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Montrose Voice, No. 254, September 6, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 254, September 6, 1985 - File 001. 1985-09-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7455/show/7430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-09-06). Montrose Voice, No. 254, September 6, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7455/show/7430

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 254, September 6, 1985 - File 001, 1985-09-06, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7455/show/7430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 254, September 6, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 6, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Briar Patch Wins World Series Houston's Team Goes Undefeated in Milwaukee The softball team from the Briar Patch wrapped up a Cinderella eeaeon by win· ning the Ninth Gay Softball World Series in Milwaukef' last week, becoming the first Houston team ever to win the event. The Patch cruised through the 19-team tournament with a 5-0 record to culminate a season in which it posted a 25-0 record, including Montrose Softball League play. Host team Milwaukee finished second for the fourth time. Series Eight Cham· pions Twin Cities claimed third and Chi· cago finished fourth . Jerry DeSale, regular season coach of the Dirty Sally's team, played on the world series Briar Patch team and led in hitting with a .688. Pitcher David Stacy drove in eight runs. Overall, the Houston entry bat· ted .434 as a team and had seven players bat over .400. Houston team also wins Tulsa Invitational Houston places 4th in Women's World Series-Stories Inside Montrose Voice __ "The N~wspaper of Montrose" September C, 1985 Published Every Friday ~~~~~~~~~~ Issue 254 (713) 529-8490 A brief synopsis of Houstons games: Houston 7, Atlanta Pharr Library I Error-free defense and a six-run third inning paced the Houston entry through its opening-round game. Stacy's three-run double highlighted the offense Houston 13, Toronto T.O. Express 4 Despite a poor defensive performance Houston had little trouble dispatching Toronto. Bill Sansom led the offensive attack with three hits. Houston 17, Southern New England 10 A 20.hit attack, including fom hits by Mike Morrison, led Houston to its third win. The game was tied 10.10 in the fifth inning before Houston scored seven runs in the final two innings. continued 1nsule Unity and Right to Live Highlight Pageant By Don Maines Montrose Voice Correspondent A spontaneous, a copella performance by the audience of "We Are the World" was the highlight of he & she Productions' "Miss Gay Texas Benefit Pageant" last Saturday night at the Tower Theater. Twelve female impersonators competed in the state finals, and although their impressions of such artists as Patti La&> lie, Sheila E. and Diana Ross pleased fans, it was the crowd'R electricity that ignited the event. Ticket-buyers joyfully heeded emcee Brandi West's advice "to leave 21.06 and all that other (expletive) outside" and enjoy the phenomenon at hand: a cele· bratin of free expression. In ke<>pmg with that theme, West per­formed "I Am What I Am" from La Cage Aux Foiles and last year's winner, Pau· Jetta Leigh of San Antonio, lip·synched "The Greatest Love" by Whitney Houston. The lyrics of both numbers advocate the right to live one's life with dignity That and the unity shown by the "We Are the World" sing-along diverted atten· tion from the dispute between he & she Police Still Seeking Suspect from May Murder Houston Police Department homicide detectives are seeking a suspect in connec· tion with a murder which has remained unsolved 11ince May. Hershel Darnell (H.D.)Johnson,51, was found stabbed 33 times in his home in the 6300 block of Rodrigo on May 22. His throat was slashed. Johnson was known to be attracted to "hustlers" and often pick(-d up poople on the streets of Mont· rose. According to Sgt. Brian Foster, homi· cide deteC'tive, Johnson would a llow individua ls to remain in his home for sev· eral days. Police a re searching for a black ma le, 25.:lO, 6', dark <'omplected with no facial hair. This man was reported to have been living with Johnson around the time of his death. The polke reason that robbery was the motive for the killing Foster said, "We really want to get this guy. It 1s apparent he really enjoyed doing this and will probably show up again." Foster al110 belicve.s that the suspect had an accomplice Anyone with ony information on this murder can <".all Sgt. Bri• Foster at 222· 3651. One of the l'ontestants in Saturday's rontest gets pampered prior to going on stage and the "Official Miss Gay Texas Page­ant" which, three weeks ago in Dallas, selected the state representative to the Miss Gay America pageanL Because of conflicts between organizere of the two state pageants, Saturday night's winner, Lauren Brach of Houston, won't advance to the national contest, which Houstonian ?l:aomi Sims won last year. Brach, a glamorous blond, represented he & she's Miss Gay Houston Metroplex pageant, although that crown was won by Charlie Linez, a veteran entertainer who perfomred at the now-closed Midnite Sun Linez opted to enter the Dallas pageant and placed in the Top 10. First runner-up was Victoria West of Corpus Christi, who won the interveiw category in which contestants participate in male attire. Tommie Ross, Miss Gay Houston 19 4, won the sportswear cate­gory and placed thrrd with a vigorous pro­duction of Diana Ross' "Muscles" that utilized a dozen body builders and received a standing ovation. One contestant, Erica Lytle of the Dallas-Fort Worth area, sang live, and his remarkable vocal ability earned the even· ing's top prize for talent. Lytle placed fifth behind Rachel Masters, representing San Angelo. Amazing Grace, Miss Gay Houston 1985, was voted the congeniality award, an honor he also captured at the Dallas pageant. Tina RenE"e, who was plucked from Houston stages to star in "Boy· lesque" in Las Vegas, returned to win the trophy for best evening gown. Houston's Vanessa Casti won preliminary awards for both sportswear and evening gown. Advertisements for the pageant stated that "donations' .. would benenfit an AIDS fund in memory of legendary Houston entertainer Tiffany Jones, who died cor· lier this ye.or. However, pageant producers Jerry Bird and C.J.Harrington were unavailable, through Wednesday, for comment as to how much money was raised in that respect. Bookstore Owner Challenges Ordinance News One N1·ws Seruice The owner of four adult bookstores has sued the C'ity of Houston in federal court claiming a new ordinance regulating such busineSRes is unconstitutional Saxet, Inc., owner of Diner's ?l:ews m Montrose, and also owner of Doc John­son's Arcade, Arcade News and Bellaire News elsewhere in Houston, filed suit in Federal Court Tuesday. The corporation is asking U.S. District Judge Ro88 Sterling to issue temporary and permanent injunc­tions preventing the new ordinncc from going into effect. The ordinance was due to go into effect September 5. The ordinance requires adult bookstore owners to remove doors to coin-Operated peep show booths. The ordinance also requires better lighting in peep show areas. The suit names the mayor and city coun· cil, Police Chief Lee Brown, and the city attorney as defendants. It claims the ord1· nance is an abusive use of pohce power and serves no legitimate go\·emmcnt intere.sts. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Are You a Survivor? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Spl'cral to the Montroae Voice After the bloody French revolution of the late 18th cen­tury, a statesman of the newly formed government asked a weary peasant: "What constructive thing did you do during the great civil war?" His answer was brief: "Sir, I survived'." In the face of extreme adversity, merely surviving may indeed be the most heroic act. Our news media bring daily reports of those who are suddenly plunged into desperate situations, but we sci dom hear about how they cope with their lot after it has struck. Most survive, but some don't. Independent research by Professors Salvatore Maddi of the University of Chicago and David McClelland of Harvard shows that survival in a crisis depends on a number of personal factors-a hardiness of spirit, resil­ience to stress and a positive attitude are all necessary to carry on in the face of adversity. Does this describe you? How would you fare if you lost a loved one, a job, or your house, to mention just a few of life's traumas? To help you be objective about answering the items ahead, we won't reveal much more about the personality traits of survivors until after you've taken the quiz. Answer each statement· Not True-I; Somewhat True-2; and Very True-3, then read on for explana· t1ons. 1 I feel a sense of dedication to some aspect of my hfe i.e., to my family, 11chool, church, community, etc.). 2. I am satisfied with the rate of progress toward the goals I have set for myself 3. It's better to be smart than lucky. 4 When good things happen they come about because of hard work. 5. People can get their own way if they just keep try· ing. Answer items 6-8, True or False: 6. It's best to adapt 88 well 88 possible to changes in life because there's not much one can do to alter fate. 7. It has alway~ been hard for me to adjust to life changes, (i.e., to a new job, school, neighborhood, etc.) 8. I usually find it hard to trust others and to build friendships. o Explanation As a group. survivors have these personality traits in common and the quiz reflects them: I. A sense of involvement in something they are doing in life. A commitment to something (a person, a cause, a group). There is a dedication and a purpose to their lives. (Items 1, 2) 2. A feeling of control over their life. A certitide that outcomes in living are direct result of their abilities and efforts. (Items 3, 4, 5, 6) 3. The courage to be open to change. The self­confidence to face the unexpected and to make new adjustments. (Items 7, 8) In contrast to these favorable survivor qualities, McClelland found that persons most vulnerable to breakdown under heavy stress often have a high power drive (a need to be dominant over others) and a high degree of inhibition about expressing it. Such types may curb their power drive(aesertivenese,aggressivity, com· petitivencse, etc.) in a socially approved way, but all too often, they tend to become ineffectual or immobilized when adversity strikes. An interesting poet-trauma reaction of survivors was studied at Yale University in the early 1970s. It seems that some people can't come through a tragedy without suffering. It's called the "survivor syndrome" and it occurs when survivors develop guilt, depression and anxiety after they have el'l'erged safely from a crisis while their loved ones or friends didn't. o Score: Total your points for items 1-5. Give yourself one point for each False answer to items 6-8. Add up all points (maximum points possible is 18). 15-18 points-You are in an above-average survivor with the resilience to carry on and be supportive of oth· ere if a crisis hits. 11-14 points-You are average in times of high stress and, though it may take somewhat longer than it would for a high scorer, you can cope with most setbacks. 8-10 points-You're vulnerable to adversity. Try to become more involved in a worthy life goal. Work at a more positive, self-confidC'nt nttitudc. Monday Night Hot Buns Contest llpm with M.C. Ernestine $100 Cash Prize $1.25 Margaritas All Day- All Night 50¢ Miller Lite Long Necks &Schnapps Houston's Longest Friday Happy Hour 'til lOpm Join Us for Houston's Most Popular Steak Night Sundays 7pm HOUSTON 2303 RICHMOND (713) 522-7616 Montrose Voice ANf'1 TEXAS•' •AA MONTROSE. TEXAS Popul•hon (•t 19851 32,000 Census tracts 401 01. '01 02 402 01, 402 02 405 oi. 403 and 404 01 Lip codes troughly) 70006. 77019 (portion), 77098 Bounded (roughly) Shepherd Or (west), Allen Parkway (north) Main St (east), US 59 (IOuth) Lal!tude ~Montt'Ole Blvd 11 Wnthe~mer Rd) 'N 44 13' N i.oog1tud1 SS- 22·50"w. Attitude 40" El.EC'TEO OFflClAtS FOR MONTROSE George Grunaa1 Houston City Council (d•st C) gr()J B•~by. 1713) 222-5933 El Franco LM, Hams County CommJSMOner (pct 1) roo1 Pr .. ton. t1t3Jnt-tur1 Waiter R1niun, Conttable fpct 1) ;JOr San Jacinto. (7'3) 121·5200 Debra Oanburg. Tex11 HotlH ot Rept ... n11t1"'" (d•tt 137) 191 f SW fwy (713) .52().8058 Cratg Washington THIS Senate td st t3) 1323 Caroline 17'31 6"'9-4343 M•Clt9)' UIUWJ. us HouH ot Repr ... ntatives (dill •8) 1919 Smlrfl •810, (1 13) 139--7339 The Newspaper of Montrose Eatabl1Shed 1980 OUR 254th ISSUE SEPT 6. 1!18S Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 CIRCULATION 9 000 cop.ea 'ftleekty through 150 major c:h1lnb\.ihon points 1n Montroae the V1ll1ge and the Heights ••t1m1ttd p111-on rare factor 2.8 tJtrmlttd rt.clersh1p 25, ?00 14<HHy plus 1.000 copies weekly through 45 other Te.:n dt•lr1buhon paints ntimarHi pass·on 11te factor 2 S Httm•ted readership 1. 500 wHkfy TOT AL CIRCULATION (GUARANTEEO) 10 000 ccptes weekly total e1t1mated rt1der1h1p '27 700 wH.lrfy Contents copyright e1gas Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurl}publ•s .. r Linda Wych&td•tor Roger Lackey ottu:• man1ge1 Mark Blazek/Austin corresPof'ldent Scott Cutsinger. 