Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
File 012
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 012. 2000-12-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7343.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-12-29). Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7343

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 012, 2000-12-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7343.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 29, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 11 health news Health concerns, lack of knowledge highlight 2000 Party-goers drink to health at the dawn of the New Year, but in a review of the year's most notable health-related news, lifestyle concerns marched to the forefront of debate about the health of gay men and lesbians. From smoking to body image, from oral sex to barebacking, debates about the root of AIDS and the federal government's "Healthy People 2010" report reveal a surprising lack of conclusive evidence about health concerns specific to gay men, and especially lesbians. A smoking gun. Gay men smoke at rates nearly twice that of the general U.S. male population, and researchers offered explanations ranging from tobacco prevention measures that fail gay men, to tobacco ad campaigns that have been successful in attracting them. A tendency to drink heavily and socialize frequently in bars is also believed to be a factor for gay male smokers. A lesbian health study released last year also indicated that lesbians have similar habits, including much higher rates of alcohol consumption and tobacco use for lesbians than for all women. In response, the American Legacy Foundation will spend $300 million a year over the next four years on public health education on the dangers of tobacco use, and a portion of these funds will be earmarked for gays. The gay male image. Recent studies show that gay men experience greater body-dissatisfaction than heterosexual men, which in turn contributes to higher rates of eating disorders among gay men. Barriers to healthy self-image in gay men have been shown to resemble those faced by heterosexual women. In addition to contributing to the onset of eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia, distorted body image can also lead to steroid use and sexual anxiety. Intemabzed homophobia also greatly contributes to lower self-esteem and body image, as gay men and lesbians aggressively act out society's negative messages about homosexuality upon their own bodies. The safety in barebacking? Some sex-positive activists insist barebacking is safe when both men are seroconcordant, or have the same HIV status. But medical experts beg to differ, arguing that not only can HIV-positive individuals become "re-infected" through exposure to a more virulent strain, but that resistance to drugs may be affected. Better-understood risks of engaging in unprotected sex include the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea, herpes, hepatitis and syphilis Which activate the immune system and allow the HIV virus to become more active. An African solution to AIDS. The HIV/AIDS epidemic's epicenter, South Africa, hosted the 13th International AIDS Conference this year. Figures indicate that at least 10 percent, possibly up to 20 percent, of South Africa's 44 million people are HIV-positive, and the vast majority don't know they're infected. South African President Thabo Mbeki backed away from his stand that HIV didn't cause AIDS after an international round of condemnation from researchers and healthcare officials. Mbeki insisted that he's looking for an African Solution" to the question of whether AIDS is caused by HIV or simple, extreme poverty. Some 5,000 scientists, doctors and AIDS professionals released the "Dtlrban Declaration," an unprecedented statement claiming the link between HIV and AIDS is "clear-cut, exhaustive and unambiguous." U.S. health officials include gays. For the first time, the nation's long-range health planning document mentions sexual orientation. But gay health advocates say gay concerns deserve more attention than they receive in "Healthy People 2010." The ways in which health data has been gathered in the past 10 years limits the soundness of conclusions and projections that can be made about the health of gays, some activists argue. In response, the Department of Health and Human Service's Health Resources and Services Administration awarded the San Francisco-based Gay & Lesbian Medical Association a $25,000 grant to publish a separate paper on gay and lesbian issues, the release of which will coincide with the January release of the government's "Healthy People" report. GLMA has also successfully lobbied to have questions regarding sexual orientation added to the individual academic and government research projects whose results eventually make up large documents like "Healthy People 2010." HIV and oral sex. Almost eight percent of newly infected gay men contracted HIV through oral sex, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. The receptive partner in oral sex is at the most risk, and simply abstaining from ejaculating into the mouth is not sufficient to prevent transmission because pre-ejaculate also contains HIV, the CDC reported. The agency did not have data confirming transmission of HIV through Judge Edwin Cameron, a gay, HIV positive high court judge in South Africa, said during an International AIDS conlerence that he wishes more people with HIV would be public about it, but the stigma in Africa is too great. For more news, visit www.houstonvoice.com cunnilingus, though experts acknowledged that HIV can be present in vaginal secretions and menstrual blood, making transmission theoretically possible. M^^H
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1053_011.jpg