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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 008. 2000-12-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7339.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-12-29). Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7339

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 008, 2000-12-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7339.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 29, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 First legal lesbian wedding held in Texas > Continued from Page 6 attack following surgery to treat blood clots. HVan Ooteghem was a leader in the Houston and national gay community for 25 years. In 1975, he was the first president of the (then) Gay Political Caucus, and at the time of his death was the retiring chair of the Ryan White Planning Council, Gary Ven Ooteghem which distributes more than $15 million annually to HIV/AIDS service providers in the Harris County area. He also was serving as chair of the Scholarship Committee of the Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals and the PFLAG/H.A.T.C.H. Youth Scholarship Foundation. Van Ooteghem's name is on an important gay civil rights case. In 1975, while working for Harris County as its Comptroller of the Treasury and Assistant Treasurer, he addressed County Commissioners Court and said he was gay. His employer, Harris County Treasurer Hartseil Grey, fired him, saying he had told Van Ooteghem not to make the speech. Following many years of litigation and appeals, the Fifth Circuit said that Van Ooteghem's firing was illegal because it violated his First Amendment right to free speech. He was awarded back pay. AUGUST Gay guide closes its Texas-wide doors: Saddled with debt and strapped with a dwindling advertising base, This Week in Texas dosed its doors after 26 years of publishing the only weekly gay statewide entertainment guide, according to publisher Alan Gellman. The final issue of the 22,000-circulation magazine appeared Aug. 10, nearly half-way through its 26th year of publication. Gellman attributed the magazine's demise to his poor health, which has kept him from closely overseeing the publication's editorial and financial operations for more than two years and led to "foolish mistakes," he said. "Our staff meant well and were good at what they did, but they had so many extra duties out on them. There was nobody steering that bus," he said. Openly gay playei; Richard Hatch, wins 'Survivor': He was taunted for his penchant for nudity, condemned as manipulative and even called a snake by a fellow castaway. Richard Hatch earned another label: millionaire. And he said that he has no regrets. The 39-year-old corporate trainer took home the cash prize and a new car on the final episode of CBS' hugely popular "Survivor," confounding those certain his scheming would cost him in the end. "I wouldn't change anything that I did," Rich told the jury in a final statement. Heche hospitalized hours after split with DeGeneres: Actress Anne Heche was hospitalized after wandering up to a rural home appearing shaken and confused, hours after her breakup with Ellen DeGeneres became public, authorities said. Heche apparently parked her car along a highway Saturday and then walked about a mile to the house in Cantua Creek, where she knocked on the front door at about 4:30 p.m. and made strange statements to the occupants, said Fresno County Sheriff's Lt. Merrill Wright. SEPTEMBER State Supreme Court to review exec order case: In a move that brings gays and lesbians in Houston closer to knowing whether Mayor Lee Brown's executive order banning sexual orientation discrimination in city government is legal, the Texas Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments about whether the city councilman and the businessman who sued to stop the order from taking effect had a right to do so. Days after the executive order was issued in 1998, businessman Richard Hotze and City Councilman Rob Todd sued the mayor and the city to try to stop the order from taking effect. Later in 1998, District Judge Patrick Mizell stopped the order until the case could be decided and said that Hotze had no legal standing in the case—that is, he had no right to sue. The Texas Supreme Court heard arguments in October in the case and a ruling from the court is still pending. Lesbian wedding held in San Antonio: When a Texas appellate court issued a ruling last year that essentially said people who are born male remain legally male even if they have surgery to change their sex, it opened the •door for Jessica Wicks of Houston—who was bom male—to marry her girlfriend. Jessica and Robin Wicks And in September, amid a throng of reporters. Wicks, 53, and her partner Robin, 44, got their marriage license in San Antonio. "They were cooperative," Wicks said of the county clerk's office. "Of course, probably the fact that there were lots of television cameras there helped." They were denied a