8111 O'Rourke.ioc•tcontnbufo'• Michael Holquist, Steve Warren n1t1ona1 con1riout011 Jerry Mulholland account ••Kut1ve Joel Cunn1ngham1ccount ••.Cut1v• Ajck H1W1ccounr executive F'oundmo M•mbera Greeter Montrose Business Guild. Gay and Letblan Press Asaoclat1on New, Strv1cH New,..One P•c.1 f1c Ntws Service Synd1C•fed FHtur• SerVICH & Wnl•fl Brian Mc:.N111ught, Uni· ver1al Press Syndicate. Ben Sargent Spe:clal Feature&t Synthcation Sales POST MAS TE A Send addreu corrections to 408 Avond•I• Houlton TX 77006-3028 SuNcr ptlOft r•rt 1n US 1n •Hied en~•lope S.C9 per year (52 UuesJ S29perahl month• C26tssues) or S 25perw~k (loa• than 26 11wet} Bai:k tssun $2 00 each. Nar onal edv•rlll ng repr•tent1t1u Joe O•S.bato R vendell Marketng MS&th Avenue New York t001' '212) 242-6863 Ad~ett~ing dHd ,,. Tuetday 5 30pm tor 11tue r~eased F n· day everMng NOi U fO advert~•" LOUI 8dv9r1 Ing rate schedule Seven-A *•effective Oct 12' 19&4 R•PofU b I ty The Montrose Voice doea not assume respon· t b ty tor adverts ng cia ms Readera thOulCI • ..,. the news r1" 1ny lh!teptf•o'Wrert •g SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 N eartown Business Alliance Changes Meeting Place For one time only, the NearU>wn Business Alliance will hold its monthly meeting in the Bering Memorial Methodist Church activities building, located behind the main building at 1440 Harold. The meet­ing will be held Wednesday, Sept. 11 at 7:00 p.m. The main U>pic for the special meeting will be a slide show and talk on adaptive use ofolder buildings in older urban neigh­borhoods. The speaker will be Lennie Brown of Texan a Design Co., Brenham. Military To Test Recruits for AIDS Beginning Oct. 1, all recruits entering any branch of the United States Armed Forces will be tested for Acquired Immune Defi· ciency Syndrome (AIDS). According to Dr. William Mayer, Assist· ant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, those not passing the initial test and a series of follow·up examinations will be denied admission U> the service. The test, which will involve about 300,000 people annuallv and cost the government about $1 niillion, will also apply U> tho e entering the service from ROTC programs, the service academies, the National Guard and the Reserves. Mayer said there have been about 100 cases of AIDS reported in the Army, Navy and Air Force. It has been reported that AIDS victims who do not respond U> treat· ment are given honorable medical dis­charges. The government iH also considering AIDS testing for all 2.1 million men and women in the armed forces. Memb1•rs of gay rights groups believe the testing policy will set a dangerous pre­cendent leading to pre·employment screening in the privat(' sector Moyer denies that the test will be used to 11crc·t·n out homosexuals. It was 1!Stimated that about two or three out of every 1000 potential recruits will n•spond positivelv to the test. Other topics on the agenda include an update on the Montrose Storefront Police Station and fundraising for completion of the station, the new location of the Chicken Coop, and meeting the new alliance officers. STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS KS DJAGNOSJS OPEN MON FRI 9-5 PM MON , WED • FRI EVENINGS AND SATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT 2801 EUA BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON TX nOOB (713) 868-4535 :z ~ = VJDEOTREND 1407 C1llfornl1-527-0656 Mon.-Sat. 10am-9pm Sun 12-7pm VIDEO TAPES/VCR RENTALS & SALES All type movies (Children thru Adult) NO MEMBERSHIP FEE ~ N~ ~EPOSIT FOR ff" EMBERS " 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 A Little Heaven and a Little Hell PhctosByAlbertPuenteMontrose Mouth By L' Angelo Miste rioao, Esq., M.B.E. What a weekend 11 was-Labor Day and the Grand Opening of Heaven. So much fun, so little time -o- Heaven now serves 10¢ well drinks from 8 until 2 every Wednesday And Heaven claims to have more video per square foot than any other gay club in the southwest United States Patio bartender Derek at Dirty Sally's One of last weekends biggest events was 48 Hours of Hell at Rich's. What a crowd Deejays Mike DeGrace, John Mott, J.D. Arnold and Enc Puyo supplied some great music. Clau1a Barry and Margaret Reynolds added to the fun with wonderful performan­ces Alan Davidson and his crew should be complimented -o- Heard that Pluccua' Trent Mixon had so much fun that he ended up with his break­fast on his face. Oh dear -o- All you sports-minded people get ready for the annual Folly ball contest to be held at its same location on Mason. This could very well be the match of the season. As usual there will be bad players, ugly cheerleaders, roller derby queens and all kinds of Day barunder Mark of the newly-opened Heaven "groovy" people. The half time show will feature a band, flag corp, and reigning Queen Norma Desmond. Anyone can play. Women are especially encouraged to play. Music will be provided by Deejay Larry Thompson. So come out Sunday, Sept. 15, and have a good time. -o- B1rthday greetings go out to Danny Campbell, Greg Kitzmiller, and Leif Lippert. - o- Spotted Cha-Cha and Larry slipping into a small barbershop on Westheimer for hair· cuts. Stop snickering -o- According to some. The 611 Club IS where summer sizzled and fall will be fes­tive Management there thanks the gay community for ell their support. - o- Robbyne was mistaken for a real woman at the AIDS Benefit held at the Brazos River Bottom recently The producers thought they'd been had. and were. -o- Heard that Our Miss Brooks was in Los Angeles for a visit, or was it Las Vegas -o- The best thing about TLC-The Annex on Missouri Street is probably the hours. Open from 11am to 11pm weekdays and 2-10pm on Sundays This leaves little excuse not to stop by -o- The staff of JR.'a wishes the best of luck to all the httle devils at Heaven. It sure is good to see David Kimbro and Russ Odem over there Don't forget JR 's newest event, the Bare Chest Contest. It's held on Wednesday's and emceed by Fltneu Exchanges Gary Chuch. Some of thsoe bodies will astound you' You might even get lucky and take one home. o- Wh1le on Pac1f1c Street, let's not forget the Mining Company. Stop in and say hello to deejay Jim He's so versatile. Also, Herbie's back. -o- Fantasy Starr is doing another AIDS benefit at Hill's 1n Austin. Keep up the good work. -o- Condolences to the family and friends of on the recent death of Gary Scarberry. Gary was a great guy and a pleasure to work with. ~o- The Houston Guest House held its annual Labor Day cookout. Along with the guests were many Montrosians The food was wonderful. Gordon, you're such a fantastic chef. -o- Let's Keep Montrose Beautiful Dept: Would someone please claim the remains of the VW Beetle, left in Mary's parking lot The Tuesday movie at Mary's will be Mommie Dearest. So. polish up your wire hangers Movie time 1s 10pm. When last seen. Fannie was sailing off In the sunset with two beauties. Yea. party' Pickles and Maria are going to do a number as Playsafe girls at the Bartender Benefit for KS/AIDS in Austin. -o- War wages on •• at the Outlaws, a Labor Day tradition. wienie wars, was rumored to be started by Mary's. War is not over yet. -o- Ed Moniger is reported to be judging another drag contest. Oh, come on Ed! -o- Mary's Leather Night will resume on Sep· tember 19 Happy Hour prices all night to those in black leather attire -o- The Montrose Cloggera will be holding clogging lessons starting Monday, Sept. 16, from 7 to 8pm in the MCCR basement. Ten weeks for $25 -o- Tho Texas Gentlemen seem to have become a regulars at Beeches. Wowl You gotta aee 'em Group Proposes AIDS Control Ordinance News One News Seruice Susan Director, a minor candidate for mayor of Houston, submitted a proposed ordinance to curtail the transmission of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) to city council on Wednesday. The ordinance was drafted by the National Democratic Policy Committee (NDPC), and is being submitted to state legislatures, and city and county councils nationwide. Director says the proposed ordinance "bars employment in touch-contact public service capacities to persons known to have AIDS, and requries all persons in touch-contact with the public to be screened for AIDS antibodies. Included are personnel employed in facilities requiring a health department sanitary inspection or license." Director says people found to have the disease "must be treated in a private facil· ity designated for AIDS cases. There are many chronic disease hospitals that have been closed down that could be re-opened for AIDS treatment and research." She says there is percedent for this course of action since it is the "procedure employed 40 to 50 years ago fortreatmentoftubercu· losis." Director says, " It is irresponsible for any public official to allow panic to build when an AIDS antigen is available to effi· ciently determine carriers of the disease." She maintains it would be especially irres· ponsible for Houston not to enact the ordi· nance since it is the number three city in new cases in the nation. Director says the "screening procedure is absolutely critical to curb the spread of this fatal disease, and the only way to actually wipe out AIDS altogether is to dump the post-industrial austerity policies of the intemational monetary fund, which created the conditions leading to the first known cases of AIDS, in Africa, in the early 1970's. AIDS is an economically transmitted disease, resulting from the total breakdown of sanitation, as has occurred in parts of Africa with the onset of intemational monetary fund condition· alitie11." There's Only One Community Newspaper for Montrose And You're Reading It The Montrose Voice Patio Now Open 804 PACIFIC 523-0511 Nitely Dinner Specials 695 Thursday Prime Rib Patio Now Open DO WE HAVE HAPPY HOURS? You Bet!! Sun. 12 Noon-7pm, Screws, Marys, Cape Codl-50¢ 3pm-7pm $1 Wall Drinks Mon. All Day 3pm-2pm $1 Well Drinks Tues., Wed., Thurs., 3pm-7pm $1 Well Drinks Fri. 3pm-9Pm $1 Well Drinks S SOC Bloody Marys, unday Tea Cape Cods, or Screws 3-7 Super Mimosa or Mother Lode Cooler Chilled Fruit Salad Sund Choice of One: l a~ Eggs Benedict or Eggs Sardu Brune or Seafood Omelette a la Newberg or Eggs Ranchero or Steak & Eggs SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 BEING GAY COULD RUIN YOUR CAREER It\ frightening but 1t'; a fact. Being gay could be the b1gge>t ob,taclc 1n }Our career. What can you do? There a re no ea'> an"''er,_ But now there" \Orne he lp: The Stnem Report. The Stevens Report " a new bi­monthl) ncw,lettcr that addre"e' the unique problem' and \1tuation' )OU encounter on the Job, m )Our career 1n a non-ga~ bu,ane'' en\uonment Each t\\UC present' conci ... e arucle' ~ inter\le"' and profile, " ntten from an informed ga) per- pcctl\C. The Stevens Report C\a mine' •uch "'uc' a' ad\ ancing) our career 1n,1de the clo,et or out, dealing "'llh ) our non-ga) bo", handling rumor,, career nct"orkmg for ga". 'ecunt) ckar­am.: L'"'~ and more I mally, practical career ad\lce and mlormation that could make a difference If you"d hke to learn more about /11e .\teu•m Report, 'end for a free '"uc.Just mail )Our name and add re" to The .\te1·ens Report, 106 \\ 11,htrc Bl\'d ., Suite 661C. Be\Crl) ll1lb. CA 90211 Or, 1f )OU'd like to 'ub,cnbc. ~ou can take ad\antage of the Sp c1al Charter Sub,cnpt1on S 12 50 for one )Car (6 1>sue•l JC)<'; off the regular rate Send )OUrchcck or monc) order to The Ste1rm Report l s5 95 with Hash Brown Potatoes, Petite Danish or • Blueberry Muffins, Coffee or Tea ~: -~ ~~~~( (All 1nforma11on I' compktd} confidcnual ) BALDING? New Medical Treatment* Proxidil •, an advanced combination of Minoxidil with other Prescription Drugs is far superior to Minoxidil alone Call today for a free consultation. MPB CLINIC Suite 10, 5401 Dashwood 661-2321 'Board Certified MD. dramatika *Framing * Fine Art Posters * Broadway Posters * Cards of All Sorts * and of course ... FUN! 3224 Yoakum Call 528-5457 20% off all custom framing with this ad!! Hurry! Good through 8131185 (W-C-IT~EJ~-. THE PAINT THAT LASTS AND LASTS. Regular Price SALE PRICE S13.99 S].99 Mtg. Rebate _s2.00 Savings Per se 00 Gallon • James Bute Paint Company 4920 San Felipe at S. Post Oak Blvd. Houston, Texas Since 1867 Monday-Friday 7am-5pm - Saturday 9am-3pm 627-1120 Light Hardware & Home Improvements 6 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5. 1985 Firm Seeks Approval to Market AIDS Drug Newport PharmaceuticalH International, a Jliewport Beach. Calif., company, has filed the first application to market a drug to treat Acquired Immune Deficiency Syn· drome (AIDS) and pre-AIDS conditions. The Food and Drug Administration revealed that Newport has applied to market isoprino•ine, a drug that has proven effective in treating AIDS-related complex, a condition which often precedes AIDS. Experience Weekend Returns The Experience Weekend returns to Hous­ton September 28-29. The Experience Wee· kend was founded by the late David Goodstein, owner of The Advocate and author of SuperlwinR. and Dr. Rob Eich­berg, a psychologist. Rob servei; as facilit­ator for the Weekend. The purpose of the Experience Weekend is to transform the participant's individ· ual experience into greater contexts of health, love, happiness, and full •elf­expresmon. Activities included in the Weekend are lectures, processes (exercises and guided meditation), and shanng. Each Weekend is coordinated by pre­VIOUS graduates of the Weekend who want to share this workshop with others. All Weekend stnffpo.~itions, except the facilit­ator, are voluntary. The Weekend is for women and men, 18 years or older. The total tuition is $250. Last year The Weekend donated $2000 to the Montrose Counseling Center, the Montrose Clinic, and the Gay Switch· board. To reserve a space for The Experience Weekend, a deposit of $100 is required. For more information, call !164-0280. )tqeltUlrials '- JIM DAVIS Jim Davis, 57, died Aug 21 , 1985. He had been diagnosed as having AIDS He is sur­vived by a son, Jimmy, of Greenville, Miss Donations may be made in Jim's name to the KS/AIDS Foundation. JOHN R. BEHRENS John R. Behrens. 55, died Aug. 20, 1985. and is survived by his lifemate of 18 years, Robert C. Park: his parents, Mr. & Mrs. C.C Behrens of Florida. a brother: and two nie­ces. John was most recently president of Micro Innovations, a computer consulting firm He was previously Associate Adminis­trator at St Luke's-Texas Children Hospital in Houston He was a member of Citizens for Human Equaltty of Houston and a member of the board of directors of the Greater Montrose Business Guild GARY SCARBERRY Gary Scarberry, 33. of Houston, died Aug. 23, 1985, alter a lengthy illness He 1s sur­vived by his father and twin brother in Columbus. Ohio Until requiring hospitali­zation earlier this year, Gary was a bar­tender at the Montrose Mining Co. Prior to that he was a bartender at the Old Planta­tion in Houston Donaltons may be made in Gary's name to the KS/AIDS Foundation OUR POLICY: The Montrose Vooce will com· rnemorate the passing of Montrose residents and Houston gay commuruty members with a one or two paragraph announcement Friends or relatives of the deceased are ul<ed to provide us w•th facts about the person's hte. names of the closest survivors. and bur· tal arrangements Prose or ... erse can be included Pictures are appreciated and wdl be retumed Name of the deceased should be attached to the photo. Jnformauon should be provlded to the Montrose Voice at the earheet pC>SS•ble date and will be pub­fashed 1n the ne.xt av11labte edition There •S no charge for !hos service You're never too old to quit blowing smoke. &•a American Heart V Association WE'RE. F-IGHTI% ~ 'rQJRUFE. ,.....10% OFF PARTS & LABOR~ ~ PETE GIORGETTI STEVE WRIGHT ~ ~ ~ :~: rL ,~- =t', ~ • ~ ·-~ · - ~ r ~· .i i PI-~T~~·~P!; .... _ ~ ~ ~ > ._ COMPLETE ::o ~ AUTOMOTIVE ~ :!: SALES AND SERVICE~ ~ Mon.