Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
File 020
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 020. 2000-12-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-12-29). Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7351

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 020, 2000-12-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 29, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 19 On Screen MOVIE REVIEWS The state of queer film in 2000 Quantity—not quality— was the key word for films with gay and lesbian content this year by STEVE WARREN At this time last year much of the awards buzz was focused on films with strong queer components: AMERICAN BEAUTY, BOYS DON'T CRY, BEING JOHN MALKOVICH, ELECTION and THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY. This year's counterparts are fewer and weaker—witness BEFORE NIGHT FALLS, BEST IN SHOW, BILLY ELLIOT and WONDER BOYS. They're clearly not as queer. For example—GLADIATOR, where the main kink is brother-sister incest; QUILLS, in which the Marquis De Sade will screw anything but has a strong hetero preference and SHADOW OF A VAMPIRE, with F.W. Murnau implied to be bisexual, but his only identified sexual partner is a woman. It's not that there weren't plenty of queer and near-queer films out there, just that they weren't as good this year. But neither were the straight ones. The overall output of the movie industry may have reached an all-time low in quality, or at least in the lack of really high- quality films—including queer ones. We wanted equality and we got it, damn it! The queerer the movie the fewer screens it opens on, as a general rule. We got crumbs in a few wide releases: a gay male cheerleader in BRING IT ON; Kip Pardue (who was way out in "But I'm a Cheerleader") letting his teammates think he's gay after kissing one of them in REMEMBER THE TITANS; and Ashton Kutcher and Seann William Scott wrestling shirtless and locking lips in DUDE, WHERE'S MY CAR? Queer directors working in the mainstream also made us settle for less. Don Roos put a gay supporting character (Johnny Galecki) in BOUNCE, as did Stephen Daldry in BILLY ELLIOT. Gus Van Sant says Sean Connery's character in FINDING FORRESTER is a closet case, if you read between the lines. (Why else is he watching those boys through binoculars?) Joel Schumacher threw some nice butt shots into TIGERLAND, and if Terrence Davies stayed faithful to Edith Wharton there's naught but a gay sensibility in THE HOUSE OF MIRTH. That left John Waters to carry the rainbow flag in the disappointing CECIL B. DEMENTED, in which a diverse group of radicals kidnapped a fading movie queen to strike a blow for independent cinema. Before you get too depressed let me give you the good news. Four queer filmmakers got at least mixed-to-good reviews for their debut features, which received decent distribution and did some crossover business: GREG BERLANTI for THE BROKEN HEARTS CLUB, JAMIE BABBIT for BUT I'M A CHEERLEADER, JON SHEAR for URBA- NIA and NISHA GANATRA for CHUTNEY POPCORN. Overseas our newest greatest hope is FRANCOIS OZON, who had two good films in limited U.S. release this year, the twisted fairy tale CRIMINAL LOVERS and the filmed Fassbinder play WATER DROPS ON BURNING ROCKS. He's building quite a body of work but not much of an American following. Gay Canadian JEREMY PODESWA followed ECLIPSE with THE FIVE SENSES,- in which the character representing smell was gay. Longtime favorite documentarians ROB EPSTEIN and JEFFREY FRIEDMAN had a fine new entry, PARAGRAPH 175, about queers in the Holocaust. Another personal-and-professional couple, FENTON BAILEY and RANDY BAR- BATO scored a one-two punch with THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE and 101 RENT BOYS. Our lavorite fag hag, MARGARET CHO scored with her San Francisco-filmed concert, I'M THE ONE THAT I WANT. If you've never heard of, let alone seen some of the films I mention it may be because they haven't been shown here, or have had a festival or campus screening or an unpublicized week at an art house. Many will yet show up—in a theater, on cable or in the video store. As usual there wasn't much for lesbians, besides CHUTNEY POPCORN and BUT I'M A CHEERLEADER. The German docudrama AIMEE & JAGUAR was tops