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Montrose Voice, No. 278, February 21, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 278, February 21, 1986 - File 001. 1986-02-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7165/show/7140.

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(1986-02-21). Montrose Voice, No. 278, February 21, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7165/show/7140

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 278, February 21, 1986 - File 001, 1986-02-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7165/show/7140.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 278, February 21, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 21, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript City Council Committee Rejects Health Card Idea inside mnntrose VOICE ''The Newspaper of Montrose" _!'ri d!)l;!.!:_~uary_ 21, 1986 Issue 278 J!,2_3) ~2~ ~90 _ Area Residents Receive Bogus AIDS Warning news, inside Womyn­space Grows as New Goals are Attained neighborhood, inside Weber and Rice Confuse Joseph! Bill O'Rourke, Montrose Live. inside Ranch Hands Move Up in Pool League Play Sports Voice, inside Powers Defeats Bearden in Houtex Tennis Action SportsVoice, inside Gay Club Owners Hold Emergency Meeting Inhalants in the Bars By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Speaking to a large group called to an emergency meeting of the Houston Organization of Bar Owners, Capt. Michael Harris of the Harris County Precinct Six Constable's office and a member of the Governor's Task Force on Inhalant Abuse, addressed the question of the legality of selling and using inhalants. The meeting, held Wednesday, was called at the request of Charles Armstrong, general manager of Heaven, J.R.'s and the Montrose Mining Company. Armstrong explained to the group that undercover agents and under­cover junveniles had visited several clubs last week to establish whether or not the clubs were complying with the law concerning inhalants which are sold at many of the clubs. continued inside Some Club Owners Cool to both MADD's Program and Another The Politics of Taxis By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter "We have always provided taxi service if one of our customers is drunk," said Dick Sandison, manager of Mary's. This type of comment represents most of the area bar owners who have considered outside programs offered by such groups as Mothers Against Drunk Drivers Taxi Program and the newly-formed Safe Ride Home of Texas. "I'll do my own program which will be about half the cost of the other programs offered," commented Jim Dondson, owner of the Venture-N. "I'll send my customers home and pay for it if I need to," he added. "At least, I know where the money is going." continued inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21 . 1986 FEBRUARY 21, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 City Council Committee Rejects Health Card Idea By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter The three-member Houston City Council committee studying the proposal of rein­stating health cards as a means of control­ling the spread of AIDS and other communicable diseases, moved one step closer Monday to forma1ly rejecting the plan. Following testimony heard at a series of meetings on the issue from about 30 indi­viduals, including local, state and national health offieials and researchers, rommittee members have tentatively n•<·ommended to reject the proposed ordi· nanC'e. City Councilman Jim Gref'nwood. who chain; the committee on Communica­ble Infectious Oisease Control, said all hut on~ of the speakers felt the ordinance would not be t>ffective. If approved, the ordinance would have requin·d food handlers, re.t;taurant. groc ery nnd rnnvenience store employt'(•i;, as well as tt-acht·rs and day care workers, to bt> teAh·d twice a year for exposur!' to Hev· t·rul rnmmunicable diseases, and mo~t montrose VOICE -'M' TEXAS•q-'A MONTROSE. TEXAS Potw1-t1on ( .. I 1985) 32 000 Cenwt Ir.els .01 01 . .01 02. 402 Ot 40202. •05 02. -403 and ..o. 01 Z1P coo. (rougtltyl 77006. 77019 !PQrttOn), 77098 Bounded (roughlyl S~d Dr (wfflJ, Alletl Pe•kway friorth). Main St (8"11, US 59 (IOuthl lati~ (Mof'ltrote 81\ld 11 Wntheimer Rd I 21•,...·13·N Long111Jd1 95°2Z50"W. Atlllvde 40' ELECTED Off.CIA.LS FOR l.IONTROSE 0.01119 G•..-i-. HOU1t0fl City Council dltl Cl 901 81gby_ j71JJ222·5P.33 El Frat'QI LH. Ham• County Comtn11110ner !pct 1) 1001 Pr.stort, (113/221·5111 Wlltlr Rankin. Conttlble (pct 1) :JOI Sin JK•nlo, (113} 221·5200 Debre Oenbvtg. Tl•U Hou• d Alprwentat•~• {d11l 137) 11n1sw Fwy.(7131t120-aoea Cr11g Wuhmgtoo. T••H Senata fd•tl 13) 2323C.rol1,,., /113)559-4343 l•kkey L1111'd. u S HouM ol Reprnent1t1vM fd11t HI) 1919SrMhlrB20/113J131H331 The Newspeper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 278th ISSUE. FEB 21. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 7700&-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DISTRIBUTION 10.500 eop111 weekly 1n ~ton through 1.a meior d11tnbult00 po'"ts •n the MontrOH. lhl Village. th• Heights Nl1met«lpn1·oor•r•l•clor28 Nlimatld ,.ld•rsh1p 2Sl. 400 """"'Y 175 cop•• weekly e1sewt1ere Nl•m•t«I fMU·Ofl r•t• f•cror 2 5 •al•m•r«I rHd•r•h•P 440 wHk/y TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (GUARANTEED! 10.B75cop191wee«ly ror., astimalld rHd•rsh1p 29.840 wHkly Contents copyright 1986 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg Ptibl••h•1·1d•tor Linda Wyche m•~•ng eclilor Connie Woods n1w.1 Pete Diamond riew1 David Roumfort produer•on Scott Cutsinger, 8111 O'Rourke revlftou Steve Warren iu1.ana1 eorr1sponc1a,,1 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston: (713) 529-8490 ElsewhMe Texas !800) 222·1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere U S (800) 225-0227 EX'T 995220 Jerry Mulholland ad!f«f•t11t11 d.recta< Karen Myrow ~coc.mr 1.11Kill•¥• Founclmg M•mO.n GrHler MOll!fOM 8ua1nns O!Ald. Gey Ind l•b1an Pr•• "'eoc1at1on Niwa S1rv1c11 Newa-Ooa. P1cd•c News &tni1ce Syncl1C1/ld FHIUll S.rYICH & Wr1/1rt Brien McNaught Un•­.... , .. , Pr911 Syndicate. News Amenu Synd1e1t1 POSTMASTER S.nd lddlHI correct1on1 10 Q AYOfld•le. Houlton. TlC 7700&-3028 Subacript•ort r•t• in US m SNlld .-ivllope M9 par y .. r t52 IU09t), Sl9para111 mori1t11 (2e1ssu•).or St 25perweek (lest tl'lal'I 29 11~) S.ck iUuet S2 00 nch Nat•Ofll/ lld~1rt11mg ,.pt•Hfll•I,,,_ Jo. 01Saba!O. Ro...enOlll MMk1t11'19 9ee 8th AY90UI. New Vent 10011, !212J 2<12-&863 Aavert•lllfJfl cH.dl1t11 Wedrwttd•y. 5 JOpm. tor 11 ..... r• .. ued hld•yavarung Not•c110 «llilft•Hll Loc•l•dverltsmg ••l11Cl'ltdul1 s..i.n·A w,.• .•.t tact•~•Ocl 12 ,.,. andEigt1t-Awdlb91tt.el•v•Jan 3 ,_.pe>n,obll•ty n,. MoltlrOM \loot:• dOl9 f'IOI HtU!l'l9 fMpe>fl• "bl"IY lor MIWrt•••nG Cla•"" ReMMra •hould 9Cfv1M Iha ,.....P9PI' 10 eny OIC1fPl1v1 .OY11111mg notably, the AIDS virus. Opponents of the ordinance argued that AIDS is not spread casually and therefore a health card, which is on)y reliable fort he date it is issued, would not be an effective method of controlling the spread of AIDS. Following the review of speaker testim­ony, committee members met Monday after nearly one month. There, Greenwood offered several alternatives to the health card ordinance, among them extending the city's educational efforts concerning AIDS to the non-gay community, expand­ing education programs aimed at various food handling groups andcontinuint-\' city­wide efforts to monitor public place~ such 88 bathhouse::\ and adult bookstore:; where the pol'sibility of anonymous sex encoun­ten1; oC'curring-and the potential spread of AIDR-is likely. Greenwood said, if nE'Ct'S&ary, the city council may be forct-d to consider an ordinance that would close a;uch rstablishments ' Committee members Eleanor Tim•ley and John Goodner agreed with Grre~­wood that educational efforts directed T STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMlTTED DISEASES AID51KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON.-FR/. 8:30AM 5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MON~ WED .. FRI. EVENINGS ANO ;:,ATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston, TX 77027 621-7771 ltl::E through the KS! AIDS Foundation and the city's Health and Human Services Depart­ment would be a more effective means of deterring the spread of AIDS than health cards. The committee will vote on its final recommendations following a public hear­ing which has been scheduled for 7:00 p.m., Feb. 27 at City Hall. Greenwood said it is unlikely the committee's recommen· dations will be altered by the hearing, however Clinic Changes AIDS Testing Days From a Press Release The Montrotte Clinic, located at 803 Haw· thorne, continues to be the alternate te~t sight for the HTLV-111 ' LAV·AIDS Anti­body Tefit. However. the day on which the test is adminil:itered has changed. Ht>nre­forth. the t('l:it will be administered on Fri­day eveningR only from 5:30 p.m. through 9::JO p.m. The tf'St will continue to be provided free of charge to the patient. Results of an invi­didual's test will be given in perHon at the clinic one wttk later during the testing houl'8. Test results will not be given over the telephone. The teHt is available at the Montrose Clinic for those who wish to take it volun· tarily. Names are not taken. Absolute con· fidentiality and anonymity is asl:lured. The public is reminded that. "'thi~ test was designed to screen donor blood for the presence of antibody to the AIDS "irus . This test is not designed to be diagnostic for .~ms or AIDS Related Complex (ARC). For information and or an appoint· ment can the Montrol:ie Clinic at 713) 528· fi.'i35 betwem the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m .. Monday through Friday 4 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21 . 1986 Area Residents Receive Bogus AIDS Warning Acquired Inunune Deficiency SJ11drome Testing Center The Mtdical Ctn•t-r ~1 Offt< r Bo'° ~~18 Hou~100, TC"u!. i~:l<> February 13. 1986 RE1 Test No. J346 7WB Hr. Houston. Texas 77056 Dear Hr. We have been advised that you may have been exrosed to sareone who currently carries the Acquired lr.JTU'le Deficiency S)'nd.rorre vi.rus. Pl~a.se n~fra~ fr?" any irit imate contact wj th anyone and contact thu office J.."'fled1ately for testing. Sincerely, ORE1cre ca14S37 Several residents of the Montr08e area became alarmed this week when they received a letter informing them they had been exposed to someone who carrits the AJOS virus. The letter, which is stamped .. Second Notice," tells recipients to "refrain from any intimate- contact with anyone and Counseling Center Sponsors Women's Weekend The Second Annual Women's Weekend '86, sponsored by the Montrose Counsel· ing Center, will be held March 1-2 at the center at 900 Lovett Blvd. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Satur day followed by the keynote speaker at 9:00 a.m . Three iotessions on Saturday and one eession on Suoday will offer a selec· tion of eight topics. The dicussions will focu1 on lSBues, concerns. and identity for women Participating att group leaders are Karen Hanson, director of Women's Pro­grams at the center; Joyce Gayles. pKy­chologist~ !'.j ancy Harrington, vice prmident or communications. director of rape crisis program of the HouHton Area Women'• Center· Dt-nise O'Dougherty, peychotherapist; and Carmen Zepeda. therapist. The sessions will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday and from LOO p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Sunday The coet of the tw<Hlay workshop is $25 per person Brochures and registration forms are available at the counseling center or Wilde 'N Stein Books. I 103 California. Space is limited and prior registration is sug geated. Registration at the door will be hued on apace availabiJity. contact this office immediately." It is signed by "Dr. Ronnie Embrachney" of "The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syn· dro~e Testing Center in the Medical Cen· ter. According to Kenneth Vance, director of the Montro~eCounselingCenter, the letter contains several flaKfant indications that it is bogus. Neither the testing center nor a physi cian by that name are listed in the phone directory. Also, the post office box lisW as a mailing address differs greatly from oth­ers used in the medical center area and the zip code is not correct for addresses in that vicinity. Vance also noted errors in stenographi­cal procedure including the signature which differs from the standard form used by medical professionals. Vance sees the letter as either a scare tactic or a "bad joke." He theorizes that the prankster selected names from phone directories which restrict listing to certain parts of the city. i.e. , Montrose. Heights, etc He urgeR anyone receiving the letter to ignore it or report it to postal service offi­cials. o Ways to Recognize Bogus AIDS Warning Letter 1 See if it'R possible to telephone the name listed as the originator. If not, the letter is probably bogus. 2. It is standard for members of the med· ical profe~Bion to foJJow their names with the appropriate degree, never preceeding. :J. Improper stenographical identifies· tion . In Montrose, Neuly l:vHyone Reads the Voi<e MERI DIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW '86 MERCEDES BENZ __ '86HO~ 32S 309/mo 190E 300E 560Sl 349fmo 4'f8tmo 725/mo Accord 1S9fmo 5211< 395/mo Preludt 179/mo 73Si S69imo '86 POR~Q!!