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Montrose Voice, No. 335, March 27, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 335, March 27, 1987 - File 001. 1987-03-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7199/show/7166.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-27). Montrose Voice, No. 335, March 27, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7199/show/7166

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 335, March 27, 1987 - File 001, 1987-03-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7199/show/7166.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 335, March 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOME DELIVERY? ADVERTISING? Call (713) 529-8490 montrose A Montrose Community VOICE Center? Sooner than You Think News, inside HOUSTON WEEKEND WEATHER Fair and mild fffl Ill Ill fJ 111iI1] , .. 1] ot o!I nights, low in the sos. Warm and sunny days, high in I ! I,,''' h' MARCH 27, 1987 ISSUE 335 II 11 .. "" ~7_0s. _______ ~ Violence Against Gays Unked to AIDS News, inside Meet Shake- , spears Lover Steve Warren, inside MORE NEWS FROM THE HEALTH CRISIS o Scientists Ready to Test Possible Vaccines o AIDS Programs Not High on Texas Budget List ~\ The ,,~e- ""- Unholy WAR News, inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 Arts 'N' Crafts Movement at Griffin Warehouse European - American Traditional Furniture Montrose Community Center Close to Reality It appears that following a meeting of the Montrose Activity Center on Mon­day, March 23, only one major obstacle remains before a Montrose community center can become reality. According to Dwayne Wells, board chair, the owner of an 11,000-sq. ft. building at 1110 Lovett Blvd. submitted what seems by far to be the best prop­osal. However, the building owner is requiring a personal guarantor to ensur(' rental payments before drawing up a lease. "This is a major stumbling block," said Wells. He added, "The building owner will accept a single individual, small group or business to co·sign lease payrr.ent." Underwriting by an estab­lished foundation would also be accep­table according to Wells. The personal guarantor demand seems to have arisen after the property owner turned negotiations over to his attorneys. Wc1ls feels the requirement is "asking too much." He commented that, coupled with other community needs, "few peo­ple ore willing to stake personal estate on the matter." Ray Hill, another member of the Activity Center, said efforts will be made to convince the building owner that a problem does not exist. "All those with an interest in this pro­ject are already good renters," Hi11 said. Wells feels confident that once the rent guarantee issue is "resolved or dropped," the center could be in use by Gay Pride Week (June 19-29). "The building recently underwent some major renovations including a new roof and painting. The only remaining modifications would be those required for each tenant," he explained. Some 40 people representing 12-15 organizations attending the Monday meeting unanimously endorsed the board's recommendations and autho­rized it to proceed with negotiations. Other proposals were submitted hy owners of properties at 811 Westheimer and 3217 Fannin. The Westheimer prop­osal was dismissed as being too costly, while it was felt that the Fannin prop· erty, which now houses Dignity Center, was not actually in Montrose. It has been speculated that proposals from property management for build­ings located at 3400 Montrose (Cody's building), 3:!17 Montrose <Kwik Kopy building), and the old Liberty Bank building (Montro•e and W•stheimer) may be forthroming. Plans for a Montrm;e community cen­ter h{•gan last November and hnv<' pro· gr.-st-d quickly. It is felt hy Wells that the project "has to happen now or is not going to happen." One of the reasons the group is pro­gressing at such a quick pace is that one of the center's potential clients must Boon find a new location "The Montrose Clinic has to move now," said Wells. It is hoped that the c1inic with the Montrose Counseling Center will form the core of the center. ~Pl~y ~Safe! MARCH 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 o Art Fest Donates Funds Accepting the first donation toward a re-roofing project at the Neartown Com­munity Police Center is Sgt. Don Williams, officer in charge of the center. The presentation was made by John Daniel, president of the Westheimer Colony Association, from proceeds of the Fall Westheimer Colony Art Festival. Looking on, after receiving funds to be used for two-way radios, are Guardian Angel Patrol Leader Salvod-Or Suarez, Assistant Chapter Leader Zeke Suarez and Chapter Leader Kit uan Cleave. Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Montrose & Community Groups .. Faster Women Win Pantzer Tournament The Marion Pantzer women's softball pre-season tournament was held March 14-15. Eight teams participated in the tournament which was won by Faster Women. Second place went to the Hollywood Bears, and third place went to Undercover The Houston Women's Softball League regular season begins March 29. 1987 at Heights­Lyons Field ••106 Octane Wins MSA Chili Cookoff Doug Sutherland's "106 Octane Chili' was judged to be the best entry m the Montrose Sports Association Chih Cookoff held March 15 at E/J's Eddie Garza with "Betty "G' Chili" took second and ·Bowl Them Over Chili' by Tom Wiseheart captured third .. Bruce Willis Double Tennis Winner Bruce Willis was the big defender in last week's challenge ladder action of the Houston Tennis Club. First. he defended his No. 12 ranking against newcomer Gary Schwartz 6-1 6-0. After hitting a few with another newcomer. Dawn Donaldson. he defeated Randy Lunsford for the third time in a row since May 1986, 6-1, 6-1 No. 1 Andrew Morris defended against David Heiland 6-0. 6-2 to mark a solid year of holding the No. 1 rank. Rick Hadnot held his No. 7 rank against Rich Corder's challengeS-0. 6-1. Jeff Barkman held on to No. 18 against Dimples when she retired 6-4, 3-2. No. 1 doubles team of Mike Houston and Mark McMahon came back from losing the first set to a new challenger team of Rick Hadnot and Rich Corder 3-6. 6-4, 6-4 The club will be on Memorial Tennis Center courts 11 , 12 and 15-18 each Sunday Call 524-2151 for more information Direct Burial or Cremation CREffiAT\On SER\JlCE tnTERilAT\OilAL• Operated by James H Murphy Funeral Homes pnced $395 from ~ 363-9999 AFH Receives Grant, Executive Director Resigns Citing a mutual decision between the board of trustees of the AIDS Founda­' tion Houston, Inc., and executive direc­tor Curtis Dickson, board chair Donald Skipwith announced Tuesday, March 24, that the board has accepted Dick­son's resignation . After a tenure of slightly over one year, Skipwith said it wa_s the feeling of both the board and Dickson that the public health administrator's "roots lied in the public •ector" and that the foundation needed a director who was strong on organizational and fundrais­ing skills. "He feels he will gain more satisfac­tion in returning to public health ," ~aid Skipwith. He added, "He admits being weak on organizational and fundrais­ing skills." Dickson was formerly head of public health in Beaumont, Texas. Skipwith did commend Dickson for "working very hard, putting in some long hours" as chief administrator of the foundation, which has an annual budget in excess of $300,000. Dickson's resignation became effec­tive Monday, March 23. However, he will remain with the foundation, in a limited capacity, until the end of the month. Skipwith said Dickson will probably have other employment by the beginning of April. The foundation expanded existing programs and began several new ones under the direction of Dickson. Among those were the development of mental health and minority education pro­grams. A food pantry, "Stone Soup," was also begun. "Stone Soup" was recently a recipient of a $1,000 grant from the National AIDS Network. Funds for the grant were generated from the "Stamp Out AIDS Program" and are intended solely to provide direct services to persons with AIDS. Stone Soup will use the grant to purchase a cooler so the pantry can increase the availability of perisha­ble items. Less than two months old, Stone Soup serves over 50 clients on a regular basis. Stone Soup coordinator Bruce Cook recently returned from Los Angeles and San Francisco where he toured similar pantries in those cities. Cook says that although tho!-Oe pantries have been in existence longer than Houston's, Hous­ton's selection of foodstuffs equals ifnot excttds their West Coast counterparts. The Viet Nam Restaurant and Andy presents the Finest Food in town at the Best Prices Lunch or Dinner Special $12 a couple Choice of Appetizer, Entree, Dessert, with complimentary sake Open: 11am-10pm Sun., 11am­midnight M-F, 11am-2am Sat. 3215 Main at Elgin 526-0917 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 MAKE THE RIGHT CONNECTION • • on Houston·s outrageous New conference Call our exciting phone service has become the rage In callfornla, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It available to gay men right here In Texas! we are the first and biggest company In the field-our conferences are HOT!! When you dial you will be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from all over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine Interesting men, like yourself, anxious to make new acqualn· tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. TOP or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they're an here! It's only $2*-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are required. vour anonymity Is guaranteed. can 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • Houst~~: 713-976-9696 *This call is only 52 In most of the 713 area codes. Matching Is random and you may not hear another caller al'ld yet still be charged. call at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi· tlonal toll charges may apply in some areas. MARCH 27, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 5 2100 in Military Test Positive Gays Protest Lack of AIDS Drugs in NY By Richard C. Gross WASHINGTON (UPI)-More than 2,100 active duty military personnel have tested positive for the virus linked to the deadly AIDS disease out of more than 1.2 million men and women exam· ined, the Pentagon said Tuesday. The rate of infection in the active duty military population worldwide is between 1 and 2 per 1,000 people, slightly higher than the steady 1.5 per 1,000 recorded among applicants for service in the armed forces, Pentagon officials said. As of December, 2,139 men and women in uniform among 1,274,072 tested forthe HIV antibody linked tothe disease tested positive, Pentagon fig­ures showed. There are 2.1 million peo­ple in the military. They included 1,116 people of the 531,430 tested in the Navy and Marine Corps, 797 of 569, 158 examined in the Army and 226 of 173,484 tested in the Air Force, the officials said. The statistics translate into a rate of2 per 1,000 for the Navy and Marine Corps, 1.4 per thousand for the Army and 1.3 per thousand for the Air Force, Pentagon officials said. Including the 976 of 641,220 recruit applicants who showed exposure to the disease as of September, it brings to 3,115 the number of people examined by the military who have been infected by the disease. Recruita exposed to AIDS are barred from military service but active duty personnel are retained. It marked the first time that figures showing the prevalence of exposure to AIDS in the active duty military have been released even though the results of tests administered to applicants are dis­closed routinely. The Pentagon made the statistics available to United Press International in response to a query fol1owing their disclosure by Dr. Joseph Mayer, the assistant defense secretary for health Church Bonfire Protests Decadence LINWOOD, N.J. (UPl)-Members of a fundamentalist church fed rock record co~s and tapes into a bonfire last weekend under a sign saying "Jesus is the Rock of my Salvation." Several dozen police were on hand March 21 at the Mainwood Assembly of God in Linwood, near Atlantic City, because of fears that counter· demonstrators would disrupt the cerem· ony. But no one showed up, although police arrested one 16-year-old boy they said refused to leave the bhyrch after making noises during the burning. The ceremony was originally sche­duled for February but police asked for a postponement because they needed time to prepare. About 100 teenagers and parents watched as hita by Madonna, Kiss, Tina Turner and Boy George, a collection of 1950s hits and a Jane Fonda exercise tape went into the fireplace. The group said that rock lyrics encourage homo­sexuality, masturbation, incest, child abuse, adultery and suicide and that rock stars like David Bowie and Tina Turner have decadent lifestyles. The Rev.Jerry Sturgeon, the church's pastor, led prayers as the tapes and cov­ers burned. "The end result is if we can save the life of one teenager, if we can keep one young person from going into drugs, we've accomplished something," Stur· geon said. Gay Group Honors Films, TV LOS ANGELES (UPl)-Three episodes from the TV series "Hotel" and the PBS production of "Agony" were among 23 shows honored Saturday night by the Alliance for Gay and Lesbian Artists for 0 responsible portrayal" of the homo­sexual lifestyle. Clips from the winning film and tele­vision programs were shown at the eighth annual awards ceremony at the Wilshire Ebell Theater hosted by actress Patty Duke. "Hotel," was honored for the episodes "Scapegoats," "Undercurrents" and the "Rallying Cry." Other productions honored included the television movie, "An Early Frost"; the "Isn't It Romantic" episode of"The Golden Girls"; "My Beautiful Laun­derette"; "The Normal Heart"; and Lily Tomlin's "The Search for Signs oflntel­ligent Life in the Universe." Chris Uszler, AGLA'sexecutive direc· tor, said the organization hopes to improve the image of the gay commun· ity through the awards. "The more people know, the less likely they are to act in a bigoted or prejudiced manner when in their lives they meet someone gay or lesbian," Uzler said. Sex Appeal Studied in Rats and Pigs COLUMBIA, Mo. (UPl)-Female rats with sexual problems may have their brothers to blame and the same may go for pigs, university researchers say. Studies of rats show female fetuses located between male fetuses pick up male hormones, resulting in a variety of sexual problems when they become adults, researchers at the College of Agriculture at the University of Mis· souri said Wednesday. They believe the same thing may happen in pigs, contributing to repro· duction difficulties that can be costly for pork producers. . "In rate, female fetuses located between two males have high blood lev­els of testosterone, the potent ma]e sex hormone," said Frederick vom Saal, a biologist. "These females grow faster, reach sexual maturity later, ha,·e very irregu­lar estrous cycles and are •ery aggres­sive. Also, they appear :o be less attractive to males than females that develop within the uterus next to female fetuses." Vom Saal and scientist Kristie Rohde now are collaborating with a swine research team to see if the same princi­ple applies to pigs. "If it does, producers will be making some important management deci­sions," said animal scientist Bill Day. "For example, if a sow has a litter of seven males and only one female, pro­ducers won't want to keep the female as a replacement sow because there's a good chance she'll be infertile," Day said. affairs, at a March 18 hearing of the manpower and personnel subcommittee of the Senate Armed Services Commit­tee. The Pentagon, which is conducting the most ext.ensive AIDS examination program in the world, has been reluc­tant to reveal the statistics because not all of the testing has been completed. For example, the rate of incidence of 1 to 2 per 1,000 among the active duty force is based only on the 1.2 million people tested thus far, not the total force of 2.1 million men and women. The Navy, Marine Corps and Army are expected to finish testing in six months and the Air Force in another year, officials said. "We don't know all thedata,"oneoffi· cial said. "Of what we've got, that's what the rates are. We don't know what they mean yet. A positive test for the Human Immu­nodeficiency Virus (HIV) means only that an individual has been exposed to AIDS, not that he or she has contracted acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as the illness is known. By comparison, the Centers for Dis­ease Control in Atlanta reported that as of March 16 there were 32,825 cases of full-fledged AIDS among the civilian population-19,021 of which resulted in death. There is no known cure for AIDS, which attacks the body's ability to resist infection. Most of those afflicted with the disease are homosexuals, intravenous drug users and people who have received tainted blood transfu­sions. Release of the statistics came amid a Pentagon policy review about whether to retain military personnel who test positive. u1 anticipate no changes in the policy on retention," Mayer told the Senate subcommittee. "All HIV positive service members are evaluated on their fitness for duty at their current rank and responsibilities. There is no medical reason to establish a different set of retention criteria for individuals infected with HIV." montrose VOICE HOUSTON. TEXAS ISSUE 335 FRIDAY. MARCH 27. 