in that limited field, and there was cause for at least some rejoicing in DR. T AND THE WOMEN when (spoiler ahead, if you haven't seen it) KATE HUDSON ended up with LIV TYLER. There's a lesbian moment in REQUIEM FOR A DREAM but it's degrading, not romantic. Mike Figgis' failed experiment TIME CODE gave us JEANNE TRIPPLEHORN ("Basic instinct") and SALMA HAYEK as lovers, but Hayek was having an affair with a man—the slut! T JULIANNA MARGULIES and KYRA SEDGWICK were happier together in WHAT'S COOKING? as they endured a family dinner. Yet another lesbian couple, CALISTA FLOCKHART and VALERIA GOLINA, didn't make it to theaters this year because MGM stupidly sold THINGS YOU CAN TELL JUST BY LOOKING AT HER to Showtime instead. Watch for it next spring. Stage fare didn't translate too well to the screen. David Drake's THE NIGHT LARRY KRAMER KISSED ME, directed by Tim Kirkman ("Dear Jesse"), though well done was too late to be topical and too early for nostalgia. Charles Busch's PSYCHO BEACH PARTY, as directed by Robert Lee King, was a thorough disappointment. How about novels? Marcel Proust's life and work got an interesting going-over by Raul Ruiz in TIME REGAINED. Julian Schnabel took an almost equally oblique approach to the autobiography of gay Cuban poet-novelist Reinaldo Arenas in "Before Night Falls." Peter Cameron's THE WEEKEND was poorly adapted by director Brian Skeet, despite some bright moments in the mother-daughter bitch fights between GENA ROWLANDS and BROOKE SHIELDS. Shields also turned up as a beard for ROBERT DOWNEY, JR. in James Toback's BLACK AND WHITE. Downey also played gav in WONDER BOYS, where he (here's another spoiler) brought out "Spider-Man"-elect TOBEY MAGUIRE. MICHAEL CAINE was gay in MISS CONGENIftir MICHAEL MCKEAN and JOHN MICHAEL HIGGINS in BEST IN SHOW, which also finally got JENNIFER COOLIDGE and JANE LYNCH to act on their obvious mutual attraction. CRAIG FERGUSON wasn't very funny as a gay Scottish hairdresser in THE BIG TEASE. HAROLD PERRINEAU, JR. was more entertaining as the drag comic relief in WOMAN ON TOP, certainly better than WING CHEN as the transgendered butt of questionable humor in CATFISH IN BLACK BEAN SAUCE. Some highly anticipated films were early-year disappointments. Just the idea of NATHAN LANE playing BETTE MIDLER'S (as Jacqueline Susann) husband should have been enough to make ISN'T SHE GREAT funny, but nothing could. Bette bombed again a few weeks later in DROWNING MONA, which opened the same day as the MADONNA muddle THE NEXT BEST THING, in which she had a baby with best friend RUPERT EVERETT. No wonder he's going back to Oscar Wilde! Two queer fantasies about gays in the military came from different parts of the world. Each received some praise from knee-jerkers who cream over subtitles, but I didn't like Claire Denis' BEAU TRAVAIL or Nagisa Oshima's TABOO. Less arty but guiltily pleasurable was BURLESK KING, the latest "macho dancer" movie from the Philippines. Even more dreadful by cinematic standards but a big crowd-pleaser in its native Thailand was THE IRON LADIES, the fact-based story of a queer team that won the national volleyball championship. It could attract fans of feel good movies if it reaches our shores next year. GUINEVERE TURNER ("Go Fish") co-wrote MARY HARRON's adaptation of AMERICAN PSYCHO, giving herself a sex scene with Christian Bale and another woman. Other edgy films with more queer content were Miguel Arteta's CHUCK & BUCK, written by and starring Mel White's son, MIKE WHITE, as the childlike gay protagonist; BENJAMIN SMOKE, a documentary about a queer (in more ways than one) Atlanta poet/musician; and Constantine Giannaris' FROM THE EDGE OF THE CITY, showcasing the body (and incidentally the acting ability) of STATHIS PAPADOPOULOS as a Greek hustler of Russian descent. At the end of the year Strand released another terrific package of shorts, BOYS LIFE 3. One of those shorts. Lane Janger's comedy JUST ONE TIME, has already been expanded into a feature, which began hitting theaters a few weeks earlier. All in all—and that's far from all—there was nothing on theater screens this year as good as QUEER AS FOLK—either version, even though Showtime betrayed us by cut- 1hlg**«r-' * iu> MwlMI
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1053_019.jpg