marriage license in Harris County, but the Bexar County clerk agreed to issue the license based on birth certificates that show Jessica was bom male and Robin was bom female. Etheridge splits from girlfriend: Rocker Melissa Etheridge and her girlfriend, director Julie Cypher, announced they were ending their relationship after 12 years. The couple has two small children together. "With the utmost of love and respect for one another, we have decided to separate," the couple announced in a statement released by Etheridge's label, Island Records. Etheridge and Cypher, together for 12 years, were one of Hollywood's most famous lesbian couples, after Ellen DeGeneres and Ann Heche, who announced their breakup in August. Ex-gay leader confronted in gay bar A prominent ex-gay leader once featured as "going straight" on the cover of Newsweek magazine was confronted and photographed by activists Tuesday night patronizing a gay bar in Washington, D.C. John Paulk, board chair for the umbrella ex-gay group Exodus International, admitted in an interview with the Voice that he was in Mr. Fs, a gay bar in Washington's DuPont Circle neighborhood, but said his only intention was to use the bathroom. OCTOBER Trans teen kicked out of Covenant House: In February of this year, Jeff Loftin checked into Covenant House Houston and was allowed to stay. He left in March. In September, Loftin checked into Covenant House as Chanel Dita, and she was ousted in no uncertain terms, even though she had nowhere to stay. And Covenant House knew it, says Dita. Dita is a 19-year-old homeless transgender. She was thrown out of her home in Pasadena, after she told her mother she was transsexual. When Dita checked into Covenant House on Sept. 16 as a female, she says she was told she could not dress as a woman. She was also told she must submit to a physical within 48 hours of admission. The physical exam is standard practice. By the first of December, Dita was back at Covenant House, allowed to stay as long as she adhered to a few house rules. This time, Dita underwent the required physical and she says she has been told to wear unisex clothing ("jeans and stuff," says Dita) and forego the makeup while there. Though she landed a job at Burger King in the Montrose, she has since quit and as of presstime had left Covenant House as well. Happy birthday, Ray Hill: On Friday, Oct. 13,2000, one of Houston's bold, brazen, and at times brash, queers celebrated his sixtieth birthday. For most of those 60 years, Ray Hill's life has been spent, in one way or another, for better or for worse, standing up for social justice for queer folk or for folks who simply had been too beaten down to stand up for themselves. Roy Hi Hill admits that his way has always been "years ahead of my time." He backs that statement up by reminiscing about attending Tulane College in 1966. He enrolled in the graduate program there and submitted his thesis topic, "A Sissy is a Sissy, is a Sissy." NOVEMBER Houston's Black Tie draws 1,200: For the second year in a row, the George R. Brown Convention Center was transformed from its ship-like appearance into an elegant dining room with subdued lighting and muted music played by the Ricky Diaz Orchestra for the ^^ Houston Black Tie Dinner, the stylish fund-raising event that draws who's who in the city's LGBT community. Houston City Councilwoman, Annise Parker, introduced the keynote speaker, Steve May, as one of only 200 openly gay or lesbian politicians nationwide, and as a good friend of hers. Pointing out May's abilities as a leader in the LGBT community, Parker said, "We cannot afford mediocrity." May, the only openly gay Republican in the Arizona House of Representatives spoke about his experiences as a First Lieutenant in the U.S Army Reserve and about his road to politics. Deaths of transgendered commemorated in solemn ceremony outside City Hall: Two dozen transgender activists assembled on the City Hall steps in Nov. 28 for a candlelight memorial for the 18 gender variant people who died as a result of violence since last year's memorial. The Day of Remembrance was set aside to memorialize those who were killed due to anti-transgender hatred or prejudice. The event is held on Nov. 28 to honor Rita Hester, whose murder kicked off the "Remembering Our Dead" project. DECEMBER 'AIDS: Men Make a Difference': Candlelight vigils, toy and food drives, art shows and help for those with HIV/AIDS marked Houston's LGBT observation of the 13th World AIDS Day on Dec. 1. The event is a day, when people around the world join to commemorate public awareness about the disease that does not discriminate. The united theme for this year is, "AIDS: Men Make a Difference." With new infections of HIV/AIDS rising at an alarming rate worldwide, it is time for all to make a difference. According to figures from AIDS Foundation Houston (AFH), it is estimated that within the Houston/Harris County area alone, one in 90 individuals is HIV positive.
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