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours: 8am-6pm Henry McClurg pub/1Sl>eNKM0t Linda Wyche man•""J9 «"'°' David Roumfort product'°" SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529--8490 ~~~~ ~--~~~ ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland ~erl1S'f'l9 t111«t01 Ken Boge •ccount eJrecul"'e POSTMASTER Send •ddff!'SI couechOrtl 10 4()(1 Avondele. Houston. T)( 77006-3028 Subac,.pt1on r•I• 1n US /by VOIC9 c•rr'91 °' US M1t•IJ $1 25 per week (uplo2111uea). S65peryear J52w..els). or $32 50 per 1u1. months (26 weeQI N1110n1l •dverl1l•"fl rept"eHn/111~• Aovetldell Marketing PO Box 1268. Pl11nf1eld_ NJ 07061 , 120117S4·43'8 fWJ•/ 1dver/•1Jl"fl a .. dl11>e Al chspley eds 5pm 2 dllys pnor lopubhcetoon dllle Allclessoloedlds2pm 1 Olypnor 10 publocet•on date No.I.le• to echerf••.,, Adverhl!f1g rate sehedute Eoghl·A was ellect•ve April 11. 1986 R•.lp0nal04rty We do not uaumti l•!"lano11 •814)0t1Sibility tor d••ms by mdvert....,. but reectf!'rs are nked to ldltU the f'loC!WSPIJ*" Ol ll"IY IUSP•CIOn ol lradulent or decept•VI a::Jvet11SJng and stnpocoona w I be trwesto;.ted N..,.,• 19n'IC• Umted Prn1 lntem11o0nel' NEW YORK (UPl)-About 175 protes­ters enraged by delays in offering exper­imen tal drugs to AIDS patients marched near Wall Street during the morning rush hour Tuesday and 17 peo­ple were arrested for disorderly conduct, police said. "We cannot wait 10 years for an AIDS drug," shouted one protester in front of Trinity Church in the heart of city's financial district. "AIDS patienta do not have enough time to live. The Food and Drug Administration last week approved the only AIDS drug on the U.S. market-Retrovir, the trade name for azidothymidine, or AZT. The manufacturer announced Monday, however, that it may be in short supply for months and should go first to the sickest AIDS patienta. Sixteen men and one woman who broke off from the group chanting "You can die too" in front of the church staged a sit-down in the middle of Broadway, said Police Sgt. Diane Kubler. When police approached them, the protestors laid down in the roadway. Police carried off the protestors on stretchers to be booked on disorderly conduct charges. A Cockatiel Saves Life of Its Owner BOYNE FALI..5, Mich. (UPl)-A pet cockatiel named Boy George awakened his owner in time for him to flee his burning house-taking the bird with him, of course. James Churchill, an engineer, said he was awakened on a recent Sunday morning when he heard the cockatiel, a small crested Australian parrot with a long tail. thrashing around in his cage. Churchill calmed the bird down and went back to bed, noticing nothing amiss other than a hall light that had apparently burned out. Ten minutes later, Boy George resumed the ruckus. This time, Church­ill said he could hear the ceiling crac­kling and see the glow of fire although there was no smoke in the house. The fire damaged 75 percent of Churchill's rented house in Hudson Township, but both Churchill and Boy George escaped unharmed. The next morning, Churchill bought Boy George several special treats. 'Td buy him a steak if he'd eat it," said Churchill. BETTER LAWilS & qARDEilS Total ldwn maintenance Commercial-Residential • LtlndsCdpe • T rnsh Removtll • Ch1mneq Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler Sqstems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN 6 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 No 'Safe Sex' for Phyllis Schlafly Camp Closet 109 Tuam By Celia Hooper WASHINGTON (UPJ)-Phyllis Schlafly, who accused C. Everett Koop of advocating "safe sodomy," turned up the volume March 13 in her attack on the surgeon general's advocacy of sex education as a means to halt AIDS. Schlafly discussed her exchange of letters with Koop at a news conference and attacked Koop for refusing to include "any criticism of the public schools . .. whose disgusting, embar­rassing, pornographic, offensive, des­criptions of sexual activity forced on children in the classroom are a major factor in the problem of promiscuity." Schlafly was speaking on behalf of a coru;ervative coalition that is cam· paigning against Koop's stand on the use of condoms and education as a means to prevent AIDS. Koop has said he believes the surest protection against AIDS is monogamy or abstinence, but that for those who practice neither, he advises "every pre-­caution to protect themselves and their partners against infection." Koop has on numerous occasions endorsed the use of condoms as protec­tion against acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome. The coalition wrote Koop asking him to repudiate "the scandalous public impression that you advocate the explicit teaching of safe sodomy with condoms in the early elementary grades.' Responding to a March 3 letter from the Coalition for Teen Health, Koop said statements from the group "reflect a misunderstanding of my position which has remained unchanged." The group's letter. which was signed by 55 people, asked Koop "to promptly issue public statements urging every· one to practice abstinence from sexual activity until they make a commitment to a monogamous. lifetime marriage." Koop responded: "I have made it a point of my stewardship of the office of surgeon general that I carry out my duties as the nation's chief physician in a scrupulously correct and scientific manner. ''Therefore, I must decline comment­ing on those matters in your letter which are judgmental in nature and which do not directly bear upon the scientific, medical and epidemiological facts of the disease of AIDS." The group also demanded that Koop reverse his stand on the need for early sex education to combat AIDS. They said he should order public schools to advocate sexual abstinence until mar­riage, to refrain from teaching or dis­cussing sexual acts or devices and to Whatever He's Stealing, It Isn't Working HOUSTON (UPI)-The price for vanity can run pretty high-three years in pri­son in one case. Terry Lynn Smith, 32, was sentenced recently to three years in prison for stealing hmr care products-two bottles of activator and four bottles of moisturizer-from a supermarket in November Smith has stolen hair care products five times before, and went to prison last year for swiping four bottles of curling lotion. said pro8ecutor Donna Cameron. "! iu•t can't understand it," Cameron said. "His hair looked pretty bad in court. \'lhatever he's taking is definitely not working." forbid facilities from dispensing contra­ceptives. "The American public has been sub­jected to a massive campaign to institu­tionalize and validate promiscuity ... by means of false advertising in the media and false instruction in the schools, which teach that condoms make 'cas­ual' sex behavior acceptable and safe," the group's letter said. They also asked Koop to require "aJI physicians, dentists and other health personnel who are carriers of the AIDS virus to notify their patients of this fact," and asked the physician whether he plans to require blood tests for people seeking marriage licenses or plans to "call for closing the bathhouses and clubs that facilitate high-risk behav­ior." Koop replied that decisions on these issues were reserved to state and local governments and any comments by him would be inappropriate. Signers of the letter included Schlafly, head of the Eagle Forum, a conservative organization that opposes the Equal Rights Amendment and abor­tion; Paul Weyrich, head of the Coali­tion for America; Rep. Patrick Swindall, R-Ga.; and Dr. Bernard Nathanson, who made the anti-abortion film "The Silent Scream." The signers claimed they represented "a significant part of what might be called the Reagan coalition." Mon.-Sat. 7am-2am Sun.-Noon 'til 2am Happy Hour Opening 'til 8pm Daily 528-9814 One Vea,. Old/ It doesn't seem like it's been a Y.ear but it has. (Time flies when_Jou're having_ fun.) JOE celebrates its fir,st birthdav THIS SUNDAY beginning 6pm. Be there. JOE. IS A PRIVATE ORGANIZATION MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES may be made Tuesday & Thursday 6-9pr.., Fr+day&Saturday11pm- 1 30am, Sunday 6-9pm. THERE ARE RESTRICTIONS. Memberships arehm1ted to reasonably­attract1ve out-of-the-closet liberated adult gay men who are secure with their sexuality. We discriminate-on the basis that you must be in reasonable condition for your body type and (even more important} that you possess a mental attitude that will contribute to the overall atmosphere at J.O.E J 0 E. meets at the C'OTTAGE PLAYHOUSE at 611 PACIFIC (Look for the Play Safe Flag) Houston Medical School to be Site for Vaccine Testing BALTIMORE (UPI)-Two city medical facilities in Baltimore plus Baylor Col­lege of Medicine in Houston were among six chosen nationally to test a potential AIDS vaccine on human volunteers this year, the National Insti­tutes of Health said. NIH officials said the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health will conduct the trials set to begin as early as this summer. NIH officials hope to select one or more of the most promising AIDS vac­cines and begin testing them later this year, said Judy Murphy, a spokeswo­man for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The tests will be conducted at six vac­cine evaluation centers established under existing federal contracts to assess vaccines against other diseases, Murphy said. In addition to Houston and the two Baltimore facilities, the cen­ters are located at Vanderbilt Univer­sity in Nashville, Tenn., Marshall University in Huntington, W.Va., and the University of Rochester, in Roches­ter, N.Y. No final decisions have been made on which vaccines will be tested at which medical centers or when the first sub­jects will be recruited, Murphy said. The vaccine testing scheduled to begin in Baltimore will be Phase 1 trials that will be aimed at establishing that the vaccine is safe and causes the human subjects to produce antibodies to fight off the disease. Phase 2 tria ls of a vaccine are designed to ensure the a ntibodies pro­duced actua lly protect against illness. In the case of the AIDS virus, the body produces antibodies but they often do not protect against the disease. Murphy said during the Phase 1 trials, researchers are likely to recruit subjects who are not at high risk of infection with AIDS to avoid confusing antibodies produced by the vaccine with antibodies produced by actual exposure to the virus after enrollment in the study. Dallas Park Director Gets Leave of Absence DALLAS(UPl)-Membersofthecityof Dallas Parks and Recreation Board voted to grant a paid leave of absence to parks director Jack Robinson, who was indicted TueHdayon charges of indecent exposure and evading arrest. Hoard members met for about 4f> min· utes Thursday before granting Robin · son'A request to be placed on paid leave, said board Chairman Billy Allen. A Dallas County Grand jury named Robinson in the misdemeanor indict· ments stemming from an incident Feb. R in a restroom at North Lake Park in which he and a nother man, Gary Evans, 33, were discovered partially dis· robed. Evans was indicted on one count of indecent exposure. Robinson, 55, who has been city parks director smce March 1978, has des· cribed the cha rges as "absolutely false a nd totally ridiculous." MARCH 27 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 7 Rendezvous Club (The Old Boobie Rock) Tel. 527-8619 1100 Westheimer Monday-Saturday 9am-5am Sunday 3pm-5am Monday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Tuesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Wednesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Thursday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Friday & Saturday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Disco Beats of George from early hours and after hours til dawn! Sunday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 3pm-9pm After Hours Every Night Dance until Dawn Daily §AME DAY TYPE~ §ETTER§ A NEW Dl\' IR ION OJ<' 'l'JIJ<; MONTROSE V OICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get it to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have it ready by Spm (size of the job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LI MIT' If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes, you' ll only be charged for 10 minutes) 81TVPESTVLES TO CHOOSE FROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 Changes Slated for '87 Parade The 1987 Houston Gay Lesbian Pride Week Parade will not include motorized vehicles, will be grand marshaled by a group instead of two individuals, and will possibly take a different route from previous years. At a meeting of the Gay. Lesbian Pride Week Committee held Sunday, March 22, it was agreed that instead of a "Mardi Gras-style" parade, the annual culmination of Gay I Lesbian Pride Week will become a people parade/ march. Planners, citing the high cost of preparing elaborate motorized floats, agreed that there is not enough money currently available in the community for groups and businesses to prepare the traditional floats. Jack Valinski. planning committee media coordinator, said, "F1oats cost so much money when there is so much need within the community." Aside from marchers, manually operated. push type units will be allowed. As a result of the new limitations on units, parade organizers are also look· ing at changing the fee structure for parade units. Joe Wilson told those gathered that last year's parade cost approximately $10,000. Valinski said the group is looking for ways to cut costs without lessening the scope and quality of the event. It was also proposed that the parade route be switched from the Westheimer Road route to begin at Bell Park and continue along Montrose Boulevard to a site in the vicinity of Montrose and Westheimer where it would feed into a festival type activity. Ray Hill, committee co~chair, feels this may present a logistics problem in dealing with the city. "! will do all I can, but the city is not going to be easy to deal with on this," Hill said. He noted that the Montrose route would require blocking off heavily·travelled east-west corridors on a Sunday afternoon. Streets affected would include Richmond. West Ala­bama, and Hawthorne. Mark Stevens was placed in charge of parade coordination as well as plan­ning for a street festival. The two-and-a­half acre parking lot of the Kwik Kopy building, 3317 Montrose. is being consi­dered a possible <ite for the festival which coulrl possibly span two days. Since the post-parade event is partially a Gay Political Caucus activity, plans will be made in conjunction with that group. A time for the parade has yet to be decided. Unlike in past years. when one male and one female were chosen as grand marshals. a group of individuals will lead the parade. People with AIDS (PWAs) were unanimously selected to receive the honor In other Gay Pride Week business, Hill reported that T-shirts will be avail­able for Ra)e in time for the Westheimer Art Festival, April 25-26. An initial order of two gro~s has bet'n di\.;ded behH~·n Deb's Ts and Tl\"T Shirts. Brian Keever has been placed in charge of ordt'ring commemorative buttons Also during the mt"eting, an attempt to remove the word "I.....esbian" from the official name of the activities, slated for June 19·28, was quickly voted down. The Montrose Voice Ifs The Place to Advertise 8 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 '1ell It again, Gfompsl The one about being caught in the shark frenzy on the Great Barrier Reel!" I .DONr LIKE IT HrnER, BUT 1"al. SAW. WE NE.ED 1D SAYE lo'DNEY Wl\ER£VER ____ WE.:-'; CAN. "You ever do this? _ Just stt In a place like this and ontwotch." Voice Comics Unlucky fishing holes Thinking his wnl alone would halt the plane, Bob tries again. Mrs. Hadley's husband has been left home all afternoon, with a tiny gas leak and a vacuum cleaner for company. T\£ l'lllNN SHDP? YEAH ..... ~ ~ nftE 8LOCI<~, 1J lURN RJ6l.l1' lWO l!