Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
File 017
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 017. 2000-12-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-12-29). Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7348

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 017, 2000-12-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 29, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Mostly hits, Jew misses marked Houston theater in 2000 >■ Continued from Page 15 studied hyper attitude, and a pronunciation guide stolen from past divas, Alexa's velvet spider ensnared up-and-coming wanna-bes behind her enticing, seductive smoke screen. Her latest conquest is a hot gay writer on the rise. With his dark matinee idol looks and four-star physique, Ty Mayberry was the perfect naive fly caught in Alexa's seductive web. "Bees" pricked the balloon of "sticky sweet success" with sass, and the Alley mounted it in a setting of flashy rhinestones. A genuine theatrical cubic zirconium. Zombies From The Beyond Silly and inane, this cheesy re-mix of '50s sci-fi B-movies made you laugh out loud. Part homage, part vaudeville, Theater LaB's parody was wonderfully goofy. In James Valcq's loving satire, the surprise was the addition of a musical score that's a clever parody of times past. The death ray of the evil Zombina, the alien aviatrix, earth's pneumatic nemesis, is her voice. Like a demented Norma, her stratospheric coloratura drives men mad. The septet of talented performers handled their stock characters with infectious high jinks, over-the-top zaniness, and nimble high- kicking supplied in spades by director and choreographer Jim Phillips. This was the type of show that can't be played straight, not when the young lovers whistle their love song, or the illustrious skyline of downtown Milwaukee is knocked senseless by the malevolent alien. Earthlings, beware! Fat Men In Skirts Nicky Silver's "Fat Men in Skirts," written in sulfuric acid, was a mordant, blacker than black, comedy. You were likely to gag on your laughter, as if gargling blood. Flawlessly acted at Ashland St. Theatre Co., it documented the chilling fall of Bishop Hogan, plane crash survivor and ultimate psycho, whose insatiable taste for human sushi matches his unholy desire for his mother. There was no redeeming social value in this satiric amoral tale, whose progenitors are Jonathan Swift, John Webster and John Waters. The play took the human condition and whacked the stuffing out of it. Veering wildly between biting satire and horrid melodrama, it was like a highway accident: fascinated, we had to look. Travis Ammons inhabited the mad Bishop Hogan like a second skin. Blood-drenched from dinner, he sank deeper into psychosis and resembled a dangerous medieval icon. Hannibal Lector meets Norman Bates. Therese Katara, as Bishop's out-of-touch mother, matched his intensity every mad step. This sit-com from Hell was laced with enough tasty laughs to make it potable. On a shoestring budget, director Chris Jimmerson managed this bitter comedy with imagination, keeping us sated all the way to its bloody conclusion. Fairy Tales As the inaugural production of Houston's newest theater venture, Theatre New West, "Fairy Tales" was a jubilant, radiant, enlightening gay musical revue. With music and lyrics by Eric Lane Barnes, it was required viewing for anyone who adored theater, musicals, or just an exceptional evening out on the town. With wit and great charm, this bedtime- story-for-adults revue celebrated the ordinary life and times of a gay man who grows up in a dysfunctional conservative family, comes out, meets a lover, and eventually succumbs to AIDS. Although solemnity runs under the story like a riptide, this production rejoiced in the delicious diversity of gay life. It reveled in camp, yet glorified remembrance and humanity. Alex Stutler, firm of voice and body, made a strikingly good Matthew, all wide-eyed comic innocence, longing for the complacency and normal existence of his favorite TV family, the Partridges. Keith Caldwell as Matthew's lover had the best voice of the five, and his twang rendition of "Illinois Fred" gave a well-heeled boot to the conventions of masculine role playing. With its sublime mix of laughter and tears, "Fairy Tales" gave us a needed boost of humanity and pride, ending in a stirring message of empowerment and hope. Rent Jonathan Larson's exuberant rock paean to life has become a pop culture phenomenon. In a decade or so of really egregious musical the ater, "Rent" deserved all its awards. Spinning its "Boheme"-inspired tale in contemporary hues of AIDS, sexual nonconformity, drug addiction, and multiculturalism, the musical took the verities of poverty, homelessness, and illness and transformed them with splendid affirmation. Larson's heartfelt empathy for his alternative