not limit the cen­ter to the hotel occupancy tax .... 5. The special interests who want us to build yet another convention center say that "only a vote of the people" can change the ordinance. But it was only a few years ago that "only a vote of the peo­ple" could change council salaries. The legislature simply passed a law overriding that provision .. love humor that starts from and remains firmly footed in left field! -Pl-ea-se- se-nd- m-e- -----------------,1 _ _ copies of The Far Side at S3 95 each 1 ~ __ copies of Beyond The Far Side at S3 95 each 1 ~~~ / Totalamountenclosed _____ 1~ i, anctude S1 fOr postage and hand/Ing per book 1 orderedJ I Mall t<r. Far Side Books, c/o MOntrose IA:llce : ' • 4400 Johnson onve. Fairway, KS 66205 !Make Cheeks payable to Universal Press Syndleatel : 0 0-S. 0"'--'f'OrM O vtSA OMetf..c....i I I -- ~ -------------- I - ~-- -------------- I en, ''"" -----.;;i: --- : "Pull out, 8eftY1 Pull outl ... You'Ve hit on artery!" ------ -- """"""'--- I I OCT. 28, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Alley Stages a Compelling 'Dresser' Montrose Live By Joe L. Watts The Nina Vance Alley Theatre is grandly dressing its stage with their opening pro­duction of the '83/84 season with Ronald Harwood's The Dresser, winner of the Drama Critics' Award as Best Play of 1980, a funny and compelling dramatiza­tion of backstage theatre life. The play is focused on Norman, the devoted dresser and confidant of Sir, the ailing star actor/ manager of an extremely tatty travelling troupe performing in the provinces of Britain in the early 1940s. The theatrical tradition of the actor­/ manager troupe which nurtured the char­acters in The Dresser no longer exists. But for more than 200 years until the 1930s, the actor/ manager troupe was the British theatre. Usually dedicated to performing the plays of Shakespeare, the actor/ manager, who always had the best part, took his troupe from one end of the British Isles to the other, performing a repertoire for the people. Actor/ managers saw themselves ae and, indeed, were the aristocrats of touring actors. They financed, produced, directed and, of course, starred in every play. No actor/ manager ever survived entirely on hie own efforts. Hie dresser wee his personal servant, his valet and confidant: the dresser not only saw to it that the actor/ manager wore the rightcoe­tumes in the right play, but also protected him from unnecessary intrusions a nd demands. He was the guardian of the actor/ manager's dressing room, and that gave him a position of great importance and power in the company. At the opening of The Dresser, Sir hH gone off his beam a bit and is in the hospi­tal. It's two hours before the curtain goes up on King Lear, with a full house expected. Norman, Sir's dresser and Her Ladyship (Sir's wife) are discussing whether or not to cancel the performance. Alas, Sir arrives at the theatre, dragging his tired body and weeping over his pres­ent state of mind and health. Sir doesn't believe (along with Her Ladyship and the stage manager} that he can go on. But Nonnan, using his best Nanny voice and dotty manner, serving Sir in a nursery, chatty, mother-loving way, convinces him that he should, can and must go on for the sake of theatre tradition. Sir isn't sure what the play is, and after being told repeatedly by Norman that it's King Lear, starts putting on black face for Othello. Finally getting ready for Lear, Sir remembers a fellow actor's performance in the role and tells Norman, "I saw his Lear and I was pleasantly disappointed." Dealing with a company actor about to goon with him in Lear, Sir tells him not to get in his way and "you must find what light you ca:i." . . Amid air raids and bombings (remember it's early 40s), the curtain goes up on Lear. Sir is very distraug~t and ahakes like an earthquake, refusing to take his place on stage. The actors on stage yell out uMe thought I saw the King " (no Lear) followed by "No, I waa misi.;.,k." After an act of God, Sir takes the stage and gives his 427th (and poasibly last) performance in the n:>le. . Agonizing in his dressmg room wtth Norman after the performance, Sir yells out, ''I hate them, the