>i.OCl<S, ASK AA 1!4E 'C:ZEOI~ MARCH 27 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Doctors Report Some Trouble with AZT By Peg Byron NEW YORK (UPI)-The drug AZT has offered the first ray of hope for prolong­ing the lives of AIDS patients, but the severity of its side effects appears to be worse than originally claimed, some doctors say. As many as half the patients taking AZT, the first AIDS drug approved for prescription sale, may suffer adverse effects that could force them to discon­tinue treatment or undergo blood trans­fusions every 10 days to every month, doctors say Rep. Ted Weiss, D-NY, said Saturday the Food and Drug Administration should not have approved the drug for marketing last week without knowing more about who it helps and who it harms. Weiss said he expected to hold hear· mgs on whether the FDA "may be using AIDS to further its agenda for deregula­tion" of drugs before their effectiveness is proven. He also questioned "unaudited" state­ments about the cost of AZT's develop­ment, and said free distribution of AZT for research and "compassionate use" should have been continued 1111til the drug is better understood. · FDA approval loosens restrictions on the drug's distribution, allowing the manufacturer, Burroughs WeJlcome, to betrin charging each patient up to $10,000 for a year's supply. Wall Street analysts have projected that AZT will double Burroughs Wel­lcome's total revenues by the end of the 1990H. The FDA based its approval of the drug on studies in which 34 percent of patients taking AZT had to reduce dos­ages and get blood transfusions or dis­continue treatment, said Kathy Bartlett, spokeswoman for Burroughs Wellcome Co. of Research Triangle Park, N.C. But those reports were based on the first six months of clinical trials with the antiviral drug, begun last February on 282 patients. Burroughs Wellcome and the National Cancer Institute, which sponsored the trials, have not released new data since September. In the preliminary studies at clinics around the country, a statistically sig­nificant number of patients who suf­fered an AIDS-related pneumonia were kept alive longer with AZT, or azido­thymidine, than those who received no treatment. Scientists emphasize that AZT does not cure AIDS. But the drug can cause headaches, nausea and most troub}Pi:;ome, suppress bone marrow production of white and red blood cells. Dr. Arthur Englard of St. Luke's· Roosevelt Medical Center in New York said about 50 percent of his patients were forced off the drug or required fre­quent blood transfusions. "Some have required transfusions every week and a half to a month," said Englard, who now has only 14 of an original 2.5 patients still on AZT. "Some have suffered no ill effects at all," said the physician, who noted that in spite of possible problems, his clinic has started AZT treatment with 23 more patients. "There is no other drug to put them on," he said. At San Francisco General Hospital, healthier ARC and AIDS patients were tolerating AZT better, but half of those in the primary clinical trial from last spring had to drop out, said the unit's protocol administrator. "About one fourth are doing fine and another fourth are toughing it out," said the administrator, who declined to be identified for publication. Transfusion needs with AZT have been so pronounced that the Irwin Mem­orial Blood Bank, which supplies the city of San Francisco and surrounding counties, projects a 5 percent increase in demand for blood this year, said spokes­woman Sylvia Ramirez. Dr. Samuel Broder, who led the National Cancer Institute team that studied the drug, acknowledges that much remains unknown but passion­ately defended AZT as the best known treatment. He cited better survival rates, improved weight, blood and neurologi­cal functions, and lower levels of AIDS viral proteins in people on the drug. "Even if everyone can't draw bene­fits, there is no question some get the benefit of (prolonged) survival" with AZT, he said. But both Broder and Burroughs Wel­Jcome refused to comment on whether fewer patients were tolerating the drug than expected, saying that data were awaiting publication. Dr. Michael Lange, head of St. Luke's­Roosevelt's infectious disease unit and a consultant to the panel that recom­mended government approval of AZT, criticized the scientific picture painted of the drug so far "What's being advertised has very carefully avoided what happens beyond six months of (AZT) treatment," said Lange, who has treated hundreds of AIDS patients he said can live up to 18 months with more conventional thera· pies. A San Francisco group that docu­ments AIDS research criticized the focus on AZT, the only drug to undergo large-scale clinical trials to date. "What we're being given is the drug with the most side effects, the most equivocal data on efficacy. and with the highest price," ~aid Joe Brewer, chief investigator for the non-profit group Project Inform. An estimated 41,400 people may qual­ify for the drug, including those with the less severe AIDS-related complex who are eligible for AZT treatment. Over 19,000 people have died out of 32,825 people who contracted AIDS since 1981, the federal Centers for Dis­ease Control said. One patient toughing it out is Tom Waddell, a San Francisco physician and organizer of the Gay Games, who was diagnosed with AIDS in June and started taking AZT in December. A former member of the 1968 U.S. Olympic Team, Waddell now finds him­self periodically bedridden despite nearly four months of treatment. He also needs a blood transfusion every month. "I'll live-l·i-v·e-with that," said Waddell, 49, who treated AIDS patients before he became sick. "The botwm line is, what else is there?" Scientists Now Ready to Test Some Possible AIDS Vaccines By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Wnter WASHINGTON-Three teams of scientists have askffi. the government for permission to begin limited human testing of possible AIDS vaccines, the Food and Drug Administration said Thursday, In addition, Dr. Anthony Fauci, direc­tor of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he knows of several other research teams who are ready to seek testing approval from the FDA. Dr. Allan Goldstein, chairman of bio­chemistry at George Washington Uni­versity Medical Center, announced at a National Institutes of Health confer­ence Wednesday that he and colleagues asked the Food and Drug Administra· ti on for the testing go-ahead last month. FDA spokesman Brad Stone said the regulatory agency received two addi­tional applications from other research teams late Wednesday to begin initial human testing of AIDS vaccine candi· dates. The agency is not permitted to identify the applicants. The initial tests, if approved by the FDA, would be to designed to assure that the preparations are safe. If safety is confirmed, a Jong series of additional tests will be needed to determine if the preparations are effective against the AIDS virus. Goldstein said 24 volunteers who belong to high-risk groups for develop­ing AIDS but who have no evidence of AIDS virus infection have been selected to participate in tests of the vaccine he and associates have developed. Testing can begin immediately if the FDA grants approval, he said. The initial testing will take place at the university and at the Institute for Immunological Disorders in Houston, if the FDA approves, Goldstein said. The vaccine to be tested by Goldstein and associates differs from most other vaccine candidates in that the new one is based on protein in the core of the virus that causes AIDS. Other candi­dates use protein from the surface coat of the virus. The development follows the announcement last week that a French scientist, Dr. Daniel Zagury, had tested an experimental AIDS vaccine on him­self. The material used a protein from the.outer coating of the AIDS virus. He reported that the vaccine induced his body to produce antibodies that neu­tralized one strain of the virus in the test tube. Zagury said he suffered no ill effects. In Israel , AIDS patients in a Tel Aviv suburban hospital will soon receive a drug made from egg yolks that may be effective against the virus, an Israeli doctor said Wednesday. The drug, AL721, was developed six years ago by professors at the Weiz­mann Institute and was reported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to have successfully repressed the AIDS virus activity in the test tube, said Dr. Zvi Aentwich of Kaplan Hospital in Rehovot. The protein being used by Goldstein and his associates is similar to a protein in a hormone, thymosin alpha 1, which is produced by the thymus gland, the principle regulator of the immune sys­tem. The thymus is destroyed in many AIDS patients, suggesting that when the body tries to attack the AIDS virus i~ instead destroys its own thymu~ tissue, Goldstein said. MILITARY FASHIONS FRENCH"* GERMAN* HAUAN * wwn VIITTAGE * When he and his associates announced last May they were working on the vaccine, they said that theoreti­cally a vaccine made from the protein could neutralize the virus after people become infected and thus could prevent the development of AIDS if the vaccine is given soon enough. COME m~ THE FASHION ARMY AT ..... ~ INTERNATIONAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. In a distant time and a far·off world. MON··SAT 11 6 Eleven top science fiction writers give their visions of whot it could someday meon to be gay or lesbian. in this widely-acclaimed new anthology. Contributors include Samuel R. Delaney. Joanna Russ and Edgar Pangborn. ltVbRLDS APART S'J:l-!111 edited by Camilla Decarnin. Eric Garber and Lyn Paleo $7.95 1n bookstores. or clip this ad to order .J Enclosed is $8.50 (postpaid) for Worlds Apart. name _ address city . _state __ _ Alyson Publications, ,.. r:. ,. ;: ... 'Yf'" ~ • Zip I &J.'. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27 1987 Events: April 1: Preliminary Judging, 9pm •Talent •Poise •Sleepwear April 4: Carnival Opens 1pm • Entertainment •Games • Community Organizations • Retail Booths Final Judging 10pm • Extemporaneous Speaking •Wardrobe • Hats, Hair & Finishing Touches Prizes: • $100 Cash 1st • 2nd & 3rd Place Prizes • Trophy for Best Theme Booth Rules & Entries: Inquire at Mary's naturally! Ms. Vacant Lot Festival, April 1st & 4th --------------------1r---------------------- REG1sTRAT10N FORM FOR MISS VACANT LOT 4/ 1/87 & 4/ 4/87 Drag/ Stage Name ----- Daytime Phone ------- Address Deadline for Reglstereing Is 3-31-87 No Entrance Fee Signature __ _ Mary's 527- 0669 Registration Form for Booth Space for Ms. Vacant lot Carnival 4/ 4/87 Bus./ Org. Contact Person Phone Address Commercial Time (Y/N) No Booth Fee. Donations Appreciated. Maximum booth Size 8'x8' Nature of Booth: Mary's 527-9669 _,I I ~--------------------- ------------------- /~-:~~~-- >, a. ~ 0 ~';;;::::J u Can Be-·"!1'5 1 = li~~jEI a. :::i !"'lr,11Bet-1 ctl 0 Morrnng Aftcrno1lr Even~nri We D· nk1$1 ~~:.) I ,. N• '}prr 8pm ,, \..,,., "' '.'V· ,. M 1day rir1ay 1022 Westhelmer naturally Montrose, TX 77006 By Sharon Perkinson FORT MILL, S.C. (UP!)-Jerry Falwell says a miracle is needed to restore credi· bility to the PTL ministry-and televi· sion evangelism in general-shaken by a scandal that has preachers trading charges of adultery, blackmail, deceit and hostile takeovers. Despite pleas for calm, both sides in the "holy war" that surfaced when PTL founder Jim Bakker resigned last .veek continued to exchange barbs and scrambled to back their claims. The new directorsof PTLwere to have their first meeting Thursday at the$172 million Heritage Village USA complex that Bakker and his wife, Tammy, built from a television pulpit that reached 39 million homes. Falwell, the fundamentalist founder of the Moral Majority who Bakker asked to take charge of PTL, has tried with little success to calm the firestorm sparked by Bakker's resignation. Bakker confessed last Thursday to a sexual encounter with church secretary Jessica Hahn in 1980 and paying $115,000 to hush the affair, but said later he resigned to halt a planned hos­tile takeover of PTL his lawyer said was masterminded by Louisiana evangelist Jimmy Swaggart. The Charlotte Observer reported today that in addition to the $115,000 lump sum paid to Jessica Hahn and her representatives to assuage her distress, the PTLalsosetupa$150,000trustfund for her. It said the 27-year-old one-time church secretary drew $10,045 in 1985 from the fund set up in the Bank of Los Angeles. The newspaper said Hahn received only $20,000 of the $115,000 direct payment, with the rest going for legal and other fees. It said the trust fund arrangement called for Hahn to get the entire $150,000 after 20 years if she did not sue Baker or make her charges public. That agreement, however, was apparently never signed. By mid-week, Swaggart, Oral Roberts and other Goliaths of television evange- MARCH 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 '' 1HAT'5 RIGHT- JIM AND 'TAMMY WERE £XPE\.l.ED FROM PARADISE AND LEFI ME IN CHARGE! " liem were taking eidee or, in the caee of evangelist and presidential aspirant Pat Robertson, trying to avoid fallout from what commentators and partici­pants were calling a "holy war." University of Virginia sociology pro­fessor Jeffrey Hadden, authorof"Prime Time Preachers," called the controversy swirling around Bakker uthe best live soap opera in the history of television." But Hadden added, "It's got to be dev­astating to the image of religious broad­casting." Falwell said he agreed to take charge of PTL to protect the entire television evangelical movement, which experts say has become a $1 billion a year busi­ness in the United States. "If Heritage Village were to go down the tubes, it would affect every Bible teaching group in the country," Falwell said. Falwell discounted reports of a Swag­gart takeover plot, but said Bakker may "sincerely believe that" and added "a miracle of major proportions is needed" to restore the credibility of PTL, which stands for "Praise The Lord." Bakker's attorney, Norman Roy Grut­man, said he would present his evidence against Swaggart today to the PTL board. He said it includes two memos Swaggart gave The Washington Post and a third document. While refusing to discuss the third document, Grutman said it came from a disgruntled employee of PTL and added, "When spliced together with the other documents and other evidence, (it) has persuaded me and others ... of Jimmy Swaggart's so-called hostile takeover" Swaggart and his wife, Frances, told the Post they had no knowledge ofGrut­man's "documentary evidence" and denied having contact with any former employees of PTL The two documents given to the Post by Swaggart were a memo from Swag­gart to John Ankerberg, a Tennessee evangelist and a Swaggart ally, and a proposed letter to Bakker that was never sent. Grutman says the memos provide evidence that Swaggart attemp­ted a PTLtakeover. Swaggart says they don't prove much of anything. Ankerberg called Bakker's takeover claim "patently false" and flew Wednes­day to Springfield, Mo., to give the denomination's executive presbytery board evidence backing his view. Assemblies of God spokesman Terry Terrell said several people were invited "to share their knowledge of events sur­rounding the problems Jim Bakker is experiencing," which include Tammy Bakker's acknowledged drug problem. In California, John Stewart, host of the national radio program "The Bible Answers," said Bakker "is not being truthful" in saying the $115,000 he paid to hush his affair with Hahn was black­mail. Electronic Evangelism in Crisis, But Don't Count Out Oral Roberts By Leon Daniel UPI National Reporter TULSA, Okla.