__ 329/mo 944 944 Turbo 398/mo 498/mo '86 JAGUAR XJ6 569/mo ~~ '86 BUICK ltX-7 209/mo '86 TOYOTA Sliylart. Electra: 11'9/mo 626 178fmo Camry 219/mo Ctliu 172/mo 18S/mo CALL LEE BORBA i!!/8&.. (713) 975-1986 NO OOW'N P,A,'rMlNT • LOWlR MONTHLY P,A,YME.NT • (A)H FOR YOUR TRADE. 808 Lovett ~\.--~~ 521 - 1015 ------~ CAf"~ ~1....----~ =- -....... Boulevard Big Bang $1. 99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage and 2 Pancakes Hours: 7am-11pm Mon.-Thurs ?am-Midnight Friday Sam-Midnight Saturday 8am-11pm Sunday First North Houston had "One" Then there was a "Choice" Now We give you the answer K.J.'s @ 1183~~~R~INE 2 blocks South of Aldlne-Bender 445-5849 SUNDAY Free BBQ 3pm Lip Sync Contest 10pm CASH PRIZES HOURS: 6PM-2AM MONDAY ALL NIGHT HAPPY HOUR 7pm-2am TUESDAY HAWAIIAN LUAU 9pm WEDNESDAY THURSDAY POOL Tournament $4.oo entry Winner Takes All, 8pm $1 Bar Drinks All Night FRIDAY SATURDAY NO COVER! PARTY!! PARTY!! PARTY!! HELP WANTED-ALL POSITIONS NEEDED FEBRUARY 21. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 5 America's New Culture Objects-The Homeless By John Ross Pacific Neu·s Sen·ice Special to the Montrose Voice Are the homeless the nation's hotteHt new pop icons? They have made the covers of all the major news weeklies this winter, Holly­wood and network TV are cranking out docudramas about their plight, and the art world has even discovered them-as high fashion and rock 'n' roll. Upcoming in May is "Hands Across America," a gigantic coast.to-coast hand· holding and pop music fest, chaired by Bill Cosby and Kenny Rogers to raise as much as $100 millin for the Homeless and the Hungry. But the music community doesn't have a monopoly on altruism, thinks Bob Zmuba, who is behind Home Box Office's "Comic Relief," a comedy fundraiser for the homeless Ret to air this spring. Whoopi Goldberg and Billy Crystal will headline. Zmuba SeE'S it as an antidote to "Compas· sion Fatigue Syndrome," coming after last year's entertainment fundraisers for hunger victims in Ethiopia, the anti apartheid Eitruggle in South Africa, and farmers in the U.S. Midwest. Hollywood, too, has found something funny to say about the homeless. Disney Studios has released Down and Out in Beverly Hills. in which Nick Notle plays a drifter who falls into the swimming pool of Bette Midler and Richard Dreyfus. One key scene was shot at the Union Mission on Los Angeles' skid row. Direc­tor Paul Mazursky, with approval from the Scrttn Actors' Guild, paid the 800 homeless who sleep there $20 a day plus "a $10 meal," says the mission's community relations director. Simi larly, Los Angeles' homeless-the federal government calculates L.A. county to have the largest.displaced population in ~ the country-have found work playing themselves in a pair of TV docudramas. "Stone Pillow" aired by CBS last November starred Lucille Ball as a bag lady, and "Samaritan-the Mitch Snyder Story" dramatizes that activist's struggle to obtain shelters in the nation's capitol. After a recent week-Jong shoot in Washi ngton, "Samaritan" producer Chuck Fries gave a catered party for homeless extras, who were served hors d'oevreR by tuxOOoed waiters. "Everyone connected with this production has been touched deep down," says Boots Lebaron, Fries' publicist. "This little casting gal just told me that for the first time in her career she fttls like she's doing something important," says Lebaron with a thob in his voice. Although such ventures are bound to make the homeless more visible, some observers are dubious about the message. I :.11D:U~~'D1Y £.}JJ_PI~~' :.1.fD:UbJJll "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS; Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A Thayer Esther Cohen is a New York editor who helped shape Anna-Marie Rousseau's book Shopping Bag Ladies, the first liter­ary look at their lives. Cohen thinks the latest films won't be very realistic "because the problem of the homeless is so distressing that we have to keep them unreal in order to deal with them." Instead she predicts the media will soon move onto other causes, with Hollywood following right behind. She thinks, "It's depress­ing." Meanwhile, a Santa Monica, Calif., firm decorated designer tee-shirts with images of bag ladies borrowed from Rousseau's volume, until homeless providers pro­tested that the shirts were "tacky" Tacky or no, Glamour magazine runs profiles of bag ladies and Vogue has touted "the Bag Lady look." Both Bloom­ingdale's and Tiffany's on New York's swank East Side have recently "done" their windows in bag lady motiffs. And art, by and about the homeless, is making its mark. On New York's newly­chic Lower East Side, at art spots with names like Fashion Mode and Kamikaze, young artists have made the homeless their themes. The Storefront for Art and Architecture this December sponsored a proJect in which artists stenciled the word "Homeless" on sidewalks. buildings, and right next to "sleeping bums," says one participant. Canvase1:1 by homeless women dis· played at one Wa•hington, D.C. shelter drew critics' praise. On the way to high­powered pret>s conferences, White House presR corps photographer Jim Hubbard has snapped pictures of the city's home­less outside government buildings. and recently he made agalleryexhibitofthem. Washington activist Snyder elicited a different kind of art criticism from the fed-eral government in December. His group was not allowed to place under the National Christmas Tree a bronze statue of a black family huddled over grates. The U.S. Park Service deemd the piece "inap­propriate for a Pageant of Peace," accord­ing to an agency spokesperson. Are the homeless at risk of becoming culture objects? In a recent East Village Eye critique, art savant Lucy R. Lippard endor1:1ed the theme because "good art can move the homeless closer to public vision." She likes the work of Martin Wong, now selling canvai;i~ in the five figure range, who calls him1'elf a member of "The Dumpster School.·' Wong paints the home­less becauRe, "I'm a landscape painter and they have become part of the landscape." In response to a New York art elite she sees as "very snapping and mocking," artist Mary Agnes Smith coordinated ''The Soup Kitchen Project" in which artists not only hung their work in a Man· hattan soup kitchen but worked there as well. "I don't feel a lot of social responsibil­ity among artists today," rues Smith, She works ¥.'ith, but no longer paints, the homelefls. "I'm doing breakdancers now." Rachel Romero's interest in painting the homeless began when paying custo­mers were in short supply. "I find people who are homelees live complicated lives that often involve arti.-tic expression," she say~. The homeleu themselves. however, may already be bored by the efforts of the arts to find resonance in their lives. Says Gregory, a young homeless man whom Romero has drawn with a dollar bill over his mouth ("Gregory With Dollar Bill"): "I'm not interested in art no more. I like to dance real smooth now- or go for long drives in the country." ROCK "N" HORSE Newest Women's Bar (Men Welcome Also) Dancing Soon Draft Beer-75¢ Happy Hour $100 Regular Well Drinks $125 Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-7pm Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4pm-2am, Fri.-Sun. lpm-2am Narene Kee-own.er 5731 Kirby 520-9910 To better sen•e )'OUT needs . . . TEXAS STATE OPTICAL announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 l'niversity 528-1589 TSO-South !\fain 4414 s. !\fain 523-5109 Tues.-Sat. l\fon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Monday Closed Saturday Eff--ec=tin-· Feb. I, 1986 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21. 1986 Some Club Owners Cool to Taxi Programs By Connie Woods Mont~e Voict- Staff Reporter "We have always provided ta.xi service if one of our customers is drunk," said Dick Sandi.son, manager of Mary's. This type of comment represents most of the area bar owners who have considered outside programs offered by such groups as Mothers Against Drunk Drivers Taxi Program and the newly-formed Safe Ride Home of Texas. ''I'll do my own program which will be about half the cost of the other programs offered." commented Jim Dondson, owner of the Venture-N_ "I'll send my customers home and pay for it if I need to," he added. "At least, I know where the money is going.'' Controversy concerning the taxi service program peaked at the recent monthly meeting of the Houston Organization of Bar Owners CHOBOI held at the Venture­N. Founders of the Safe Ride Home of Texas. Bill Killingsworth and Todd Phil· lips, spoke to the group about their new program while pointing out some of the problems with the MADD programs. Killingsworth, who once worked with MADD. told the club owners that money designated for the taxi program had been diverted to be used for MADD's lobbying efforts He and Phillips presented information about their program while pointing out alleged discrepancies within the MADD organization. However, Marinelle Timmons, presi­dent of MADO. maintained that the taxi program was originally designed for safe transportation and a fundraiser for MADD. She told the group that no monies from the taxi service program had been used for lobbying efforts. Many of the local club owners are satis· fled with their own methods of handling patrons who have had too much to drink "We had rather pay the taxi fare than have our customers get killed or kil1 some­one," Sandison explained when asked how he felt about taking care of intoxi-cated. customers leaving the club. Marian Coleman, owner of Kindred Spirits. explained that she also had her own program for dealing with the situa· tion . "For big events like New Year's Eve, I rent a van and provide a driver," she explained. She said that she provided rides for some 50 people New Year's Eve. "If someone gets drunk in my bar, I feel responsible for that person ," she added. During normal nights she said that she will , indeed, call a taxi for a patron who cannot drive safely. Coleman also pointed out that her bar tenderos and waitresses are trained to watch for people who have had too much to drink. "They cut them off and make sure they don't get another drink,' ' she said. Coleman also pointed out that her custo­mers are good about protecting each other and are willing to provide rides home when someone should not be driving. Other club owners, including Alan Pierce of the Brazos River Bottom and. TOO Lenze of Chutes, said they are always wil­ling to call a taxi for someone who does not UT Gives Go Ahead on AIDS Hospital By Pete Diamond Montro~ Vola Staff Reporter University of Texas regents, meeting in Houston Feb. 13, tentatively approved a plan to work with M.D. Anderson and American Medical International, Inc., to develop the nation's first hospital special· izing in the treatment of AIDS patients. The propoeal calls forUTandM.D.And· erson to support and staff what is now CitizeM General Hospital. If the plan is approved, AMI would begin conversion of the 150-bed facility and reopen it as the Southwest Institute of Immunological and Infectious Dito1eaHes as early as May. Although •till in the planning stages. the AIDS hospital ha.a become a controver· eial •ubJect. According to City Health Director Jame. Haughton, phone calls and letters received from residents living near Citizens General have, for the most p_art. been against the proposed conver­a1on. Some people. believing AIDS is a "gay diaea.ae. ··oppose "'anything to do with the gay community," Haughton says. Others are opposed becauee they do not want to lose the nearby. general-service care Ci ti zena General providee. The city has not taken a position on the conversion. but Haughton said that as an individual physician, he opposes an AIDS hospital in Houeton. .. There's no question that good research ie going to eventually benefit all patients with AIDS . .. and I have no objection to the research" (that would be done at an AIDS hoepital). But he adds the p88t 13 months have been turbulent ones in Hous­ton, largely becauae of AIDS, the defeat of the job rights referendum and anti.gay election rhetoric last November Haughton believN it is .. bad politics" for Houston to focutio on AIDS by develop. ing the country'• first AIDS hospital. By creating a specialized hospital­eomething Haughton says has been disap­pearing from the medical scene for a long time-the hoepital and every patient who wall<• through its doors becomes labeled. Thia, he adds, may cause a variety of prob­lem•. such as thoee faced by people who eeek treatment for AIDS at the hospital and recover enough to return to work. "It'• all a worthy cause," Haughton eaye, "but there might be a better way to go about thie. Maybe if it waa in a different city it might work." Haughton &aye an alternative to the AIDS hoepital might be a •pecial AIDS reeearch center located at M.D. Anderson Nate Sebastian, executive director of the KS! AIDS Foundation, says he favors such an idea. However, he is reluctant to offer full support to an AIDS hospital. "We want to support the concept, but we're waiting to hear more definite plans," Sebastian said. For example, he says AMI has been vague about the amount and extent of care they will offer to individuals who are unable to pay for medical treat· ment. 