swines,'' refe~l'!g to everyone in general. N~~man askh~ if~e is addreBSing the entice, to which Sir replys, uNo, I have nothing but co~pas­aion for them. Who could hate the cnpple and the dead?" I loved it. At times, Mr. Harwood's pla~ 1is repeti­tious and windy, but mostly 1t s a very interesting slice of life of theatre past. Returning to the Alley after a l4·year absence Tom Toner's performance as Sir is nothi~g short of briJJiant. \Yith his mas­tery and akill displayed as S1_r, Mr. Toner could lead any acting troupe m ttne coun­try or Britain. He's comical, lovable and full of charm, yet touching to the bone with his genuine humanity. . The ladies in the company all serve then rolM hand•omely: Ullian Evans aa Her Ladyship; Robin Moseley as Irene, an ingenue that Sir has an eye for; and espe­cially Bettye Fitzpatrick as the stage man­ager who has loved Sir from afar for all the 20 years she has worked for him. Richard Poe as Norman is a bright, com­petent actor but never reveals any real inner emotional turmoil that must exist in his totally devoted relationship with Sir. Visiting director Josephine R. Abady, from the Bershire Theatre Festival in Stockbridge, Mass., was well chosen for this assignment and deserves credit for a solid production. Enough can't be said for the award­worthy stunning set by British guest designer Michael Holt. It is an exception­ally well designed knock out, incorporat­ing Sir's dressing room theatre wings and darkened backstage corridors. The Dresser will play on the Large Stage through Nov. 20. o Schumann Program Reviewed By Peter Derksen Unforgettable! First, for musicianship at the very highest level: bold romantic con­ducting, phenomenal piano playing, and superb response from the orchestra. =en!J~\~~~ea~~::~a~~a~~::;:~ the Metropolitan Opera. Mr. Giovaninetti is a vigorous and pre­cise condutor with absolute control over tempo. He can move the orchestra from fast to slow and back again to smoothly that you wonder why you don't hear it done that way more often. He uses time in music to emphasize each piece's structure, building and releasing tension, and using the orchestra as if it were a single instrument. The Manfred Overtune is very easy to do badly; the interpreter walks a tightrope and must beware of too much or too little romatic color. Ciovaninetti stayed on target throughout, avoiding the sins of too dry or too florid an approach to the music. Schumann is the spiritual grandfather of industrial efficiency experts; loath to see anyone sitting idel, he uses almost all the orchestra almost all the time. The result is usually rapid listener fatigue, and this composer, in the hands ofinsensi~vecon­ductors, has gotten a reputation for clumsy orchestration. This conductor bal­anced the the different sections of the orchestra so well that the texture stayed clean even during the big crescendos. The violas were clearly audible throughout, somewhat of a miracle in any German romantic music. I first heard Mark Zeltser in New York five or six years ago, and I had forgotten how good he is. It wouldn't have mattered-he's gotten even better, and the first few bars of the Grieg Concerto would have told me that anywy. He is one of the half-dozen or so musicians I have seen who demonstrate total mastery over their instrument. Most pianists do what the piano allows them to do; Zeltser has the piano do what he wills. His dexterity in the rapid runs was extraordinary, and dynamic changes (fff to pp in two note&) happened 80 often that they amostseemed commonplace. He has heart as we11 as technique; hie lyricism in the second movement was as fitting as the technical fireworks in the first and third. Ignoring the request in the program, the audience gave him a warm ovation at the end of the first movement, and a standing ovation when the concerto was finiahed. (We would probably have applauded after the second movement, but Giovaninetti wisely went directly into the finale.) Pictures at an Exhibition is another 'old warhone' from music appreciation classes that has attracted critical disdain and mediocre performances, causing it almost to vanish from the repertoire. Mussorgsky's music deserves, and Rav­el's orchestration demands, better treat­ment. Giovaninetti g4ve the music the beat treatment imaginable. The players of -~---........ --~ Richard Poe as Norman and Tom Toner as Sir star in the Alley's presentation of "The DreBBer" the orchestra, given some of the toughest solo work there is, rose to the occasion. Unfortunately, a pair of couples sitting right behind me were a constant annoy­ance. During a concert, one really cannot turn around and admonish noisemakers without making matters worse for eve­ryone else, though I have seen pitched bat· ties in New York with roJled-up programs and crinkling candy wrappers. Tu.ming around and staring intensely is just about the limit of propriety, and had no effect, though I was not the only one doing eo. The aource of the problem seemed to be lack of consensus within the group-two of them wanted to goto the KIKK featival in the park, while two wanted to come to Symphony. It would have been far better for everyone if they had suspended one of the Ten Commandments of Relationships and separated for the evening. Ca.sting cultured pearls before cultured swine ia a loaing battle. Perhaps Jones Hall should offer child care for infants of all ages. 22 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 28, 1983 There's Never Been a Problem Like the Present One Health By Harvey Thompson, M.D. There never has been a health problem like AIDS. AIDS is the worst pc>ssible version of an Andromeda Strain scenario come true. lt is apparently 100 percent lethal. There is no known test for AIDS, no known cause and no known cure. AIDS rocks the very foundation of the gay and lesbian community. It will forever alter the way we relate to one another, where we live, how we live and even if we live. It will alao change the way society relates to us and, in turn, have an effect on the non·gay community that will be felt all the way to such mundane matt.era as the price of real estate. All too often, when health matters have such far-reaching implications, the patient is forgotten, and attention focuses instead on medical aspecta. An example of this was the second national AIDS Forum held in Denver, Colorado, in the summer of this year, which was atteneded by over 300 people from all parts of the country. The last morning had been one dull report after another. The audience had for­gotten that AIDS is not just crisis centers, information pamphlets, T-cells ratios and hotlines, but real people. Then the experts were upstaged. The last word was had by nine "people with AIDS" who closed the session with their own statement. When they entered the room and walked down the aisle, there was at first a ripple of applause which rose and created to a tidal wave by the time they aSBembled at the front of the hall When they unfurled a banner that read •·we Are Fighting for Our Lives," the audience rose to its feet. The AIDS people looked confident. not ashamed. They preferred not being called "victims," for that implied hopelessness. They preferred not to be called "patients," for that implied passivity. They looked as if they knew something of life that we didn't, or possibly they knew something of death that we could not know. Dyfog is more a tabooaubject in America than even homosexuality. These were the people whose names had been drawn in the cruel AIDS lottery. They didn't look like drug·abusers or fist· fuckers or bath-dwellers. Some were gaunt, some were bald, and some were strikingly handsome. They were all about the ea.me age; for aure, the.x were all too young to die. Irrational fears surfaced when one of the nine brushed an elbow on the way down the aisle; or you recognized another as the man who had used the sweaty sit· up board in the hotel gym just before you that morning. You caughtaglimpseofthepub­lic hysteria in yourself. Just a few days before, the whole conference had almost aborted when the hotel management objected to the use of the word "AIDS" on lobby PoSters. Then the nine men began a roll call of AIDS sufferers, and each name brought a ohudder of relief at the realization that it waen't your•, and a shudder of despair, too: It's true, you thought, there are hundred. of us dying! Then the fear turns