-God told Oral Roberts, according to the television evangelist himself, that it was curtains for him if his supporters did not meet an $8 mil· lion fund-raising goal by April Fools' Day, A Florida dog track owner thought he was putting the campaign over the top this week with a $1.3 million check, but Roberts indicated more was needed in a statement that failed to make clear whether he still expected to die. Roberts' on-and-off reprieve from a premature heavenly reward came just days after a sex scandal forced Jim Bakker to hand over his financially troubled evangelical empire to Jerry Falwell, whose own television ministry reportedly has some money problems. Add up all these shenanigans and the bottom line is that some of the biggest TV preachers, already fighting credibil­ity as well as cash-flow problems, are in deep trouble and trying hard to duck a growing nationwide backlash. There are hints that money was the root of Bakker's sexual backsliding. Some charge he was set up by conspira­tors plotting to take over his PTL Net-work, an acronym for "Praise the Lord!" or, as his critics would have it, "Pass the Loot.'' Roberts, the granddaddy of video soul-saving, devised and perfected many of the television techniques and much of the mail-order magic that spawned his competitors. Some of them now reach more viewers and spin more money than he does. But it was Granville Oral Roberts, born dirt poor 69 years ago in a shotgun house on the dusty Oklahoma plains, who showed them how. A man once dismissed as an "Okie holy roller," a faith-healing tent preacher, Roberts became with his friend and booster Billy Graham one of America's most influential religious leaders of the 20th Century. Roberts now controls a $500 mi11ion international conglomerate. He lives in posh houses in Tulsa and in Beverly Hills and Palm Springs in California. He travels in a corporate jet and drives a Mercedes. The poor boy from Ada, Okla., whose hands picked cotton and pulled corn before he laid them on the halt and the lame, now sits on the board of directors of the Bank of Oklahoma and Okla-homa Natural Gas. The jewel in his earthly crown is the futuristic complex that includes Oral Roberts University and the adjoining and towering City of Faith medical facilities. Detractors have dubbed the complex "Six er Jesus," but to Roberts' devotees, whom he calls "partners," a visit to Tulsa is comparable to a Moslem's pil­grimage to Mecca. The partners, many of them oldsters or working people of modest means, believe the media have been unfair to Roberts. They say news reports fail to emphasize that the contributions for which he has been praying for daily in his 200-foot prayer tower are earmarked for a medical missionary program. Suzanne Heck, a partner visiting the complex from Coconut Creek, Fla., said she never doubted that God told Roberts he would be called home to heaven ifhe didn't raise the cash. "The press is blinded," she said. "Things of the spirit seem like foolish­ness to people who haven't been born again. Can you imagine what kind of press Noah would have got?" Noah's Ark is just one of the exhibits in 11Journey through the Bible," which is something like an admission-free theme park next to the hospital. Visitors sitting in a dark room constructed to resemble a boat are assaulted by jibes and guffaws from overhead speakers. "Where's the rain, Noah?" jeer unseen Noah-baiters. "How are you doing in there with all those animals, Noah? Haw, haw. Noah." Then, suddenly, there are rumbling noises and the boat-like room starts to shake. The voices stop mocking and start pleading for permission to come aboard, but it's too late. So much for doubters and scoffers who mock those to whom God speaks. Heck, a public school teacher and mother of two, and her husband Larry, a pipefitter, as charismatics share Roberts' belief that the Holy Spirit can move the chosen to speak in tongues. They left a mainstream Baptist church for one that "gives the Holy Spirit free­dom to move." The Hecks embrace Roberts' gospel of health and wealth, which he calls "seed­faith" and which promises material as well as spiritual well-being to contribu­tors. "You don't give to get," said the teacher, "but you expect to get when you give." 12 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 Counseling Crunch Most Doctors Aren't Up to Speed in War on AIDS Commentary by Neil Schram Pacific News &rvice The U.S. Public Health Service was right to alert people who received blood transfusions between 1978 and April 1985 of their heightened risk of carrying AIDS antibodies. But encouraging thetie millions more Americans to have AlDS tests will put a heavy strain on what is already one of the weakest links in the battle again•t the deadly epi­demic. Most of the responsibility for provid­ing the tests, including counseling before and after, will fall on primary care physicians, the majority of whom are terribly ill-equipped to meet the task. Their shortcomings must be under­stood and overcome quickly. Counseling about AIDS virus anti­body testing covers three important areas. First, patients must be told about the test's potential adverse consequen­ces of a positive test-possible loss of employment and insurability, for exam­ple. Secondly, a physician must evaluate a patient for past, present and future risk of AIDS virus infection, including possible risk of infecting others. This requires taking a sexual history and injectable drug use history and then counAeling about low risk sexual or IV drug use behavior when appropriate. Thirdly, there is often a need for short­term emotional counsehng for people who test positive. On all three counts, most physicians don't measure up. That is because we are primarily trained to diagnose and to treat. Many physicians know the AIDS symptoms, and can diagnose AIDS-related infec. tion and treat thoHe infections. But counseling requires far different skills. Talking about sex is a key one. When AIDS was reported primarily in gay and bisexua! men it was easy to dismiss physicians' general unwilJingne.ss to talk about sex as homophobia. How· ever, that . ame reluctance exists for heterO!Sexual ~ex as well. Thus we must recognize that ours is a sexophobir society-we can have ~ex but we cannot talk about it. Ideally, all patients should be asked strictly confidentially if they are at risk for AIDS. This requires asking men if they are sexuaJly active with men, women or both. It means asking women if they have multiple sexual partners. It means asking married men and women if they or their partners are or have been sexually active outside the marriage. It means asking all patients if they use IV drugs. Then comes the harder part­advising those at risk about using con· doms for alJ anal or vaginal intercourse; during oral sex. not allowing semen or cervical secretions in the mouth; and not sharing injectable drug equipment. An estimated 1.5 million Americans are infected with the AIDS virus and presumed infectious. That number is likely to rise by three to four million or more over the next five years. Based on a study of gay men in San Francisco, as many as 75 percent of those infected may become ill with AIDS or AIDS­Related Complex Because we physicians are in the frontlines of war on AIDS. we had better learn how to fight We must learn to encourage patients to protect them· Many physicians know the AIDS symptoms, and can diagnose AIDS-related infection and treat those infections. But counseling requires far different skills. ' / Only physicians have the right and the opportunity to ask the personal questions tha:t must be asked. The lives of our patients and no less than the future of our society depend on our doing so, and on our then giving the correct counsel. We must start imme~ diately The AIDS virus will not wait. selves. We must learn about high and low risk behaviors. We must overcome our reluctance to talk about sex. We must recognize and overcome our dis­comfort with gay male and bisexual patients-sexual orientation is innate, it is not a matter of choice. We must overcome our stereotype of IV drug users by asking all our patients if they use injectable drugs. Sch'7am is ; physician and heads the Los Angeles AIDS Task Force Two Weeks Free on All Units and a One Year Membership to ~ (Monthty Fen NOC Included) Remember, you don't just get a neighbor, you get a friend at ~ QREENWAY PLACE l::xclusivc Adult Apartments 3333 Cummins 623-2034 J '6l JOHNSTOWN PROPERTIES-Code Number Needed to Get AZT Drug By Gayle Young UPI &u~nce Writer NEW YORK-AIDS patients who want the newly approved drug AZT must have their doctors apply in writing to the manufacturer and then use a secret code to fill prescriptions, company offi­cials said. Burroughs Wellcome Co. spokesmen said Monday the elaborate distribution program is designed to ensure the drug, which may be in short supply for months, goes to the sickest patients first. Retrovir, the trade name for azido­thymidine, or AZT, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration March 20 and is the only AIDS drug on the U.S. market. It has been shown to ward off the infections that kill people with the deadly disease but it is not a cure. There are 14,000 victims of the deadly acquired immune deficiency syndrome in the United States. Many more suffer from a less severe condition called AIDS-related complex, making the total number of patients who may be eligible for the drug at least 41,000. Paul Dreyer, Burroughs Wellcome product manager, said the company will be able to supply 15,000 AIDS patients with the drug immediately and hopes to have enough stock to accom­modate 30,000 patients by the end of the year. A spokesman for the national, non ~ profit American Foundation For AIDS Research said the Burroughs Wellcome plan appears fair. "Their proposal has been set up for people who need it the most to get it first," foundation officer Terry Beirn said in a telephone interview. "It's an ethical dilemma and a judgment call." Burroughs Wellcome officials said that beginning Wednesday, doctors will have to apply to the company for per mission to prescribe Retrovir. Those patienl8 the company deems sickest will receive a code number that will allow their pharmacist to order the drug directly from the Burroughs Wellcome plant in Greenville, N.C. "The only thing I can think of that is similar is a kidney transplant system we keep lisU! and when it's ready we contact the doctor," Dreyer said. "Of coun;e, we hope soon to be a}:>le to meet all the demand." The recommended dose of Retrovir will he two capsules every four hours and new supplies of the drug will have to b. reordered every 28 days. Dreyer said the company will monitor reorders to make sure the code number system is not being abused. Burroughs Wellcome officials also defended the cost of the drug, expected to be between $7,000 and $10,000 a year, saying it reflecl8 the high cost of mak· ing it. The drug takes seven months to manufacture, they said. The officials pointed to a San Fran­cisco study that indicates the drug may cut an AIDS patient's yearly medical bills, •stimated at $5.5,000, by 25 per­cent. The company has established a toll free number, 1-800-843-9388, for physi· cians interested in applying for permis­sion to prescribe the drug. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voite MARCH 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 I HOUSTON -----~ April Fool's Day Party Patio Bar Opens April 1st New Special! Customer Appreciation! Take a Break at the Hours of 2pm and Spm Monday-Friday Whatever You are Drinking at That Time Have One On Us! New on Tuesdays! Come Munch and Win A Tab with us at our T.A.B. Tuesday Afternoon Bash Coming Attractions: • Cha Cha's Homecoming •Easter 220 Avondale Saturday and Sunday Liquor Bust 4-7pm $5 All the Well You Can Drink Monday Beer Bust $1 6pm-'til 75¢ Schnapps and 50¢ Draft 7 Days a Week Thu is. Jockey Short Contest M. C. The Euerpresent Maude $200 in Prizes Showtime 11:00 529-7525 14 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 Violence Against Gays Linked to AIDS young, &prouafY By Gayle Young UPI Snence Writer NEW YORK-The fatal disease AIDS may have sparked a backlash of vio· lence and abuse against homosexuals in the past year, according to a psychol­ogist who studies "homophobia." "When a controversial group becomes more visible it is common for people to attack it," said Gregory M. Herek, an assistant professor of psychology at the City University of New York Graduate Center Herek said the spread of the deadly disease may be inciting people who are already prejudiced against homosexu· als to rape, kill and beat the people they dii;like or fear AZT Gets Government Approval By Celia Hooper WASHINGTON (UP!)-Government health officials March 20 granted final approval for the sale of AZT, the first drug known to be effective in treating people suffering AIDS. Assistant Secretary of Health Robert Windom said the prescription drug will be marketed by the Burroughs Wei· !come Co. of Research Triangle Park, N.C .