'Tm afraid they'll put all this effort into (developing an AIDS hospital) and it will not be able to support itself." Haughton also expre8l:led concern that AMI, a profit-making business. may close the AIDS hospital if it fails to make a profit. Richard D'Antoni.AMI group vice presi­dent, said AIDS patients will not be turned away if a profit is not made. He added the possibility would exist for expanding reAearch within the hospital to include other diseases. He said the idea of an AIDS hospital is to offer patients with AIDS a facility that will focus on the research and treatment of AIDS and other immunolgi­cal diseaaee. "I think the prospect of establishing the first hospital of its kind in the country is very exciting,•• says Tom Lassiter, execu· tive director of Citizens General. And, by drawing on the expertise of UT and M.D. Anderson reRearchers. he says "we can set up a first class research operation and hopefully find a cure to the problem of AIDS." Lassiter said that by having a number of AIDS patients in one location. researchers will be able to conduct sub­stantial amounts of research in a more controlled environment. Physicians wi1l also have the latest technology and treat­ments available to them, he added. Despite these advantages, there are some individuals who fear the AIDS hos pi· tal will lead to an eventual quarantine of people with AIDS. While Haughton says this is not the intent of AMI, he does believe it is "an easy step from an AIDS hospital to a barbed wire fence around that hospital." Lassiter said concern over an AIDS qua· rantine is reminiscent of the early days of cancer research and treatment There are a lot of unwarranted fears about AIDS, he said, and education aimed at the general public and the medical community, together with further research proving that AI OS cannot be transmitted casually will eventually prove that a quarantine is unnecessary. UT regentH are scheduled to meet agam in April to discusM tt • .:- hospital and vote whether to finalize clinical affiliations with AMI. UT would not provide funding for the fadlity. but instead support it by working with a foundation to obtain refo<.(>arch grants. However, a medical direc· tor, chief of staff. consulting physicians and a house staff would be provided by UT need to be driving and will even pay the cost of the taxi if the patron has no money. Several of the club owners contacted said the $500 price of the other programs seemed excessive and feared the money raised would be used against the club busi­ness through lobbying. However, Charles Armstrong, general manager of Heaven, J. R. 's and the Mont· rose Mining Company, said he is pleased with the MAOD taxi program. "My sole purpose is the safety of my club patrons," Armstrong said. "I joined the service in October with the holiday season approaching because I knew there would be a lot of people celebrating. I was con· cerned for their safety,'' he added. He said he has no complaints with the program. "It has certainly worked very well for me," he said. $2.49 ~ Coffee Shop Charlie's Early Bird Breakfast Special 2om to 10om (through Feb28) 2 Eggs any style Bacon or Sausage Hosh Browns or Grits Toast or Biscuits Coffee or Teo 1102 Westhelmer 522·3332 BETTER LAWns & QARDEns Total lawn maintenance 1nclud1nq mowmq edgmq tnmmmg, prunmq, Jertilizmq . sprcl1.pnq firewood ~. Bed ffiulchinq {'(f, AZdled Feeding .~;·~:li~ Oebru Removul .. )..(~;.._"r Complete T rec Service Stumps Removed Totcll fencmq Services (Cedar . notched Picket. Treclted. etc .) Complele Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN ~~ ___..:-· .. •see the stars ...... Coming $oon "Return of the Jedi" 2016 MONTROSE Houston. Texas 77006 529-5544 Hair Associates Is Proud to Present Houston's First Annual Hair Fashions Expo o First Time Ever Open To the Public o See the Newest Styles for Spring & Summer '86 o See the Latest Styles Created Before Your Very Eyes The Top 10 Professional Salons in Houston Will Present the Newest Technique and Looks in Color, Style and Make Up Designed Specifically for the Houston Fashion Market. Exhibits by Many of the "Professional" Product Manufacturers See and Compare Skin Care. Tanning, Nails and Fashion Accessories Will All Be Represented Adams Mark Hotel Exhibition Center Sunday, March 2, 1986 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Come & EnJOy A Fun Filled Day Bring The Entire Family General Admission 3. 50 per person Flllhlon Show Area Entry 10 00 Includes General AarussJOn • per person For Ticket Information Call 777-7567 FEBRUARY 21. 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Stein & Toklas DE TE CTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Tok.las as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Tok.las. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores. or use this coupon to order by mail Here is $7.so for Murd;; is Murd;;. is Murd-;r. by s.,;;-uel Stew;-d. name _ _____ _ __ address ________ _ city state ·P------ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St Boston. MA 02118 " ... In the heart ot The City" $44 00 • COMPUMEHTARY CHAMPAGNE• WIWE · FRH AIRPORT SHllTTU • • COMPLIMENTARY COHTINEHTAI. IREAICFAST (large single/double occupancy) • VALET SERVICE • Spec la I Weekly and Monthly .Rates Rcisarvations required ::>I..:. .;ise c a1 loll F1ee 800-253·5263 (Na1..:inol) 800·521·4523 ((;0;1f) (415)-441·514< (Son f'JO' •SCOl 1315 POLK SL, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 8 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21. 1986 The ffiontrose Uoice announces a new Public Affairs Column '~sk Cil1:J Hall'' B-q Houston Ci.t-q Councilman (ieorqe Cireanias Ever hdd d problem with Cit4 Hdll? An4 cil4 service? Perhdps 4ou're just curious dbout some dspect of ourcit4 government or the services it is required to perform for its citizens (streets. police, gdrbdge, hedlth. utilit4 reguldtion. or even the zoo). Councilmdn Grednids will dnswer 4our questions. dddress 4our concerns or help lJOU get dround Cit4 Hdll "red tdpe" Write "Ask Cil'I Hall," c/o ffiontrose Uoice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX '27006 (ljour question will be answered in the ffiontrose Uoice. Confidenlialit\j can be maintained if desired. On personal issues, Councilman Greanias will provide a personal answer.) Startinq in march in the newspaper of ffiontrose S~. Pa~rick's Day March 17 ~ And there's going to be Party in the Pages of the Montrose Voice Call now and reserve your space for St. Patrick's Day. And be a part of the party in the pages of the March 14th Montrose Voice FEBRUARY 21 . 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 Gay Club Owners Hold Emergency Meeting Inhalants in the Bars By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Speaking to a large group called to an emergency meeting of the Houston Organ­ization of Bar Owners, Capt. Michael Har­rie of the Harris County Precinct Six Constable's office and a member of the Governor's Task Force on Inhalant AbuR!', addressed the question of the legal· ity of selling and using inhalants. The meeting, held Wednel'day, was called at the request of Charles Arm· strong, general manager of Heaven, J .R. 's and the Montro1>1e Mining Company. Armstrong explained to the group that undercover agents and undercover junve­nilE" 8 had viRited several clubs last week to et1tablish whether or not the clubs were complying with the law concerning inhal· ants which are sold at many of the clubs. The undercover agents represented the Harris County Precinct Six Constable's offic<• and the task force. Compliance with the state law passed by the 69th lf>gislative seRsion concerning inhalants meant meeting certain guide­lines. However, the law passed by the 68th session stated it was illegal to sell certain products to juveniles. Although the agents found no evidence of sales to juveniles, one customer was cited for "pos~eRsion of a volital substanC<' with the intent to inhale." Harris pointed out that the law had lx-en on the hooks for six years and could not explain why the club owners had not heard of the restrictions before 'Wednes· day. He did, however, say that the laws had been reviRed but the basic illegality of the use of inhalants and restricted sales had not changed. Because his office is responsible for see­ing that these laws are enforced, he said they came to Heaven for no other reason than to see that the club was operating in compliance with the law and the city ordi· nance. The confusion with the law stems from the lt'gality of selling volital substances, which includes more than 20 chemicals, and the violation of inhaling or injeRting the subetancl'&. "It is legal, " he said. "to sell the sub­stances." Howf'ver he pointed out certain MCCR Holding Spiritual Renewal This Weekend From a Press Release The Rev. James Brock of Joy Metropolitan Community Church, Orlando, Fla., will continue the first Spiritual Renewal of 1986 at the Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection tonight at 7:15 p.m. R<>v. Brock, who was ordained a Baptist minister at the age of 18, will speak on "Acceptance." He will speak at the 10:45 a.m. Sunday service on "Affirmation," and on "Action" at 7:15 p.m. Sunday. Rev. Elder John Gill of MCCR has termed the spiritual renewal a "special blessing" to all who attend. A program of special music and a pot luck dinner will be held on Saturday in the church's fellowship hall at 7:30 p.m. Rev. Gill invites all members of the com­munity to share in the services. "We need time for worship, and time to remember the positive, reinforcing love God gives all of us," he eaid For more information about the Spirit­ual Renewal, call the church office at861 - 9149. MCCR IB located at 1919 Decatur restrictions and qualifications which must be met. According to the law, it is illegal to sell inhalants to juveniles ages 17 and under. Secondly, the law requires proper signage at the point of sale including that juve­niles cannot buy the products. The third point is that the substances must be con· tained in counter with lock and key and must he sold by only qualified persons. He emphasized that using these volital substances in a public place is illegal. "We are requesting your assistance," he told the group. "We are not trying to tell you how to run your club." The penalty for violating the law is 180 days in county jail and lor $1000 fine. When one member of the group asked how the club owners were to enforce the law, Harris asked the members what they would do if someone in their bar was smok· ing a marijuana cigarette. The consensus wnR t.-0 ask them to leave. He likened the situation to any i1legal substance found on a customer in a club. Harris said the intent of his office is to stop inhalant abuse in Texas. He pointed out that 11 people died last year as a result of chemical inhalants. Although the greatest concern of the inhaling or injei;ting of volital sub.stances lies with youngsters, Harris related the posAihihtieR of heart problems or even a heart attack resulting from the use oftht' substances. Citing some background on the use of chemical inhalants, he said that Houston has only had the problem for about 10 years while San Antonio has had the prob­lem for 20 years. When emphasizing the problems with ~uveniles buying the products, HOBO pres· 1dent Alan Pierce pointed out that clubs in the area do not allow juveniles in the clubR. Evt'ryone must produce proper iden· tification before entering. A club owner from Austin commented ~n Ja!Iemorinm MAY VOLENTINE TALK May Volentine Talk. 101 died Feb. 14. 1986 in DeWitt County She was the mother of Montrose real est­ate owner Arthur Talk. A funeral was held Sunday. Feb. 16. al St Anne's Catholic Church, Nordheim, Texas Burial was on the Talk Ranch. RONALD A. DENNIS February 2. 1986 JAMES MANNING WELLS James Manning Wells. attorney. died Feb 18. 1986 Survivors include three brothers, H.B Wells of Conroe, W H. Wells and E.M Wells, both of Normangee, Texas A funeral was held Thursday, Feb_ 20 at Heights Funeral Chapel. Interment was m Madisonville City Cemetery, Madisonville. Texas "Thank you, Jim, for helping me grow up Thank you for being there when no one else was_ I'll remember and miss the fun and the laughter. as well as the debates and the tears"- -Jim's friend. Ray Hill UNCLE JIM Uncle Jim. clean-up man at several Mont­rose gay clubs in the 1970s and connoisseur of red wine, dted recently at his mother's home m Alabama Ou~ POL.CY T..,. .. M01'1UOM vo.ee ""'''' com~ormte ttiv pns1ng ol Mom"CM ._.dents end HDultol'l gmy- COnvnuNtr "'emben wllh an ~emem_ that he did not like to sell the products but due to competition and demand he did sell them. Severa} members of the group pointed out that the responsibility should not be as much with the retailers as it should be with the manufacturers. Harris recommended that the bar owners spend some time with their lobby· ist and government representatives to have the laws changed if that is what they wanted. He reassured the group that his task force was at the bars for no other reason than to see if the barswerecomplyingv.rith the laws. He said they are not a part of the Houston Police Department nor the Texas 0 0 0 THE 0 0 LISTKEEPERS 0 0 522-2268 0 0 LET US KEEP YOUR LISTS: 0 0 0 0 . 