to anger, and you shout to yourself, why doesn't anyone do something! The nine people with AIDS took turns reading off their rights: to full and satisfy· ing aexual and emotional lives; to quality medical care; to full explanations of treat­ment and their right to refuse it; to refuse research procedures; to privacy; at and last, to live and die in dignity. They asked for support in the struggle against those who oould fire them, evict them, refuse to touch them or treat them. They asked for support in not losing their loved onea or becoming scapegoats for an epidemic. They asked us health-care providers to "come out" to them, to get in touch with our own feelings about AIDS and examine our own agendas. They want to be dealt with, not just intellectually, but as whole people with complex social needs as well as medical ones. In turn, they promise to become involved in every level of decision­making, to share their experiences and knowledge, to inform any potential partner of their health situation, and to practice low-risk sexual behavior. One of the people with AIDS, Bob Rey· nolds, asked the audience to close their eyes. Then he asked us to hold the hand of the person next to us. He began his pre­pared narrative slowly. He spoke of love and asked us to ra'4ate it out to the people with AIDS, to the already-dead and the soon·to-die. His voice cracked, wavered and halted. Each time ·we wondered if he could go on, but there would be a dry· mouthed swallow or a quick breath of recovery to clear the tears before they fell. He asked that we recognize that quality is better than quantity, that dying is a part of living, and that we come to grips with our own mortality. And the love grew and filled the room. I almost expected a mira· cle; the purple spots would disappear, his hair would grow back and flesh fill out again. Even now, I wouldn't be surprised to hear that it happened. We were told to hug the peraon next to us, and our spirits joined together. We envisioned that love and energy soaring out of the hotel and acrosa the Rockies; it spilled down sunny slopes into the streets of both coasts; it overflowed up stairs and down hallways in gay households all over America; it touched every man that this kind of brotherly love could enfold. When he finished, the tension broke into the relief of tears, and we held the whole lesbian and gay community in our arms, laughing and crying. I hope that those nine men draw on that love when they need it. I hope that if they close their eyes for a last time sometime soon, some of their thoughts will be of us and how we loved them in Denver. I'll never forget; to them, this apace is dedi­cated. Whatever is discovered, said and writ­ten on the subject, it is the people with AIDS who have the last word. Dr. Thompson practices medicine in Sacramento, Calif., and is co-medical director of the Kaposi's Sarcoma Founda­tion there. l(l J983 Stonewall Features Syn· dicate. e San Francisco only $329 Round Trip e San Dieao only $270 RouncfTrip e Miami & Ft. Lauderdale Gateways to Key West as little as $229 Round Trip (daily non-stops to Ft. Lauderdale eff. Nov. 1) Certain travel restrictions may apply. Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at 738-8615. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. EASTERN America's favorite way to fly ... Celebrate All Hallows Eve All Weekend With Our Weird Wacky "1,., Daniel t-Aa1"- Bartenders O',r Kenn) Trent Fri. Sat Sun \'Ion. Happ' Hour prices for Costumes 6pm-2am Mon. Lola Loo~ Alike Contest 10 45 Cash Prize Proudly Presenting Our Newest Musical Comedy . of the ~-ev~~: . ilver Csbsret1Theatre ere en SUNDAY, OCT. 30-1/2 price admlulon with costume SHOWTIMES Thursday-9:30pm Friday-8:30 & 11pm Saturday-8:30 & 11pm Sunday-8:30pm Doors Open 7pm Happy Hour till 8:30pm 2700 ALBANY-Open 7pm-2am-528-3611 (adjacent to Officer's Club) CanCrusher Co~oration We Pay Cash for Your Trash*! •Trash by Can Crusher's definition is aluminum cans only. Can Crusher Corporation 1s a full-service recycling company paying market prices for aluminum cans Our hours are 9am to 5:30pm, Monday thru Friday. Help America Recycle and Make i ~~r- Spring Money Too! in i <ii The