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Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004
File 012
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Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 012. 2004-04-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7313.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-04-23). Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7313

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 012, 2004-04-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7313.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date April 23, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com APRIL 23, 2004 11 Oillt BRUCE CARROLL President Bush and the religious right didn't start the culture war over marriage. It's the radical gay groups' agenda. A fine mess we're in now THE BACKLASH OVER GAY MARRIAGE during the past few weeks doesn't come as a surprise to me. I predicted it months ago to a group of friends who are rabidly in support of pushing the issue. I told them that while there was a gay- marrying frenzy breaking out in San Francisco. Oregon, and New Paltz, N.Y., most Americans were not at a place to accept this change. Since two-thirds of Americans oppose gay marriage, and the same percentage support legal protections for gays in the workplace, then why, I asked, are the radical gay groups forcing marriage down the throats of America at this time? But it wasn't the "religious right" or President Bush who started this round of the culture war. It was us. The battle was clearly started by gay activists who adopted the tactic of challenging marriage laws across the country. The battle was joined, of course, by the conservatives now pushing for a federal constitutional amendment. But we need to step up and admit that the responsibility of the gay marriage debate, good or bad, is squarely on the shoulders and the consciences of the so- called leaders of the Human Rights Campaign, National Gay & Lesbian Task Force, Log Cabin Republicans and their ilk. Now the dominoes are falling against us, in Georgia, Kentucky and Mississippi. A state constitutional amendment banning gay marriage in those states will be put before voters. Georgia, Kentucky and Mississippi — not surprising, right? But in Massachusetts, far from a bastion of the religious right, the state legislature adopted a constitutional amendment, though it still must survive additional legislative votes next year before it goes on the ballot there. SO THERE WE HAVE IT. THIS DECISION by our supposed leaders to push gay marriage onto center stage in America at this time and in this election year has resulted in a colossal setback that is solely the fault of those same groups. Why? Because instead of appreciating the feelings of most Americans and undertaking a long-term commitment to educate our nation about who we are, our leaders took the easy way and went to the courts to dictate one version of morality and forced tolerance from the bench. That strategy is faulty and will never work. What we saw in Massachusetts, Georgia, Kentucky and Mississippi will be replicated in nearly every other state of the union. So the net impact of our activists launching this culture war will become discrimination enshrined into state constitutions. That certainly doesn't seem a step forward for gay rights. Gay leaders will scratch their heads and wonder what went wrong, but the fact that they don't "get it" is proof enough that we need to find a new way and new leadership. Instead we get Rosie O'Donnell who says she's getting married in front of TV cameras merely because President Bush says he's opposed to it. Well, that's one sure way for opponents to question the sincerity of the true commitment to gay marriage, isn't it? THE PATH TO GAY MARRIAGE IS NOT to force Americans to accept a morality they are not prepared to embrace, Instead of radical gay groups spending their precious few dollars, time and resources engaging in court fights and street battles, it's time to turn our attention to the hearts and minds of mainstream America. What is needed is a fundamental and, most importantly, mature awareness campaign across the country about what it is to be a gay or lesbian American today. We all need to be willing to come out of our closets — proverbial or not — and let our friends, family and work colleagues know who we are. Let them know that we pay our taxes just like them. Let them know we experience the ups and downs of daily life just like them. Let them know that we want the same financial, job and relationship security that they enjoy. Let them know that we want to be as tolerant of their long-standing religious beliefs as we want them to be tolerant of ours. Until the leaders of these radical gay groups come to grips that they have wasted precious years on counterproductive strategies, we will continue to face these predictable setbacks to gay marriage and other issues with increasing frequency Until all of us start reaching out to mainstream Americans, instead of shouting in their faces, we will continue to be responsible for our own failures. Brace Carroll lives in Alexandria, Va, and is a former member of Log Cabin Republicans; he can be reached at BraceC2K(a!acicom. DykeS ToWafdlOuftfor tyAliso«BecWcl
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