• under the trade name Retrovir A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recommended in Janu­ary that AZT, or azidothymidine, be approved for marketing, and the agency followed with its final approval March 20. hToday's approval marks an impor­tant step, but by no means a final vic­tory," Windom said. 04Retrovir is not a cure for AIDS, but it has demonstrated ability to improve the short-term survi­val of AIDS patients with recently diag­noHed PCP Ca type of pneumonia) and certain patients with advanced AIDS­related complex." Because supplies of the drug are limited, it will initially be reserved for AIDS patients who have had a history of PCP Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia-other AIDS related infec­tion and for patients with severe AIDS­related complex, a syndrome considered a precursor to AIDS. The government began making AZT available free of charge in September to these patients, even though the drug had undergone only limited testing. Results were so good scientists felt it would be unethical to withhold AZT from other patients. Windom said clinical data were insuf­ficient to approve the use of Retrovir for all AIDS-associated conditions. Developed in 1964 by Dr. Jerome Horowitz of the Michigan Cancer Foun­dation as an anti-cancer drug, AZT was found to prevent reproduction of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus in cells. Burrough8-Wellcome said testing of the drug began in February 1986, with 137 patients receiving a dummy drug and 145 getting AZT. There were 16 deaths among the 137 patients receiving the dummy drug and only one death among patients receiv· ing AZT_ Some symptoms, such as fun· gal infections, also cleared up. Since then. new studies have begun to test the drug on patients with AIDS­related complex, patients with Kaposi's sarcoma. a soft-tissue cancer character­istic of AIDS and young people with AIDS. No federal agency keeps tabs on vio­lent acts specifically aimed at homosex· uals and only a handful of cities have recently begun keeping separate records on violence against gays, Herek said in a recent interview. But some political and social gay groups that keep an unofficial tally are reporting an apparent rise in violence and abuse against homosexual men and women, he said. Herek, who testified in October at a Congressional hearing on criminal jus­tice, said the unofficial tallies indicate more and more attacks in the past year have included slurs and remarks about AIDS. Herek has interviewed dozens of peo­ple who have attacked homosexuals and he said he believes AIDS has given homophobics an excuse for violent acts. The disease first appeared in America among homosexual men and quickly spread to the heterosexual population. "They think, 'these people are paSH· ing AIDS so it's okay to hurt them','' he said . But, people who are not homophobic to begin with are probably not moved to violence by the AIDS epidemic, he said. "!would suggest AIDS is not increas· ing prejudice against homosexuality," he said. " It is being used as an excuse by people who hate gays to hurt them. when perhaps they would not have hurt them physically before." Most attacks against homosexuals Woman Follows Government AIDS Advice, is Arrested LONDON (UP!)-A female lawyer who followed the advice of a government anti-AIDS campaign said she was briefly arrested, strip-searched and given a urine test for carrying a packet of condoms. The British government has mounted a multimillion-dollar publicity drive warning of the dangers of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and sug­gesting people use condoms. Its cam· paign slogan is "Don't die of ignorance." The 30-year-old woman said she was returning from a vacation in India Feb. 22 when she was stopped by customs officers at London's Heathrow Airport. She said that when they found the condoms in her luggage they arrested her, strip-searched her and gave her a urine test. The woman said a customs officer told her that carrying condoms was "reasonable grounds" for arrest since drug smugglers sometimes fill them with drugs and then swallow them to avoid detection . . The lawyer did not reveal her name but her story was splashed in many Sunday newspapers and a Labor Party member of Parliament said he was tak­ing her case to the Home Office. The woman said that after the results of her urine test were negative, she was released. She said she was seeking com pensation from Her Majesty's Customs and Excise department for wrongful arreRt and false imprisonment. A spokesman for Customs and Excise said he could not immediately confirm the case but said that any complaint would be investigated. are committed by young men in their late teens and early 20's, Herek said. They often commit assaults in gangs, beating up lone gay men whom they don't know personally, sometimes fatally. "Young males are sensitive to peer pressure," Herek said. "By going out­side of the group and attacking some­one, they establish their manhood within the group. "To attack someone who is perceived as unmascu1ine makes it even more so." Herek said often the attacks are very sexual in nature and involve castration, mutilation and even male rape. He said his studies of homophobic crimes suggest gay men are attacked with the same anger and vigor that characterized lynchings of blacks in the past. "They're not just killed,'' he said. "They're mutilated, hung, shot and stabbed even though they are a stranger to their attackers. They bring out incredible feelings of rage. Herek ~aid attacks against lesbian!-i are hardf>r to characterize. "They may be attacked because they're gay women, or because they are women,'' he said, "It's very hard to dif­ferentiate." Herek said both black and white youths attack homosexuals. Often, the attackers are "model kids,'' athletes and good students. "They use a common defense that the victim came on to them," Herek said. "And they don't have a lot of remorse if they're caught. Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice Seek o dote. on adventure, on encounter Send a message for all to see lo someone you love Advertise your secret lontosy TO Pl.ACE A 'PUSONAl' IN THE NEWSPAPER Of MONTROSE, JUSICAll 529-8490 i'Sl . . . . . - - . . . . . . ' Gay teenagers have no place to go with their questions. Here is a can­didly written book addressing such concerns as: Am 1 really gay? What should I tell my parents? Is it a good idea to come out in school? How can I tell if my best friend is gay? YOUNG, GAY AND PROUD! $3. 95 in bookstores. or use this coupon to order by mail [' Here is $4 .00 for Young, Gay and Proud' [. Here is $8.00 for one copy each of Young, Gay and Proud! and One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth . in which teens tell their own stories. name: _______ _ addr~ city ---- -- state 1p _ _ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 1411 T11ft lj ~-::::.,'. 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO • ••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Builcling­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS 16 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 27 1987 Ensemble Doesn't 'Monkey' Around with Comedy Hit The Ensemble Theatre presents the ret•ival of the 19113 hit ··one Monkey Don't Stop ,\'o Show" March 26-!Vlay 2 Featured are f/eft to ri11ht1 Chandra Wilson , Jlfu:hael Washington. Wayne Dt·Hart, Yvette Jones. .4.dorne Blye, Anthony White Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke ,.lfon ''06~ Vo1re o One Monkey Don't Stop No Show One Monkey Dun 't Stop No Shou· now playing at the Ensemble, is a very plea· sant comedy, a romantic situation comedy This show could be a mega-hit on the dinner theater circuit. Avery Harrison lWayne DeHart) is a successful preacher, whose congrega­tion meets two flights up over a dry cleaners. That's apropos. because his ¥.-i.fe Myra cYvette Shevaron Jones) might remind you of a younger Mother Jefferson. In her hoity-toity way, •he has left her lower class roots as far away from her as po~sible. Imagine her consternation when her son Felix (Michael Washington} falls in love with a girl from the wrong side of the tracks (Chandra Wilson}. She's try­ing to trap Felix by possibly being preg­nant. His son's predicament rekindles flames in Avery that Myra hasn't doused in years. Can he convince her to .. do it" again? Meanwhile, Avery's brother has died , He left behind one daughter, Beverly (Adorne Blye\, and bequeathed her his half intere~t in a nightclub and made its other owner Caleb !Athony White} her guardian. liantly It's been quite some time since the En•emble last turned their hand to a bit offluffauch as this one. I loved it. I could easily see why this play did so well for them a few years ago that their audien· ces asked to have it revived. It is the funniest contemporary comedy playing anywhere in town at the moment. Sometimes it feels a Jot like Prairie Home Companion. Only they're talk ing, usually about things that happen in the city. Cooper is homey, but sophis­ticated. Then again, they're sometimes more like The Goon Show, an earlier version of Firesign Theater, which was an ear· lier version of Monty Python. The Goon Show starred Peter Sellers and when Herman gets wild he might remind you of him. I mean in things like his Fu Manchu movie, not the more disciplined Inspector Clou~eau bits. When I say they read poetry (and an occasional short story), I don't mean like a sedate hippie intoning long solos. Most of their poetry, the best of it, was obviously written for the group. They art out and up. They speak in counter­point to each other. The background music is an integra1 part of it all. They're not afraid to take chances, either. They do some very daring things So of course they don't all work. But the vast majority of the pieces do work wonderfully! There was one long bit that didn't the night I went, but I'm sure it'll be gone soon . This r-;how is evohdng all the time. They've got a large, loyal fan follow· ing, made up mostly of college studt.·nts So, if they're playing a smal1 space, you might want to arrive early. o Notes The rumor that Randall Spangler might quit touring is untrue. His fantastic, cheerful littlt.• dragons are available in Sam Houston Park during the Houston International Festival, which closes this weekend. He says he'll be back again for the Westheimer Art Festival. When Caleb agreed to the term•, he thought Beverly would be a little girl. WhE>n they meet, she's a pretty, young woman of 20or so who's already set her bcmnet on him from her father's letters Can ishecatch him? And if she does, can she tame him? Or ran he make her into the kind of woman he wants her to be? JEB (rtRht u·i/J 'li'iit Houston to present her photo slidl' show on March 28 This is not a 8hOw for the children . Leave them at home. The language isn't graphic. but the intentions are. All of the acton; are not only very good on their own. but have worked together for !'O iong on various projects that they can bounce the script around between them until it comes out looking better than it i•. Director George Haw­kins has, a• usual, coached them bri 1- o Writers Guys in Concert Writers Guys in Concert appear all over They seem to usually play Munchies Coffeehosue, but I caught them at the University of St. Thomas. That night al~o turned out to be their first anniver· sary. It's a tough act to describe. The bare boneH is that there are these two poets. Robert Cooper and Herman, who read their poetry and one guitarist, Dowel. Mudry, who plays mostly folk tunes. TheRe three are augmented by an army of friends who help read, play, sin!(, etc Anytime during the day this Satur· day, you can get a map and a list of clues for six sitNJ along the path leading to a statu<• of the sacred White Buffalo. (It starts in Sam Houston Park at the map booth.) The stntue is by Paul Kittelson, the creator oftht>Stegasaurus that lived under the freeway. The first 200 P'"ple to find it will receive free kites, specially produced for this event by Gayla Indus tries of Houston . The adventure will fami1iarize participants with the pro­P<'" ed new park system along Buffalo Bayou. The InterdisC1plinary Arts Fellow· hip Prol(ram has $28,600 in grants to Performanre artist Kathy Rose comf'S to Hou!iton for the fir!il time u·ith show.'i a.t Dicerse Works, Afarch 27 at 9:011p.m admmister. Application deadline 18 May I. Call Michael Peranteau of Diverse Works at 22:!-9100 or Marian Luntz, Southwest Alternate Media Pro· i<~·t) at fi22-016fi. Marcin .Jon(\8 is the new Houston Grand Opt.•ra Director of Development. Celebrate! \'ou know what it's like when we go off or onto Daylight Savings Time. Confu sion reigns suprE'me. That's only one hour. What would happen if they changed the entire calendar? They did once. On April I, 1564 in Paris. That'• how April Fool's Day started! B'days: 27-Jane Chambers, Glona Swanson, Michael York. 28-Ken How· ard, Marlin Perkins, Raphael. 29- Pearl Bailey, Bud Cort, Eric Idle. 30-Eric Clapton, Peter Marshall, Paul Verlaine. 31-Leo Buscaglia, Richard Chamberlain, Edward Fitzgerald. !­Wallace Beery, ToshiroMifune, William Mulready. 2-Marvin Gaye, Alec Gui­ness, Emmylou Harris. "Perfection is such a nuisance tr.at I often regret having cured myAelf of using tobacco. "-Emile Zola (born Aoril 2> o Openings C'nrtc~m EsthetiC's (Diverse Books, 27)­worktt by five Houston artists who use t·artoon imagny Grandpa Hmm't Moved in Days (Radio Music Thc•at<>r, 27)-The singi~g Fertlc• Family i• bnck. Let's Murder Marsha! (Theater Sub· urbia, 27)-com<•dy Robertson, Lamhf'rt (Com1x Annex. 27 & 28) Kathy Rost>, performance nrtist (f}iver1-1e Works. 27)-a fusion of solo danc·e and film . ONO' Sau>me (,Jones, 27)-Houston Grand Opt.·ra pr('!IE'ntH o~rar Wilde's drama about .John the Baptist's beheading, lramilat.ed to Gennnn with mm1ic hy Richard Strauss, then put back into English m the surtitles, "Back to the Future" (Music Hall, 28, 10:30 a.m .. pre-show at 9:30)­Toshiyuki Shimada conducts the Hous· ton Sym1>hony for children. ONO! Out of Bounds: A Lesbian Journey (Treebeards, 28, 6:30 p.m.)-Hazelwitch presents a dinner show with slides by J.E.B. ONO! Hair (Stagc>s, 28)-the quintessential 'f>Os musical Lawndale Presents: Music Houston (Lawndale, 29)-lnterarts composer col· laborations. ONO' Milt Larkin and the All-Stars tTran­qutlity Park, 30, noon)-Freebies. ONO! Consortium Chamber Ensemble (University of St. Thomas' Cullen Hll, Ian McKellen MARCH 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 :lO)-f'reebi ... ONO! Extremities (Rice, 1)-Shouldayoung woman take revenge on her would-be rapist'! American Ballroom Theater (Tower, 2 &3) HSPVA Concert <MFA Sculpture Garden, 2, 7:00 p.m.)-Freebies. ONO! You Can't Take it With YoutHSPVA. 21 SC'vt•ral Core Dancen; <Theatre I, Heinen Fine Arts Complex, Houston Community College, 3, reception 7:00 p.m. p<'rformance 8:00 p.m.)-dance company doe~ benefit for Foundation for Immunological Disorders. Recep­tion and performance $25 donation Res(•rvations required. 874·4310. An Interview with Shakespeare's Lover By Steve Warren SpeC'ial to the Mont_rose Voice Joan Rivers beat me to the punch, ask· ing Ian McKellen whether Shakespeare was gay I'll tell you the same thing I told her," the English actor says later the same week. "He was certainly the father of three children, but he didn't live with his wife. He moved three or four days away .. He lived in London and had plenty of opportunity for extramarital affairH. Whether these were with women, men or both we have no way of knowing. "If he wasn't gay, he certainly wasn't homophobic. I think he was bisexual, but I think gays should be cool about it and !