Can Crusher Corp. also offers a full- ~ service pickup recycling program for bars Washington restaurants & industry. Call 864-2223 for details ~ 2011 Silver Sl OCT. 28, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 23 Commentary Decisions, Decisions By Joe Baker I've got a problem this week. I don't know which of the following ideas would make a column: Jury Duty. I received a summons recently and obe­diently went to the courthouse at my appointed time to serve. The man in charge read to the prospective jurors a list of qualifications for jury service. One of the qualifications, as defined by state law, ia that jurors muat be of good moral character. I didn't know whether I ahould have asked to be diaqualified on that ground or not. After all, I've been told for years by religion and government that I'm not moral because I'm a homosexual. I really wanted to get out of jury duty­but not that bad. But it really ticlts me off. I'm expected to serve my country-and pay taxes-but government still won't guarantee me my rights because of my sexual orientation. War. I'm aitting here looking at the headlines in the newspaper. "U.S. troops invade Carribean nation." "630 Cubans, Soviets seized." "207 Marines killed in attack in Beirut." The way things are going, the United St.ates is going to be involved in several new "Vietnams" pretty soon, and the draft will have to be reinstated. But don't worry, we gay males won't have to go to war. Remember, the U.S. military doesn't want homosexuals in the various services! It is always trying to kick us out. The reason has something to do with "good moral character." I guess serving your country in the army is a lot like serv­ing on a jury. Only in San Francisco. I've been noticing bar ads in San Fran­cisco's gay newspapers lately. Did you know that bars out therehaveJ.0. nights now? Talk about adjusting and responding to the AIDS crisia! The bara used to have a lot of other kind of nights; I won't mention what ldnds-use your imagination. Can you imagine a J.O. night being held atJ.R.'s? Liberace's loue life. Huatling CongreBB. Larry Flynt, publisher of HuatU!r mag a· zine, has placed all the membera of Con· gress on his 1ubscription list. Herefuees to take them off, even though several of them have threatened to go to court to have their name& removed. Flynt claims members of Congre88 are scumbags or something like that, and they should be looking at nude pictures of real women instead of trying to hop into the sack with young Congre811ional pages. Doesn't Flynt realize that some Con· gressmen like to hop into the sack with young Congres1ional pages who are male? He ahould be aending them free copies of HoncM, Mandate or Blueboy. Ch«r1 for Kennedy and Falu'<?IL I certainly don't hesitate to take a swat at the Rev. Jerry when it is called for-and it usually is. But this time, I must compli­ment him for agreeing to let Kennedy speak to 7000 atudents at his Liberty Col· lege in Lynchburg, Virginia, the bastion of Falwell's evangelical empire. When Kennedy offered to speak, Falwell didn'thavetoagreetohis appearance. But in doing so, Falwell showed that even he can be open minded and put aside his pol· itical differences to hear another's views. And Kennedy's views certainly are oppo­site to thoae of Falwell. The Kennedy speech was a great coup for the senator and a master political stroke. But, more importantly, it was a great message to those people who are try· ing to mix politics and religion. Or, rather, church and state. Kennedy chided the Moral Majority for behaving as though it had a lock on piety, God, said Kennedy, had no position on every political rhubarb. He cautioned against religious intolerance and said he hoped "for an America where neither fun­damentaHet nor humanist will be a dirty word." It is too early to tell, of course, if the Kennedy-Falwell meeting will have any lasting effects, either on the two men or on their many supportera. But a little under­standing can go a long way. lio~~~\i~~~~~~h'~i!t.::'..!'.