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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
File 004
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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 004. 2000-12-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7335.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-12-29). Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7335

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 004, 2000-12-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7335.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 29, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 NEWS NEWS INSIDE National News 4 Polite News 5 World News 10 Health news 11 Quote/unquote 21 Han-Net establishes list of goals for 2001 VOICES 8, ECHOES (rain: lime for gays lo break the faith? 8 Murphy/Minicucci: Celebrate your neurosis . .9 'Dykes to Watch Out For' 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU The good, bad and ugly of theater in 2000 ..15 Oul in Music: Queer tunes of the year 18 On Screen. Quantity, nol quality in gay film ..19 Ealing Oul at Marrakech 20 Bayou Calendar 17 Community Calendar 22-23 Occasions 26 My Stars! 27 CLASSIFIEDS v..24-25 Issue 1053 I.MIMMil voice AH material in Houston Voice is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced without the written consent of Houston Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers, writers and cartoonists published herein is neither inferred or implied. The appearance of names or pictorial representation does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation of that person or persons. Houston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility for its return. The editor reserves the right to accept, reject or edit any submission. All rights revert to authors upon publication. Guidelines for freelance contributors are 'available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 Finding homes for GLBT organizations, generating political activism top the list by ELLA TYLER Han-Net, the e-group for Houston's GLBT activists, recently asked its members to vote on Community Challenges for 2001. The poll closed Tuesday night. "Focus on local and state political issues" was the top vote-getter, with 16 votes. The Texas legislature will be meeting from January to May of 2001, and city elections will be held in November of 2001. Finding new homes for the Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center and the Gulf Coast Archives & Museum were the next highest priority, with 12 votes and 10 votes respectively. "Exploring options for a new home is one of our primary objectives for the year ahead and we will soon have a second meeting open to anyone who wishes to participate in the process," Tim Brookover, HLGCC president, said. The Community Center is outgrowing it's current space, and GCAM is temporarily housed in a portion of a warehouse east of downtown that is used as a residence. > Continued on Page 12 _ __——ppj,-— eGroups »53S??a! Xu»«*w» si au—nrf*? YhMMM CM c*IBnwh* *MX V* m+*n m-Matft |Mm cafe «n* I »w^!iliBi Han-Net, an e-group for political activists in Houston's queer community, was established two years ago by Brandon Wolf. Found at www.egroups.com/group/han-net, the list is not moderated and has nearly 250 members. Snapshots from a gay millennium As 2001 marks the real start of the new millennium, the first 1,000 years show escalating change for gays by LAURA BROWN To say that life on Earth has changed in the last 1,000 years would be a massive understatement—although to say that there are some for whom things haven't changed so much is also certainly true. Gay history, too, shows a pattern of escalating change with a stubborn undercurrent of hostility toward gays, although gay history is much more difficult to track. Most scholars, in fact, will argue that there really is no such thing as "gay history" before the last century or so. The idea of a separate gay identity, they point out, is a very recent social phenomenon: While individuals engaged in sexual relations with members of their own sex in centuries past, and even in some cases were assigned social roles because of it, they were unlikely to have constructed their identity around their sexuality in the same way that many gay men and lesbians do today. So looking back to the beginning of the millennium, the story of "gay history" is more often a story of same-sex attraction, sodomy or gender transgression, and how the people involved in these activities were treated by the individuals and institutions around them. It is also, very often, a tale of persecution— although there have always been cultures, many non-Westem, that have accepted and even celebrated such differences—and a tale of institutions of social power and how they affect whose story gets told, then and now. Much more is known about male-male relationships, especially up until the last two centuries, as sexism and patriarchy in many societies kept women from recording their own stories and made them invisible or uninteresting to the men who created much of the bodies of law and literature that have survived until today. Most gay historical scholarship has also focused on Western cultures, to the exclusion of those in Africa, Asia and other parts of the world. 1000-1100 • In his 1051 treatise "Book of Gomorrah," Saint Peter Damian wrote at length about the evil of male homosexuality, especially in the clergy, including long and very detailed accounts of what he implied were very common homosexual acts. • Though not officially condoned, homosexual activity often was tolerated in the Catholic clergy. Pope Urban II, who launched the first Crusade, declined to act on information from church leaders who complained about the male lover of Ralph, Archbishop of Tours, rjecoming Archbishop of Orleans. John, Ralph's lover, was elected in 1098. And while Ralph's homosexuality was so well known that it was described in popular songs, in later years, crackdowns on known adulterers among the clergy—who were required to be celibate—left John and Ralph alone. 1100-1200 • In 1102, the ecclesiastical Council of London sought to inform the general citizenry that "sodomy" was a sin that needed to be included in confessions, although the edict may never have been published. "This sin has hitherto been so public that hardly anyone is embarrassed by it," wrote Saint Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury. • In 1179, the Catholic Lateren HI council imposed sanctions against a variety of sinners, including those involved with homosexuality Relative tolerance of same-sex relations in the early part of the millennium may be represented in art from the period: This sculpture from the 12th century came from an area known for homosexuality; it could depict merely wrestlers, scholar John Boswell notes, or much more. in a list that also included Jews, Muslims, heretics and moneylenders. 1200-1300 • Although the past century in Europe was considered fairly open to same-sex relationships, the next two showed increasing persecution, as religion and law became increasingly absolute. As the Crusades continued, Christian leaders tried to rally hatred against Muslims by alleging effeminacy and sodomy as characteristics of the entire ethnic group. • The earliest and most stringent legislation passed against gays came from Europeans > Continued on Page 12
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