-Ffl 8am-5:30pm ~ .,e AFTER HOUR 0 0 EMERGENCY SERVICE ::D ..- CALL 523-0585 :; ~ 1 COUPON PER NVOICE ~ -j. 1901 TAFT 528-1901 ~ w. t:t08V1 'll S.1t:t\td :t:tO %0 ~ ....... HOSPITAL INSURANCE MAJOR MEDICAL Ages 19-34-$45.30 35-49- 50.84 50-64- 70.01 Monthly Bank Draft Insurance Office 523-9822 Group Rates Individual Issue Chain reaction The fallout is hepatitis B infection. There 1s no cure . But hepalllls B can now be prevented for most people. For more information, ask your doctor or clmic, or call the American Uver Foundation, Cedar Grove, N.J. 07009, 1-800-223-0179. Commentary Queen of the Desert By Sharon McDonald Special IQ the Montrose Voice Th~ face is imperious, staring straight out of her 18th century portrait. Eyes wide open and unflinching in a regally beauti­ful face, she's fixing the portrait painter with a look that should have curled his brushes. This is one tough dyke. Little Hester Stanhope dismayed her upperclass English parents by arriving in the world in 1776 equipped with the per· sonality of a charging bull. Rude, uncon­trollable, and a distinct tomboy, Hester proceeded to grow to a solid six feet in height. That alone was considered a rather hostile act by a woman. Hester's mother was the sister of Eng­lish Prime Minister William Pitt, so just eliding quietly into the background of English high society was not an option for her. No matter how much of a smart aleck she was (and she was) she was still Lady Hester Stanhope. It was noted early on that Lady Hester had a decidedly mascu­line style about her, and there was unplea· eant gossip, but there wasn't much that could actually be done about this shocking niece of the prime minister. While the lords and ladies cluck-clucked, Lady Hester found her own kind of friends. After all, we are everywhere. As a young woman she hung out with Georgi­ana, the Duchess of Devonshire, and the duchess' constant companion Lady Eliza· beth Foster. Lady Foster came from a long line of notorious individuals, the Hervey family A popular saying was, "There are men, women, and the Herveys." One of thoAe previous Herveys was Baron of lckworth (I am not making this up) John Hervey, who was nicknamed "Lord Fanny" by the Pope. As Vern Niven ~urns it up in her biography of Lady Hester Santhope in Lesbian Lives, "Lady Heeter deliberately chose the more questionable portions of her society and soon achieved a notoriety we can only view as intention· ally acquired." Our kind of woman. Another of Hester's buddies was the Duke of Cumberland, a gentleman who always kept around him a court of beauti­ful young men. There turned out to be no basis for the wild hope in some circles that Lady Hester and the Duke would reform each other. While the lords and ladies cluck-clucked, Lady Hester found her own kind of friends. After all, we are everywhere. ------- Young English ladies of the era tradi­tionally debuted at elaborate balls. Lady Hester's was a masquerade ball, where the young women guests arrived in delicate costumes and Hester arrived in drag, or as a duchess who was present carefully dee· cribed Hester's attire: ". . . a costume which had nothing feminine about it except the mask." In 1802 when Heeter was 26 years old, she made her first trip abroad, meeting and comparing notes with another well· appointed lesbian ofherday,Maria~arol· ina, the Queen of Naples. But then 1t was back to England, where she became her uncle William Pitt's confidante, sitting with him at state dinners and blistering the ears of the guests with her irreverent commentary. Unlike most of his contem­poraries, Pitt liked Heeter, but ev~n he might have been appalled by her dmner table parody of what she called "the Dev· onehire House lisp." Well, all good things must come to an end, if only to make. way for n~w good things. In 1806 W1lham Pitt died, and Lady Hester experienced a sudden and forceful fall from grace she , had .b.een afforded by virtue of her uncle s position. With Pitt gone, Hester was unceremon­iously dumped by many of the people who had barely tolerated her till then. For two years she visited with her remaining friends then finally took off for Wales. No, not for 'the solitude, but just the opposite. She had been to Wales two years before, and had met a young Welsh woman named Elizabeth Williams. At long last, love! Lady Hester was 32 years old. Elizabeth and Hester spent the next few years in Wales and England, but mean­epirited gossip and bad feeling plagued them. In 1810 they gathered a group of mostly women servants and Lady Hes· ter'e personal physician, turned their backs on England, and set sail. The ent· ourage went through Gibralter and got as far as Malta before Elizabeth left and returned home. Lover's quarrel? Seasick? Culture shock? We'll never know, but Eli­zabeth left and Hester sailed on. Traveling through the Middle Wast, Lady Hester finally gave up all vestiges of traditional English femininity and began wearing completely masculine attire. This tall handsome, masculine-appearing wo~an who was so intensely disliked in England was an instant hit with the pashas of the Middle East-so much so that she was the guest of a pasha at hie private harem bath. Vern Niven quotes biographer Joan Haslip'e account of Lady Hester's initial foray: "The first time Hester Stanhope entered the ladies' baths, women fled m dismay, covering their faces, marveling !1t the audacious young boy who dared to dis­turb their privacy, but soon they disco­vered their mistake and the Turkish ladies . .. made timid overtures of friendship to the English princess, who usually so criti­cal of her own sex, now went into raptures over the beauty of Asiatic women. It amused her to go to the Mamman and watch them bathing . . . and soon she was a constant visitor in all of the harems of the neighborhood." As the guest of a Lebanese prince, Hee­ter Stanhope rode through the streets of Damascus in 1812 with her face unco­vered, a crime for a woman that was puni­shable by death. She continued to travel, and in 1816 was rejoined by Elizabeth Wil­liams after a six year absence. Finally, it was time to settle down. Elizabeth and Hester found and pur­chased an old monastery in the Synan desert, which they rebuilt to more closely resemble a fortress. They each had separ­ate apartments within the structure which were some distance from the other rooms; even in the 19th century, some lesbians just need more space. While she traveledd in the Middle East, Lady Hester had been financially assist­ing the various pashas in their wars with each other. She continued to do this as she and Elizabeth lived in their fortress, admitting as guests all who came to meet her, especially poets and anyone intereted in the occult. There was one exception to her hospital­ity. Lady Hester did not allow Europeans in her home. Arab locals called Hester Stanhope the Queen of the Desert.. . Bad times arrived in 1826, begmnmg with Elizabeth's death from an accidental overdose of medicine taken when whe was ill. With the loss of Elizabeth, Lady Hester lost her own vitality, and the rema~ing years of her life were years of detenora· tion. The fortress went to ruin, and Lady Hester's temper, always fierce, now went unchecked, and she punished her servants cruelly. By all accounts, Lady Hester drifted toward madneA& during the end of her hfe. A year before she died, she insisted that nearly all of her servants leave, and she sealed off all entrances to the fortress but one. In 1839 Lady Hester Stanhope, British eccentric and lesbian, fasted to death. Sharon McOoneld 11 a nationally syndicated colum­nist T 0 w E R SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 THE 17th ANNUAL MISS CAMP AMERICA® PAGEANT Emena~nmem EYem of •he Year For Ticket Availability Call 522-5560 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 Sports Voice Houston Wins Gay World Series for the First Time from page I Houston 9, Twin Cities 7 In a stirring comeback, Houston wiped out a 7-1 deficit with an eight-run seventh inning. With one out, Houston reeled off eight consecutive hits, including a game­winning triple by Mario Gauna. Houston 6, Milwaukee Wreck Room Wings 4 Sansom 's RBI sacrifice fly in the fifth inning broke a 4-4 tie and provided Hous­ton its championship. Good defense, excel­lent pitching by Stacy and balanced hitting (10 hits) paced Houston. "Thia World Series championship truly is a team effort, as all 15 players contrib-uted in key situations," said coach Bill Sansom. "We appreciated the fan support we received from Houston women's team, the approximately 15 fans from Houston and other teams. It feels tremendous for this team to complete an undefeated sea· son and to bring Houston its first World Series title." Team members from the regular-season Briar Patch team include Bill Sansom, Ken Bailey, Ferrell Bivins, Jeff Broome, Mario Gauna, Dave Gebert, Joey Holton, Bob James, Reggie Osborne, Ricky Palomo and David Stacey. Added to the squad for this tournament were Jerry DeSale, Mario Marchena, Mike Morrison, and Danny Webber, all from Dirty Sally's. Houston Places 4th in Women's World Series Marion & Lynn's Rebels won the consola­tion round and placed fourth overall in the first Women's Gay World Series. Playing in Milwaukee in the tourna­ment which coincided with the men's Ser­ies IX, the Rebels beat a Dallas team 5-4 to take the consolation round crown. In overall play, the team was forced to forfeit to the eventual champion San Diego in the first round. In the second round , they were defeated by Dallas 7-2. In later action. the Rebels regained their win­ning form to capture victories over Chi­cago (f>.3) and Birmingham (16-6). San Francisco was forced to forfeit their last game to Houston. According to Myrt Badding, coach of Beaches Wins Softball Tournament The softball team representing Beaches took first place in the Southwest Invita­tional Tournament held in Tulsa, Okla­homa, over Labor Day Weekend. Beachee outscored their competition 81- 12 with a 12-4 win over Patrick's of Dallas in the finals. Lipstick Makes Steady Climb in Pool Rankings After 16 weeks of play, Lipstick has climbed to fourth place in MSA Bilhards competition. Lipstick earned the new ranking by defeating E/Js. Lipstick fol­lows Bacchus I, the Barn, and JRs, respectively. The pool league's final monthly meeting will be held Sunday, Sept.15, 2:00 p.m.,at Hooters. Information on the League Awards Party, Turkey Shoot and registra· tion for the 1985 Winter League wil be available at the meeting. There's Only One Community Newspaper for Montrose the Rebels, the first round forfeit resulted when an iniured player left the game in the fifth inning, leaving the team with an insufficient number of players. At the time the game was halted, San Diego led 12-4. Cathy Batten, was the team's leading hitter among the women with .429. Barry Pirkey, one of the men playing for the Reb­els, led the team with .571. Linda Mortier and Shirlene Straton rounded out the top hitters with .400 and .316, respectively. Badding says the team was told by oth· ere at the tournament that the Rebels "gave Houston fine representation." Spe­cifically, they were cited for their neat appearance and sportsmanship. .-. ------------, I I I I I I I I I I I CLIP THIS AD and attach 1t to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I afo/ of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing • Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Emelopes • Amouncements • Imitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • lmoices -.:~ ... o/'t.d1~ ~ Sl:::JEED'r' PRINTii-G SE.=.RY GE I ~;,.; Fast. Rella!* Service. I Excellent Oua111y. Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE I BLVD. I Convm1t'nt Snuthwet t.ocation I bbO r.r.r of Ctwmry ~ro: M ~ I CAU 667-7417 I PICK UP AND DELIVERY I M!MBfll GREATER MONTROSE llUSINBS QJllO. GREATER BElU\Jllf CHAMBER OF COMMERCE I ~-- .,,,.. COl4J0'1 pt'f ~ ill'd/OI ordtr QlfYl(J( I _ll<' _a:irn_DlnM_ Wit_h olt_1"f d_ls<O_lllll O_I sp_<'Cial_ otf~ .l J 110USt OF MEAlS 833 ALGREGG e HOUSTON, TX 77008 e 869- 3319 (1 Block N. of 14th & Studewood) Houston's Most Complete Meat Market 9am- 6:30pm Mon.-Fri. 8am-6pm Saturday /§) RTrrneSJS ~XOH~ NAUTILUS FOR MEN & WOMEN *COUNSELING *60 NAUTILUS MACHINES *SUPERVISION *SAFE UVA TANNING BEDS *WHIRLPOOLS *COMPUTERIZED BIKES *UNIVERSAL *DYNAMIC AEROBIC CLASSES *FREE WEIGHTS *WET & DRY SAUNAS *VERY CLEAN *AIR CONDITIONED *Only $30 with No Start Up* 2900 RICHMOND [,.,. G.....,w1y PlllZIJ PHONE 524-9932 SpectraNet Communications connects telephone, people and business computer systems together. VOICE MESSAGE EXCHANGE (VME) Now available for under $779. IBM PC or compatible with 192k, dual disk required Works on standard phone line and PBX. lnstallatlon, setup & training Included. A timely package for efficient business throughput, scheduling rounds out our VME system to free your time 24 hours a day providing access and control to your system from any touch tone phone. Features: 5 Rolladex-style card file databases. Background operation answers your phone while you use other software in the foreground (e.g. WordStar, Lotus) Automatic voice or data transmission lets you send and receive while you're gone, allowing computerized solicitation of clients. Automatic mailing lists from any or all card files. Easy to use; well documented. Voice editing, like cut-and-paste in word processing. SpectraNet Communications Bus: 520-9336 (Barb) 526-1954 (Todd) Digital Pager 549-3051 24 Hours A group of hardware and software systems developers dedicated to permanent business solutions at an equitable cost Final Plans Are Made for Gay Games II Plans for Gay Games II, which are to be held in San Francisco August 9-17, 1986, have been finalized. The sports, entry procedures and rules and regulations have been announced by San Francisco Arts & Athletics, producers of Gay Games II. The games will be held under the theme "Triumph '86." A cultural week is planned in conjunction with the games. Seventeen individual and team sports will be fea­tured. There are no minimum standards necessary to enter the games. Those at all levels of ability are encouraged to partici­pate. Basketball, bowling, boxing, cycling, marathon, physique, pool, powerlifting, racquetball, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, tria­thalon, volleyball and wrestling are the sports scheduled for Gay Games II. Competition in both men's and women's groups will be held for all sports except wrestling, which will be for men only. At the first gay games in 1982, 40% of the participants were women. Next year, it is expected that the number of participants will be approximately equally divided among men and women. The games' sports committee, chaired by Sara Lewinstein and Hal Herkenhoff, expect more than 5000 participants for Gay Games II, compared with 1300 in 1982. Opening and closing ceremonies are planned for Kezar Stadium, former home of the San Francisco 49ers. Entry fees have been set at $20 per per­son, whether for an individual or a team sport. Additional events may be entered for a fee of $10 each. Most sports have various age groups and some sports, such as track and field and swimming, have many different events. Complete information on how to enter specific sports may be obtained by con­tacting the Gay Games II at 526 Castro Street, San Francisco, California 94114 or by phoning (415) 861-8282. Sports Voice Calendar & Standings Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston Tennis Club 9am-Noon, Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling League Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B. Bowling League 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: Frontrunners. Goll Center, Her­mann Park MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League," 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool League, Bpm, on sponsors' clubs THURSDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Sta­dium Bowl Special Events Sept. 14. Garage sale to benefit Houston Tennis Club Sept 15,22.29' Houston Tennis Club Singles Championship Tournament Oct. 12-13; Annual Texas-OU Tennis Clas­sic, Dallas Oct Texas-OU Football Weekend, Dallas Nov. 9· 11 : Houston Tennis Assn. "Hou-Tex V" June 1986. Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge. Dallas. competing with Houston Tennis Club Summer 1986· United States Olympic Festi­val. Houston :S (/) > ~ 522.4495 ~ 1420 WEsn£JlllER .... ~ q~1 ~·deJJ i :S i (/) r t;eri1CP" > .... ~ ~ .... ~ ~ toEW IVEIWIERS RECEIVE OM: FREE RENT .AL wnH THS Ml J MSA Pool League Standings, Summer League FOLLOWING WEEK 16 TEAM Th11 Weel<, Matches so far, Total games 1 Bacchus I 9-6 14-2 156-82 2 The Barn 6-9 12-4 164-76 3 JR's !Hi 11-5 150-89 4 Lopshck 6-7 11-5 145-95 5 Ranch Hands 6-9 11-5 13<>-110 6StreetCats 10-5 11-5 1~111 7611111 8-7 11-5 126-112 8 Bacchus II 9-6 10-6 136-102 9KondredSpor1tsl !Hi 10-6 1~111 10 E/J's 7-8 6-8 116-124 11 BAB Cowboys 7-8 6-8 106-134 12 Kindred Spirits II 6-9 7-9 114-126 13Sally"aShooters 6-9 6-10 100-140 14Too811 15-0 5-11 13C>-110 15The611 7-8 5-11 116-122 16Al'sPals 9-6 4-12 92-148 17 Hooters 6-7 3-12 75-150 18 Rancheroos 5-10 3-13 92-147 19 Yard Dogs 5-10 3-13 91-149 Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Aug 25 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Donny Kelley 3 Rick Hadnot 4 Randall Dickerson 5 Ron Bell 6 Roch Corder 7 J C. Barrera 8 Rick Dupont 9 Shy Willie 10 Arm1 Albanza BLADDER 1 Tim Syers 2 Oscar Martinez 3 Richard Pregeant 4 Sebastian Velez 5 Lou Garza 6 David He1land 7 Larry Jarvis 8 Ronnie Mauss 9 Rick Massey 10 Thomas Cortez C LADDER 1 Joe L. 2 Rick Knapp 3 Gabe Horp1n 4 Steve Bearden 5 Steve Bryant 6 Roy Mendiola 7 John Murphy 8 Paul Brown 9 Billy Green 10 Oa1w1d Hendrickson COFFEE SHOP 1525 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 529-2289 We've set a goal for ourselves: To create a friendly and personable atmosphere with ~ood ~holesome food at a air price. Check out our cook's dinner specials- Monday thru Friday. A special price for a special meal. SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS NOW LEASING WITH OPTION TO PURCHASE large Beautiful SWlmmlng Pool Controlled Entry Security Remote Controlled Garage Entry High Efficiency AC I Heating ONE BEDROOM-ONE BATH ONE BEDROOM WITH LOFT-ONE BATH TWO BEDROOM-TWO BATH TWO BEDROOM-TWO BATH TOWNHOUSE FROM $375.00 A MONTH OFFICE OPEN DAILY 1100-6:00 2507 Montrose 524-0830 Announcing: LEE BORBA IS NOW AT MERIDIEN LEASING INC. [),,,KlllOI~~~ We Make Your Auto Needs A Pleasant Experience *MERCEDES BENZ BMW ---- 190 E 349/mo 318 i 294 mo 380Sl <>.i9:mo 32.5e 34.5 mo 500 SEL 720/mo ;35j 596.mo CADILLAC BUICK S<.-dan CN\ille 3;5 mo SI..} Ha\\ k 14.5 mo Flet•h\ood 460 mo Somer,et 189 mo Eldorado 43.51mo Elt>ctra 23.5 m<' TOYOTA PORSCHE Corolla 154 mo 944 42.5/mo Celie a 180'mo 928 ii.5/mo Cre~sida 2.59.mo Supra 26.5 -'mo CALL LEE BORBA for any type of vehicle leasing 975-1985 Cash For four Trade 10 MONTROSE VOICE SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson • tt!• •N VERSAI.. PRESS SYNDICATE ~ I And then Joke saw something that grabbed his attention. "Varmints! -· You're all just a bunch ol cheotin' varmints•" Knowing how it chould change the llves of canines everywhere, the dog scientists struggled diligently lo understand the Doorknob Principle. '1his was your suggestion, Edna! ... 'Lers play Twister, everyone, lers play Twister!'" Through patience and training, Professor Carmichael believed he was one of the few scientists who could freely visit the Wakendas. Fortunes Capricorn's Life is an Adventure By Mark Orion For Friday. Sept. 6, 1985. through Thursday. Sept 12, 1985. ARIES-Emotions with a capital "E" are what this week's about. Feelings that nor­mally pass you by will be felt deeply and profoundly, The usual becomes the intense. Everything looms larger than life. Cry and laugh, and let the stars have their way with you. TAURUS-Changes that you've consi­dered making in the past may now present themselves as absolutely necessary. A deci­sion that requires no looking back may take you into strange and unfamiliar territory Be the brave explorer. The time has come. GEMINI-Staying healthy is what you're concerned with right now. It's a good time to begin a new exercise program. Other people are in the picture, so you may want to join a health club or spa. Working out with others could turn into playing around. CANCER-Are you ready to change your line of work and get into something very different? An opportunity could come your way along that line that you may not want to miss. Something you had forgotten will be remembered in order to get the ball roll ing. and there's advice from a relative. LEO- With more energy than you've had tn a long time. you're thinking and working to definite goals. No more of the wishy­washy' No more of the "what'll I do?" syn­drome. You know what you're headed for, and with some careful attention to detail you'll do 11. VIRGO- The new position you're being offered demands more responsibility than you imagined. Rather than being bogged down by this, you find rt extremely stimulat­ing, and an impetus to do more. In helping others, you help yourself to a little bit of what's around you. LIBRA-It's d1ff1cult to make predictions or plans when things are changing so rapidly. Hold on to your sense of relatrve importance. because the winds of change will blow you this way and that. Learn how to fly wrth both feet on the ground. It ain't easy, but you can do it• SCORPIO- The action you've been thriv­ing on is allowing you to find a very creative part of yourself. This week that creativity should take a definite form. Whatever shape ii assumes, go with it and results will be beautiful. SAGITTARIUS-Your ability to stick to the decision you've made is going to be tested The temptation to let somone else make decisions for you will be strong. But what you're working on right now will have far-reaching effects, so trust your own JUdgement and don't get blown away by circumstances CAPRICORN- Others may marvel at and even envy the adventure that your hie is becoming. Remember that not everyone shares this sense of romance and excite­ment; don't show off' At the same time. there's not a thing to be ashamed of, either. Enjoy this run of fun you're having AQUARIUS- The picture clears, and yoc• realize it's time for building and making preparations, rather than trying to achieve everything at once. Diligence, deliberation, a kind of one-day-at-a-time approach makes more sense. Examine the child in the adult. PISCES-Your private self and your pub· lie self are a bit at odds with each other. This looks like a point of coming out of the closet that you thought you'd passed, or maybe one that you're not ready for Don't take two steps back for every one forward; open that door I SUNDAY BEER BUST 2:30 til MONDAY BEER BUST 9pm Tuesday Movie Sept. 10 ON THE PATIO 10 PM Member Play Safe! Don't miss "The Group's" production of "One" benefit for the KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston. Channing Hall. First Unitarian Church. Sept. 19-21. 8pm. Reservations- 522-2204. ~ 1022 WESTHEIMER 528-8851 ~ SEPTEMBER 5. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 Free Lance Journalists Houston's largest alternative publication, the Mont­rose Voice, has positions available for free lance jour­nalists to cover news items.of interest to our readers. Important: We are seeking journalists-not commenta­tors. We need writers of factual stories-not editorials or reviews. We need in-depth investigative articles and major news features and interviews. We serve, in combination, Houston's large and influen­tial gay community and the general Montrose population. Submit samples of your work-and ideas you have for stories-to Linda Wyche, Montrose Voice editor, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. 11G;. 'OFF"PA~Sll7!5' CX'e"?m T'a....om>'i! I~ e A/C.REPAIR ;l!I I"" • vw SPECIALISTS =i ~ ALSO & FOREIGN CARS a: I~ OPEN • OVER 10 YEARS gJ ~ EXPERIENCE 1cn SAT. e ENGINE ~, I~ CARS OVERHAULS 0 CrRUCK e ELECTRICAL ~I r WORK '"' l:,cvcLES ~I I~ TEXAS STATE ~I ,~INSPECTION STATIO : Ii 238 WEST GRAY ~ I~ 528-2886 l:e OPEN z 8AM-530PM I~· TWO LANES I~. FAST SERVICE O e AUTO REPAIRS I~. MUFFLERS • TIRES • CONVERTERS :1 11?~0:: • .0!!. ~R!! ~D .. !;;N!g'ilo~!f.1 Looking for LEGAL SERVICES? Looking for a FUNERAL . DIRECTOR? Looking for MEDICAL CARE? Look in the Greater Montrose Service and Slwpping Directory in every issue of the Montrose Voice £}ff_fif~~I 'FfDD~:..EJ "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J Adams and Gordon A. Thayer 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5. 1985 U of H Gallery Features Italian Drawings ~ By Albert Puente Montrose Voice Art Critic Italian drawings from the 16th to 18th centuries are currently on view at the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Gallery of the University of HouHton. The exhibition rune through October 20. The exhibition is composed of over 100 drawings taken from The Helen and Loreer Feitelson Collection (organized by the University Art Museum, Santa Bar­bara), The Mary and Leigh Block Collec­tion (Northwestern University), and over 50 drawings found in Houston collections. With Houston's drawings in public view, we have a first attempt assessment of the holdings of Italian Old Master drawings in our city. The Master drawings are predomi­nantly of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Included are the major Italian schools of F1orence, Rome and Vemce. Master artists such as Carracci, Tiepolo, Canova and Tintoretto execute subjects ranging from religion, mythology to landscapes and the human anatomy. Montrose Art - Southwest Funeral Directors 1411 Taft 522-2190 "Venus, Hercules and Mercury (Allegory of Divine Wisdom?) by Luca Giordano now on display at the Sarah Campbell Blaffer Gallery, University of Houston 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily * Cooling System check & flush $27os * A/C Charge & Check $26os * Oil, Filler & Lube $249s A number of le11ser known and several umdentificd artists are also repre11ented One of thee lesser known artists is Pompeo • Batoni. Batoni's Seated Nude Looking Down (1765) and Seated Nude Looking Out (1 765) are two beautifully rendered nude male studies. Both drawings exe- • cutcd in pencil nnd blue paper are heroic • r..-.e to cr>oo vour coo1ong svsten"• • and brilliant. ASK FOR CHIFF BUTTROCK 1411 TAFT-522-2190 -. Even though the high Renaissance had come to nn end, the artists of that period had more or less dictated a certain amount of tradition. One said tradition was the classical depiction of man. A pair of char· coals rendered in this classic depiction are studies of a male arm and a study of a male torso from the School of Jacopi Bassano. Special attention should also be given to drawings of nn antique mask and head of youth, both in red chalk and grey wash, highlighted with white on tan paper. The Italian drawings exhibition is for everyone: student and scholar. But for the lover of Italian art. this exhibition will be of particular joy. To find out more about the special events such as lectures, tours and a Baroque music recital, call 749-1329. International Printing Specialists #/ JfO«' ned '#rik an f!/Ja/W/t' uu can fflu/nL it/ Our Services Include: * Design & Layout * Business Stationery * Business Cards * Flyers, Brochures * Price Lists * Menus * Office Forms including: * Blank Paper Stock: Continuous Forms, Invoices, Copy paper, letter & legal size Purchase Orders, Mailing * Large Mailing Envelopes Labels, Tabs, Interoffice Forms. * Delivery * Wedding Invitations, Social Announcements & Brides Boutique Please consider us for your printing needs - Call 861-0026 so our Sales Staff can asist you with your next printing order. 2103 Yale • Houston, Texas 77008 • Telephone: (713) 861-0026 SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 SATURDAYS ON PACIFIC STREET Saturday ... llam-8pm-Happy Hour Nightly-TV 5 plus the newest music videos and Houston's best burgers. 8pm-2am-Only $1.25 schnapps or Amaretto, plus Houston's most Handsome men-The Party Continues with cruising, video, and dance til close. Never A Cover 808 Pacific 521-2519 14 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5. 1985 Montrose Live Comedy Workshop Matures with 'Infatuation' By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic Today is one of those blah days. I have a cold. So I don't feel like I could be plelllied. let alone terribly excited, by anything. Then I had to write this review .