~El!:::~~ Violence Against ~r..i~h.d ~o;:~i~·==~~~~:? dancer" who Gays Epidemic I know lawsuits take a long time, but it has been two years, and I haven't heard any new news. It was probably settled out of court, and that kid is sitting on a pile of loot somewhere. Boys won't be boys. So happy to hear that little boys are changing with the timee and becoming less sexist. Little girls, however, are stick­ing with their doUs, according to two uni­versity researchers. After atudying the play patterns of girls and boys between the ages of three and five, the reeearchera concluded that the boya are more liberated than the girls. The little girls' play choices have remained the same-art projects and houae play-but the boys' activities have expanded to include houae play. See! I wasn't a si88y for playing house when I waa little. I was just liberated-and ahead of my time! What's a Pope to do? Pope John Paul II recently called Ameri­can bishops to Rome to discuss a serious problem. It seems business is really down at the confessional. Catholics just aren't kiBBing and telling to their prieets like they used to. Does this mean people are sinning less? Of courae not, the bishops decided. It just means (a) people are more baahful, (b) peo­ple are sinning more and ashamed to admit it, (c) or a good PR firm ia needed to drum up interest in confe88ions. It sure is tough being in the religion bus­inees these day1. The National Gay Task Force reports that in the first eight months of this year, 1682 incidenta of harassment, threats and attacks against gay men and women were reported in its Violence Project. During this same period, the gay com­munity was hit by the first wave of vio­lence attributed to '"AIDS backlash.'' According to San Francisco's Community United Against Violence (CUAV). fear and hatred aBBOCiated with AIDS was a motivating factor in nearly 20 percent of all incidents reported this year. The Dorian Group in Seattle also reports that gang• of youth• seeking to beat up "plague-carrying faggots" were responsi­ble for 22 brutal attack.a this summer. In Northampton, M888., over the past year gay women were singled out for sex· ual aasault and other physical attaclts, reports the NGTF newsletter. Establish· ments for gay women were vandalized, and hundred• of phone threats and other verbal harassment against these women were reported. According to Kevin Berrill, Violence Project director, '"Theae (incidents) repres­ent only a small fraction of the total number of incidents that actually occurred during this period. The great majority of gay victims do not report attacks against them, and far too many atill suffer the aftermath in silence and isolation." 24 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 28, 1983 Women's Softball, Montrose Tennis Sports o Women's Softball Ho/,ds Elections Following the final action of the 1983 F"all League last Sunday, elections for the 1984 Women's Softball League were held at Levy Field. Linda Landry, the energtic manager of the Briar Patch Renegades, was elected president; Darlene Ruberto, vice president; Karen Smith, treasurer; Carolyn Collins, secretary and Beverly Vernon, coordinator for special events. The League also decided to hold a post­season tournameut this weekend at Mem­orial Park. Saturday's action will begin at 10:00 a.m. on field No. 2 and No.3, while Sunday's final action will be on field No. 1 beginning at 12 noon. Come out and watch the final softball action of 1983. o Tennis Championships Set The Montrose Tennis Club 1983 Singles Champions for three divisions was deter- Montrose Tennis Club Challenge Ladder Following Oct 23 competition 1 Rich Ryan 2 Tim Calhoun 3JanMauld1n 4J1mKitch SRon Landrum 1 Tom Cardinale 2Dav1dG1rz1 3 Don Smith 4J1m Kttch SM1keGreen A LADDER 6JonColbert 7VictorChapman 8 Harold Hope 9Arm1Alabaru:a 10 Donny Kelley BLADDER 6Jon Colbert 7AobertArriaga 8 Rich Corder 9ThomasCortez 10TerryA•ch C LADDER 1 Mano Durham 6 Julia Collter 2 Jim Flanagan 7 George Whrte 3 Kim Hotmqu11t 8 Rick Martinez 4R1cherd Pregeanl 90aleGraves 5 Manuel Murillo 10 S.ndra Givens DOUBLES LADDER 1 Kitch/Colbert S Collier/ Scott 2 Kelley/Corder 6 Cortez/Martinez 3 Arriaga/Cas111.. 