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Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004
File 005
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Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 005. 2004-04-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-04-23). Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7306

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004 - File 005, 2004-04-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7331/show/7306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1225, April 23, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date April 23, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 APRIL 23, 2004 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE r Waco chapter opens first PFLAG center in U.S. national news Chapter names center after Baptist minister and wife active in the family support group By BINNIE FISHER WACO, Texas — An ordained Baptist minister and retired religion professor at Baylor University and his wife were on hand recently when Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays dedicated the new PFLAG Community Center in Waco. Eddie and Velma Dwyer were there because PFLAG named the center after them. Yes, it's true, out of 501 PFLAG chapters nationwide, the first one in the country to open a community center has named the facility after a Baptist minister and his wife. "They are just totally non-judgmental and open minded," noted Daniel Hollingsworth, vice president of the Waco PFLAG chapter. As people began arriving for the dedication on April 17, Hollingsworth said, he realized that the Baylor faculty was well represented. "People came in honor and support of Eddie and Velma," he said. "I was overwhelmed that they came." The Dwyers, whose son, Paul, is gay and a graduate of Baylor, said they are honored that the PFLAG chapter, of which they are members, chose to put their names on the buildin-- "It makes me extremely proud," Velma Dwyer said. Paul Dwyer said he had come out in the late 1960s, but took the advice of a faculty advisor at Baylor and said nothing to his parents. There were moments when he mourned the fact that he wasn't truthful with his parents, people he knew to be loving and not judgmental. "I never heard anything from them that was negative about any minority group," he said- Still, he kept quiet and moved to Washington. D.C. where he now works for the Congressional Research Service. "I wanted to be totally out with everyone," he said, everyone but his parents, that is. Unknown to Paul Dwyer, along the way his father had come to suspect that he and Velma were the parents of a gay son. An academician and a Biblical scholar, Eddie Dwyer, now 92, knew just where to turn for answers to the questions that were beginning to nag him: books written about homosexuality and to the Bible. Eddie said the first question in his mind was, "Is there some reason for peo- Ordained Baptist minister Eddie Dwyer and his wife Velma say they are honored to have Waco's new PFLAG Community Center named after them, pie to be gay other than choosing it? I came to the conclusion that it's part of a person's inherent nature. It's not something they choose." Though many of his fellow Baptist theologians claim the Bible to be the infallible word of God, Dwyer accepted that it was a work open to interpretation. It had to be taken in the context and light of the times in which it was written. A thorough search of the document convinced him that there is no condemnation of gays and lesbians in the Bible. Dwyer, who eventually penned a paper using the research he had done, wrote: "I am convinced that gays and lesbians are born with their respective natures. I long for the time when homosexuals will be treated as equals, respected for who they are, and allowed the freedom they deserve." Velma Dwyer, 87, said Paul eventually came out to her and her husband. "It was Easter weekend of 1992," she said. "Eddie had done a lot of research by then, and we were prepared to accept it. It was a beautiful experience that Easter morning." Paul said that Easter morning talk with his parents confirmed what he knew in his heart. "I just knew they would be there for me. They are so loving and so nurturing." Eddie said he hopes the Eddie & Velma Dwyer Community Center, housed in a former bar, will bridge a gap between PFLAG and Baylor. The school has been in the news recently for condemning a pro gay marriage editorial in the campus newspaper for canceling the scholarship of a gay student. "Having been in the religion department, and with this coming out, I hope it will open the way to help parents and students," he said. Billboards used to solicit clues in Allyn murder Friends and family of murdered gay lobbyist hope new signs solve case By BINNIE FISHER Nixon Wheat, longtime friend of Ross Allyn. gazed up at a billboard bearing the slain gay lobbyist's photo and surmised, "He'd say it was great, but he'd wonder why it wasn't full length." Other friends agreed that Allyn would be gratified to know that efforts to solve his murder included billboards with his photo. Clear Channel Outdoor donated the billboard, installed Monday morning at the intersection of Dallas Street and Montrose Boulevard. The company is installing a total of fifteen billboards in Houston in an effort to help solve the murder. Allyn was found early on the morning of November 20, 2003 inside his burning home at 919 Worthshire. Firefighters called the Houston Police Department to the scene after confirming that Allyn had been shot. The Harris County Medical Examiner ruled the death a homicide and confirmed that Allyn died of a bullet wound in the back of his neck at the base of his skull. ft MORE INFO HPD Homicide Division 713-308-3600 Crime Stoppers 713-222-TIPS Mary Lym Miller, Ross Allyn's sister, addresses the media beneath one of 15 billboards donated by Clear Channel-Outdoor to solicit clues in the murder of the gay lobbyist. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) Allyn's sister, Mary Lynn Miller of Philadelphia, flew to Houston for the Monday billboard installation and for a weekend of events staged to recognize National Crime Victims Rights Week. Surrounded by friends of Allyn at the base of the billboard. Miller called on anyone with information regarding the murder to come forward. "We're all suffering," she said. "This is a horrible nightmare that never gets bet ter. Please, help Ross find some justice." Kim Ogg, executive director of Crime Stoppers, said billboards have proven to be an effective tool in solving crimes. "We hope these billboards will remind everybody that Mr. Allyn's case is still unsolved," she said. "Somebody knows what happened. We hope they will look at this billboard, look at this family and give us a call." She added, "I can think of numerous cases where bill boards have been the catalyst that resulted in new information coming in." Ogg stressed that even though months have passed, the person with the right information can solve the case quickly. She pointed to the recent case of Coral Eugene Watts, a violent offender and confessed serial murderer who was due to be released within two years from prison in Texas. As news of the case spread across the country, and law enforcement officials in Texas voiced their concern, a tip was called in by someone with knowledge of a murder committed by Watts in 1979 in Ferndale, Michigan. The witness to the Michigan murder came forward after learning that authorities in Texas would be unable to keep Watts behind bars once he completed his prison term. The woman, who had worked with the victim, called the office of the Michigan attorney general to report what she witnessed. "Even 20 years later, a witness sees a story in the national media and responds to it," Ogg said. "Because of that witness, Watts will be extradited to Michigan." More recently, she said, a citizen responding to information regarding the murder of artist and teacher Helen Orman was a major player in solving that case. The woman, who spotted a vehicle resembling the one that sped away from the murder scene and a driver resembling an artist sketch of the suspect, jotted down a license number. It was that number that led to the arrest of Beau John Maloney. "Sometimes you can just stimulate somebody into action," Ogg said. Lee Vela, public affairs director for Clear Channel, said the company often donates billboards to enhance the efforts of Crime Stoppers in specific cases. "We'll probably reach nearly 100,000 a day when all the signs go up." he said. In addition to the Montrose location, billboards are being installed in the neartown and downtown areas.
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