•.. The need to finish this task makes me think back a couple of days to when I saw Premature Infatuation at the Comedy Workshop. The memory lightens my mood considerably. Those people are juRt not content to sit still. They'll never stagnate on their lau­rels. Their style continues to evolve. A few Rhows ago, they introduced the TV monitors and went a little overboard. l'ow they've tamed that beast. put it into perspective, and added two beautiful new dimensions which, having learned their lesson, are already in balance with the rest of the show. One new element is pantomime. Nancy Bacon and Michael Goudeau do a wonder­ful little thing about two budding nerds out on their first date. Some of the moves are so spectacular that they reach over into dance repertoire. The other is conflict. Too often in the past, 81tuations have been solved by eve­ryone agreemg too quickly, too patly. There is one sketch here where that ) . 'Premature Infatuation' at the Comedy Workshop. The memory lightens my mood considerably. Those people are just not content to sit still. happens. Two brothers have allowed their sibling rivalry to carry childhood gai;nes over into their Jaw practice. When a chent appears, one of the brothers has bee_n caught in a jinx and cannot speak unt1l his name has been said out loud in public. Well the client is incredulous at first, of cour~e. But then it develops that they just happen to have hit on exactly the right client. That kind of thing used to happen in .. J every sketch. It started feeling like a cop­out. But it does work. The answer? Bring it into balance. And they finally have. The same three talented men-Goudeau, Frank Militello and Andre Chimene-also do a wonderfully bittersweet sketch about three ex-high school buddies breaking into the school years later. It's the wee hours of the night, right after one's bachelor party. There was a lot of humor, but, also a lot of introspection and real emotion. The improvised dialogue remmded be strongly of a Lanford Wilson script. There was a lot of quality there. That quality is also found in the sketch where Bacon and Dee Maculso play two lesbians trying to convince Chimene to father their baby. True, some of Goudeau's nerdy charac­ters blend into each other. Are they meant to be the same man? It bothered me at first. But not for long. The character is too good for that. Recurring characters, like Marcel Marceau's Bip, are nice. But is this one in balance, yet? Ah, well, as Thomas Carlyle put it, "The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none." By the way, you'd better get to the theater an hour before curtain, at least on weekends. Seating is first come, first served, and on crowded nights ... There are no really bad seats, but there are cer­tainly better ones. o Notes Larry Kramer is turning his play about AIDS, The Normal Heart, into a screen· play. I hope that's good news. One critic said that the play was insulting to eve­ryone, mcluding PW As. A better bet is The Dtt Macaluso and Andre Ch1mene of "Premature Infatuation." Popular demand has led to the second extension of "A .. My Name is Alice," now playing through Sept. 29 on the Alley Theatre's Arena SlaJlC". The C"ast includes (sitting front} Manjane Vandwier. Peggy Ann Byers; (standing) Cheslry Ann Santoro, Karla Burns and Janet Williams Adderley. Group's local production of One, benefit­ting Houston's KS/ AIDS Foundation, September 19-21. Call 522-2204 for reser­vations .... Beth Henley has just had her fourth play, The Debutante Ball, open on the West Coast. She wrote Crimes of the Heart, which opens at Country Playouse tonight. ... Lynn Siefert's Coyote Ugly, a hit for Stages last season, also made it big for Chicago's Steppenwolf Theater. It's expected to open Off-B'way soon .... Art Yelton is the musical director over at the Alley this year. Michael Jones will be taking over the musical reins at Risky Business. You might remember his hand­some voice and accordian playing from Around the World in 80 Ways . ... Houston Symphony Orchestra needs volunteers for its education program in the elementary schools. You do not need experience, a musical background or the ability to play any instrument. You must be willing to appear before a bunch of kids in fifth grade or younger dressed as a cello, a tuba, a kettle drum or a clarinet. Docent training is September 19-20. Call Ginny Cade at 224-4240 .... Equity and the theaters under the LORT contract, including the Alley, have reached an agreement. So there will be no strike. Details of the new contract will not be released until after ratification, which could take a month . ... Dance Magazine critic Elizabeth Elam is forming an informal discussion group that will study dance and dance criticism. 669-9226 .. . . After ~O years at the Alley, the Iris Siff Merry-Go-Round School is moving into the Erwin Heinen Theater, over at Hous­ton Community College . ... Stages is starting stage make-up classes tomorrow (the 7th). 527-8243 .... Karen Douglas will be starting six-week classes in beginning acting at the Actor's Workshop starting September 10 and 11. 850-9121. ... Celebrate! Going back in time-Maurice SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 Chevalier (born the 12th). Valerie Taylor, sixties authoress of lesbian love stories (7th). Marie Therese Louise (8th) became one of Marie Antoinette's lovers, then was tom to pieces by a mob in the French Revo­lution. Richard the Lionhearted (8th), whose "page" Blonde) found him serenad­ing every prison with half of a song he and Richard had written. Poet Albius Ti bull us (7th, 60 BC) who started one group oflines (in the 1720 John Dart translation): "Far from the tender Tribe of Boys remove, For they've a thousand ways to kindle love." And concluded that section with: "But if at first you find him not inclin'd To Love, have Patience, Time will change his Mind." o Openings Goldiggers of 1633 (Main St., 12)-musical adaptation of Moliere's School for Wiues. Opening of the Week! Crimes of the Heart (Country Play­house, 6)-Pulitzer Prize winner- the tra-gidomedy of three flamboyant ::iouthern sisters. Hold Me (Company Onstage, 6)-a revue by Jules Feiffer. One Act Operas (Heinen, 6)-Featuring Mozart's The lmpressario. Rich Hall (Tower, 6)-the comedian who invented sniglets-words for those ever­day things which hadn't been named yet. He's a cast member of both Not Necessar­ily The News and Saturday Night Live. ONO! Emanuel Ax (Jones, 7)-famous pianist appears with HSO Simple Simon (Company Onstage, 7)­S. S. is persecuted for being "different." Cimarron Wind Quintet (Heinen, 8)­Beethoven, Straus and Mozart. ONO! International Art Exhibit (427 Lovett, 12)-L'Alliance Francaise de Houston presents the work of artists from Belgium, France and the United States. There will be a door charge opening night which will cover champagne and hors d'oevres. 526- 1121. 16 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 Films Australian Drama Examines Shattered Relationship By Scott Cutsin1er Montrose Voice Film Critic What can you say when someone tells you that they don't love you anymore? In the new AuRtralian film My First Wife, there is a traumatic moment when the wife admits to her husband oflOyears that she has fallen out of love. And yes, she is hav­ing an affair, too. For her husband John, this revelation literally means the end of his life. He cries, he gets angry, and eventually there is even a suicide attempt. Obviously he is a des­perate man who likes his marriage, even if he cheated himself. He is furious at his wife for ruining what he thought was a good marriage, and he can't understand why or how •he could even think about leaving him and taking their daughter. Surprisingly, the underlying theme in My First Wife seems to be a call for couples to examine their marriages and attempt to stay together. Unlike most films of the sev­enties and eighties, this one tries to exam­ine marital problems and solve them instead of hastily retreating to divorce court. It's an old fashioned return to the ideas of family and morality that seems to be a trend lately. Obviously, John and Helen need each other, but as a married couple they are failing to meet each other's basic needs. They both are cheating on each other, so guilt is a problem. They are having sexual problems that are being discussed after being neglected for way too long. And finally, they don't seem to take enough But there are two sides to every story interests in each othl'r's lives or careers. Like in Kramer vs. Kramer, there is not always a villain when a marriage breaks up. John's wife Helen has been neglected for years, and she also feels the need for the freedom to do things on her own. Sepa· ration is a drastic step, but emotionally she feels that a marriage can't work for her right now. John Hargreaves and Wendy Hughes in "My First Wife" Watching this film, it's easy to translate these problems into helpful hints for gay relationshps also. At a time when long· term gay relationships are becoming more standard and acceptable, many of us will become well acquainted with things like jealousy, guilt, pain, and sexual needs. Living and dealing with a person on a day-to-day basis is often a test of wills and nerves, but it can also be rewarding and beautiful. Fall Films Promise Classier Product By Scott Cutsin1er Montrose Voice Film Critic One would be hard·pressed to come up with some Oscar nominations with the spar•e quality of films so far in 1985. Here we are with two thirds of the year gone, and only a few winners like Silverado, Mask, Purple Rose of Cairo. Lost in Amer· ica. and St. Elmo's Fire come to mind. Acting standouts are even harder to think of with only Cher (Mask), the men of S1/verado, the ladieH of St. Elmo's Fire, some supporting actors in Prizzi's Honor, and John Lone in Year of the Dragon com· ing to the forefront. Still, just when things look the bleakest, along comes the fabulous fall film explo­sion. That wonderful time when the kids go back to school and the "serious" films can peek out of the clo11et. Studios start bringing out their claBSier products, and our favorite actors and actresses appear JUst in time to be considered for Academy Awards. Popular actresses will be abounding at area theaters in a host of exciting new projects. The exquisit Glen Close will appear in a comedy {Maxie) and a thriller (JaRRed Edge), while gorgeous Meryl Streep stars in two dramas: Out in Africa and Plenty, Sissy Spacek, Jessica Lange, and Jane Fonda are prevtou• Oscar nomi· nees who will be gracing movie screens this fall, all of them in dramatic efforts. Other acclaimed ladies like Ann Mar­garet, Ellen Burstyn, Anne Bancroft, and Teri Garr will also be prominant in new features. Of course, there will be plenty of hot actors, too, in everything from heroic adventures to hilarious comedies. Pros like Sylvester Stallone, Jack Nicholson, Chevy Chase, Robert Redford, and the late James Mason will lend their presence to films with action, romance and intrigue. Younger actors like Emilio Estevez, Keven Kostner, Matt Dillon. and Rupert Everett will continue to gain new fans as they grow and mature on the silver screen. The films below are listed by the month of their expected release. Dates often change depending on how crowded the market is, but most of the films will be released sometime before Christmas. A list of movies announced for fall with no specific opening dates is also provided. It looks like quite a thrilling time is in store for serious filmgoera, but as always we have to adapt a "wait and see" attitude. We can only read reviews, pluck down our hard-earned money, and hope for the very best. Rachel Melish and Miss France, m a scene from "Pumping Iron II, The Women" September Agne~ of God-Norman Jewison (A Soldiers Story) brings another Broadway drama to the screen with a plot involving a nun on trial. The mystery surrounding the death of a nun's illegitimate child involves Anne Bancroft as the Mother Superior, Meg Tilly as the accused, and Jane Fonda as the chain-smoking psychiatrist. Looks like Academy Award material by anyone's standards. American Flyers-A new film about bicycling from the writer of Breaking Away. Kevin Kostner (Silverado) helps his dying brother through a cycling clas· sic in this well-reviewed "road movie" by the director of Wargames , John Badham. After Hours- Martin Scorsese's much anticipated farce stare Teri Garr. Melanie Griffith, and Robert DeNiro. The story involves the misadventures of a man in Manhatten'a Soho after a disasterous date. Beer-Loretta Switt(MASHJ stars as an advertising agent who makes an over· night sensation out of three guys who appear in her succeRsful beer campaign. Flesh and Blood-16th century roman· ce laction flick starring Rutger Hauer continued next page My First Wife doesn't give pat answers, and even in the end we don't know what the future will hold (do we ever?). Director Paul Cox(Man of Flowers, Lonely Hearts) says that he just wants his film to "pro­voke people who see it to talk about what their feelings are toward their partners . .. " Maybe by looking deeper than just the surface, we might just understand joint needs as a couple and as human beings. This film was a big winner at the 1984 Australian Academy Awards, with awards for Best Screenplay, Best Director and Best Actor (John Hargreaves). The lead actors (Wendy Hughes and Har­greaves) were both in last year's Careful, He Might Hear You, and they give tre­mendously effective performances here. Hargreaves is especially deRerving of his award for a sorrowful performance that is never overwrought. An entertaining and thought provoking film, My First Wife is definitely a must see for anyone who deals intimately with another person. My First Wife is showing at the River Oaks Theater on Friday and Saturday only at 5:30, 7:30, and 9:30 with Saturday matinees at 1 :30 and 3:30. Million Dollar Stars: Arabian horse Rlkanada stands betu·een Glenn Close and Jeff Brid.Res m "Jagged Edge" SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 er the dof Monlrose! The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 ~-':-­:~\.-.------- 4 ':.