0 0 *Business *Invitations 0 *Family *Christmas 0 *Friends *Direct Mail 0 O *Wine *Cassettes 0 o *Albums • Video Tapes o 0 0 0 ADDRESS LABELS OUR 0 0 SPECIAL TY! (Average coat: 10001" stick 0 on labels S 140.00 plus tax) 0 0 0 Alcohol and Beverage Commission, nor any other law enforcement agency. In addition, Harris offered the services of his office to help the club owners in any way he could including talking with their staffs about the problem. "If there is any­thing that we can do, feel free to call my office." he told the group. One of the points that Armstrong and Harris made was that they all need to work together on this issue. Harris had earlier told the group his office had quite an extensive IU;tof places to visit last week but with the recommendation from Arm· strong to speak to the club owners he post­poned the bigger effort. -a--.- ------- TOMMY'S BARBSR SHOP 2154 Portsmouth 528-8216 Haircuts- $10 House Calls- $15 & up $3 off with this coupon I_ - - - - - - - - - - - Softball Players Wanted: competitive softball players to fill positions on the 1986 Montrose Voice softball team Our first practice is this Sunday Call Jerry, 523-0413, Friday or Saturday 10 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21. 1986 New 'La Cage Aux Foiles' Thin But Enjoyable By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic Those crazy queens Renato and Albin are back in a new La Cage Aux Foiles romp, and they are a welcome sight indeed. The plot is thin and repetitive of the past fea­tu~, but it's still a gay ol' time at the movtes. Sad to say, our other two films for this week are howling dogs. Goldie Hawn's Wildcats is a terrible football movie with a severe feminist twist. The other one is Quicluiluer. a boring film for those who like to watch bicycle wheels spin. Kevin Bacon stars as a stock market whiz who becomee a bicycle messenger when he loses his hard·earned fortune. Need I say more? o La Cage Aux Folles III-The Wedding Renato and Albin have become the cine­ma'a most celebrated gay couple. Their first La Cage movie was one of the most popular foreign films in U.S. history, and received three Academy Award nomina· tions. La Cage II was also an American and international hit, although it was not as artistically put together. Now we have a third installment featur· ing the further adventures of the screetch­ing transvestite and his patiently calm lover. Actually, La Cage Ill sort of re­works the situations of the other film.8 into a thin new plot. We laugh at situations these two queens get themselves into, if only because they are familiar and fun. This time, Albin (Michel Serrault) finds out that his aunt in England has left him a huge eetate and inheritance. There's only one small hitch: Albin must marry and have a child in 18 months or the whole works go to his cousin. Naturally, the poor man is thrown into a complete state of shock at the thought of marriage. The rest of the film is an attempt to get poor, effeminant Albin (or Zaza, as he is called at the club) to find an appropriate wife. Of course, this is the chance for him to try to act straight and dress more nor­mal than usual. Renato also tries to help by acting like he's turned "straight," but this only throws Albin into a tizzy. The movie sort of moves along on it.a own momentum, held aloft by the comic genius of Michel Serra ult and his outrage­ous coatumes and facial expressions. One episode involving a "Queen Bee" produc­tion number is well worth the price of admission. Another episode involving makeup at an airport baggage check is also priceless. The main problem with La Cage Ill is that, like any sequel, it breeds familiarity. We laugh at Albin and his antics because he's funny, but also because he did similar things in other films that were funny also. However, unlike the first two films, the story here is often too uneven and choppy to sustain the unique comedy style. Five writers worked on the script. and it's definitely a c88e of too many cooks apoiling the broth. It's like one writer said "Let's have the guys do this," and then another writer said ... Wouldn't it be great to have them do something like in the last movie?" Unfortunately, everyone must have submitt.Pd their ideas separately and then they pieced together a script. La Cage III is a must see for fans of Renato and Albin, but it's not nearly as memorable as the other two. Benny Luke ill still adorable as the black maid, and Michel-Galabru is still manic as the public morals chief. All the characters are great and do their best to make us laugh. In the end, we pretty well get what we expected with La Cage III-light enter· tainment about gays which hardly has anything to offend even the most prudish viewer. It's amazing that a subtitled film about two middle-aged gay lovers ever became so popular. It's even more amaz· ing that after three films, Renato and Albin are still endearing, and still very faithful to each other We should be so lucky. Faced with the prospect of gaining a fortune provided he marries and fathers a child within 18 months, Albin (Michel Serrault) devises a surprising solution with the help of Renato (Ugo Tognazzi) in "La Cage Aux Foiles 3" Goldie Hawn m "Wildcata"-a dog of a mouie o Wildcats I'm sorry, but this week I really have to dig into Goldie Hawn for her terrible new film Wildcat•. The movie is a weak excuse for Goldie's production company to make a redundant feminist statement, and it's a pitiful effort at beat. We know from scene one that all the men in this film are going to be buffoons and infringe on Goldie's womanly rights. She will have to stand up to these men in order to become what she wants t ..... be-a foot· ball coach. No one is going to stop her, even if she beco_mee the butt of a joke for her efforts. (It JUSt makee her character more pathetic.) Are we supposed to cheer for Goldie's character Molly as she takes on an almost totally black, inner-city team with one win their previous year (a forfeit)? Should we laugh at her valiant attempts to whip a bunch ofloud·mouthed high schoolers (all who look over 25) into a decent team? Actually, you begin to get sort of irritated at this predictable concoction that is unfunny and headed toward the usual "showdown game" ending. I realize that women have often been given the short end of the stick in films, but it is ridiculous and pointless to tum around and make all the men in a film stupid imbeciles. Molly's husband (James Keach) is a nerd who wants to get custody of the kids, but resort.a to low mf'ans to get them from her. There is also Molly's law­yer, a dimwit who promises that they won't be taken away, and then loses the case in court. A grouchy coach from her old school (where ohe taught gfrls track) tries his best to make her look foolish . He becomes the villain of the film, although Molly man ages to show him up later in the movie. First she humiliates him on the racquet. ball court, and later she beats him in the big game (oops, I guess I gave away the surprise ending.) The meat of the film should lie with the guys on the football team, but we really don't get to know any of them very well. We recognize them best by their obvious traits-fat, loud mr}uth, stupid, or other "undesirable" features. I guess we have to believe thai Molly loves these guys so much he"ause it's a challenge to woman· hood and the spirit of the game of football. Special note must be made of Swoosie Kurtz (as Molly's friend) and Nipsey Rus­sell as the school 1>rincipal. Both add a touch of class ti,,, 1s badly needed m th11 film. As for Goldie, she is cute as alwavs but basically she is repeating herselr°in the role. This was a weak vehide to use for her soap ~x ff'minism, and her fans may treat this hke her last few effort.a f Protorol Films and Swinl( Shift/. Not that she should b. a dizzy blond(• again. but a woman who is modf'rn without being a tum-off would be much more appealing. Director Michael Ritchie (Bad News Bt·ars)is also way below par this time around. He knows how to direct sports filmR {Etee Downhill Racer and Semi Tough). but this effort seems to have too much Goldie dabbling in it. Where ever the problem lies, Wildcats is a flat disappoint· ment and should be avoided. I Keum Baron only spins his whttls in ''Quicksilver'' o Quicksilver This is one oft.hose films that I would have walked out of if I hadn't been reviewing it. This is the year's first big turkey, and it's a major gobbler for Columbia Pictures. The film's only tiny, redeeming aspect is Kevin Bacon as Jack Casey. With a fakey mustache and business-like glasses, J eek is a sure-fire stock market genius who has done rather well. That is, until he blows all his millions (including his parents' sav­ings) on a risky venture. Throwing in the towel (and the must­ache end glasses), Jeck becomes a bicycle delivery boy. Yes folks, it's riches to rags just 80 Jack can prove that he can survive out in the world and be responsible again. Again and again we see feeblereminiscen· ces of Flashdance and Footloose as he "rebuilds his life and allows himself to care for others (according to my press material). Although Jack is broke, he manages to keep his huge, open spaceapartment(sim· 1lar to the one in Flashdance), which gives him the chance to ride his bike indoors to pop music. Jt's pretty boring to watch him 10-speed around the room, especially with his uppity girlfriend doing ballet twirls around him. Talk about art! The hairsbreadth of a plot is so merci­lessly slow that we snap to attention at silly little things like a bicycle race or kids doing cute but dangerous bicycle tricks. We get awfully tired of hearing thewhizof bikes going down the street, and there is no greatrxhileration here liketherew88 in the other bike filJ1l Breakmg Aw~y. Even the nowhere romance is a tired one between Jack and another biker named Terri (Jamie Gertz}. In true adoles<'ent movie tradition, these two prowl and leer at each other through the whole film and then fall madly in love near the end. If it's possible, this movie is worse than Flashdance. There are no memorable tunes to hum, no nicely coordinated sequences, or evt>n pretty photography to entfre us. Only Kevin Bacon manages to keep himsE'lf above it all, giving a plea aantly appealing performance. It's just amazing that he would take on something so similar to his last film (Footloose) and not realize how inferior it is. Qufrksifot"r is one of thoAt" films thnt looks fast and nifty in the teltvision com mrrcinls, hut don't hf" fooled. FEBRUARY 21. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 11 .------------------------------. ~ ~ -- .... - - ---_ _, s10°0 : I off ! I CUP THIS AD and attach it to 1 I your next order for S 10.00 off 1 1 arrt of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing • Flyers Daily Specials 7am-2pm Mon., Thurs.-Sat.: Drinks DerJour by Jerry Tue., Wed.: Breakfast Tacos by Maria • Contracts •Menus •Resumes• Envelopes • Amouncements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet CoP.fing • Invoices Sat.-Sun., 25~ Draft, 2pm til? 3 Happy SPEEDY Hours Daily Mon.-Fri. After Hours Nightly -=. PAINTING SERVICE c::w: re-xAS Fast Reliable ~~. Excell<llt Qualrty. low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. C""""""'1t Souttw.st Locaoon D.J. Lary Thompson 528-8851 rn16COLL 0T ..-----C ·A· f · E- ___ AND CABAQET Kim Yvette, RichardAdkins, Mahli McGee and Liz Mendez Driscoll St. Happy Hour Strawberry Daiquiris $5 per lb. Cafe Driscoll (coffee drink) Well Drinks $1.25 Happy Hour Prices on All Drinks 4-Bpm Experience a Hand Reading with Susanna, Fri., Sat., & Sun. Brunch All New Lunch Menu, Daily Ltuwh Special $4.95 Early Bird Dinner Special 6-Spm '696 New Dynasty & Colby Dinner Club $10-Buffett & Complimentary Champagne-6:30pm-9pm Every Wed. & Thurs. (Call for Information) 1834 Westheimer 522-7020 12 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 21. 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson The Invaluable lizard setter. The heorlbfeok ol remoros. ''You know, Bjorg, there's something about holding a good, solid mace In your hand-you just look for on excuse to smash something." In God's den. "Louise! C'mon over here .... I think we got so~e bug spteodln' through the store." Fortunes Capricorn Shines in the Spotlight By Mark Orion For Friday. Feb 21. 1986. through Thur5day. Feb. 27. 