community could be as sappy as a Hallmark card (a chorus line of homeless junkies seemed just as unreal as a convent of singing nuns) but his passion packed a mighty wallop. His pop and rock score, a melange of styles borrowing tangos, blues, gospel, reggae, funk, and MTV, is still rooted on firm Broadway stock. The love ballads are haunting, and the up-tempo pieces, feisty and energetic, are filled with sophisticated rhythms that keep us off balance. His dramatic lyrics, agile and propulsive, shift in off-kilter ways, too; sometimes comic, sometimes heartbreaking, yet always right. Bar none, this was the finest touring production of a Broadway musical last year. An amazingly theatrical show, it used all the high-tech smoke and mirrors that money could buy. Grunge never looked so high gloss. Bruiser When Houston Ballet opened its 2000-2001 season in September, it did so with a knockout: Stanton Welch's "Bruiser." With a company of eighteen, "Bruiser" was a tongue-in-cheek, witty look at modern relationships, using all manner of sports references, Wearing skin-tight abbreviated shorts and midriff revealing tops, the dancers—wrists bandaged and cheeks blackened—feinted and jabbed, performed tae bo, jumped hurdles, skipped imaginary rope, power walked, even egged us on to fight. One of the guys flexed like a muscleman upstage in silhouette. The women, all on pointe and just as seasoned and strong as the men, fought back - a contemporary Gen-X take that was mighty refreshing. The guys were butch; the girls were butch. A perpetual mobile of off-kilter classical steps, big sweeping arabesques in lifts, sexy duets, expressive solos, "Bruiser" was modern ballet with vengeance and a laugh. As the preeminent tomboy, Britain Werkheiser exuded stage presence with a feisty powerhouse performance. The intense and razor sharp Joel Prouty was a perfect foil to the leggy and athletic Lauren Anderson; while the very blond and beefed-up Ian Casady complemented Sarah Webb's beautiful line. At the end of their pas de deux, he pinned her down, but not for long. There's no entry in the Olympics for ballet, but if there were, Mr. Welch and his brilliant dancers would've shared top spot: gold. Naked Boys Singing The title said it all. Unfortunately, there wasn't much else to this musical presented by Bienvenue Theatre. Once the revelatory shock of being up close and personal faded, our gazes glazed over. This was a musical revue written by committee: 24 hands to be precise. Too many cooks and no chef. This gay musical mean dered without much thought in its head. It was well-scrubbed and sex-free, non-prurient and G-rated. Why did they bother to remove their clothes? For a musical that paraded its gimmick in our face, it's ironic that the best number, the most erotically charged, was the love song where Augustin Paz slowly donned his clothes, until by song's end he was fully dressed. If only the rest of the show would've been so charged. This was a sex musical without a rise. Jeff Stryker Does Hard Time In his first venture into live theatrical performance, the world's most famous male pom star had the savvy to fashion himself a vanity production. For what it was, this star vehicle served him well. Everyone else got the shaft. He and his un-credited co-writers crafted a soft-core showcase, where Stryker is swathed in '40s film noir glamour with inky shadows and wet reflections. On display, his body became his own fetish. To be fair, you didn't go to this expecting "Hamlet." But after scores of performances in NYC and San Francisco, the eponymous star and his tailor-made "hilarious, erotic comedy" should have had more pizzazz and polish than this lumbering, limp effort. As a live porn movie, this sad little affair moved with the speed of a lump of Crisco. For all its X-rated trash sex talk, the pom was missing. Discreet and hiding behind veils, the play cried out for Viagra. The evening ended with a mini-sex show, as Stryker doused himself with baby oil and danced nude among the audience. It's one exotic dance where he brought his own pole. The curtain call had him parting his large friend in appreciation of a job well done. It's the only part of him that could act. Kiki and Hetb If you didn't experience this demonic dysfunctional duo at Theater LaB, you missed one of the truly theatrical events of the season. Frightening and funny, this psychotic lounge act was post-modem drag and performance art mixed with a full fist of barbiturates. Kiki (Justin Bond) is a washed-up, never- has-been boozy cabaret singer whose grotesque life story is the patter that drives the rock and alternative grunge song cycle. Herb (Kenny Mellman) is her autistic co-dependent pianist who bangs out the accompaniment and adds his wails to Kiki's vodka-tinged >- Continued on Page 17
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1053_016.jpg