~\~~ \ 18 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 Better Movies Predicted for the Fall Season from previou.; page (Bladerunner1 and Jennifer Jason Leigh. This wild adventure through the Renais­sance is filled with sex, violence, and mad· ness that's sure to send moviegoers on the rampage-in one direction or the other. Kiss of the Spider Woman-Already ~cclai med at Cannes and by gay film crit· 1cs, the film stars Raul Julia and William Hurt in a passion play of sex and politics. Hurt plays an effeminant gay prisoner who tells vivid movie scenarios to a revolu· tionary (RauH to pass the time in prison. Proclaimed as a gay cinematic break· through, this film by Hector Babenco(Pix· ote) will definitely be the Mubject of much discussion. Maxie-Glen Close tries a different type of role in this comedy about a woman poA· sessed by the ghost of a " flapper" from the past. Mandy Pantankin (Yentl) and the late Ruth Gordon are also on hand. Miracles-New romantic comedy with Tom Conti (Reuben, Reuben) and the hilarious Teri Garr. Plenty-Sting, fresh from his Bride deb­acle, teams up with Meryl Streep in this post W.W.11 drama. Seems that Streep's character wants to have a baby by a black marketeer (Sting), much to the chagrin of her husband (Charles Dance). October Commando-Arnold "Terminator" Schwarzenegger is a good guy this time around as he attempts to rescue his daugh· ter from kidnappers. His sidekick is Rae Dawn Chong (Choose Me) in this "Rambo"·ish adventure. Sissy Spacek stars m "Marie" Sylvester Stallone in "Rocky IV" Dance u:ith a Stranger-A consuming love affair ends in murder in this drama that was voted Best Foreign Film at the 1985 Cannes Film Festival. Rupert Eve­rett of Anot_her Country plays opposite Miranda Elhs, a stunning newcomer who might nab an Oscar for her acclaimed per­formance. Jagged Edge-Past Oscar nominees Glen Close and Jeff Bridges star in this mystery-thriller involving a million dollar Arabian horse. Seven Minutes in Heaven-High school teens look for friendship, love and identity in this bittersweet comedy. For some rea· son, this sounds all too familiar. Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins-Rollicking adventure film based on the "Destroyer" "eries of books. Star­ring Fred Ward (Right Stuffj and Joel Grey (Cabaret). Silver Bullet-The latest from the mas· ter ofscary tales. Stephen King. This new· est horror feature has the talents of Gary Busey (D.C. Cab and The Buddy Holly Story). . Sweet Dreams_-The life story of country s1!1ger Pa!8y Chne comes to the big screen with Jessica Lange (Country) portraying the star. Ed Harris is her husband in this bio-pic of a life that ended in a shockingly tragic plan crash. Twice in a Lifetime-We've been wait· ing for thi~ one quite a while with Gene Hackman leaving his wife for another woman. Ellen Burstyn is the leftover, and Ann (where has she been?) Margaret plays the new love interest. Should be quite a battle. November Rocky IV-Sylvester Stallone returns to his most successful character after being the top box office hit of the summer in Ram~o. This time Rocky is up against a Russian fighter of enormous strength in the first true world championship. Hope­fully Stallone will keep the high standards of past Rocky films for this unprecedented ~ourth installment of a hugely popular ser· 1es. Santa Claus: The Movie-Takes the !~end of Santa from his miracle begin­nmgs up to modem times. Dudley Moore (as an elO, John Lithgow and David Hud· dleston star in this effecu;·laden spectacle. Target- Gene Hackman is on the come­back trail in a second drama. This one about a man forced to deal with his son after his wife is kidnapped. Matt Dillon plays the troubled son to whom secrets are revealed about a mysterious past. That Was Then, This Is Now-Latest adaption of a S.E. Hinton novel (Rumble{· 11h, The Outsiders) starring Emilio Estevez from St. Elmo's Fire and Kim Del· aney (Jenny on "All My Children"). Dates Unannounced Coca-Cola Kid-From the director of Montenegro comes this outrageous fan· tasy about a young Coke busine,;sman continued next pal(e Anne Bancroft, the Mother Superior and Jane Fonda the psychiatrist in "Agnes of God" ' Ryan O'Neal and Catherine Hicks in " Thf' FPt•er" • Rupert Everett in "Dance With a StranRer" Christmas Season May See Better Movies from prPvtous paf?e sent to Australia to drum up business. Eric Roberts (Star 80) plays the lead in this looney look at an institution, although Coca·Cola (who owns several of its own movie studios) is not at all happy about the concept. Eleni-A story of a mother's courage to save her children during the 1948 Greek Civil War. Kate Nelligan (Eye of the Nee· die), John Malkovich and Linda Hunt star in this story of love and revenge. The Fever-A sportswriter investigates the wild world of gambling in this look at America's $200 billion a year habit. Filmed in Las Vegas by Richard Brooks (l.ookinR for Mr. Goodbar), the film stars Ryan O'Neal, Giancarlo Giannini, Chad Everett, and Catherine Hicks. Marie-Sissy Spacek (The River) stars in this true story about a woman who risks all to take a stand against political corrup· tion. The modem scandel that erupts in the state government is based on the bio· graphy Marie · A True Story by Peter Maas (Serpico). PumpinR Tron II-The Women-From the director of the 1977 film, Pumping Iron that brought Arnold Schwarzeneger into the spotlight comes a true exploration into the sport of women's bodybuilding. Focus· ing on top females including Lori Bow· man, Carla Dunlap, Bev Francis, and Rachel McLish, the film hopes to dispel myths surrounding a relatively unknown sport. The ShootinR Party-The late James Mason makes a final appearance in this British drama about nobility gathering for a "weekend shoot." A complex film involving love affairs, relationships, and even death, this English adaptation co· stars Edward Fox and John Gielgud. To Live and Dte in L.A.-Newestfeature from William Friedkin (Exorcist, Cruis· tnR) about a Secret Service agent search· ing for the killer of his partner. A sophisticated tale of betrayal, murder, and passion, this adventure into the heart of a city just narrowly missed getting an X· rating. Christmas For those who just can't wait, here is a partial list of some of the Christmas goo· dies lined up for December. Back tc School-Rodney Dangerfield takes a late stab at college. Clue-An all-star cast is lined up for interrogation in this adaptation of the popular board game. Color Purple-Steven Spielberg's attempt at serious, adult drama. Jewel of the Nile-Seque! to the popular "Romancing the Stone" w:th Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas both return· ing. One Magic Christmas-Mary Steen bur· gen stars in a holiday film in the style of It's A Wonderful Life. Out of Africa-Meryl Streep is a married author having an affair with none other than Robert Redford. Spies Like Us-Madcap comedy star· ring Chevy Chase and Dan Aykroyd. Two Jakes-Jack Nicholson returns in this sequel to Chinatown. White Nights-Mikhail Baryshikov and Gregory Hines are defectors to Amer· ica and Ru88ia respectively in this drama about troubled ballet dancers. YounR Sherlock Holmes-Another Spielberg effort about Watson and Holmes meeting when they are very young. " ... In the heart of The City" $44 00 · FRH AJRPOllT SHllTTLE · COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE & WINE • · COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL llREAJ<FAST (large single/double occupancy) • VAi.iT SfRVICE • • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required please coll Toll Free 800·253-5263 (Notional) 800·521·4523 (Colit J (415) 441. 514• (So"'I Fro"'lc1scal 131.5 POLK ST.1 SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 NEW HOURS EFFECTIVE SEPT. 9 (Monday) OPEN 7AM HAPPY HOURS 7am-7pm STIFF DRINKS ICE COLD BEER HOT MEN Ne-w Sound Live D.J. Great Music D.J. MARDI COLEMAN -ALWAYS- 50¢ DRAFT BEER NOW OPEN!! lj. 4dams~ Ltd. 611 Hyde Park 528-9079 20 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 Montrose Classified GAY/LESBIAN PARENTHOOD B1WF, 31 ; a happy. attractive, intelligent and stable profeas1ona1 seeking B1WM profess1onat 27-37, exploring marrying and having children As 1 nurtur11nt father. I envision creatively working through our becoming companions and parents while making room for other re11- honsh1ps Reply Blond Bo• 25'4C c/o V0tce. ANNOUNCEMENTS ARTISTS/ARTISANS WANTED Ma1or gallery IOOk1ng for artists/ artisans for possoble representatoon. For appoint­ment call Val 5~. Tues.-Frl., 10-5 LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice. a general c1rculatton newspaper havong publoshed conhnu­ously for 1 year or longer. 1s qualofoed to accept legal nohces attect1ng the news­paper's circulation area Montrose CARS & BIKES ASCOT LEASING 1303 Upland, 973-0070 (See our dosplay ad this oasue) DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE Br\Jn Apts , 2007 Br\Jn, 1 & 2 bedroom apts now leasing 1 mo free rent, limited otter. New security, new swrmm1ng pool. newiy redone complex 861-5556 FORECLOSURE SPECIAL IST Many locahons, 0-3~ down payment. easy quahftcat1ons Homes. townhomes. condos 524-6730 HOUSE FOR SALE Medical Center area. Large 2 story, 4 bedroom. 3 bath, large back yard and garage apart­ment Very private 526-7946. Lease-purchase avaolable FAEE HOUSING 1nexehangeforyardwork, home improve­ment carpen1ry, landscaping, and house work Would not interfere wrth full-time employment. Straight looking and actong only Can dlSCJ'etely arrange woth profes- ~'g1~~ ~~~~':.;t~~~~ Box 25'4S c/O Open House-Garden Oaksaffla 1123 w 31&1 St 1-5 pm Sunday, September 8 3-1 brick, harct.oood, ce1hng fans. mono blinds, new paint, landscaping, deck, 110rage bu1ld1ng Tr- Fenced Assuma· ble $52.000 Loan 11~ 25 year Appro• $575 00 total $7.500 equity Owner l•nanco c:onsldered Owner/agent 88()- 5174 THE GARDENS CONoOMiNiUM­NOW LEASING 2507 MONTROSE BLVD. 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N-""'TOWiiCK.. -. -- 212'11/ 1 Vaulted celongs. fireplace. fenced Great for roommates Must aee $675. 688-4757 VOICE ADVERTISING WO~ Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Ctassof1ed. Call 529-8490 ~~!~~a~r:b'.t ~J~~:n~~~~. .e: 'e':c":r"ci or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Accepting applic;.;o;;;speed bartender, C&W atlotude BAB 52&-9192 Alan. (MISC.) FOR SALE FOR YARD SALES See ads under "Yard Sales" at the end of t"4' Montro5'1 Ctass1f1'1d MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS MASTER MASSEUR ~lt1e~?su~e~:;v,:,C!, bta1~~~';;':;t(7~~ 52&-3147 Thanks INSOMNIA? MASSAGE! BUT the same moves 1n different proportions can be very 1nv1gorating Wake up with Bill o·Aourke! (Wednesdays and Thurs­days 20'llo Off.) 86~2208 --- -BODY MASSAGE Full body massage Hot 011-tn or out Bruce 622.()370 HEAL THY BODY MASSAGE Galleria. David (713) 622~530. ET PERSONALS HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SCOTT 2t and countong love. Bruce GWM, 30. 5'8", brown/blu-eg-o-o"d't"o'_ok,...1-n­g and hot Seeks 1he same for fnendsh•p and possible relationship Reply Bhnd Bo• 25'4A c/o Voice GWM. 32. 6". 155. blonde. blue. good tookmg, masculine. secure. stable. Inter­ested in meeting masculine. good look­ing. well built. stable outdoor types not onto bar scene. Send letter with photo and phone. D1scret1on assured Bo• 253T c/o Voice OUR POLICY on Sexually-Explicit Adver­tising: The Montrose Voice does not behave that human beings engaging on sexual acts with one another 1s immoral. It 1s abnormal. in fact. for a person not to engage in sexual actrv1ty Therefore. our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relat1onsh1pa. encounters. adven­lures. etc All advertising should, how­ever, not contain language that would offend an unsuspecting reader GWM. 36. 6'2", 185. brown hair. btueeyes. moustache, versatile Wants fnendsh1p, stable retatoonsh1p 3()-'40 No smokong or drugs Reply Blond Bo• 251B. c/o Vo•ce. G 'M,-GIF, Runners end joggers wanted Front Runners 681-5679 A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their new book, · c1ass1f1ed Attairs," they'll tell you how to wnte an ad that really stands out, what to e•pect when you place or respond to an ad, and even what all those funny httte abbrev1ahons mean. Send $8 to "Classof•ed Atta1ra." Aly­son Pub . Dept P-5, 40 Plympton, St , Boston, MA 02118 (Also included wdl be a coupon for $5 ott on your ne•t Personals in your choice of 25 gay pubhcat1ons. 1nclud1ng t~ontrose Vooce.)__~- PLAY SAFE Sele se• is fun, erotoc. Play safe, for your sake. for your partner's sake YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? __ Announce It here then st1nd back for the crowd Call 529-8490 or v1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sate announcement Keep vour working parts in order. .:a American Heart V Association wrR! P -HTlf\¥3 Fa? lOJl~ulL BO/, TH'h IS GETTING IMICUlOUS .. I FEEL LIKE l'M BEii'-(, BlRIED IN PAl'ffili.X)RI\ .. . Are you spending Hundreds of Dollars for a little ad lost in a magazine of a Hundred Pages, and which is read mostly by people Hundreds of Miles Away? OH NO! Join those who have made the smart choice. The cost-effective choice. Put that ad in the Montrose Voice instead and you'll reach an estimated 28,000 weekly readers-IN HOUSTON. Whether you're selling a car, looking for a roommate or advertising a club or other business-you'll get greater results. for less money, from the Voice. This is because we have about twice the Houston circulation at about half the cost. That makes the Montrose Voice-in cost effective­ness- about a 4-times better buy for HOUSTON adver­tising. Yes the other guys have greater circulation statewide. But the Voice has greater circulation locally. In your market-where perhaps 95% of your customers come from. Say YES to the smart alternative- the Montrose Voice. Call us, 529-8490. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE honest journalism, cost-effective advertising, community involvement Tttl\NKS. ~S ... I NEf.DtD 'ffif\T ONE OO'AA SHOVELFUL TO PUT nJINGS INTO I\ HU\Qlf{ P£R5P£c:nv£ ' . - On the Town ACCOMMODATIONS {for Visitors to Houston) Houston Gun t House 106 Avond11e -5z3:" 2218 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Eaglecrnt lnn - 104 Avondale- 520-9767 GAY BARS iiiCc'hut=s23lovett - SzJ.3396 lesbian e;r;;-1~1i1c 528-9427 counlry 81you L1nd1ng- S34 WesfhiMmer .:-~9 opening SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Beaches -2700 Albany •* m pool SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Brazot River Bottom 2400 Braz_o_s_ _5 28-_91_9_2 country SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Heaven Pacihc at Grant-521-9t23 dlSCO SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mary 1-1022 Westheimer-528-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrose M•nino Co-805 l'acihc - 529-1"'88 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mother LOde C1le & Saloon 804 Pee~ 05H SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE .N.u..m..b er1 2 300 Wnthe1m8r'"-52&-M51 nu fiMt 811 611 Hyde Park-- 52&-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Tw1n~1r1 Rd ~27-1'113 -­Vent;;;;;; r-2923 Mam- 522-0000 --­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE RESTAURANTS Milt.her Lode C1ft & S.'oon - 804 Pecihc-523-- 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD• IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOW CAN I STOP THl'3 MAAKCTING CAMPAIGN? I DON'T HP-.Y£ t-1.,01 CLOUT IN THE. ::fl:- CCX"1PAN'-,' · [l)P£C1ALL'f SINCE WITHERSl'{)(N STOLE CREDIT FlR Ttl£ li}10LE IDEF\ ... PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Club Houston Body Centre 2205 Fannin -M• •998 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE F;ench Ou~et-320' Loulalana-527· 0782 VACATIONS VISITING SAN FRANCISCO?