-illy he's for everybody." Ian McKellen and William Shake­spt'are are lovers. Despite the 376-year difference in their ages, their relation· ship is l'onsummated eight times a week on .stage when the actor performs Jan McKel/en Acting Shakespeare. PBS viewers have seen the one-man show, which has been done all over the world but only once in London-as an AIDS benefit. A master storyteller, McKellen not only acts out scenes from several plays but also relates anecdotes from hi• own life and the playwright's, dem· onstrates 400 years of acting styles, reads reviews and shares showbiz gos· sip from a like p<'riod. DiHcussing the lack of actrct:>ses in the 16th century McKellen speculates, "What boy could possibly play Cleopa· tra?" and recite8 Sonnet 20 (A woman's fact' with nature's own hand painted/ HaHt though, the master-mistresR of my pa~sion ... ") which he theorizes "was written to one of those boy actors." Homosexuality was less of an issue in Shakespeare's time than it is today, Mc Kellen says. "King James I, who suc­ceeded Elizabeth I, was openly gay. I don't think it was until the 1890's that they bothered to pass a law against men having sex with each other." One of McKellen's most acclaimed roles-and they are numerous in a career which has spanned almost 30 years-was of another gay king in Mar­lowe's Edward JI, first produced in 1592. McKellen's 1969 revival shocked that year's Edinburgh Festival, helped, he believes, by publicity from religious leaders who objected to what they saw in a church building being used as a f('stival theatt'r. "They were a little upfiet to H<'(' buggery, sodomy and vioM lC'ncc of various sorts being committed in the middle of the church, but I think that only helped give the production somr notoriety and therefore financial succesH." The play's best known scene is the historically accurate ending, when the king is executed by the insertion of a red·hot poker where the sun, as they say, don't shine. In a 1911 production, Mc Kellen says, this was played behind a curtain and left to the audience's imagination. It was staged rather gra· phically and openly in his version, as se<>n on PBS. "Atthatpoint,"helaughs, "all men in the audience crossed their legs and all the women leaned forward." McKellen calls Edward "one of my favorite parts ... just a man who had no love in his life, except for a beautiful boy." After that boy is murdered by his enemies, "he do~sn't achieve the great warmth, love and solidity of a lasting relationship with anybody and hence Jan McKellen. in love with Shakespeare turns into that awful tyrant which he becomes at the end of the play." It was the nationality, not the gender of the king's lover, Piers Gaveston, that characters in the play objected to, the actor says. "No one complains about Edward knocking about with a man, but because he's French." He thinks the role should be played by a blatk actor to make the point for modern audiences. "The story is not a man fighting to be gay. That doesn't bother anyone, except perhaps his wife." Yet another gay role in McKellen's repertoire is Max in the Holocaust drama Bent, which he played in the 1979 London premiere. They had trou­ble finding a theater, he recalls. "There were questions raised in the House of Commons of whether, if these were the sort of plays being done should there be public subsidy of the arts?" Having gotten the script almost by accident, McKellen later learned that American playwright Martin Sherman, whom he now calls "one of my closest friends," had him in mind when he wrote the part. "But he never sent it to me, silly boy." During the run of Bent the actor was called to Buckingham Palace to be named a Commander of the British Empire. "I went with my head shaved (for the role)," he says, "and I'm sure the Queen wondered what this conl'ict was doing there." Stephen Frears tried to get McKellen to play Joe Orton's lover. Kenneth Hal­liwell, in Prick Up Your Ears, which opens April 17 in the U.S. but the actor says he was tired and "had vowed to take (last) summer off" He would like to do more film work however and dropped broad hints to that effect on R recent trip to California. That was where he did Joan Rivers' 8how after an aborted attempt to get on Johnny Carson. where "I was upstaged by a dog that climbed trees." Carson,he complains, wouldn't allow him to dis· cuss anything he was comfortable with. "Ht> only wants to make joke.s. He wanted to talk about football, women , , . things I had nothing to say about." He is grateful to Rivers "for letting me do what I do ... I did a bit of Macbeth ' McKellen wishes Bent and Edu·ard II had been filmed. Span;e American movie audiences have seen him in Priest of Love (as D.H. Lawrence), Plenty and The Keep, while theater­goers in a few cities have been fortunate to see him in Acting Shakespeare, Wild. Honey and his Tony.winning perfor· mance ofSalieri in Amadeus. He claims the last role is "actor-proof," but when asked if it mav not seem that way only }>{>cause the h~st actor~ have played it, he admits it could be a "chicken and egg" situation. The rest of the country knows him only from plays that have aired on PBS, and Trevor NunF:' Macbeth, shown on C'BS ('able. a production he extols mod­estly as "nothing to do with me, but ifs the best n every level." In Montrose, Neady Everyone Reads the Voiie The Ultimate After Hours Stop 1HBpo1t»IE offers The Ultimate 2 Breakfast Special 2Eggs 2 Bacon 2 Sausage 2 Pancakes $269 llpm-7am 1525 Westheimer 528-4350 -- 18 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 27. 1987 Cast Steals the Show in 'Burglar' the Alley Theatre's Endowment Fund. The monies raised ($15 per ticket) will go to help match a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. For info or reservations, call the Alley, 228· 8421. Houston Screens by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice o Burglar When I heard that Burglar was Whoopi Goldberg playing Bernie Rhodenbarr, I blanched. In Lawrence Block's series of novels, Bernie is a white man, suave but slightly square. The kind the back cover calls "our Heifetz of Heists." The kind far back as The Maltese Falcon in this character. From Archie Goodwin, Nero Wolfe's legman and assistant, we heard the wisecracks start. There's some pan­ache akin to the Toff and the Saint. Whoo pi em braces them all and adds a little something of her own without ever denying anything. With the exception of the sexes of some four or so of the characters being changed, this movie is very, very close A wealthy thouRh shady jogger !Raye Birke, left) and his associate !Scott lmcoln) get hysterical misinformation from disguised cat burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr (Whoopi Goldberg) as she tries to get them off her trail m "Burglar" who, while leaving the caper this movie's based upon (The Burglar m the Closet), congratulates himself on show· mg ••o little quiet class." ~ow, Bernie's a black woman. She"~ got class, but ifs often a kind of street class When she's leaving a caper, she physically jumps on her semi-corrupt cop friend and rolls him around on the ground, tickling him. I was afraid that this would be a fiasco like the movie where Chevy Cha•e was supposed to be F1etch. I sup­poRe it watin 't really a bad movie, but I remember it as wretched and so would anyone who had read the books. That person up there might have been enter· taining, but he certainly was not our Mr Irwin Fletcher. Nowhere close. That movie had been conceived as a vehicle for Chase, who is so cute when he bumbles. So he bumbled a lot. Lurk­ing just out of sight round every bend was Wally land, or whatever the name of that vacation site. There was no earthly way they could have gone on to film any other F1etch books. Coming in between F1etch and Bur­glar, though, was Parker. That T.V. show started out as a pop fly, but worked itb way back to home base. It's gotten just about as close to the feel of the books now as it can, given the differ· ent demands of the small screen. It's also found a respectable audience. That's something that owners of book· stores that specialize in mysteries could have told them all along. But it's some­thing that's only sporadically been remembered by movie producers since Casablanca . It always seems to surprise them. Also, Whoopi is a very different per­son from Chevy. He's an entertainer. She is, at times. an actress. She fits her· self to a role, not vice versa. She takes great delight in fitting into a role with rich tradition~ . There are traces from as to the book. At the same time, it's not a slavish copy, getting every detail exact. That's good. You can now enjoy each of them for themselves as well as for their echoes of each other. I opened the b<.,k to try to find a description of tho male Bernie and almost got trapped. It was all I could do to tear myself away. That wouldn't have happened if they'd been carbon copies of each other. In the process, the filmmakers have created one of the two best films in the past several months about what a woman who lives up to her potential can be like. The other-Black Widow-was also playing cops and robbers. Dr. Sheldrake (Lesley Ann Warren) has hired Bernie to steal some jewels back from her ex-lover. She bought them with money she had hidden from the I.RS. So she can't simply take him to court. Bernie hasn't made good her escape, though, when the ex comes back unex· pectedly. She hides in the clo .. t, but while she's there someone kills him. The police figure she's the murderer So not only must she elude them, she mu"t also find out who really did it and prove it to them or they'll never get off her back. This is not another of those dreary detective stories which force the audience to cheat by showing us right away who the killer is. Wegettofigureit out alongside Bernie and her sidekick, Carl (Bob Goldthwait). Goldthwait's speech is sometime impo••ible to understand, but that is part of his humor. Otherwise he makes a maniacally marvelous Tonto. Bernie is helped and hindered by her favorite old nemesis, Ray Kirschman He's played by G.W. Bailey, one of the most rascally charming character men working in Hollywood today. This is the most serious work he's done. You may remember him for Rustler's Rhap.•ody or the Police Academy series of movies. It would be very nice if this got him nominated for the best supporting actor Oscar next year. Incidentally, he started acting at Texas Tech in Lub­bock. The movie is set in San Francisco and contains one of the three best car chases across those steep hills. Although its tongue-in·cheek humor might remind you of What's Up, Doc?, it's nearly as gut wrenchingly exciting as the one in Bullitt. That's hardly surprising as the sequence was filmed by the same cine· matographer, William Freaker. The movie is based primarly on one of a series of novels. I would love to see this movie become one of a series of movies. But, with as large a star as Whoopi Goldberg in the lead, I sincerely doubt that will be allowed to happen. So· gather ye rosebuds while ye may! Let's enjoy this one while we've got it. o Notes Monologuist Spaulding Grey's new film, Swimmmg to Cambodia, will have its Southwest premiere April 8 at the Belair Theater. It will be a benefit (including champagne reception) for o Openings Blind Date-"Whatever you do, don'tlet her drink." Ghost Fever Return to Horror High Amici Miei (Museum of Fine Arts, 27)-My Friends. ONO! Prairie Storrn (Rice Media Center, 27)-the abortion controversy in 1981 North Dakota. ONO! Restle•• Natives (River Oaks, 27)­two young Scots become modern day Robin Hoods A Cavallo Della Tigre(MFA, 28)-0n the Tiger's Back. ONO' Never Turn Back: The Llfe of Fannie Lou Hamer (Rice MC. 29)-story of a brave civil rights activist. ONO! La Vista (MFA, 29)-The Visit. ONO! La Soufriere; God's Angry Man (Goethe Institute, 2)-A volcano; a European's look at an America T.V. evangelist. Two short documentaries by Werner Herzog. Freebies. ONO! Weekend (Rice MC, 2)-0NO! The Wrong Box (Rice MC, 3)-0NO! Bernie Rhodenbarr (Whoopi Goldberg) gives Carl Heffler (Bob Goldthu•aitl a ri.de through the San Francisco hills on a stolen police motorcycle as they try to find the killer responsible for the crime for which she's the numbt-r one suspect Al's Insurance Service 4108 Fannin Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 529-0140 AUTO LIABILITY SR-22 FILINGS YOUNG DRIVERS LOW DOWN PAYMENTS LIFE COMMERCIAL AUTO BONDS PROPERTY HOMEOWNERS NOTARY SERVICE MARCH 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 AIDS Programs Not High on State Budget List By Bob Lowry UPI Capitol Report.er AUSTIN-The chairman of the House Public Health Committee said Monday the Texas Legislature is not likely to place a high priority on assistance for AIDS programs because of budget res­trictions. Rep. Brad Wright, R-Houston, said AIDS sufferers must take some respon­sibility for their lifestyles, but he said they should not be punished for being homosexual or drug users. "I don't think you can ignore a prob­lem because the behavior, which may largely be the source of transmission (of AIDS), is prohibited," he said. "But I do think it's a consideration if we're talk­ing about the amount of money we're going to commit to help intravaneous drug users versus helping the rrippled children's services. "!think that's a choice that is not a difficult one to make." Wright made the comments after his committee heard nearly three hours of testimony from AIDS experts. Liberace Relatives Lose Estate Fight LAS VEGAS, Nev. (UPJ)-A judge refused to grant a portion of Liberace's multi·million dollar estate to four disin· herited relatives who sought to chal· lenge a will signed two weeks before the entertainer's AIDS-related death. The thre<> nephews and a niece appeared in probate court March 20 to contest the will, but Judge Thomas Foley said the famed pianist had "good reasons" for keeping them out of his will and rejected their claims. Liberace died at his Palm Springs, Calif., home Feb. 4 of complications from AIDS. He was 67. The will, dated Jan. 22, 1987, placed Liberace's estate in a revokable Jiving trust with the entertainer's Los Angeles lawyer Joel Strote as trustee and long· time acrountant Frank DiBella, of Whittier, Calif., named to oversee the funds. Strole also is executor of the will The four relatives who protested the will are Ina, Lester, Harry, and Rudolph Liberace Jr., the children of his sister-in­law, Isabelle, and brother Rudy, who died two decades ago. Las Vegas attorney George Rudiak told the court that the challenge was designed "to blackmail the estate" by threatening adverse publicity unless the nephews and niece were included as beneficiaries. "Liberace didn't even like these kids. He ultimately disinherited them," Rudiak contended, Attorney Kenneth Kahn, represent· ing the relatives, argued that Liberace was not of sound health and mind when he signed the will. But Las Vegas attorney Richard Oshin, a spC"Cialist in probate and estate planning who said was hired by Strote in January to restructure the will, noWd that the four relatives were also left out of previous wills. "Prior to the final will there was a 1982 will and several codicils, all of the previous documents left out the child­ren," Oshins said. Wright said at one point during the hearing that AIDS victims must assume some responsibility for their illness because of the possible illegal conduct that caused the disease. But he said later his remarks were aimed mainly at intravaneous drug users. "I think intravenous drug users have to assume some of the risk for their con· duct," said Wright. ur don't think homo­sexuals have been identified as the problem. I think promiscuity has been identified as the problem. "I don't think