7 Hope/Holmqulst 4 Garu/T AK:h MSA Monday Night Bowling STANDINGS F0Uow1ng Oct 24 compet1t1on A DIVISION 8 DIVISION 1 Stike Force 1 E/J's Boys 2StSt8fSofMercy 2SEasyPieces 3 Bowlerma 3 MCCR I C DIVISION D DIVISION 1 Stella's Feil.. 1 Oust Rollers 2Cha1nGang 2Ba11Chasers 3 Snap-Snap 3 High Heel Rollers HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Lou11 Schneider 213 Stft'e McConaughy 571 SJ_ 212 LOUIS Schneider560 MA. 211 Tommy Davis 553 MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bowling STANDINGS Follow•ng Oct 20 compet1hon 1 Kauttman·s Kook1es 2 Leslie's Boys 3Goog1es 4Daddy A the Diesels HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Lynn KeUey 241 Steve McConaught 542 MarkHall 209 LynnKeUey506 SteveStaplecon 205 Tim Mannea 201 MSA Women's Softball League STANDINGS following Oct 17 Division I KindredSp1nt1 7 .778 Cyanide 6 667 Renegadea 6 600 R- 5 500 scu . 500 Dtvl&IOllJI RIYerRats 6 1 857 MCCR ... 3'• 582 Special 8._,d ..• 311 582 High Hopes 5 . 556 Manon & Lynn's 3 .. •11 DoubleR """ . 711 083 mined this past weekend. T!z,, Houston Post referred to Chris Evert Lloyd as "overwhelming Britain's No. 1 player 6-1, 6-1" ... referred to it as "The one-sided final lasted 62 minutes." Well, it's a good thing the Post wasn'tcov­ering MTC's Level I final. Randell Dicker­son won over Armi Alabanza 6-1, 6-0-and took only 40 minutes to do it. Eat your heart out Chrissy. Seems Randell had houseguests in from Australia and wanted to hurry and get back to them and I'm sure you can bet he is more hospitable with them than he was with Armi. "Wait 'til next year, Armi." Level II Championship match saw MTC Pres. Rich Corder came back from losing the finit set 3-6 to Danny Casillas, win­ning the second set 6-2 to force a third set. The match was dead even, as the lead ~ f "Jlenns 'n ,,tuff'~ - ~efn & ;3tl11eh­~ orn &'morn! QJ:latlting :Jiue~lllt\l ~iecounl Jlricee ,:ut ~inute ;Jlallofneen ~rag ";Blilll ~ill" J\Juanller "Ji'onni( d!arriml 2201-2203 ~nelJington ~·­( across from Salvation Army Thrift Store) 880-8824 & 880-8844 YEAR ROUND GROUNDS MAINTAINANCE INSECT CONTROL FERTILIZING switched back and forth as each player was able to break serve with long, consist­ent rallies. It looked indeed like neither player wanted to gamble for a win, as each tried to wait patiently for the other to make a mistake. Rich pulled ahead at 5-4 and was able to break Danny's last serve for a 6-4 win. Both players met for the Class C Cham­pionship of last year's HouTex, with Rich victorious then also-but you can look for more of good competition in HouTex 1983, the second weekend in November. Level III witnessed our first all-women's final in MTC history. Beaumont's Kim Holmquist womanaged (?} or woman­handled (?) Houston's popular Julia Col­lier. WitneSBes did not report overhearing any "foul words." Kim pulled the vktory out 6-3, 6-1. This was the first meeting of GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 these two women, but we can look forward to more good competition in the future. In ~~~;:;~a~ m!r: ::~eha~eav:0 s~i;: Women's Division some day. C'mon, ladies, Welcome. The Championship Flight will be deter­mined this week as No. 1 seed Tim Cal­houn meets our No. 1 woman player, No. 2 seed Jan Mauldin. As we go to press, the surely to be hard-fought match has not been scheduled between these two tennis pros. 1982 champion Rich Ryan did not enter to try to defend his championship this year; but these two finalists are cer­tain to have an exemplary match. HouTex 1983 will be November 12-13. For entry forms and information call Jan Mouldin, tournament director, 440-0281. $10 single, $15 doubles team. ~===~- -­North Looi> --- ------ SEEDING I Wartl.r I Shepherd Legal Clinic Legal help available at affordabk price• LANDSCAPING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE CALL DAVID WORTHY (713) 529-0027 The staff and management of the Ripcord urges everyone to vote Nov. 8 for the candidates of your choice The Ripcord, as a business enterprise, has not endorsed any particular candidates and has not authorized an_yone to use the name Ripcord for political endorsements. 1~:;;_8J;,1;:. s:::::::; Por suplU!sto, hablamo• E•pallol Car titles, contracts1 Iea.aea, wills, criminal cases, agreem.ent.s, collections, divorcee, name changes
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