-­DOLORES ST BED & BREAKFAST 41~1-5887 OR WRITE MARC 381 DOLORES ST , S F , FOR INFO For Houston travel agents see "'Travel Agents" on the Grealer Montrose Busi­ness Directory, next page __ NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE 1118 Ursulones. (504> 566-1177 See our dosplay ad monthly on the Montrose Voice SAN FRANCISCO: LELAND HOTa 1315 Polk. 1· 800-253-5263 or (415) 441 - 5141 See our display ad monthly on the Montrose Voice Lookinlf for AUTO REPAIR? Look in the Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Director)', in every issue of the Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat SELECTED EVENTS SEPT SEPT IN FUTURE WEEKS 6 7 SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT 8 9 10 11 12 Ct1tene tor incluSiOn n 7-0rt C11encsar and M.ontrote Aewurces 1 Evenl or group musi gpectftca»y pertain to netghbOrl"tOOd of Montrose or Houston 1 gay community unless mapr city state or nauona holiday or majOr n1.Uonal gay Cl'lent. ? Strictly commercial events not included 3 Buamess dvic and IOcia groups and the r t'V~tl ere geneflilty qu1fifted • Political events whefe onty one view of a 1ut)Jecl candidate or party fl dOm•nant not qualified For add bon11 mformati0n or phone number& look tor the sponaoting orgamza1JOn un<lef Aesourc• • Typestyles Indicate events' location: Eventa in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere, Events or Area lnter81f SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH7 DAYS • IN I WEEKS: Gay Political Caucus meeta 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm St>pt. 13 • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFI', FM·90, 8:15·10:30am • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR. 1919 Decatur • SATURDAY; KS/AIDS Foundation meet.a 3400 Montroee, no. 501, llam • SATURDAY: Houston Gay Health Advocates meet 7:30pm Sept. 7 • SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 9am·noon, MacGregor Park • SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center • SUNDAY: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm. Stadium Bowl • SUNDAY: Gay Asians & Friends meet 3pm Sept. 8 llSUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes • SUNDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett 0 Brien's Oyster Bar «>& Weattltumer-52• · 0105 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Perky·1-RIC!'lmond I t Kirby 52•4.175 Rai'Ph't -515 W Al1barn1 -~~-­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE RMC"als 2702 Kirt>~ ~-­Second vne::3619w"Uhi"Oton::M2..-n3 Spaniah flower -3921 Ma•n-889-1700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE w~u1e·1 880- W•t?teunet at Mof,lfoM-- 528- 5411 • MONDAY: Frontrunners run from Golf<A-nt.er, Hermann Park • MONDAY: Integrity mceta 7:30pm Sept. 9, Autry House, 6265 Main • MONDAY: Montroee Art Alliance meeta Sept. 9 •MONDAY: KS/AIDS Foundation & Montl'Ofle Coumeling Center AIDS IUsk Reduction (Safe Sex) Workshopa, 8pm Sept.9 • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain llTUESDA Y: Lesbian/ Gay Resource Service, Univ. of Houston, meeL• 2:30pm SepL 10, Spindletop Room, Univ. Center, Univ. Park llTUESDA Y: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llTUESDA Y: MSA '"Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm llTUESDAY: Montroee Symphonic Band meeta Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm llTUESDAY: Lutherans Concerned meets Sept. 10, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh llTUESDAY: Citizens for Human Equality meets 7:30pm Sept. 10, Houston House, 1617 Fannin. 9th floor llTUESDAY: HouRton Data Professionals meets 7:30pm SepLlO • WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennie Club plays 7:30pm, Homer Ford Tennie Center • WEDNESDAY: Neartown Business Alliance meeta 7pm Sept.11, Liberty Bank, 1001 Wemheimer • WEDNESDAY· MSA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY: Overeat.ers Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold llTHURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center WI'HURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 WI'HURSDAY: Avondale Association meets 7:30pm Sept. 12, Christian Women's Center, 310 Pacific WI'HURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 9pm, Stadium Bowl. tl200 Braesmain •1N 1 WEEK Baytown lambda meets 7 30pm Sept 13 •IN 1 WEEK Garage sale to ~nefit Houston Tennia Club Sept. 14 N 1 WEEK: T•as Freedom F•!IYal. "Pride nt: 85." Dallas. Sept. 14-22. with Texas Freedom Parade and "Celebration In lM Parle" Sepl. 22 •IS 1 WEEK. Houston North Prcfeosionals meeta 7:30pm. Sept. 14 •I!\ 1 WEEK: GPC's 10th Annivenary Dinner Sept. 14 • IS t WEEK Houston TennlB Club ~lea Championship Tournament S<pt. 15, 22, 29 • IN 1 WEEK Choices meeta lpm N?t.15. Mutenion YWCA, 3615 Willia • ll\ 1 WEEK Parenta FLAG meets 2pm, s.,,t.15. Presbyterian Center, 41 Oakdale • IN 2 WEEKS. KS AIDS Foundation u-airung weekend Sept. 21·22 • IN 2 WEEKS HouelOn Area Gay & l..Nbian Engineers &: Scientist.& meet 7pm Sept.24 • IN 2 WEEKS Montrotie Civic Club t l'.artown) meet.I 7pm Sept.24, 1413 Westheimer lllN 2 WEBCS Yom Kipper. Sept 25 • IN 2 WEEKS Greater Monu-oee Buinesa Guild mecta 7pm ~- 25, Brennan'• Restaurant, 3300 Smith •N .. WEBCS Human Rlghll Campaign Fund CIV>UOi awadl, WaldOlf Allorla Holel, N-Yortc. Oct. 9. honoring TY hoot PllD Donahue. publllhe< Gloria SI.._,, 6 lmnbda legal OelenM 6 Ec*Jcallon Fund •N 5 WEBCS T•at-OU Foolbatl WMkend. Ooflas mtN 5 WEBCS: Annual l • blan 6 Gay Pride Conference. R. tauderdole, Ao, Columbus Day Weekend ll1N 5 WEEKS: Columbus Day, Od 1' •IN 5 WEEl(S: Alftrmallon/Gay and l•blan Mormons nattonol conference. San Diego. Od 14-15 • IN 6 WEEKS Fall WNtheuner Colon'· Art Festival Oct. 1920, 1001 w .. tlieimer • IS 7 WEEKS: Houston Tnathlon l\', Oct.26 lllN 7 WEEJ(S· Hol1-\ Od. 31 a WEBCS Election Day, NOY 5 • !N 9 WEBCS Houston Tennis Aun. "ffou.T• V' NOY. 11-11 9 WEEl(S v....an·s Day, NOY 11 f.10 WEEKS. T•as Gay Rodeo. Houslon. NOY. 1 !>-17, wllh judging Mr 6 Ms Rodeo No\<. 1' lllN 11 W(EJ(S: Thanksgiving. NOY. 28 • IN 11 WEEKS Turke) Trot Fan Run. No,· 21' • IN 14 V.'EEKS Jingle Bell Fun Run, °"' 15 • IN 15 WEEKS. Chrls!moa. Dec. 25 ll:N 16 WEBCS N.,. Year's he. Dec 31 • IN o4& WEEKS Gay~ II, Aug 9, 1916. San FrancllCO mtN 1 VEAi!: o4lh anntv8'Kll)' of lederol ruling ogoinll state·s "hornoMKual ~.,,.,,. Aug 17, 19&2 • IN 1 YEAR 1.SOth birthday of City of HoW110n, Agg 30 lllN 96 WEBCS Un!Y9rsal feflowshlp ol Melropollan Community Chufeheo 6 l>lgnlly lrlernatlonal slmUHaneous lriemaltonol COi ...... 1C81July1f.26 1917, Miami/ R l auderdole 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5. 1985 Greater Montrose Service Ir Shopping Directory TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE OR IN THE MAIN FRONT PAGES Of ".HE MONTROSE VOICE CAL.. 529-8490 'MEKDAY~ 10. M-53CFM. ADULT VIDEO RENTAL WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay video service 1420 Westhe1mer 522-4-485 ft1ilfJi;ll~11~1H------ PROVIDING AsERVICE? Keep 1t 11sted tiere 1n the Montrose Voice where literally tt>ousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS - Advertise your professional service through a Voice Cla551foed Call ~8490 Pay by check or charge rt on your Amer1- can E•press Diner's Club MasterCard, Visa or Carte Blanche STEFFECK ADVERTISING 933-3333 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE fdlH;t!)lm:J.i ------ Fred & Elhel's Car Clean Free pock up and delivery service 520-1424 AUTO SALES LEASING ASCOT LEASING LTD. 1303 Upland. 97~70 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mill•l;tli@m _____ _ Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or1Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel EIOClrtcal Repalf 526-3723 2110 Fatrv1ow Gay Owned & Operated ALL PAINT I BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland 65~131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE U11 Tait 522·2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PISTONS UP 1901 Tai~ 526-1901 Sff OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIR & BODY SHOP 2001 Harold. 522 5255, 526-1940 CHIROPRACTIC CARE ROBERTS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 1305 Waugh 521-2003 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE CLEANING. JANITORIAL Becks Cleaning Specializing in Bars Professional Service We Care How Yoi. Look 528-9427 (8am-11am) SERVICE PLUS 526-6245 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE COMPUTER-AHA TEO DIMENSIONS IN SCANNING 1820 Heights Blvd 864-7845 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE 111nml\1111:rn ------ PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY ASSOC 4622 Waker 926-2182 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE 111m~11;1111111m1 ____ _ WILMARK CONSTRUCTION co. We do remodeling, room additions, minor plumbing, electrical. No job too small or too large. 521-1377 RONPETERS. D.D.S. EXAM, X-RAYS, CLEANING $25 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Houston, TX 77006 Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appooniment (713) 524 -0538 111m1~1ii-------- B&G PLANT CO 2600 Houston Av, 862· 1213 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 526-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ril'B----- FITNESS EXCHANGE 2900 Richmond. 524-9932 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 OashwOOd #10. 661 -2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE r:Wlfl?IM)hP-___ RON"S HAIR STUDIO 1310 H-lhom• 521-3000 Your Barber/ Stylist in NW Houston is Hank Wierzba 680-3166 682-9495 Barchus Barber Shop 727 N.W. Mall Bm11111mm1H---- TIME FOR A/C REPAIR? $25 pluo p•rto. CALL 843-0398. Mid Town Air Buy & Hll window A/C S.r-.lc• •II br•ndo A/Co 521 -~7~yo ml\111mmu ______ f Jr a1 yo~;-;-nw;;;;ce n8ects Call Joan Brownrodge. 524-3939. LEGAL SERVICES ])A.VII> SOSEBEE ATTORNEY AT LAW a lawyer who care.s about Montrose W..!1-!H)HH NO CHARGE tor 1ntt1al consultat1on AFFORDABLE FEES-quoted upfront Evenings and w&ekend appomtments o DWI o Possession ol Drugs '1 Prostitution o Lewd Conduct C' Debi Rehel o Bankruplcy o ln1ury Claims o Job & Accident and other areas _ I ~\~·1=1-'lHnt ~:..!00 3816 W. Alabama, Suite 212 M•mber Hams County Cmninat L•wte'1 Assoc ation Da¥1c:1 Sosebee rsoz BEJ .. liCel\Hd .!!~=-.~~~~ N Cert by H Bd <g ~ LAW OFFICES OF R.R. RAINOSEK Generai practice. tree consultations DWI DIVORCE. BANKRUPTCY INCORPORATIONS PER· SONAL INJURY. JOB INJURY, OTHER LEGAL SERVICES Reasonable Rates 222· 7144 ANS 2• HOURS enwe1 by lhe Te•• preme Court •nc:e19 z MfMBEA Of TMf TE.r:AS CR tu NAL DEFtNSE LAWYERS A ATl()N N Cert by T~ll 8' t eoa 1;pe 1 za1 STUDENT LOANS Guaranteed Acceptance-Ideal for grad­uate students 524-6730 MAINTENANCE. GENERAL - F.S.L-:-GfNERAL REPAIR SERVICE- 850-1122 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE lqlll!!RdlRa;H------ sTEvE D MARTINEZ. M.D 2801 Ella Blvd , suite G. 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE IT WAS OK, BUT I COOLO NMR FIN~ A RELIABLE BA'?H SITTER .. 1~mtm1H -------- MOVEMASTERS Bo•es. 1001 Visa. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westheomer. ~6555 Moving? Bulldog Movers. Reasonable Rates. 521-1377 1a•1Hm11;m• PEST CONTROL 993-0663 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL TPCL #05640 VISA MASTERCARD PHOTO OE VE LOPING ---C~ALIG-ULA PHOTO LAB 2513 E1men, 520-7061 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE IQ•l\1f!1l:Uf3•i POSTAL BOXES SPECIAL $8 per montt"I. Special. Pnvate forward• ~~~ u~;t·~~~~d:,;.,!'t~~~~~~g52~.;~fJ"ng Next time you feed your lace, think about your heart. Go easy on your heart and start cutting back on foods that are high m saturated fat and cholesterol. The change'll do you good. a.•a American Heart V Association WE'RE: FIGHTING F-0? 'lanllFE 1a;m11mH _______ _ SPEEDY PRINTING~-- 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ----- INTERNATIONAL PRINTING SPECIALISTS 2103 Yale. 861-0026 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE 1;11!1••11!111 ------ FORECLOSURE SPECIALIST Many locations, 0-3'!t down payment. easy quahf1cat1ons. Homes, townhomes, condos. 524-5730. 11mmmH _______ _ KWIK TAN 3313 Stanford-526-9170 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE IDm---- ··~ 529-1414 &~THE 'Utll r..acE - ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks West of Mon1rose TRAVE"L°CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangements All 5erv1· cee FREE Open Monday thru Fnday 9am-5 30pm S•turday Hlam-2pm 2029 Soulhwest Fwy . Houston. TX 77098 (713) 529-8464 TEXAS TOLL FREE 1· 800-392-5193 VACATION- IDEAS? See 'Vaca11ons" following ··on 1he Town• on the previous page l!Jlmmm Montrose Voice Classified Advertising ~~=~ ;;:,es:'/J~;:'.'; ~~=~~n~1:;hl :.~'.'