1986 ARIES-That Midas touch of yours 1s working overtime. Everything and eve­ryone you touch turn to gold. Don't be greedy. Remember the story about the goose laying golden eggs TAURUS-Times have been a little tough financially, Don't panic. A little austerity goes a long way in clearing things up. Delay major purchases for the time being GEMINI-A case of mixing business with pleasure has you in a little mess. Try to subtly solve the problem by stepping back a little. Concentrate on gaining ser­enity on the domsetic front CANCER Although things are mov­ing along rather smoothly, don't allow fate to take total control over your life. Expend some time and energy correcting shortcomings in the workplace. Recog­nizing problems now and working on solutions help you avoid trouble down the road LEO You unintentionally offend someone close to you. An apology 1s in order It will be accepted but it may take a while before things get back to normal. In the future, watch out for sharp tongues VIRGO Concern over health matters seems to dominate your thoughts. You always take good care of yourself so don't let minorsniffles and coughs bother you too much. Maintain a good diet and exercise. It will probably do the trick LIBRA You are such a great manipu­lator You have that someone special wrapped right around you finger Enjoy your new relationship but don't push your luck Don't expect too much change too fast. SCORPIO You find yourself falling behind on a maier project. Arrange to postpone other activi ties until you catch up. You've gone too far not to complete the work Those around you will under­stand SAGITTARIUS-Now 1s time to make plans for at-home entertaining. You will want to make everything perfect so don't be overly amb1t1ous. Watch your budget Remember your friends like simpler affairs CAPRICORN-Get out your dancing shoes and get ready for a party. Now is the height of your social season and those around you expect you to shine Don't be shy The spotlight 1s on you AQUARIUS A confusing romantic s1tuat1on begins to clear up. Things begin to fall in place and you acquire a better understanding of the other pa•ty. Now is the time to concentrate on nurturing and growth PISCES You've been asked to advise a friend who is making a major decision. Stay clear The matter doesn't concern yo.u. .a.n d may result in a ruined friendship . In Monhose, Nearly E11eryoile Reads the Vot'e I I I I - I I I I I I- ,, I I ,, \ , \ , ,_. --HO-U-ST-O-N -- 14 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21. 1986 Weber and Rice Confuse Joseph! By Bill O'Rourke Montroae Vo•ce Th.eaUr Critic JoaqJh and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat cStageo, daytimes) celebrates the Bible •tary more than it actually tells it. It could rea1Jy confuse or mislead anyone who hasn't read the book Every once in a while the wonderful Rice/ Weber score turns ethnic for no other apparent reason than just for comic relief. Joeeph'1 brothera tell their father of their brother's "death" in a rousing countzy and western number complete with cow­boy hata and a cactus. Later they lament their inability to make it through the fam­ine in a charming little French cabaret number complete with berets and the Eif­fel Tower. All of this it good fun but queo­tionable 1tary telling. Joseph's reaction to Potiphar's wife raise. a worse problem, especiaBy since the producer is aiming this show primar­ily at children. l believe that in the origi­nal, Joseph is busy resisting her advances when Potiphar surprises them and mis­construes what he sees. In this staging by director Harry Silverstein, Jr., it is implied that he catches them en flagrante delicto. Well. a child past a certain age has almost indubitably seen that implied moreexplic- 1tly on television Our children, at least those with whom I attended this show, are more morally inclined than one sometimes fears. Joaeph wa.e thrown into jail and immediately launched inta a Iona; ballad saying a true believer ia never alone. He always has God at hia 1ide. The kids weren't buying a bit of iL Their tiny 1huffling feet and noisy cougha seemed to ehout, t•Repent, einner, before ye buddy-up with God." Montrose Live The character of Joaeph was another problem all the way through the piece. He it.arts out insufferably conceited. One can 1ympathize with his brothers when they get rid of him. Through all his trials and tribulations, all his fear and sorrow, he acquires a little charm but not really any humility. Again, this flaw wa.e in the writ­ing u much u or more than in the perfor­mance by Jeffrey Gimble. Jeff Baldwin (left) as Reuben and Sam Whiting as Levi in Stages production of "Joseph and the Amazing Technioolor Dreamooat" The production values are quite high. The mullic is excellent Those of you inter­eeted in seeing Rice and Weber'• firat big hit Ctttainly won't be ditappointed. Do me a favor, though. Don't take any child under 8 fat leut)toeeethia, and make sure any older child you take hao been tald the 1tary first. o Notes Daniel Mal'CWI is doing an absolutely mar­velous iob 88 Nicely-Nicely in TUTS mounting of Guya and Dolu! He had ta 1tep in on very short notice when Jack Harrold bowed out due ta artistic differen­c: eo. Jim Harwood huhad ta go into the hos­pital. Hi. role, Arvide, it being covered by Iggie Wolfingtan, who 1ang "Shipoopi!" in the original Broadway cast of The Mu.aicMa.n. Only a ban on reviewing shows in which I perform restraina me from telling you more about thia etunning, must-see pro­duction .• . . The Alley'• fint--ever tour of Texas beg­m1 thit evening They're taking The Mua Firecracker ConUat to the hinterlands to help celebrate the Sesquicentennial ..• NYC ie catchinc up with Houston, again. For their production of Big River, a dentist provided a number of actors with dental inaerta to help change their appear­ance.. One geta buck teeth, one get.a a hare lip, etc. Locally, Dr. Ben Peanon h88 often given Paul Polk the88me kind of help. Jn fact, in Balm in Gilead, you can see Paul with a a;old taoth ...• The star• veraion of TM Kin of the Spl<kr Woman hu been a real hit in Lon­don. Now there'o talk that William Hurt and Raul Julia might reprise their movie rolee on 1tage on B'way Anne Bancroft will atar in the movie venion of 84 Cltar1ng Croas Road. Remember that good Chocolate Bayou production a few seuons back? I sure hope they get enough money ta start build­ing their new theater soon! ... The M uaeum of Fine Arte ia showing off the art worlu purchased over the past five ye&nJ by The Muaeum Collectors, a sup­port group founded in 1980. Thit exhibi­tion will cloee March 30 .• , The Society for the Performing Arts is celebrating its 20th year. Right now. they're looking for a poster representing their more than 500 performances by widely varied musicians and dancers. Get your design and your entry fee in by March 17 and you might win the $500 pur chase prize. Info: David Wayne, 227-1111. Houatan Community College will be offering a two-day workshop on "How to Write and Sell Your Screenplay," March I and 2. Hollywood staff producer and stary editor Michael Hauge wiB be the instruc-tor. The enrollment deadline is Feb. 25 ... . The Houston Festiva1 is looking for volunteers to assist behind the scenes with either their regular stages (521-0993) or with New Music America (521-9036). April 3-13 . ... Auditions: IMPACT (a black repertory theater) ia auditioning actors and actresses for its upcoming season March 1. You need a two-minute monologue. Also, Stanze Peterson Dance/ Theater will hold auditions that day for its scholar· ship and profeuional trainee programs. Info on all th .. e aude: 741-7534 ... . Celebrate! "Where I'll find a fwend,/ don't you know, a charmin' cweature,/ like a Gweek god and devoted: how delicious!"-W.H. Auden (21). Thia week'• birthdays include a gay pope-Paul II (23); a gay king-Ferdinand ofBulgaria (26); and one of the beat writers of gay plays for gay audienrea-Doric Wil son (24), Alao, Felice Picano (22) and Bar- 1411 'rAF'T', 522-2 19() FEBRUARY SPECIAlS * 011 Change $1995 * A/C Check a Charge $1995 * Check Cooling System $2J95 ~1! ~~ J~!s~:!o~~u~~~~ Do:-.-'T. 'EOLEC'T BETSY! GENERAL REPAIR AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION ELECTRONIC TUNEUP AIR CONDITIONING bara (Sapplw Was a Right.On Woman) Love (27). "We were very tired, and were very merry-/ We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry."-Edna St. Vincent Millay(22). Enjoy! o Openings Chapter Two (Channing PJayers, Fannin at South more, 21 )-a romantic comedy by Neil Simon. Hello, Dolly! (HSPVA, 21)-The musical matchmaker Bear Repair, Care and Construction (Children'• Museum, 10-4, 22)­Demonstrationa and Q&As by Suzy Ste­wart and Jo Anna Meredith, creators of the Mereart bears. ONO! Alice Becomes Electric (Children's Mu•eum. 1:00, 22)-onginal musical by Once Upon a Time Productions. ON01 Remington Place Apartments •• special ** 1 Month Free Rent 1 Bedrooms $265 & up $100 Deposit 2 Bedrooms $290 & up $150 Deposit 4 Pools, Hardwood Floors, Distinctive Floor Plans, Convenient Location Call Teresa or Pam 965-0589 2210 Mid Lane (Inside 610 Loop, near Galleria) Neighborhood Womynspace Grows as New Goals are Attained By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Last year the idea of a guesthouse for women developed into a meeting place, a monthly calendar and a house for women's gatherings. "We started thinking about a guest­house and restaurant. Anita (Davidson), Lynda (Jones) and I expressed an interest in having a place for women to go," said Margo Shelton, a member of the Collective of Womynspece. Womynspace, a non-profit organization designed for and about women, continues to grow since the initial meeting in Febru­ary last year. The leadership of the organi­zation is called the Collective. From the initial conception, Womyn­space developed a list of priorities. "We wanted a healing, gathering space for women to provide a forum for all ot llS to come together to educate ourselves about various subjects," Shelton said. "We also wanted a place where women artists would share their talents with other women including art exhibits, story· telling and singing," she continued. Through their efforts they developed an intensive monthly calendar of events for women. "Anita is in charge of the calendar," Shelton explained. "I twas first a newsletter than a weekly calendar from the Unitarian Church, compiling all events and networking," Davidson added. In addition to the birth of the monthly calendar in May, 1985,the Collective held its first fundraiser in May. Since then Womynspace has SPonsored several fun· draisers including dances and the Sunday coffeehouse buffet. Womynspace now has a permanenL facility at 2033 Norfolk where women's groups can gather for seminars, classes and special events. Such groups include a women's only Alcoholics Anonymous group, a supJ>Ort group for incest and child molestation survivors, Al-Anon, an eating disorders support group and Tai Chi classes. Avondale Association to Plant Trees Prom a PreBB Release This Sunday, Feb. 22, the Avondale Asso­ciation will plant a dozen large trees in the Avondale area. The 12 trees are crepe myr· ties, magnolias, and live oaks between 12 and 18 feet tall. They are the association's seMquicentennial gift. to the neighborhood and will be decorated with red, white and blue ribbons appropriate to the sesquicen· tennial spirit. The trees are being planted in selected locations to replace large tree,; lost to Hur­ricane Alicia or the past harsh winters. The association serves the neighbor· hood bounded by Bagby. Westheimer, Montroee, and Tuam. The association hopeK the planting of the tress will become an annual event as an example of the com mittment and dedication that Montrose residents have to the preservation and beautification of their neighborhood. The tree planting will begin at 10:00 a.m . at the home of Marie Crider, 2916 Helena. Crider, who is in her mid· seventiee, is a lifelong resident of the Montrose area. For more information concerning the tret" planting or the Avondale Association, <all Sharon Hope Weintraub at 863-2479 or Stan Strei• at fi22-l 683. Last year Heidi McMunn conducted an auto mechanics seminar for women and plans to hold another this year. Womynspace also raises money through the sale of advertising in the monthly calendar as well as renting the rooms in the house to groups for meetings and seminars. In March, Womynspace is bringing "Musical Femina," a musical presenta· tion featuring Kristan Aspen, flute, and Janna MacAuslan, classical guitar. According to Shelton, the space pro­vided by the organization is "chemical free." Alcohol, drugs and smoking are prohibited at the house as well at the den· ces. Reflecting on the year's efforts, Shelton said, "Each of us brought our dreams along with a survey from other women so they can also realize their dreams." While Womynspace is currently oper· ated by consensusofthenine-memberCol· lective, each expressed an interest to hold open meetings to include the 86 members. Davidson describe Womynspace as a "safe, empowering place" .for women to come together. "Though validation here, we feel more comfortable when we go out in the world again," she explained. Another Collective member added, ''We come to Womynspace to renew ourselves, a resting place. We don't fight, although we do have our disagreements at times. We certainly have a strengthening here." The organization encourages other women to join and volunteer their time toward the necessary work to be done. "It is not only an alternative to the bars, it's also educational. It provides for a jel­ling of the women's community, and this space for us is growing," Shelton added. The Collective is planning more activi· ties for this year. They would like to organ· ize such events as camping, bicycling, and trips. Other goals of the group include some remodeling to the house so that it is handi­capped accessible and meets the fire codes so that the second story can be used for meeting rooms, art exhibits, or even, possi­bly, a women's bookstore. Womynspace welcomes calendar list· ings from any women's organizations, groups or seminars. To place a listing write Womynspace Editor, 413 Archer, Houston 77009. For information about the organization, contact Margo Shelton at 869-6510. Switchboard Announces Training Sessions From a Press Release The Gay and Lesbian Switchboard of Houston (GI.SH) will hold a training ses· sion for new volunteers the first two w~ kends in March. The time and date of the training ses· sions, which begin Friday, February 28 from 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. will be from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sun· day, March I and 2 and the following Sat­urday and Sunday, March 8 and 9. GLSH provides extensive training and information for volunteers who wish to work with the switchboard. Volunteers must make a firm committment for the two weekends as well as three hours per week staffing the telephones Those interested in the training session should <all the swit<hboard at 529-3211 between 4:00 p.m. and 12:00 midnight. FEBRUARY 21. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Watch for Big Surprise Coming for You 608 WESTHEIMER Across from Jim's Gym 528-5953 Sunday, Feb. 23rd with The Illusions of Kandi Love, Koffie, Jerry Harper, Tina Rene Special Guest Lola Flame Show Starts 10pm Mon.-Tues.: Happy Hour Well Drinks $1.25 Thurs.: Buddy Night Fri.: Dance until 2am Sat.: Beer Bust 3pm til 2am. Dance until 2am Sun.: Beer Bust 12 noon-10pm SHOW STARTS 10pm 50¢ Draft Beer All the Time $3 Cover Wednesday-Sunday 16 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21. 1986 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Getting to Know You By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D Newa America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice The goal of a personality quiz is to bring a ray of self-insight to readers of this column. But no matter how well-written and researched our topic is. your score won't really get to the truth of who you are unlea the test ia accurately answered.. Before reading the explanation, answer each item ahead true or fal.se honestly and ob1ectiuely. They are statements concern­ing perBOnal attitudes and habits of behavior and their goal is to help you toward better self-understanding. Don't dwell too long on any one state­ment. but give the first answer that aprings to mind, then read on for explana­tions. --1. I would never deliberately hurt some­one's feelings. -2. At times, I have been envious of someone's good furtune. -3. If I'm ignorant about something, I would admit it. A. Sometimes I've tried to get even with .;;. ______________ _ someone instead of turning the other cheek. --5. I can clearly recall times when I took advantage of someone. -6. If I could sneak into a movie without being caught. I probably would do it. _7. My table manners at home are about the same 88 when I eat at a restaurant ---8. I've never intensely disliked some-one. _j}_ I treat all people with courtesy even if they are obnoxious, JO. There have been times when I insisted on winning my point. o Explanation Our quiz measures a human tendency to present ourselves to others 88 attractive, adequate and wholesome. The introduc­tion to the quiz isn'tspecific about its goal Reason-had we clued you in to our topic, it very likely would have biased your responses. Self-report tests like this one, which rely upon self.insight, ask that one look back in his / her life to answer each statement. They always run the risk that the answers might be distorted through faulty memory, distorted recall or just plain fudg­ing. "Faking good," intentionally or unwittingly, is the goal of some test tak­ers. But answers slanted in the direction of social desirability can seriously distort a test's validity. Since personality tests began, over 75 years ago, this problem has plagued test experts. By around 1950, largely through the efforts of Dr. Allen F. Edwards of the University of Washington, more sophisti­cated tests containing distortion scores have been devised to spot those who indulge in exce8sive self-flattery. Such scores are based on probabilities. This means that chances are highly improbable that all items (like those here) would be answered true by any one person . Take item 9, for example. It would be a rare individual who treated everyone with courtesy no matter how revolting or obnoxious that person might be. o Scoring Key. 1-T;2·F;3·T 4-F;S.F;6-F; 7-T;S.T;9·T; 10-F. Give yourself one point for each.correct answer. Consider scores of three to seven average. The higher you socre, the more you tend to preRent your8elf (on tests, at le8.HO as socially desirable. Do you seek the approval of others too much? Scoree of less that five depict a person who wants to be seen as different and non· conforming, or (at an extreme, if your score is one or two) as being a social rebel. Either high or low socres on the quiz are undesirable and indicate that you could use more self·insight into how you come across to others. UNBELIEVABLE Own Your Own Condol -0- Down -0- Closing Costs -0- Mortgage Payment for 3D days -0- Association Dues First 12 months Excellent Security Swimming Pools Secured Parking Laundry Facilities 11l0% Home Ownership 24 hr. Approval Payments as low as '1Hl/month P&I Reduced to $200 MEMORIAL PLACE 915 Siiber 681-3600 FIRE FOX Chimney Rock at Blssonnet 664-9036 A Full Service Contractor .I •Roofing (All Types) •Remodeling •Sheetrock/Painting •Plumbing/Electrical •Foundations Repaired •Tree & Trash Removal • Insulation •Water Proofing •Tile/Masonry •Carpet •Cabinets •Decks/Hot Tubs • Room Additions •Concrete •Fully Insured •References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Dlgll•I P•ger 891-4053 --------. .--- - FEBRUARY 21, 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 17 Sports Voice - o MSA Holds Chili Cookoff Nick ERcobt>do, director of the Montrose Sport.a Association, spoons up some chili at the organization's chili cookoff held last Sunday at E1Js (Connie Woods photo) Powers Defeats Bearden in Houtex Tennis Action Pat Powers avenged a recent loss to Steve Bearden and moved into the No. 4 position on the top ten ladder of the Houtex Tennis Club last Sunday. Powers defeated Bearden 7-5, 4-6, 6-4. This is Powers' high­est ranking since joining the challinge ladder. In other matches, Eugene Brown defended against Thomas Cortez 6-0, 6-0. Eddie Chavez surprised Tiny Tim 7-6, 4-6, 6-0 to win the No. 8 position on the top ten ladder. In another three set match, Rick Massey defeated Bill Santaiti 7-5, 6-7, 6-1. Randy Miller defeated Gabe Herpin 6-2, 6-1. Houtex Tennis meets on Sundays from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Homer Ford Tennis Center. Upcoming activities include a Spring Singles Tennis Tournament and the annual Texas Cup competition with the Oak Lawn Tennis Club of Dallas in June. For more information, call David at 926-7171. Ranch Hands Move Up in Pool League Play The Ranch Hands downed Division A leaders, Four 611, to move within one match of the top spot in that division after the 11th week of play in the MSA Billiards League. Bacchus I remained in third place by defeating rivals Marion & Lynn's. The Barn won a close match over Kindred Spirits J, retaining their lead in Division B. 611 Ill came in second place, followed by the Galleon in third. America's Last Frontier Westheimer Flea Market 1733 & 1735 Westheimer Antiques-Furniture­Accents One Huge Garage Sale Buy Some/ Sell Some Turn Your Storage Room into Cash Space Now Available in Two Buildings From $20/wk. Open 7 Days 'Iii 6pm See John or Ed 520-0013 or 528-9145 Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily Coming in February and March ''Scuzz lz A'z Scuzz Duzz'' . .. naturally D.J. Lary Thompson 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 at Mary's, It Ain, Hard Trashing Trash!! Ripcord D.J David Oleson 715 FaiNiew 521-2792 18 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21 . 1986 We Cover the \llorld of Monlrose! The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS EX-2306 MEMBERS Call 529-8091 LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice, a general c1rculatt0n newspaper havrng pubhshed contmu- ~~6!rp:~~a1~~t~~o~p,:~;~gq~~~f~'!~~ paper's ctrculat1on area of Montrose CARS & BIKES 86. BMW 325. Red. $318 per month. Lee 975-1985 '86 Honda Accoard Xu. $228 per month Lee 975-1985 ·83 Volvo 240. $8295. Lee 975-1985 ·a4 Olds Cutlass. 20K miles. $7895 Lee 975-1985 "84 Chrysler Lazer, 16K miles. $7250- Lee 975-1985 84 Cutlass Cierra. $7495. Lee 97&-1985 FAMILY MOTORS 5210 Bullalo Speedway. 667-6804 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE RENTER'S POWER S~OO'mo for a :R>r. largf' secure. duplex 2 blocks from TSU. Hardwood floors 937· 1889 Male to share latge homew1th w-d. cabt8. den. l1tepJace etc $285 plus 14 uhht18!l 880-0538 Roommate lor 2 plus 2 apartment High­way 6 at Beechnut Washer/dryer Included $175 plus 1-'2 ut1ht1es Male or female 561-5665 East Woods across 1-45 from U of H Completely remodeled 2-1. downstairs 1n 1r1ple1C Lots ol windows. new appliances. carpet. quiet neighborhood Five minutes 10 downtown or U of H. $350/mo. plus ~2Q~~~r:(~i1~hs~~a~~~1~::n ~~·~~~:s)1 II interested call 523-7261 after Spm Mon -Fri. or on weekends Luxury Condominiums Now Leasing with option to purchase. Great location Large beautiful swimming pool & Jacuzzi. Controlled entry security. Remote controlled garage entry. High efficiency AC & heating. Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($150 deposit) Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 deposit). 2507 Montrose Boulevard Cati for appointment 524-0830 Reduced $20.000. Now only $79.000. 211. ~~~-0:1~1-~e~~B~t;6~g~~e~~~1arge Hardship sale. will n~ot1ate -8(,gm $69.000. lease purchase considered 1800 square feet. 4 bedroom. 2 bath. double ~~~~R: ~~ie e:~~no;p~~:er;:\c~~~~- Southwest Houston 723-8368 Milture, responslbi8, ·GwM to share 2 bedroom home. CA/H, cable. w1d $190 plus~ electricity 4~1086. Evenings or leave message Montrose/Heights Several apts avait8- ble. 1 & 2 bedroom. covered parking $250-$425 Midtown Property Service 868-1129 :-Special"' Montrosel-Greai"way Plaza $100 of! rent. low deposit. beautiful small garden comple1t. balcony. patio. disposal. dishwasher Must see to appreciate 524~ 0492 :S-pec1al"" $100. oll renl. Montrose. low deposit. bus line. pool. well maintained Must see to appreciate. 524-935t - MONTROSE APT .1POOL s~~~,~~:1}"r~~~!u~~~~o;nw~~re~.~~~~ ming pool for summer Central A/C. GE appliances. m1n1-bhnds and more. 1BA at $315, 2BA at $375 plus security deposit & electric 306 St,.tlord •I T•lt Discount on 1yr.L••• 523-6109. 1920 WEST ALABAMA APTS. 1920 w Alabama. 529-6798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GREENWAY PLACE APTS 3333 Cummins Lane. 623-2034 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Small quiet Monlrose comple>e New paint, new double door ice bo1tes $100 deposit 1 bdrm S285pluselec Also avail· able 2 bdrm. 529-8178 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED POLITICAL PAC promoting gay and I b1an c1v1 rights and AIDS funding seeks applicants for three new pos1t1ons--leg1slat1vedsrec­tor. development director and field organ­izer Send resume. wntmg sample and salary requirements by 3115186 to Human Rights Campaign Fund. PO Bo1t 1396 Washington, DC 20013. Women and r:''~onlies are encouraged to apP_~Y College educated with 13 years retail e1tpenence. f111e years 1n management E1tcellen1 11erb1I skills, e1tptmence in po.._ ~~~i~~~a~~z~nPi:i~d ~~~c ~~a0kfmhgo~~~ phobic environment Please call Leonard De Palma al 869-8685 during business hOurs Barber. styhst with following !or Heights Blvd shOp 868-4 784 PERFORMING ARTS Ticket office personne4 sought lull/part time. E1tcellent verbal sk11ls required Base plus commission Call Ms Knipp after 11am 526-5323 SALON DANIEL Hair styhst with some following Be pro­fessional. crea1111e current We provide everything for you m a fun. modern atmosphere Comm1sst0ntbenel1ts Call or come by 2431 81ssonnet i.20-9327 (MISC.) FOR SALE ANTIQUE Ornate grand piano. Collard and Collard $9.600 appraisal Sell for $2.000. 937· 1889 HALF PRICE Fast sailing custom catamaran Paid $5.050. Seit for $2.500 937-1889 FEBRUARY 21 . 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 HALF PRICE Half price queen SLZe waterbed Looks like regular bed. Solid brass with porcel1n knobs Pa1d $1.995, sell tor $995 937· 1889 FOR YARD SALES See ads under "'Yard Sales' at the end of the Montrose Clas51f1ed VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS ~6~,:~: ~~:' c~~~~f~~mC~l1 ~;s.~~'00 ~;~~~~~ueb1.1 ~~J~~:;,~~.c~~,~~(;8,5,~ or Visa MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS STARTING AT $10 My Swedish Massage Fees' Of course. midmght-8:00 am . outcalls. only one­hour notice. etc. can drive the price up1 8111 O'Aourke. 869-2298 Tomball area rub down. m-.-,,.-g-e-1h-.,..-.-py by Pat $30. 356-4124 Days only TOP TO BOTTOM Ae4ax1ng and soothing deep muscle mas~ sage by: bod_rbuitder 568-25« THE CADILLAC OF TOUCH o~l'f~~1~,g~~s1o BODY MASSAGE Full body massage. Hot 01 -m or out Bruce 622-0370 ---HAYING A YARD SALE? Announce 1t here then stand back for the crowd Call 529-8490 or v1srt the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat FEB FEB 21 22 FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 23 24 25 26 27 Cnt..