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Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004
File 009
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Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 009. 2004-04-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7310.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-04-23). Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7310

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 009, 2004-04-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7310.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date April 23, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript APRIL 23, 2004 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I national neuvs Mass. governor tries to stop gay wedding march MARRIAGE, continued from Page 1 In a decision that he said gave "a little to Everyone." Circuit Judge Frank Bearden said that the state Supreme Court — or voters — will ultimately decide the issue of same-sex marriages. He gave the Oregon Legislature 90 days before they reconvene for a special session in June, to change the law to extend marital benefits to Oregon gay couples who already have a marriage license. The case. Mary Li, et al vs. State of Oregon, brought by the American Civil Liberties Union and nine gay couples, was heard in the Multnomah County Courthouse last week. Supporters of gay marriage asserted that the constitution bans discrimination of any kind while opponents claimed that voters have the right to define marriage as the union of one man and one woman. Paul Cates, a spokesperson with the ACLU, said Tuesday's victory was unprecedented in that it was the first time any judge in the U.S. had ordered a state to recognize marriage licenses issued to samesex couples. Cates said he was uncertain which side would file an appeal in the case since the decision, for now, has made "everyone a bit happy" The county raised the constitutional question over the legalities of the marriages on March 3. Democratic Gov. Ted Kulongoski, a former Oregon Supreme Court Justice, and state Attorney General Hardy Myers agree with gay rights supporters that a ban on gay marriage will likely be ruled unconstitutional, according to an Associated Press report. Before the trial, they had requested that the county cease issuing same-sex marriage licenses. The county refused. The plaintiffs brought the lawsuit against Kulongoski, Myers and the Defense of Marriage Coalition, a group formed the day Multnomah County began issuing marriage licenses to gay couples. Cates said Judge Bearden rejected the opposition's main argument, made by Kelly Clark, a former Republican state legislator and the attorney for the Defense of Marriage Coalition, who contended in court that the framers of the Oregon Constitution never intended marriage to apply to gay couples. Calls to the Defense of Marriage Coalition were not returned. Calif, closer to legalizing gay marriage In California, gay Assembly member Mark Leno's (D-San Francisco) same-sex marriage bill was approved by the state's Democrat-controlled Judiciary Committee by an 8-3 vote. AB 1967 would prohibit the state of California from denying marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Testifying at Tuesday's hearing was Randy Thomasson, executive director of Campaign for California Families, who called the measure "illegal, unconstitutional and immoral." Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney is seeking emergency legislation in a last-ditch effort to derail same-sex marriage ceremonies slated to begin next month. "This bill turns marriage upside down and utterly rejects the vote of the people to protect marriage for a man and a woman," Thomasson said at Tuesday's hearing. Opponents maintain that AB 1967 contradicts the 14-word ballot initiative known as Proposition 22 that states, "Only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California." The measure passed in March 2000, with 61 percent of voters statewide supporting it, and carries the weight of state law as a part of the California's Family Code. Supporters of Leno's measure assert that his bill does not conflict with the state initiative since the 2000 measure deals with recognizing out-of-state gay marriages, not samesex unions performed within the state. California Assembly member Mark Leno's bill that would legalize same-sex marriage advanced out of a committee this week. Vince Sollitto, a spokesperson for Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, said the office does not comment on legislation before it reaches the governor's desk. Schwarzenegger's reluctance to discuss the bill, which Leno claims faces an uphill battle in the Assembly, has left its supporters confidant that he would sign it while leaving social conservatives to ponder whether the Republican governor is "with them" on this issue. Tony Perkins, executive director of the Family Research Council, said in a news release on Wednesday, Schwarzenegger "must" oppose Leno's marriage bill. "Throughout his campaign and his short time in office, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has been ambiguous about his willingness, or lack thereof, to protect marriage from those who want to redefine it out of existence," Perkins wrote. In a March appearance on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno," Schwarzenegger said gay marriages, if approved by the courts or voters, would be "fine with me." Mass. governor tries to stop weddings In Massachusetts. Republican Gov. Mitt Romney, in a last ditch effort to prevent the issuance of marriage licenses to same-sex couples, said last week that he will seek emergency legislation to prevent licenses from being issued to gay couples on May 17, a date set by the Supreme Judicial Court in their historic gay marriage ruling last November. If approved, the legislation would allow the governor to appoint a special counsel to argue, on his behalf, to the state's high court to delay the ruling until the state's constitution is amended to ban same-sex marriage. O MORE INFO American Civil Liberties Union 125 Broad St., 18th floor New York, NY 10004 www.aclu.org The only legal figure who according to Massachusetts state law can represent Romney in court is state Attorney General Thomas Reilly (D), who last month rejected the governor's request to seek a stay from the SJC until November 2006, when the proposed amendment would be presented to Massachusetts voters. Reilly, who also opposes gay marriage but is considered a likely challenger to Romney when he runs for a second gubernatorial term, has said the court has ruled twice on this issue and is unlikely to consider it again. Romney defended his actions as designed to "protect the constitutional process" and to prevent the "legal confusion" that is likely after 2 1/2 years of gay marriage. But he also conceded that he would begin holding informational meetings with city clerks to determine how to handle gay marriages should the legislature deny his request. The Massachusetts Justices of the Peace Association, which represents the local officials who have the authority to perform wedding ceremonies, said a meeting was scheduled for next Monday between their members and Romney officials on how to handle gay marriages in May. Massachusetts justices of the peace are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Governor's Council for seven-year terms. While the legislature narrowly approved a constitutional amendment last March legalizing civil unions but banning gay marriage, many lawmakers are suffering from "marriage fatigue," according to Arline Isaacson, co-chair of the Massachusetts Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus. She said having debated the emotional issue ad nauseum, many lawmakers have no desire to take up the issue again. While there may be support in the House for the emergency legislation, the AP reported that 22 of 40 senators oppose the effort, including Senate President Robert Travaglini, who supported the amendment. And House Speaker Thomas M. Einneran, an ardent opponent of gay marriage, said last week that he does not intend to stop same-sex couples from marrying in May. Josh Friedes, director of the Freedom to Marry Coalition, said many legislators and opponents of same-sex marriage "were in denial" following the SJC's decision in Goodridge vs. Department of Health. He added that there is a growing "understanding amongst opponents that there is no way to stop gay marriages from taking place without a constitutional crisis." The Associated Press contributed to this report.
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