/~~~1~f r;;:;:;rf»' For r~ular dcpla-; aav•rt~ng THE HEADLINE: You get up to 3 words in bold. all capital letters and centered on 1 lone. for a total cost of $3. (Or up to 6 words, $6. Or up to 9 words, $9 Etc.) THE TEXT: Then. each additional word in regular type is 40¢ (Additional regular words on "'ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each Addotoonal BOLD WORDS on all caps are 70¢ each.) II centering lines m the text or at end of ad, compute the cost of the words ond1v1dually, then add $3 for each lone centered. EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each addotoonal word toke this 4()¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $8.00 Then each add1toonal word toke thos 40¢ THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLO, $9.00 Then each add1t1onal word hke this 1s 40¢ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55C EACH Addltlon1I bold words like this In text ere SSC 11ch. ADDITIONAL BOLO, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70¢ EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes dunng the run, pay for the lull run In advance. and deduci 15% Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same condollons and deduct 25%. BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll confodentoally forward all responses to your ad to you by mall. Rate is $3 for each week the ad runs. (Responses will be forwarded 1ndelon1tely however, for es long as they come on ) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad m or phone 1t on You can pay by check. money order Mastercard. Visa. American Express, Diner's Club or Carte Blanche DEADLINE: Classofood ads received by noon Wednesday will be placed In that "."eek's newspaper Ads received later will be placed on the following week s newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, Clo Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028. It will be for­warded, unopened. to the advertiser Enclose no money $3 bold line $3 bold line $3 bold line text words Use add1t1onal paper 11 necessary CATEGORIES 0 Announcements o Accomodat ons (lodging for Houston vosotors) 0 Cars & Bikes O Commercial Space D Dwellings & Roommates CJ Employment & Jobs Wanted D Items For Sale o Models. Escorts. Masseurs D Personals Cl Pets D Rides 0 Services 0 Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales bold lines for headlines at $3 each: regular words on text at 40¢ each: _ALL CAPS regular words on text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each· BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each -~ Additional lines centered w1thm the text or at the end of the ad, add $3 per line (1n add1t1on to the per word cost) · Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete Issue of newspaper with my ad on it mailed to me. $1 25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times weeks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) CJ Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week. I have enclosed (or will be bolled or charged, as ondocated below) an addotoonal O $29 for 6 months or Cl $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT D Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed CJ cash O VISA charge Cl MasterCard charge Cl Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge 0 Amercian Express charge If charging, card exp1rat1on date Credo! card number ----~ Signature Name Address ~- ----- Phone(s) for verofocallon of ad, 1f necessary MAIL OR BRING TO· Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006- 3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am·5 30pm SEPTEMBER 5. 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 23 MONTROSE RESOURCES .... SE"LECTE0STATE. NAT ORGAN1lATIONS 8at Ow1tetl Assn or T• cBOAT• 7208tt.ZO& ~ ~t.,-(512) 472-3333 AIDS Act'°" CouneillF_,.r11on ol AIDS Retated ()rolrkuhons. 1115'4 Independence Av SE W.,,_•ngton, DC 20003. (212) ~7-.3101 Gay & L.esbi.an Preel A•n- POB A. Old Chetle9 Ste ~York. NY !0011-(212) 889-6622 Gay Rights N•t Lobby-POB 1892. Wlahlngton DC 20013-(2021 5"'tr1801 Human R.ghta camp.,gn Fund POB 1396, Wun-. ...-. oc 200t3-i202154&-= Lambda legal Defense -132 W Ord N4iw York, NY 10039-(212) 94<-94811 leltNar\/Gay Rights AO¥Oeat•-P09 822, Auatin 78767 Media Fund for Hum•n RigM1-POB A. Oki Cheb .. St8. ~York. NY 10011-(212) 98•8622 Nait Aun ol &.ineM Councill-8o11 15145., S.n FranaKO. CA e4115 (41S) ~ Nait Assn ol G91 & le&tuan ~Ck.lbl-17.(2 "4811 Av SE. WasNllgtOn. DC 20003~(202) 5'47·3104 Nat Gay HMlth Educ F QUnda11on-POB 71!M New York. NY 1003$-C217) 563--6313 or Or Q,...nbetg (713) 523-$204 Na! Gay R.ghts Advoeat• 640 CUtro. &.n Fran­ctsco. CA &tt1•-(.tt5) 863--3624 Nal Gay Task Force (NGTF) «> Sr.h ""' New York, NY 10011~2) 741--5800 NGTF'1 Criaiallne--(80) 22'·704.t (O!Alide New Yor\ State) Rural CoalitlOn. c.Ao Walter bngttt Bo• 111, BlulT'I TX 76627 Tx GayJ\.estltl:n Tat Fore• P09 AK Denton 76201-(817) 387-821'1 \JS Trarwvesttte--TtanSPual Contaet Svc-•011..a E Pike Sum. 9&122--(206) 824--82156 ~NTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your hstong We 11st here each week name of orgamzat1on. address, phOne. regular meeMg dates end tomes, and dates o! apecoaf events. II your listing 1s incorrect, mail correct information to The Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE­INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY An A C.pella Chorus, Chureh of chnst-POB 66734, 77266 A Ptace In the Sun-522-7595 - Ac:UJ.::1236-w Groy-62..,6925 AiDSHot11n...-=5"2'9-321t: (Gay & LeabJan SwUchbolrd) ~ Gay Atheists P0B 66711 n266- 527-9256 Astro Ra1nb0w Anianc.-~ (lTYJ Astro Rambovil Soc'91y tor the 0...f -&24·5074 (TTY O< vaoce) 6'S--007• (TTY) ~Assn-POB - 77266 ,,_,. 7 30pm 2nd Thurs. Women's Chrlataan Ctr 310 Pad he AiUtiiO-Womyn's Meoazi~ SW Fwy 133$--266-6237 ~~f~,:~38:' Robert Moon. d1r, 209 Ber1no Memorial United Methodist Church 1440 Hairok1-~1017 ave 10:50am Sul"I Ch<>lces t.inllm•led-POB 70we 77270-52&- 3211 (Gay & Lest>tan SwitchbOard> meets 1pm 3rd Sun. M!ISteraon YWCA 3615 WUlll '"Socl1I M111er"' 7 30pm alterrtate F~ldaya Sunday b"mch 12"30pm 3":1Sun Chrastili\ch'Uf'Cti" ot !ne GOOd Shepherd-1707 Montrose rte tpm Sun Sible study 1 JOpm T°"'rs chUrehOr Chrest.an Faith 1840 Wnttle1mer 529-8005 svcs 10:.tSam Sun. 81t>'e study 1 30pm Wed Rev CIVil A Rice pastor Citizens lor Hum•n Equol ty (CHE! POB 300 7~ 937·3516 m .. 12ndTues.Hou Houu 1817 Fann n. 9th floor act vity room CitiZena for Un ted ttou (CUH) -3317 Montrose IB32-G59--6148 Clippers~~ Colt ~ •-meeb at Brazos Rrver Bottom 2400 Brazoa-528--9192 Comrmttee tor Public Health Awuenns POB 30'5. m53-521l-EJ33 522-6084 "Sh1nng Group for the worneo Welr' meet Fr• 7..flpm. Monlrose Counset ng Ctr Community Pohtical Act10n Committee (C· PAC)-POB 2006, n252-23&-8666 Community Gospel Ctr--3207 Montroae-521: ~11 Svcs 11am Sun. 7 30pm Thura Congregation Aytz Chlly•m-HMO Westhetmer· -688--8997 728--5181 IVC & IOci•' 8pm 2nd & .,h Fri °'"' Hothne-22&-150$ ~"1=~17 Fannin-52&-0111. 523-76" ESOPS Private ProleniQnal Soclaf C1ut.--ee~ .. 9875 Fec»r•tlon oTCna~ Umted tor Sod.~ r.:.~~~~r:::.'h1 ·~~:: MonttOM Clln.c, Montrose Counsehng Ctr tat Unttanan Church 5210 f1nri1n-526-1571 SVC 11·15am Sun fr~R-.nd;iil=ss7io-;-Jo6~ runs Sun. Tua & Thl..lrw Mtmorial Part Tennl1 Ctr. runs Mon, Gott Ctr, Hermann Park G-v -4 A1;.,;·stMir~'t8iGAs~ 1311. 52trOllll 1 Grt & L•blan ArchivesO( fJI att1h•t1of VH Inc: ~LMb1an Motmon1-1113~ •60'0. 77098- se&-1'13 G•y Asians & Frtend-,-_-26_t_5_W_a_ug_ti Or •289- 523-6769. 785--3833 mHtS 3prn ?nd & last Sun Gey Fathers-3217 Fannrn- 52&-0111 Gay HlapatMC Caucus-888--5~ Q;y" ~ AU1ance-aeo-9•86,_----- Gay Pol1tJCal Caucus tGPCl-POB &eeM. 77266-521·1000 meets 3217 Fannin 1st & 3rd Wed, 10th ann1verury dlMer hOS11d by Prnl• Oents Ch.1b Sep t• tHoul Goy Pn<le w----Com--m-1t-tee---PO-eeie21. 77266-Stan Ford 523-7&4.t Of Cattly Lanahan ~ Gay ,.-LM--bol-n_S_w_lt_c_N_>o_ord -P<>B 96591. 772M-53-3211 k\foc-matton. counHhng, ref~ errall. TTY AIDS HOHtne GrNt91' MontrOH ~uUd-M•kl N .. .on 830-0300 or Bruce Woohey 529--846' meets 7pm, "'"Wed. Btannans RMt. 3300 Smelt! ~ thea1er •ortc:shop-Joe Watts 522· 2204 meets 7pm Thurs Dion ty Ctr.3217f&M1n Hu9'W1foh Product10t1$-2615 Waugh Or •266. n006 eestx.n conurts. ,,. .. madi.ng list Homoph le lnterlacH't Adiance-729 Manor 623-- Hou Aret Gay & Lnb11n En01i1ee-;;--&° Sclentoats-POB 66631, 77006-771-MSll 7· 10pm meets 7pm •th Tues Hou Bar 0-ners Assn (HOBO)-c/O Ventur•N 2923 M.,n-52HIOOO Hou Commur11~N-862-i31'4 __ _ HOO"Counol of Ctubrl-526-8054 Hou Otta ProteuK>nats~~. 66+-&'SI meets 1 30pm 2nd Tu• Hou Gay Hulth Actvocetn-7~9«8 Meets 7;.30pm 1st Sat Hou Gay S~s Aan-7•7-3098 Hou lnter·Fa1lh Alliance contact through lntegnty/Hou Hou Motorcycle C~o Mary's. 1022 w"""l$t: H-ou N~or1h ·Pro1e osionols-POB 3840 Humble 773'7 -8111 •t 82"'4-7128 meet 7 30pm 2nd s.t Hou OuidOor Group-«en 522.()699 Kuba dN ng Cozumel l.lex!CO. Aug 31-Se;> • Hou Tennos Club-Roeh et 52._2151 ploy 99,,.. ,_,, Sun & 7:30-9pm Thurs Homer Ford T"""" Center. pa11ic1pantannuat Tx-OUClalc. Dallas Oct Hou--T_x V Nov 9-11 VH lnc-POB 160'1, 7~·1732. 62&-701' affihated groups are Interact B uamo 1 A Place 1n1heSun MontroseArtAH1ance Gay&Lesbian Arcl'uves of T11, Gay & Lesbian S* tchboard MonlroH Sympnoruc Bond bolrd melt 7 30pm 1st Thurw (vaned locations) educ.atonal forum 7 30pm 3r,:.d_T_hu=-~-=----=--~-·- 1noerwol Speak.ers Bureau-POB 391 Bellaire 77.001 --4064 ~~t:t;!_:~~?,~JE~~~~·~~~o: 4t=· Autry House 6265 Mam Looking for PHOTO DEVELOP­ING? Look in the Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory Interact POB 160ot1. n222 529--701.t Kl'FT RadlO:-FM-SO:..-iu tO.Oii-e.;;j=~ •000 "'Breakthrough tesb1an-tem1n1ai pgm fr' 8 15-1Ct30am Wik1e n Stem" OSY pgm l"-'B z30-g00pm K$/A10S Foundthon-3317 Montrou Bo• 1tS$.. 77006 52.._2.t37 AIOS RlSk Reduction f$afe Sex) Wo.._&hops 8c>m 2nd & .,,, Mon except Dec 1n coniunct1on with Montrose Counseling Cen­ter_ tr11n ng wee"•nd & Sep 21·22 Jry KauttmaO Cancer Fund 178='",106 Krewe of Hydra '811 Graceland C Mercier 726-1032 Larnbclo t; r Gay A Anni. Ql-9772 Lesbian/Gay Resource Svc-Untvera ty of Hou '800 Co hOun bO• 309 770CM-7•1H253 mee1S 2: 30pm alternate Tun Spind etop Room 2nd floor Unrv~tty..;C..;11_ ___ ·----- Let "'9 En1ertarn Vou Weekend project of Hou Count of Clubs 526-eos.t TM Ltttle CJ\L!ftn- 212 Fargo 522- 1695 avca 230pm Sun Lone Star Nudsst Grous>-POB 140512 n,1.c Lutt19rant Concerned-meets at Grace lutt;;' ran ChurCh 251~ Waugh-52t~. C53-11.t3 meet 2nd & .tm Tues evenings ~cAdory House-c/o K.SIAIOS Foundation 3317 Montrose Bo:11 t1SS-524-2'37 Men Against oec'~urtesy Ctut>-POB ~~1:z~~~~S4m~s;9t.~~~k~•Y ' L11b11n MctropaU11n community Church of t~ recllon tMCCRJ-19t9 Oecatur--ee1·91'9 pot­luck dtnner 7 30pm 1st Sat monthty. svcs 10 •S&m & 7 1&prn Sun & 7 15pm Wed, member ~~'1"~:1 Sv:'S:~ Mort eoucatton iHoUr Met.rC>POlrtBn w97iid Erwemble-529-9610: Meets St Soepllef'S Eprscopol Church. 7 30 Wed MOniiOffAitAii1anC8-694-1732,86&-93tC ~ 5332 afft11ate L'H Inc:. IT'eetl 2nd Mon Montrose Bustnn1 Guitel M8 Greater Montrou Bus Guild Montroae ~Cnu--rct>_o_l~C~h~risl,..--1"100.,.,-.-,MonlIOH- 777--928fi ave 1 t1m Sun Montrose Cjvc Club Me N~~ Montrose Clmte-803 Hewthome-52&-5531 apen Mon Tue. T°"'" &-9pm ~~~~~iie~w"= meet?· Montrose Counseling Ctr-900 Lown •203- 52iM>037 AIDS v'Ct•rn support group S:30Pm Mon; Women'• Suppon Group 7pm T-. AIOS R'9k Redudlon (Sole Sex) W..._.hOPI 8pm 2ncl & •trii Mon ••C8Pt Dec. .n con}uncuon with KSIAIOS Foundation MontroH Smgerw-Car1 Ltw•ence 774-3591 1fter 6pm rehearsal Mon eves. Bering Chureh. 1•.tOHarotd MonlrOMSciftbiliiiMoue-POB 22212. 11221 52'-314-4 Series 9. Gay Wortd Sorin Mltww kee. Aug 26-Sep 1 M0<>lrOH Sporu Assn 11.0SAJ ~le "'bg'OUP MontroH Symphonic Band--POB &6613. 772118- si7-9C5' ...- 7 30pm Tues. Oogn•ty Ctr, 3217 Fannin. J)81rt.Opanl Texas Freedom P.,-aoe, Oan1111. 4pm Sep 22; afhhate VH Inc M6RE_:-526-MORE. 529--0037 PfOJect Monlro&e COunaeffng c.nter =-~,:!~~!,~Jg~tadun Linea, MSArrhurw Ntght 1M1Hd League) eo.t;;Q­M• k• W•kert al 973-1358 play lpm Stadium l.,.__ A?nD Br-.maan • • • • • • • • • • • ~~~~:~d~~Sa08.=~se!7£ competitton varKMlS locatK>nl 8pm Wed MSA/'ioc:eyDan-ih'°rll 522·,'69 games 7pm Tues Gregory-Lincoln IChOOI 1101 Taft Montrose Wateh 'Ubgl'OUP Neartown Aun M..stangs-meeti-.1-tne S.,..,, -710 Paclfac-52• 9<27 Club night T°"'" Nlttonal G.Y"-He-.-~"'n.;.E~d-ueo_t_•on_F_ou_nc_1_u_on.= 523-5204:,_ __________ _ =~~hC:ru':~t~~~=~~?::1~es· Neartown A.qn rMontrose C'"'c Club) 1•13 WMlhelmer meet 7pm •ett\ Tues Neartown Business All•ance-529-701Q. meets 7pm 2nd Wed, Liberty Bank 1001 Westtie1mer New Freedom Chnstian Church~ 163-aln aves 10.rn Sun ______ _ o;;r;.ten. AnonY"'oua-clo Montrose Coun· ~~ ~t'r::'1~=.~~~:~~s 8enng Cnurcn. 1..0 Harold Parents 4 Frtendl of Lea.t»am & G1ys (P;;:;:;tti FlAG!~ tMe1I 2pm 3rd Sun Prnby· 1enan Ctt • 1 Oakdate Park. People-co -N-.-.,-lo_w_n_C~o-m_m_u_n_y flrehOule 7·11 252.;.,,.• ___ Paz y LillltKlon-POll 600063, 7726:1- 862· 1'78 Pfnbyterians for Lesbian Gay c0n'Cems­Presby1etaan Ctr 41 O&kdale 52&-25M meets 7 30pm 2ncl Tues p;;;;c;;;;11 Club-Coo•t prnodents GiiCJ=PQe _. 77266- 52:H!02• ______ _ Recreat.ont Land Fund Comm tlee-MtJstang Club pro,.a Rice Untv Gay 'lesbi~Sup"Poft orOup 52&- 3211 IG•y & le11>1an Swllehbolrdl ROiii•o ~ i'°9 Sul Ross -624-9839 5Nnt1 Of 1'ii counsel ng tof I te--threateNng llneues 522-5084 Society fOf 2nd5ett (Tr ... Ess Gulf Coast Transvntrte Chapter-PCB 90335 n090 Society tor the Promot on of Amaz n SadO­Maoel>>& m (SPASM -POB 70996 77270- -O•y I Lntuan Swrtcl\bOartl 529-32"'11 Sundance Catoe Co aoctal clutt- <:10 TM Bam 710 P.clfoe-528-9'27 fJI Gay Rodeo Assn-Of"IWfl , 19' POB 66973 =-~w.;. ~~~!N~ ~,;x Gay ~~~~~ound1t1on-1iti T• Riden-<IO RipCOrC. 7H Faftvll8Vr-521·2792 ~,.=--~=T~-,:':lta'd:~~~rt. 5'1· w.va-eOvrl~-M,-rt 723-t•SS: tiowta 7 30pm Sun Po&I C>ak Bow ng unes Westayan FeUowstup---864,_-8899 ____ ::'!'r:~~ ~'i'.~~;-o~~:~th· '"What Ev« t-tappeMd 10 Baby Jane Bow 1ng leegue see Thurlday Bowl ng Womens Bow ;ng LeagU9--~73.-•358 5Pm Sun Stadium '-anes 8200 Brauma n Womens LObbv All ance----" cneiMa-~21-().(39 Womens Softt>a Le.a;Ue-M31 P neshade 770CM!l--carotyn at 86&-6256 lsl Annua Gey Women & Softbo WO<ld Sen• Aug ~Sep Mllwtukett BAYTOWN Bayto*n Lambda GJ'OLP •27 • 578 meets 7 30pm_odd F C:ONROE Conroe Areo lernbdo Goy AA -<09 ._u~70 c:Onroe A'H L.bmos-Klt..;y ,, f409} 756-9069 melt Spm 2nd & ""'_!:n __ _ GALVESTON - - - - L-. A "°"° Anonvmous-763-1'01 Metropo.1 tan <;ommun-rty ~t GaiVHiOn Is and 1824 ero.d¥way-765-7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Teer Out & Poat by Phone) AIDS Hottine-529--3211 AMBULANCE-222·3434 CltyH11l-~1t Ooctot-see •di °'::..:&N-=.::32:..;1.;,1 __ ~ FIRE-227·2323 Goy PoiltlCll caucuo----52~,..-1~000.,..,..----- Goy & lesbian SwilchOOard-621>-32_1_1 --­KS/ AIDS Foundotlon-52•·2•37 Lawyer-see ads or 529-3211 llb<ary-224-5-M 1 ~-Cl.,._onrc"---5-2&--653_1_ ------ Monlro&e COunsefmg Cenlor-5~7 MONTROSE VOICE -629-6490 POLICE-222-3131 ~Of' 2'30--1111- ADS BY THE INCH In add1t1on to our regular classi­fied rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by the Inch." When buying by the inch, you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 - .. - - 24 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 5, 1985 WEll DRiNl<s 8pM TO 2AM NES Hous10N's TRAdi1ioN * FREE DRAFT SuNdAy 4pM TO 2AM * AFTER HOURS WEd. FRi. SAT. SuN Hous10N's VidEo DANCE Club FoR 1ltE MEN of TEXAS PAcific AT GRANT ~21-912J
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