because somebody is breaking the law that you can say we're going to punish you by letting you be sick and die. What I'm saying is that some point after you've fully educated people, I think the state's responsibility ends_ " It's not just a criticism of the homo· •exual lifestyle because I really don't think that a reason for us to discrimi· natr against anyone with the disease," he said. "But the level of activity­you're talking about hundreds of partners in a three·year period for some of these people. That a busy person." However, Dr. Charles Alexander, chairman of the AIDS Task Force of Texas, told the committee there is evi· dence homosexuals, who once had as many as 1,500 sex partners over a three. year period, are altering their lifestyles. t*********************** t Privacy-Security : i : .t * : ~ . :t North Star :t : Fence Co. ~ t Free Estimates t £ 7 Days a Week • • Cedar-Gates Repaired £ t Wrought Iron-Chain Link t • • : 694-9113 : ! Free Walkgate with this Ad t ***********************' Coml' out and Alexander said there is evidence m Texas of a "tremendous drop" in the number of oral and rectal cases of gonorrhea among homosexuals, which he called "one of the measures of homo· sexual male activities." "There is some conscious effort being made by that group to change behav­ior," He said. "! think there's effort there." Alexander said studies show homo­sexuals have about "half or less" as many sex partners now as before the AIDS epidemic, but he said there is "a great deal of difficulty is reaching per­sons in the intravenous drug-using group." "I don't think there's been enough adjUBtment in lifestyle," said Alex­ander. "I think there's been even less adjustment in lifestyle among hetero-­sexuals engaged in risky behavior." Dr Sam Nixon, director of the Houston AIDS Coalition, said education is the only way to combat the fatal illness. "When it romeA to sexual activity, we must do away with the stork. We must forgot about. the cabbage patch," he said. "Weare builtlikewearetodowhat we do. If we do it properly, we'll be disease·free. "If we continue non-physiological practices, I have great concern about the future. The only good thing about AIDS iA it's easy to prevent and it's hard -Now Open Daily 4pm-2am; Sat. & Sun. noon-2am Beer Bust Friday: 6pm-midnight with Free Hot Dogs Sunday: 4pm-midnight 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer 527-9071 Pride \\Teck \ 7 A tearful Ina Mae Liberace said out­side of court that she and her brothers were "very dose to Uncle Lee." She said Liberace deeded his former house in North Hollywood to their mother but left nothing to them. JUNE 19-28 , ______ to catch. At the present time, prevention is the only answer." Nixon warned that ''dangerous" sex­ual practices among homosexuals and heterosexuals will continue to to spread AIDS. "If we don't change our behavior ... my opinion is these figures (projection of new cases) will be on the lowside,"he said. The Texas Health Department has projected the number of AIDS cases in the state will jump from more than 2,000 at the end of February to more than 16,000 in 1991 When Wright injected that the financially-strapped state probably will not be able to provide much money for AIDS programs, Nixon replied, "You can pay me now or pay me later. If you invest a little now, you can save a lot later " Dr Robert Bernstein. state health commis~ioner. said the state must maintain iUi AIDS education programs "! believe we've probably destroyed a forest to produce the paper used for AIDS pamphlets in the last six months." he ~aid. "But if you're going to ask me now if every citizen knows about AIDS, I'm going to say no." Safe Sex Has Results in London LONDON (UPI}-The AIDS virus is spreading more slowly among one group of Londoners most at risk because of safer sexual practices that also have reduced the rate of conventional vene­real disease, a team of British researchers reported March 19. Their report in the medical journal "The Lancet" was based on a study of homosexual and bisexual men attend· ing a London clinic. They said a lower rate of deadly AIDS virus was achieved by reducing promiscuity and using con­doms. From 1982 to 1984, the report said, the rise in anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among the London subjects averaged 7.4 percent per year. But between l 984 and Dec. 1986 it fell to 1.8 percent a year. At the same time the gonorrhea rate m the same group dropped from 15.3 per­cent a year to 5.1 percent. 0 The results of this study are encou­raging in suggesting we may be expe­riencing a slower rate of viral spread in London than in major American cities but there are no grounds for compla­cency," the report said. Hotline for AIDS in Hungary BUDAPEST, Hungary (UP!)­Hungary said it is setting up a tele­phone hotline to provide information on AIDS, the official news agency MT! reported Wednesday. MT! said 114 people have been oon· firmed infected with the AIDS virus and one had died. Groups with the greatest chance of exposure to acquired immune deficiency syndrome-homosexuals and hemo· philiacs-are subject to oompulsory screening tests. Since July 1986, all blood taken from donors has been exam-ined. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27 1987 We Cover the \Yorld of Monlrcse! The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 MARCH 27, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 21 California Here We Come "Soap" by the Staff of the Montrose Voice Montrose will be missing several famil­iar faces this weekend as two activities taking place on the West Coast have Houstonian's jetting off to La La Land-some for work, some for play. Several local health care providers are attending the National Lesbian Gay Health Conference which began Wednesday. Representatives from AIDS Foundation Houston, Inc. and Aid for AIDS are not only attending the five-day confab but are facilitating some of the sessions. Our own Nate Sebastian and Richard Jimenez are among program presen­tors. Joe Porro is also joining the thou­sands from all over the country expected to take a comprehensive look at problems and possible solutions to health care needs of the nation's les­bian, gay community. Across town, the Houston chapter of the Texas Gay Rodeo will be well represented at the Golden State Gay Rodeo, as a group of Space City urban wranglers are expected to follow the International Gay Rodeo circuit to its westernmost U.S. stop. Those planning to make the trek are Bacchus' Debbie Powell and the Voice's Jerry Mulhol­land. o Bar None The 611 Breakfast Club raised over $260 with their bake sale last weekend. The Omega House will benefit from a job well done by Ron. We understand that Pickles (Mary's) and Ron Bilbo are putting together this year's Easter high heel and bonnet race. Beginning at The Venture-N, the course will take runners to Mary's and other bars along the way to Chutes where awards will be presented. Now is the time to polish the pumps and press that veil. Mary's entry in the Mr. International Contest, Bill Bryant, will co-emcee with Tondalaya the Ms. Vacant Lot contest c3Jn Bcnwriam WILLIAM (BILL) S.' LONG September 9, 1945 March 20. 1987 In loving memory of a beautiful friend sadly missed and lovingly remembered by those who stayed with him through the end Contributions may be made in his name to Hospice of VNA Visting Nurse Associa­tion of Houston ~POllC'f T,_M!Jlll•CIMVOIC9•noo-9dlo~lhe h• OJ our ,Mdotfs er>d ''-*or ""-''Y• ol our ,.-cl.., W'I"' l'I ~~f1.....,.otr ... l1-Uiouldprt>wide1AW•l"lftfor"rna IOI'"~ nolbyll'ltlloro-thepflOMJ T""'••llOtN•gt'IQI' and Carnival finals atlO:OO p.m., Satur­day, April 4. Registration forms must be in by March 31 for this, yet another, Mary's exercise in the innocent joy of poor taste. Peler of Exile II, 302 Tuam, declares "the tradition will continue" with a grand opening real soon. The Camp Closet has a hot morning bartender named Ben. Don't believe it. Stop by and say hello. o Just Keep Rollin' Along The Montrose Counseling Center will sponsor a skate night at Carousel Rink, 9190 Old Katy Rd., on Tuesday April 7, 8:00-10:00 p.m. The Colt 45's/ HOG's skate night will be April 21, 8:00-10:00 p.m. o Tune Up Andy Mills is asking that previous members and those wishing to join the Montrose Symphonic Band call him at 527-9454 or come by to the 7:30 p.m. Monday rehearsals at MCCR. The band is gearing up for a May 15 concert at Rice U's Hammon Hall that will benefit the AIDS Foundation and Aid for AIDS. The band is also asking for tax­deductible donations of instruments. o Salute! A happy first anniversary goes out to Curt (Puppy} Norton and Gary Ruska! No comment as to how these two have gotten along for a whole year. Babs Monroe with Miss Texas Gay Newcomer Dina Malloy Babs Monroe was named Miss Conge­niaJity in last weekend's Miss Texas Gay Newcomer contest held at Vickery Station in Fort Worth. Dina Malloy of Ft. Worth walked off with top honors. Babs can been seen at The Galleon, Sunday, March 29, 8:00 p.m. o Just Couldn't Resist There's no way to resist comment on the current "unholy" wars among the tele­vision evangelists. Could this possibly be God's way of punishing those who solicit funds to use the public airwaves to, among other things, promote a cli­mate of homophobia to millions of American households? Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. Montrose Clinic Expands Hours The Montrose Clinic, 803 Hawthorne. has expanded its hours for routine sexually transmit­ted disease (STD's) clinic sessions. Effective immediately the clinic w1U be open for STD sessions Mon_, Tues., Thurs., Fn., 6.00-9 30 p·m Saturday800-11 :30a m and 1 00 p.m -4 30 p.m. and Sunday 1 00-4 30 p.m No appointments are necessary The clinic continues to serve as the alternative site for the AIDS (HIV) antibody test. The program ts offered anonymously and free of charge and includes pre-test and pos)-test counseling Appointments are required for HIV testing. Telephone 528-5535 for informa­tion and! or appointment. The clinic 1s in need of volunteers. especially physicians. nurses. lab technicians and other medical/ health professionals. For more information on volunteering, contact Fred Irvine at 528-5536 ••community AIDS Education Program Slated AMI Twelve Oaks Hospital. Wesleyan and the Southwest Freeway, will be sponsormg a community education program entitled "Understanding AIDS It will be held Monday. March 30 at 7:00 p m. at Twelve Oaks The guest speaker will be Jack Austin, M.D, a phys1c1an who specializes m the treatment of infectious diseases He will be discussing the prevention. diagnosis. and treatment of AIDS and will also be available for questions and answers The meeting is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Clarie Rowland at 623-2500 .. Women's Network April Schedule The Women's Network of the Montrose Counseling Center 1s a support and educational group established to serve partlc;ularly (but not exclusively) the lesbian and bisexual community of Houston women. Fees are based on a sliding scale ranging from $3-$10 However, no one will ever be turned away for lack of the fee On April 1, Nancy Koretz will present ''Shaking the Family Tree" This program 1s intended to help individuals learn more about themselves by exploring their roots A panel d1scuss1on entitled "Black Women m Transition" will be held April 8_ Four women will lead the d1scuss1on of roles and issues of black women in the community "On Becoming Physically Fit" 1s the title of a program to be presented April 15 by Carolyn Jordan, health studio manager. Family therapist Joan McK1rachan will explore '""Mother/ Daughter Relationships" on April 22. All programs will be held at the counseling center, 900 Lovett. Suite 203. More informa­tion on the women's network is available by calling 529-0037 STERLING Paint and Body Centers 1107-D Upland Dr. Just N.W. of Katy Frwy & Wllcrest From Minor Dents to Major Restorations Financing Available 932-9401 Open 24 Hours Phone for Appls. between 9pm-8am ~-h -0~~ tfJlns.vc· qj,,,igns o/t}louslon FLOWERS & GIFTS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, FruH Ir Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Slutted Toys Available. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted Something Different: Superior Service Pest Control 223-4000 Licensed & Regulated by Structural Pest Control Board of Texas 22 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 Artists Change Directions like the Weather Hot Wax Music by Jeffrey Wilson Maybe it's still the newness of the year, Possibly all the awards shows or the overwhelming amount of records and press to delve through-we've come to find an inordinate number of non­singers trying to be, and groups dis­banding to release solo projects en masse. and former lead singers return­ing to groups that shouldn't even exist by now. We can't decide whether it's mindbog­gling or just plain absurd, but some of the news is good so Hot Wax Music is going to •hare with you the good, bad and indifferent. There was a ~ong from the Broadway play Chicago in which they stated as long as you "razzle dazzled 'em" they couldn't tell if you were faking it. There's supposed to be a lot of saleabil­ity (at least for one curious project) in actors turned singers and vice versa. Maybe it's because they play so many choruses of Motown hits on ABC.TV's "Moonlighting" that both the label and co.star Bruce Willis collaborated on an album. Willis' The Return of Bruno can best be described as extended versions of his so-called singing during the 30-second commercial clips for Seagrams Wine Coolers. The artist (dare we giggle?) clowns his way through original and cover material including a first single "Respect Yourself," which topped the charts 15 years ago for the Staple Sing­ers on Stax Records. The musicians are jamming, the pro­duction is clean, and the background singer~ are carrying the vocal load. To listen to Bruce or Bruno or whatever he's calling his alter-ego, and not see him going through the outrageous endearing act is to realize he can't sing. He might call it singing or even soul, but Willis' audio without video is a no-go. Hey Bruce, stick with Cybill and opt for some other type of second job for moonlighting. Has the infinite Motown Industries all but forgotten its roots of Hitsville USA and Motown Records? Bunny DeBarge's press states that she's accomplished her goal and the DeBarge family tradition of musical excellence. Says Bunny, "This is a big step for me because on the previous albums with my brothers, I was solely responsible for one or two songs. This time I had to do nine and it was atl on me." Perhaps nine was too many. Bunny also recalls, "Few people know that the first DeBarge deal with Motown in the early '80s was on the strength of my demos. Motown heard the tapes and wanted to sign me. At the time, I wanted my family with me. I wasn't ready to perform solo, so DeBarge with El, Randy and Mark was formed. Later Jam .. was added." Rem em her all the great female vocal­ists during Motown's heyday including Gladys Knight, Martha Reeves and D.R.? Of course you do! Heydey, shmey day, this is late 1980's (how ominous) and Motown has turned loose this latest DeBarge sibling to solo. Ms. DeBarge's debut album is In Love, which seems to be the theme weaving throughout a variety of pro­ducers and arrangers as well as musi­cians, supporting vocalists and credit 'thank yous.' We're not sure if DeBarge is trying to emulate any of her sister vocalists, but the style is strikingly reminiscent of Columbia's Deneice Wil­liams including those ocassional trade­mark shrills. Side One opens with Bunny's finit sin­gle, a Jerry Knight! Aaron Zigman composition entitled "Save the Best for Me." This is a typical, yet pleasant r&b chart number for the dance floors. It isn't until we get to the end of this side to find a real musical treat, "Dance All Night." Although he didn't pen this track, Reggie Lucas (a Stephanie Mills attribute) arranged and produced this stronger than average dance song. 1B' is not only for Bunny, but for 'B'­side. Ms. DeBarge has written or co· Bruce Willis-or Bruno-or whatever he calls himself these days "Rhythm of the Night" and "Queen of My Heart." The so-so splits didn't work for the Miracles (only Smokey), or the Supremes (only Diana and the follow-up group as one unit!). Imagine the Tops without Levi Stubbs and Gladys with­out her Pips. Some groups were meant to succeed together. Which brings us to . Fourth Time's The Charm?!It's been Dennis Edu.:ards: gone from and back to the Temptations Trio: Dolly Parton. Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris written all but one of the tracks. Only one of her four efforts seems to avoid the lackluster of sounding segued. The nip side's saving grace is "Let's Spend the Night" sounding very family DeBarge with a tinge of Johnny Mathis' early '80s pop style. Beautiful Bunny lacks direction, but certainly not energy or excitement, try­ing to carry on part of the De Barge fami­ly's successful r&b tradition. It's time for these individual DeBarges to pool their resources once again and give us flawless recountings of hits like in again, out again for the Temptations' (Gordy) best lead singer, Dennis Edwards. When the Tempts temporar­ily left Motown in 1976 for a few unno· !iced albums at Atlantic, Edwards remained behind poorly managed to record unsuccessfully as a solo. Then came the family reconciliation with Motown boss Berry Gordy at the helm of the Tempts' return fdebut LP Power, with Dennis on lead. Charting success was not instant and so a deeper reconciliation brought back original Temptations David Ruffin and Bdd1e Kendricks for a Reunion LP and summer tour. Although the album was carried by the historical quintet turning septet, all the power they could muster with then­sensation Rick Jamee penning their lead-off single "Standing on the Top," any real chances of success and reconci­liation were again waning. Again Ruffin , Kendricks and Edwards departed. While David and Eddie gained some notoriety singing around with their blue-eyed soul broth­ers Hall & Oates; Edwards finally gained access to the r&b and dance charts as a solo for Motown's Gordy label. Now with the departure of one of the more recent replacement Tempts, whose name you probably aren't familiar with so we won't confuse the issue, Edwards comes home to the family a fourth time. Hopefully, Edwards will breathe and pump his special rhythm back into the 1987 Temptations; along with a strong songwriting team that couldn't hurt. Production for a new album is sche­duled just around the corner. While Motown contends that Edwards will still pursue his solo career as well, Dennis, "I went away for awhile and did what I had to do. l have always been a Temptation, and it feels great to be back with the family." How 'bout a trio? What a lovely triad-Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmy Jou Harris. A few years back Linda and Dolly lent participating vocals to Emmylou's remake of uMr Sandman" which naturally led to spec­ulation that three of the finest voices in contemparary pop & western would record an entire project together. Finally these three diverse talents found cooperative schedules and the result is their first single from Trio. "To Know Him is to Love Him." It seems like several musical years ago when Phil Spector wrote this catchy love song for The Teddybears, and this is its third and best cover. Unlike a trio with one familiar lead singer, these strong yet gentle voices are truly a compliment to each other, and certainly well guided under the production of George Massen· burg. From RCA, to this guest spot on Warner Bro~ .. Dolly Parton has recently signed on with Columbia Records. Before studio time, Ms. Parton is cur· rently on tour downunder cheering up the Ausaies with Kenny Rogers. Bowie on AIDS By William C. Trott United Pres8 International David Bowie says he and the independ­ent Mick Jagger have another project coming up. "Mick Jagger and I will be doing something together noxt year but at the moment I cannot say what," said Bowie, who teamed with the Rolling Stone on a raucous version of "Dancing in the Streets" in 1985. Bowie held a news conference in Lon· don March 20 and touched on many sub­jects, including the six-month tour that will take him to 100 cities and four conti­nents. Bowie, who flew in from New York, said he was amused by reports that he was retiring from music. "When I stop enjoying it all I will stop," he said. Asked about AIDS, Bowie said, "! cannot attend the AIDS charity show coming up in London soon Gut I think everyone should have an AIDS test and use condoms." Study Claims Feminine Traits in Boys Leads to Homosexuality By Delthia Ricks UPI Science Writer LOS ANGELES-Boys who prefer girls' games and whose fathers are inat­tentive and fail to deal with extreme feminine behavior are more likely to become homosexuals than boys who exhibit traditional masculine behavior while growing up, a pioneering 15-year study shows. Unlike previous research into what makes some boys grow up to be homo­sexual or bisexual, the study released Tuesday also suggested that it is not a stereotypical overbearing mother who plays the major role in her son's sexual orientation. "This is the first time that anybody has ever taken a large group of dozens of boys and looked at them directly as they were growing up," said Dr. Richard Green, professor of psychiatry at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. Green and a team of behavioral scientists tracked the development of two groups of boys in the first investiga­tion that tried to identify the factors that lead to homosexuality in males from childhood. The researcher also said "our study showed that therapy designed to stop later homosexual orientation is ineffec­tive." Green said one group in the study con­sisted of boys who said they preferred to be girls, dressed in girls' clothing and preferred such "dress-up" toys as Bar­bie dolls, role-played as girls, avoided rough-and-tumble sports and played primarily with girls. The other group exhibited conventionally masculine behavior. In the first group, Green said, 34 of the boys-75 percent of them-grew up to be homosexual or bisexual. "By contrast, all but one of the boys who showed conventional masculine behavior during boyhood are heterosex­ual," Green said. As previous studies of homosexuality suggest, Green's study indicates that parents play a critical role in their child's later sexual behavior. "We did find a great deficiency in the time fathers shared with their feminine sons, particularly in the first four or five years of life," he said. "Also, the more parents were supportive of cross-gender behavior the more extensive this behav ior became." He said the extent to which the boys in the study exhibited feminine behav· ior also correlated with a lack of interest in the child by the parents, especially the father Other factors common among the boys who grew up to be homosexual or bisexual were tendencies of being per· ceived as "beautiful children" by their parents and a series of chronic or serious illnesses early in life. He also said most of these boys pre· ferred to portray "mothers" rath~r than "fathers" in games of house with other playmates. "The most important thing is that when parents see behavior like this, they should try to understand why their boy iR unhappy being a boy," Green said. "It is the responsibility of parents to show the boy that he can be an aes· thetic and sensitive person and still be a boy." MARCH 27 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 23 r-:--=c~==="""~==-=-,..--,:--=-r-:::====-=-___,_,::--~r=~-=-------==-~=--=-_, Survey: ~. ~ It's Springtime again and time to do Americans those projects you've been putting off. 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One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth Edited by Ann Heron ''For every generation that comes out, these essays will be invaluable." - Gay Community News "There is a rare sensibility displayed in many of these es!>ays that is nothing short of astonishing ~ International Gay News Agency CIGNAI an important and nece~ry book. powerful and Vt'ry poi~nant ' Woman<'Ws ''One teenager. in ten ": accordmg to Kini,ey. th<1t's the proportion of gays to slrJ1ghts m this country. One Tet""•nager m Ten- twenty-eight young men and women from all over the UniteJ ?tale~ and Canada, from fifteen to twenty-four yeJrs ol age, speak .out about. their commg-out ~xpenences - about what it is to be young and gay m our society today. $3.95 in bookstore'>, or u~c thi'> coupon to order by mail .................................. TO ORDER ................................. . Pled<;C <;('nd me Enclosed is$ name city copiec. of 011<' Tc,·1iagt'1 i11 Tl'n at $4.50 each, postpaid address stat(' zip ___ _ ALYSON Publications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 r-s of Americans than AIDS and most pea· pie remain concerned they may be exposed to the deadly AIDS virus dur· ing a blood transfusion, a survey shows. But nearly 75 percent of those who participated in the survey issued Tues· day by the American Association of Blood Banke are aware they can reserve their own blood for transfusion during elective surgery. "Americans retain high levels of assurance in the performance of the nation's blood banks ... (as) three­fourths give blood banks an 'excellent' or 'good' rating for their performance in taking the necessary precautions to pro­tect the nation's blood supply from AIDS," the survey said. The American Association of Blood Banks is an organization of more than 7,000 individuals and 2,400 community and hospital blood banks and hospital transfusion .services. It collects nearly half of the nation's donated blood, with the Red Cross collecting the other half. A thousand randomly selected adults over age 18 participated in the survey, conducted by telephone Dec.12-16, 1986. Some of the findings were: -AIDS has replaced heart disease as the nation's No. 2 health worry. While cancer still tops the list, mention of AIDS increased by 8 percent from a sim· Har survey taken in 1985. The No. 3con· cern is now heart disease, followed by drug abuse, smoking, obesity and diet or nutrition. -Fear of AIDS from blood transfu­sion, which is possible, remained con­stant. at 55 percent this survey and 53 percent in the previous survey. But fear of contracting AIDS from donating blood declined. In this survey, 27 per· cent mistakenly believed it is possible compared with 34 percent the year before. -Seventy-three percent of respond­ents indicated awareness they can reserve some of their own blood for transfusion during elective surgery, and 80 percent said they would prefer this option if faced with an operation. Only 43 percent said they would use a private frozen blood storage center; 46 percent said they would not. Others had no opinion. -Eighty-six percent said they had confidence blood collection centers were recruiting healthy donors, testing blood and handling blood properly to provide a safe blood supply. More Gays in the USSR MOSCOW (C Pl)-The number ofhomo- 8exuals in the Soviet Union is growing, despite a law making homosexuality a crime punifihable by up to five years in prison, a Communist Party youth news­paper reported. Moscovsky Komsomolets, the news· paper of the Communist Party's youth group. took up the issue for the first time Tuesday, saying it broke a long silence because of an underlying fear of AIDS. "Why in our country, where not only publicity but the very fact of homosex· ual contacts is persecuted by law, iis the number of homosexuals growing?" the newspaper asked. The newspaper, however, provided no specifics on the number of homosexuals in the country. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 27, 1987 tm.11-!G, l'M COM~t> '10.l'VE 1U~ I"® "'W·~ l<l~ GU'>'-· ··SO 'IA. 'WfoN'l1t.. GM.IT"'~? FlamingoGate Comes Home to Roost The Innocent Byatander by Arthur Hoppe The question was how that covey of pink plaatic flamingoes which recently graced the lawn of our neighbor, Mr. Crannich, came to roost atop our garage roof. The anower , I felt strongly, lay in the heart of our oon, Mordred. My 1u1picion1 were enforced when Mordred put on his Eairle Scout uni­form, complete with aarriaon cap and merit badges, and took up residence in the driver's seat of the family station wagon parked at the curb. "What are you doing in there, Mordred?" I asked, peenng through the open window, 'Tm defending the United States Constitution, Dad," said Mordred, his chin high . "On this, its 200th anniver-sary year. it behooves all of us citizens to defend and protect this precious docu­ment which ensures our cherished free-doms." ~ "That's very noble of you, Mordred," I said, "and how did those pink flamin­goes get on our roorr· "I'm glad you asked that question , Dad," he said. "I don't think there's another pen1on in America that wants to tell this story more than I do." "Good," I said. "Let's hear it." "Unfortunately," he said, "I am not only protecting and defending the Con­stitution itself, but also its amend­ments, including the fifth. Therefore I must decline to answer on the grounds that anything I say may tend to incrimi­nate or degrade me. 0 "Who do you think you are," I said irritably, "a Marine Corps colonel?" " Please, Dad," said Mordred, "you're NEW! A Nice Selection of Pretty African Chiclidsk ~ at ~~+ Tom's Pretty Fish 224 Westheimer 6 Blocks from Main Street 520-6443 Get 'em Before We Sell Out talking about a national hero who wants, above all, to see the guilty brought to justice. Of course, if you want to discuss a grant for limited immun­ity ... " "All I want to discuss is who put those flamingoes on our roof," I said firmly. "Let's start by you telling me where you were last night." "Gosh, Dad, the human mind can't encompass everything. I'll bet you can't remember what you were doing on August 8, 1985." "Now you've promoted yourself to president," I said. "Well, ifthe presidentcan'tremember what he did," said Mordred, "how can I remember what I did?" "He's got a lot more to forget than you have." I said. "Talk." "Just a minute," he said, "you're investigating this case, right?" "I'm trying," I said. "And in the end, you'll decide if I'm guilty" "You bet I will," I said, "and after I decide you 're guilty, I'm going to ground you for a week." 14Don 't you see, Dad?" he said smugly. "Thie whole bus iness violates the very heart of the Constitution-the separa­tion of powers. You can't both investi­gate me and judge me. I'd rather die than desecrate our sacred Constitu­tion." "I'm glad to see you're only a colonel agai!'," I said._:'Now about these pink flammgoes ... Mordred bowed his head. "As the Bible says, 'Though youth be persecuted for pink flamingoes, the spirit of right­eousness shall prevail.' That's Matthew 5:27." "That's Mordred, '87," I said. "And you're grounded for a week." Mordred put on a stunned look. "You mean you 'd rape our priceless Constitu­tion and thereby shatter forever our birthright of democracy."
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