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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
File 016
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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 016. 2000-12-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7347.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-12-29). Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7347

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 016, 2000-12-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7347.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 29, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 Houston theater 2000 in review The best and the brightest (and a few dim bulbs, too) by D.L. GROOVER The rainbow flag flew high and proud over Houston's theaters this past year. We were blessed with a surfeit of gay plays and musicals. Mercifully, it was fairly free of outright stinkers, and many productions found enthusiastic new* audiences. The diversity extended to two new theater companies who highlighted gav-theme plays making 2000 a year of thriving gay the- Roy Hill and Love On Valentine's day, Stages gave us that thorny bouquet, "Ray Hill and Love." Described by friends and foes as irascible, tactless, pesky and generous, Hill says he's .i "cantankerous old fart." Whatever, he's a Houston institution and our own gay Foghorn Leghorn: preaching hectoring, and offending. With story-telling verve, this gay Aesop spun personal fables that detailed his life of love and his love of life. Along the twisted path lay shards of Houston's gay history and six former lovers For all his bluster, Hill's a big ol' marshmallow when it comes to love. He chases it with the passion of a union organizer, wrasslin' it to the ground and celebrating its mysteries, pains and joys with pagan abandon. One-sided in the telling, the ornery Hill's longevity has earned him the right to tell his fascinating stories any way he pleases. Vampire Lesbians of Sodom and Sleeping Beauty Blazing into the ultra-hip Commerce Street Artists Warehouse as if on a Bedlam Halloween float, came two one-act plays by Charles Busch, the master high dramatist of camp: "Sleeping Beauty" and "Vampire Lesbians of Sodom." These delirious, amphetamine-induced comedies were given a spectacularly cheesy charm in the greasy hands of the dos chicas pro- v'HfJuction team. Both pricked the conventions- cinema, theater, society, sex—with surgical precision. They were whacked-out, loving versions of Republic B-pictures overlaid with a slimy sheen of sexual perversion and gender-bending. Although Anne Zimmerman, who did quadruple duty as director, costume designer and actor in two leading roles, outdid herself while wearing all four hats, the eye-opener was Walt Zipprian, as the woman-eating Succubus. With foghorn voice and acidic stage presence, Zipprian overlaid the bizarre with comic relief. He was over the top and under control at the same time. It was perfect Busch: a gourmet cannibal who has Julia Child tor dinner. Nabucco Houston Grand Opera roared in during the spring with a soaring production of Verdi's first big hit, "Nabucco," which more than any other work of its time gave a nice big kick to the fat posterior of "bel canto." Thanks to Verdi, Italian opera was never the same again. Verdi supplies the bombastic plot with incredibly profound music, and sets it all in the dazzling theatrical splendor of Nebuchadnezzar's ancient court. It's quite a show, and HGO's superlative treatment never flagged. Conducted in fever pitch by Patrick Summers, the Houston Symphony raised the melodrama into the heavens- The Opera Chorus never sounded so beautifully alive, whether praving softly for deliverance or thundering out condemnation. Maria Guleghina, as Abigaille, seeker of vengeance, could be heard over an earthquake. Though her volume control was set at temple- shattering, her velvet soprano, agile enough to leap around Verdi's vocal gymnastics, was a force of nature, as was the consummate artistry ot Samuel Ramev and Segei Leiferkus "Nabucco" may not be great, but it's certainly grand. With HGO, you couldn't have heard a finer production of Verdi's stupendous translation oi this Bible story. Even the pagans were smiling. As Bees In Honey Drown Like a spring breeze, Douglas Carter Beane's "As Bees in Honey Drown" wafted in during late May. In the Alley's polished production, "Bees" was a bright, frothy boulevard comedy, whose intersecting streets are Melrose Place, Rodeo Drive and the Yellow Brick Road. It told the fairy tale rise ;and rise) of the consummate con artist, the mysterious Alexa Vere de Vere, international glitterati priestess. Lighter than a fine souffle and as insubstantial as cotton candy, melting in your mind as soon as it was over, this comedy of manners was slick and enormously entertaining. Carol Linnea Johnson portrayed Alexa with lacquered sophistication. In her helmet of jet- black hair, tailored suits, jungle red fingernails, >- Continued on Page 16
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