-1• l0t 1n. 11,o on 1n 7-0•y Cal "<larand Mc 1tr0&1J Reaourca I Event0<groupmU1t 1pec:lf1c1Hy pertam to r>eighborhood ol Montrou or HoU1lon·1 gay oommufloty ur>IMS majOI" city. :state or NllONll llohday or maior nat•on•I g•y event 2 Str1c11y commerc••I evftl'llS not 1rduded 3 Bu.,roes•. c ..... c er.cl .oc111 groups •nd their events are glnef•lly qu.11ol1ed • Pollt1a1 _,,,, where only one.,.,_ of 1 :sub,ec1. cand•date or party •• dom111ant not qu.ahhed For 1dd1!JON1I mlormat>On or phone number•. ook for ltle sponlO'lng organJZat,on und• Resourc•· Typestyles indicate events' location: Events in Houston, Events of local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Area Interest SELECTED EVENTS THRO UGH 7 DAYS llCONTINUlNG ALL WEEK: Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo opens, Astrodome complex, Feb. 15-Mar. 2 .-r'UESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center ~UESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm mTUESDAY: MontroAe Symphonic Band meets Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin. 7:10pm • FRIDAY: "B.-akthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFT, FM·90, 8:15-llam • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet ?pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur • FRIDAY: Baytown Lambda meets 730pm Feb 21 • SATURDAY: Dignity mass and social, 7:.10pm, 3217 Fannin -SUNDAY: Houston Tmnis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center -SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center -SUNOAY: Women's bowling league playA. 3pm, Stadium Bowl llSUNDAY: WW.B. Bowling League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes llSUNOAY & IN I WEEK MontroAe Country Cloggers "Westward Ho ... ge!'?" 7:.10pm Feb. 23, BRB. and ?pm Mar. 2. Kindred Spirits • SUNDAY: Overeatt>rs Anonymous meet 8pm MonlnlMe Counseling Center 900 Lovt>tl • MONDAY: Integrity me<·ts 7:30pm Feb. 24, Auhy Hou~e. 626.i) Main • MONDAY: KS AJOS Foundation & Montrose Counseling Center AIDS Risk Reduction (gafe Sex) Workshops. 8pm Feb.24 • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • DAY: Lutherans Concerned meets Feb. 25, Grace Lutheran Church, 2.515 Waugh STUESDAY: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & ScientisU. met-t 7pm Feb. 25 STUESDAY: Montrose Civic Club <Neartov.n) meets 7pm Feb. 25, 1413 We8theimer • WED!\ESDAY: Greater Montro.se Busin~s Guild general meeting 7pm Feb. 26, Backtoitreet Restaurant, 1103 S. Shepherd • WED!\ESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY; OvereaterR Anonymous meet ~pm Bering Chul"<'h, 1440 Harold .-i'HURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center ~HURSDAY "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPIT Radio, FM-90 ~HURSDAY: Cleis. Lesbian Mothers Group, open meeting Feb. 'Z7. Dignity Ctr. STHURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 8:45pm. Stadium Bowl. 8200 Braesmain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN 1 WEEK: IGBO-afflhated 5pflng Breci< Invitational. A. louderdole. Feb 28-Mar. 2 III !\ l WEEK MontrOKe Count!"\' Clo1U!'.£'I'S .. ('IOQ"ing At h's Heet~. 10:,Flpm Feb. :lR. 9:30pm Mar l, t'lpm Mnr. 5. Harn • II\ I WEEK: Hout;ton Gav Ht"alth Advocalftl meet 7:30pm Miir 1 • II\ l WEEK Tex88 Gay Rodto Aiu<n. Houi;ton chapter,-ml!!'etll :lpm Mar. 2. Ratt'-ius, fi2:i I.Lovett m.IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus mttt.e :J217 Fannin. 7::l)pm Mar.5 m.IN 2 WEEKS: Houston North Profeuionall meet# 7~m. Mar.8 • IN 2 WEEKS Montroae Art Allianct' meeL& Mar.10 a JN 2 WEEKS Gay & Lesbian Hitl.panict Vnidoa meet 7pm Dignity Center. 3217 Fannin. Mar.10 aIN 2 WEEKS: Citiuns for Human Equality mt'f'la 7:30pm Mar. 11. 2414 Gramercy m.IN' 2 WEEKS. Houston Data PrvfMaionals meets VIOpm Mar. 11 • IN 2 WEEKS: Houm.on Bar Owner11 As,n. meets 2pm Mar.12 • IN 2 WEEKS: 1'eartown Busineea Alliance mf'f'l.8 7pm Mar. 12, Liberty Bank. 1001 Wt'9theimer • IN 2 'MOO National lelbian ond Gov Health FoundotiOn p-..nts 7th NatlOnOl/1..esbton Got Heatth Conference ond 41h Natie>n<:9 AIDS Forum. "Moving l•bian ond Gov Heolth Car• Into the Ma1nsffeam.~ Mor 13-16. George WOlhngfon Untvenlfy Washington. 0.C • WEDI\"f.SDA Y: G~ater Montroae Buai.n .. Guild board mf'f'ting Mar. 13 • IN 2 WEF.KS Cleu, Leflb1an Mothers Group, cloeed mttting Mar, 13 • IN 2 WEF.KS Avcindale Anoci.1:1tion mf'fta 7;:JOl.>m Mar.13. ChrU;tian Wc•mrn'• C..ntf'r. 310 Pacific • IS:] WEEK.."\ Parents FLAG mttta 2pm. Mar.16. Pn-eb\"l.f'rian Ct>nt.er, 41 Oakdalf" • IN 3 WEEKS St Potridc's Day. Mar 17 • IN 4-5 WEEKS IGBO-offOic:ied Oi>Oe lnvrtcttonal. Atlonlo. Ma 27-30 • IN 5 WEEkS tGBO-afdiated MAJCJ.T Konsos City. Mar. 29-31 • LN ABOUT 7 WEEkS 11th onnuof Soutneost.-n Confa'ence kw lesbians and Gov Men. spung t 936. Nerw 0.-.S • IN AllOIJT 16 'MOO O<* lawn Tennis Auoe. hosts T•os Cup Challenge. Dallas. competing with Houston Tennis: Ctub. June • IN 11 'lr'EEKS 17th omtversary of Stonewall RiOts. Nerw Yc:wk. June 28 • WEDSESDAY: Gtt"atf'r Me>nt~ RusinfQ Guild husineAB building wurbhop and tradP fair a IS 23 WF.EKS C.S Olympie FNtival upma, Houaton. July 25-Aug. 3 • IN 2A WEEKS Gay Gamel II. ·ir1ump In 16.. Aug 9-17, 1936, Son ff'onclsco • IN 25 WEEKS 41h amlversay of fedefat ruling against Texas· tiomosexuot c:ondud 1ow.· Aug 17, 1982 • tN 27 WEEKS Wom•fs Softball "86 WOc:wakt Sy.1-e1-. New Haven. Conn, lobof • lN J7 WEEKS iSOth birthdav o( City of Houston. Aue .. 30 - • tN n 'NEEICS Lnlversol f911owsiup of Metropotlan Communly Churchel a Dlgnly 1"*-natiOnal slmJlfaneous lnt•notlOnaf confer~ Jutv f9.26. 1987. M1cmi/ R Lauderdale Have a heart to heart with your doctor ... 20 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21. 1986 PERSONALS PATRICK Met before Mardi Gras Finale last year--and again after the party 2/16 in the Alabama Street vicinity Need to make this more than a once a year fling Call Bill, 875-2082. SEEKING TOP MAN GWM seeks only extremely hung, very sexual Greek active man. You are nice looking . good build, friendly and like sex on a regular basis. I'm very handsome. well-built. sexually versatile. tall, blonde. educated, sin­cere and relationship-oriented. Sin­cere responses who definitely meet the above qual1ficat1ons call (713) 524-8390. Bi-sexual black male. 26. seeking pos1t1on as houseboy for cleaning or other services. Lots to offer. Hourly or live-in Call Mr Williams 526-8859 between 9am and 9pm GWM, 35, 5'11" 155, brl hzl, profes­sional, sincere. YES' Air, food and water exist outside the Loop' Anyone else live in West Houston and want to meet others in Memorial area. Enjoy cooking. movies, theater. talking and laughing For fun, frolic, friendship and a safe romp in the hay reply Blind Box 278-S clo Voice. This girl Is a woman now. Happy 30th Johnny Rawson Mom and Dad MALE MODELS Do you have 'that look"? TEXAS MEN, a tastefully-produced erotic magazine on the drawing boards, may make you a star if you're hand­some or cute and have no maier vis­ible flaws. (Let's be honest now. Some of us iust are not model mate­riar Then again, some of us are and don't know 1t) If we choose you for publ1cat1on. you will be paid (and you may become famous) To inquire. call 520-0206 (adult gay males only). NUTRIOL GROWS HAIR Proven in Europe. Full guaranteed 526-8213. 24 hours GWM. 21 5'10" 150. brown hair and eyes Enioy most sports and music. Tell me about yourself. No drugs or smoker Seeking 19to 27 I guarantee a reply Write Blind Box 278-T clo Voice. GWM, good looking, tall and thin, 33. bottom needs everything Seeking GWM. hairy top 25-40. Call Pat 356- 4124 after 6 pm LOOKING FOR LOVE You too? I'm 21 GWM, very cute and honest and sincere. Looking for the same to experience life together 19- 25. I'm serious and looking for the same in someone. Reply Blind Box 278-N clo Voice. Wanted 2 female companions 18-45 to accompany 2 men to Alaska in motor home to look for work. travel and recreation. Leaving Feb. 27. All travel and expenses paid. Call 645- 5560 GWM. business man, 40. 5'7", 135 Not into bars, games, drugs. opera, casual sex or yuppie gay society Seeking one real human being with feelings. caring nature, imagination, sense of humor and values, to date and spend time with I have no age or racial barriers Send returnable photo and descriptive letter to Box­holder. P.O Box 3474, Humble, TX 77347-3474 GHM, 30. 6 ft, dark br/br, stra1ght­actmg, sincere. Seeks similar GWM, 25-35. non-smoker, sincere. conser­vative/ moral values. for friendship. possible relationship. P 0 Box 924811 , 77292 NUTRIOL-MEDICAL MIRACLE Nutriol - Europe's fastest selling proven hair growth product now available Also Nu Skin skin care pro­ducts. Olstributorships available 527-9801 anytime. RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL Seeking a 2 year loan of $6,000- $12.000 to establish a well planned Montrose business. For information or details. call 747-2659 Cut. GWM. 25. 5'9", 153, brown hair, blue eyes. Seeking cut or uncut GWM. 20-35. Enioys camping, coun­try western. disco, movies. and also the quiet times as friends Tell me about yourself and I'll reply All let­ters answered Reply Blind Box 277- G clo Voice HOT Gay white male, 29. 6', 165 lbs brn, hzl with beard seeks similar for dat­ing and possible relationship. Only real men need apply Reply Blind Box 277-S clo Voice GOM, 28, seeks someone 30 or younger for relationship. Reply to Blind Box 278-L c/o Voice Play out any fantasy, fetish, desire that turns you on with handsome, uninhibited GWM Write now Let's get together soon. Reply Blind Box 277-G clo Voice Classical music. If you play violin. viola or any wind instrument, we play regularly for enioyment Join us. Non-smokers, please. Bill-529- 3122. 520-0133 Leather master, 36. seeks masochist 25-40. into safe and sane S&M. Send photo and letter describing fantasies and limits. Novices considered Reply Blind Box 277-A clo Voice. LESBIAN AND GAY COUPLES Volunteers needed for Master's the­sis study on decision making in les­bian and gay couples. 1-1 :.S hours of your time completely confidential interview by lesbian student. (512) 690-1693 evenings or weekends. GWM, 19, 5'4", 133, brown eyes, hair and moustache. Looking for GWM. 28-40 for a daddy Reply Blind Box 276-R c!o Voice. PHONE SEX Our service connects Horney Guys 24 hrs. a day Do it now for less than $3.50 an hour. (415) 346-8747 Tall man. mid 30s. seeks sensitive guy for safe sex, sensual develop­mental relat1onsh1p. Write P.O. Box 701041 , Houston. 77270. MEET CHRISTIAN SINGLES Local1Worldw1de-Phone/ma1I introductions text. Let love, dating, marriage change your life today! Free information. Write: Box 9020-B50, Van Nuys CA 91409 OUR POLICY on Sexually-Explicit Advertising The Montrose Voice does not believe that humans engag­ing in consenting sexual acts with one another is immoral. Our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relationships , encounters. adventures, etc. All advertising should, however not contain lan­guage that would offend an unsus­pecting reader PLAY SAFE Safe sex is fun. erotic. Play safe, for your sake. for your partner's sake. A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the per­sonal ads. In their book, "Classified Affairs," they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out, what to expect when you place or respond to an ad , and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean. Send $8 to "Classified Affairs," Alyson Pub., Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton. St, Boston, MA 02118. (Also included will be a coupon for $5 off on your next Per­sonals in your choice of 25gay publi­cations, including the Montrose Voice.) A fascinating look at the lives ~e~d~ ~ J~b"l"1 ~ For some gay men, age brings increased free­and happiness. For others, it brings loneliness. Here, six men lalk openly about just what 1t means in their lives to be gay and gray $7.95 in bookstores or use this coupon to order. Enclosed is $8.00 (postpaid) for one copy of Gay and Gray name address city state __ _ ~z ip Alyson Publications. Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St. Boston. MA 02118 TilE BEST LITilE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTIY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATfONS CALL (504) 566-1177 11 18 URSl'LINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 Gay and lesbian reading ======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about sale sex, edited by fobn Preston, $8.00. The AIDS crisis has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health·conscious gay men, but it has also encowaged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex· pression_ Herc, over a dozen of today's mo:,t popular gay writers present new short stories that imaginatively eroticize safe sex. Contributors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and T.R. W1tornski SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher, by Eric Rofcs, $7.00. When Eric Roles began teaching sixth grade at a conscr· vattve private school, he soon felt the strain of a split identity. Herc he describes his two years of teaching from within tthc closet, his difficult decision to come out at work, and the conse­quences of that decision ~SECOno CHflOCf 5 a now! 1"I Florine De Veer SECOND CHANCES, by Flonne de Veer, $7 .00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freelyr Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $3.95. Twenty-eight young peo­ple from all over the US and Canada, mostly in high school, share their commg-out experiences STOLEN MOMENTS, by John Preston, $5.00. Who says heroes can't be gay~ In the fourth of the "Mission of Alex Kane" series, Kane and his partner Danny Fortelli head for Houston. There, they take on a media baron who is intent on using homophobia to build his tabloid's circulation. Also available: Sweet Dreams, Golden Years and Deadly Lies; each star­ring Alex and Danny; $5.00 each. EXTRA CREDIT, by fell Black, $6.00. Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced. Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start~ Enter Mick, a lover from the past talking about their futwe; Garrick, a first-year teacher looking for conjunc­tions, and not necessarily in the class­room; and young Dean, an oversexed Dennis the Menace making all A's in some very advanced biology IRIS, by fanme Veto, $7.00. The retelling of an ancient Greek myth of love, devo­tion and vengeance - this time with a lesbian theme. REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $4. 95 The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7 .00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories FEBRUARY 21. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 THE LAVENDER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Mamy Hall, S8.00 Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of us really know how to go about choosing a therapist, and bow to be sure we can get the most out of therapy~ Ma.my Hall, herself a lesbian therapist, bas written the first book ever to address this sub- 1ect. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4.00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner city for Montauk, work, and the sea. She tells her story with a combination of painful innocence and acute vision, beginning with the man in the fine green car who does not mourn the violent death of a seagull against his windshield. The simplicity of Halegua's style is reminiscent of The Color Purple; it is a powerful story of a girl's sudden entry into a harsh maturity. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $13.00. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. !Oversize paperback) THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay; trans. by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun­ther is fifteen when he arrives alone in the Berlin of the 1920s. There he dis­covt: r!> the boys of Friedrich Street, and the men who stroll by and speak with them. Soon he is spotted by Hermann Graff, a sensitive and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored with Gunther. But love does not fit neatly in­to Gunther's new life as a hustler. . . Gunther's story was first published in 1926. For today's reader, it combines a poignant love story with a colorful por­trayal of the gay subculture that thrived in Berlin a half-century ago. DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, $6.00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls: "A wonderful, rip-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she writes a dozen more." "The book of the year," writes Feminist Bookstore News. ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. The story of a teenage love alfair that should have been simple - but wasn't . EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 00 Johnnie Ray Rousseau IS a 22·year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engross­mg - and funniest - vou'll ever read. TO ORDER···----------· Enclosed is S-~- Please send the books I've listed below !Add S 1. 00 postage when ordenng just one book; if you order more than one we"/] pay postage.) Please send me these books: Visa and mastercard accepted; please send acct number, exp. date, and zip ______ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St. Bo<ton, MA 02118 ·······-·-···········-···-············-·· 2G2 rMeONaTRtOeSEr V O ICE' FEBRUARY 21. 1986 1000ver1 ... .,1hls Montrose Service and Shopping 01. rectory page. COii 529-8490 dur"1Q business t'<Jurs ISING LES LEASING 5210 Buffa~A~ MOTORS SEE OUR DIS way, 667-6804 IN THE MONT~LAOS yE AVDO ICE Lee Borba~:~~~·:~ LEASING r:~Jt,;t~~~'OIY AD Also tee SE VOICE Classdl8d" ~~~ & Bikes on 'Montrose EPAIR -· Montrose Auto Repair A Free Estimates II Work Guaranteed MaJor/Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electncal Repa1r 526-3723 2716 Taft WEST GRA y AUTO 238 W~~~~~i~J:sSPECTION) fJE OUR DISPLAY AD - THE MONTROSE VOICE 1411 Talt.T~~2~~TOMOTIVE r:~i?Eu,;g1SPLA y AD - NTROSE VOICE 1901 Tait ~i4~8R6T0OWN KARZ SEE 1 IN T~u,;g~rRLAOS yE AVDO ICE 2001 AH~~~d~~~~~s·s.B5O2D6-Y1 9S4H0 OP SHOPS HAIR SALONS ' D . ~perHead 1no s Barber 5 W"st 11th & Vat!'°'> r~e1ghts) 863-1520 eg Haircut~$? Complete Hair Style $11 D~841e7s8 B48 rber St Y Im g. 940 Heights Blvd HToomusmey ·csa lBlsa rSbleSrO SOh O p, H. air cuts $10.00 8216 & up For inlo 526- PING See a•so ·rl.11 Preo•ration· category RUCTION / CONTRACTING .. ee,a~~.,~ ~5 se Lev ing & -Foundation Co Midtown Air 521 9009 520-90&4 HSK CONTRACTING TJ~~u,;g1SPLA Y AD NTROSE VOICE G SERVICE Lambda·s:--Unlim1ted - -- 3371 or p 0 Bo 7 Dating Service 4g& 7418 x 418. Hous1on 77248- TS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westheuner Houston. TX 77006 ~onday thru Saturday ours by Appointmen (713) 524-0538 t SES 2525 U~~~~ STATE OPTICAL ~~; ~uth Marn. f~~l~6s 528-1589 & IN THEUR DISPLAY AD MONTROSE VOICE DIRECTORS ~S~O:WUeTlHcWh.E SsT2 eFr ~:S~RAL OIRECTOJ' s IN T,?Eu,;g1sPLAY AD NTROSE VOICE URE RESTOR d . PARTY GODO T SHOPS Ol VMPIA FITNESS S SERVICES 5401 Dashwo!te CLINIC SEE OUR DIS; 10. 661-2321 IN THE MONTRLOASYE AVDO ICE AIR CONDITIONING L CARE 2801 E~l!Ee~~d D. MARTINEZ. M.O. SEE OUR DIS~~~ G 868-4535 IN THE MONTRollv~ICE I PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS DR.CE FONTAN I ER Diseases of the Colon & Rectum * Colonoscopy * Hemorrhoids * Constipation * Rectal Bleeding Medical & Surgical management 872-7676 Answered 24 hours 210 West Greens Rd Houston, TX 77067 - 1 Boxes. too•'t~!EMASTERS 1925 Westhetmer' :-1~6~~EX welcome 6313 SW F CLU: RACKETBALL wy_ 988-8787 GetUsted! And Get NEW CUSTOMERS! CAll 529-8490 Eoch Week. the Montrose Voice is read by on estimated 27.000 Houston pe0ple. And thOse 2 7.000 ore o\WO'/S looking tor various seNices-trom ottornevs to yard seNice. from dentists to auto repair. from travel agencies to home movers OUR RAlES ARE LOW Just Ca\\ Us TodOV~ Your ad will appear here next week. And then you will have NEW cus10MERS1 E•''"'°'edR~ ~ f'O>'-On Ralefoc'"' ol 26 O>ll us fQll 1' CCl"I Cli ofl cQM'l.m RA1E PK.~ T CONTROL RES UL TS PEST CONTROL I 223-4000 SANITATION TJ~ OUR DISPLAY AD HE MONTROSE VOICE INISHING ING EPARATION We can save TAX RETURNS ol lrus1rat1ony~~61~11 ars and e lot TAX anytime BdlR~~~~sc~~C:'UNTING TAX-ACCO , - 71-1329 20 year!. eii;peue UNTING SERVICES ind reh ed ti r;;,e tax returns prepared ChPl':ked 11: 7~~~1~days Computer .. 529-1414 ... ,••,• Ill 1 ltl f f'UICE ALL BRAND:; 3 el~OJeft~:rvMiew ontrose TRAVEL CO ~~~f' ~te travel arra~:~;:iANTS 9em-S ~~n Monday thr~uAI~ services Houston. ~X 77~9 Southw~st F;~•y 713) iN-8464 y ~-.e "Vacat~~nCATION IDEAS? on the previ l ~~~wing ·on the Town· 2016 Montro~'.05~g_~~OPE TJ~~UR DISPLA y '.:o MONTROSE VOICE 1401 Cahlorn~~0:2~T0R6END SEE OUR . . 56 IN THE Ma°~STRPLOASYE AVDO ICE Your gay ~~~ELIVER VIDEOS 5:?2-4485 ser'll1ce 1420Westhe•mer To place an AD in the Montrose Voice _ .. just phone us I 529-8490 . Ad 10am S·-30p ,,. lJee\.. da•JS ph~n~~o ~ ~~arged over the OR we can bill 1~~ucr:~: card Montrose Soap Only the Strong Survive! By the staff of the Montrose Voice Many items appear in Soap out of commercial consideration Let there be a fitting salute to all those who survived last weekend in Montrose. Let Us Entertain You Weekend was, once again. a roaring success. The sponsors and parttci­patmg clubs deserve a special thank you from locals as well as out-of-towners for a great three-day party -o- Aed eyes glistened m the sun come Sunday morning when all the revelers from Mardi Gras Finale attempted to focus on a new day_ The sponsors of that extravaganza also outdid themselves. The purple and gold will rest quietly in the closet until next year when we do it all over again. -o- ''The Brazos Side Pocket" quiet bar is open at the BAB with Richard Smith serving -o- Somebody please help out George at Mont­rose Auto Repelr. His dog just made himthe proud owner of eight more. They really are cute puppies, but he just can't handle that many dogs Stop by at 2716 Taft and fall 1n love. The The Colt 45's recently elected new offic­ers. They are Darrell Butler, president: Man­me Deleon. vtce president; Wayne Nazat. secretary, and George Weber, treasurer. -o- Poor Maria Barely off her honeymoon, mar­ried for less than a month and Pickles has her in the kitchen already. You can see for yourself with breakfast tacos at Mary's naturally -o- The Houston Chapter of the Texas Gay Rodeo Association will meet March 2 at Bacchus, 523 Lovett. at 2pm. All are wel­come, men and women, to JOin this organization -o-lt's 'California or Bust" for the Montrose Country Cloggers and they have scheduled some fun(d)raisers to do it. It's all to take this talented group to the Golden State Gay Rodeo in Los Angeles next month. Startmg this Sunday at the BAB, a $2 cover at the door with free draft beer will be donated to the effort. The Barn will host performances by the cloggers on ~b. 28, March 1, and March 5. On Sunday, March 2, it's out to Kindred Spirits for a performance. Once again a $2 cover gams admission and freP draft -o- Sunday night Divine comes Heaven. This is Female Trouble from a Woman Behind Bars dressed in Polyester, Lusting in the Dust with Pink Flamingos in the yard But, that's another story -o- St Patrick's Day 1s our excuse for our next big party weekend. The day itself is Mon­day, March 17 It's time now to send last year's green outfit to the cleaners Joe enjoys the Let Us Entertain You Shnw at the BRB It's almost spnng and that means a person's thoughts are turning to love, romance and (yes) sex To celebrate the arrival of the season of love, the Montrose Voice is expanding the Personals And, we make 1t easy to place a Personals. Just phone us at 529-8490. (We'll bill you later.) The flfst 40 people to place a Personals for neKt week's paper get a free Montrose Voice Play Safe key ring They'll hold all your keys and c//p onto your belt loop -o- John Peagram is back at the Bayou Land­mg. And there are other changes there too -o~ Jae and Gene have a new courtyard at Near­town Karz. Check it out at 1901 Taft Hair Salons Sponsor Expo This story appears out of commercial considerations With the Houston weather warming up and spring m the air, many p_eople will invariably be looking for new fashions to complement the changing seasons This year, the public will have the oppor­tunity to get a firsthand l_ook at the latest happenings in the fashion and beauty industry when Hair Associates, a group of the top 1 O styling salons in Houston, spon­sor the "Hair Fashions Expo" Mar~h 2 According to Elliot Sterlmg, Hair Asso­ciates member and organizer of the event, the expo will be a "tot!H beauty day." The expo will feature approximately 50 exhibi­tors. includmg hair, nail and skin care spe­cialists. Representatives. from spa and tanning establishments w_1ll also be present. In add1t1on, Sterling said a fashion show highlighting various designers will be held every 20 minutes throughout the day. He added that the expo 1s unique because 1t will have a special Houston flair. All of the hair styles and clothing planned for the show have been specially created for Houston by local designers Smee proposing the idea for the "'Hair Fashions Expo" four months ago, Sterling said the excitement and enthusiasm sur­rounding the expo has grown tremend­ously "It will be a new and different way for people to see firsthand the options available to them in the way of personal enhance­ment," he said. ··u will be an eye-opentng opportunity to see what is going on in the beauty industry." Admission to the expo is $3.50, with an extra $6.50 to attend the fashion show Sterling says the total pnce is far below that of similar private shows for designers, where tickets may run as high as $120 Organizers are expecting up to 10,000 people to attend the event, which will be held from 10:00 am to 6:00 p.m. at the Adams Mark Hotel Exhibition Center. Based on the success of this year's expo, Sterlmg said the event may be moved to the Astro Arena. For tickets or additional infor­mation. call 777-7567 FEBRUARY 21, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 23 Monica Rider, a member of Dallas' Flying W Motorcycle Club, seems to be preparing for an inspection of Stan Philap of the Knights of Malta as Colt 45 member Darryl Butler and an unidentified Flying W look on ·0- Charlie's has an early bird breakfast special 2am to 10am. 2 eggs, any style bacon or sausage. hash browns or gnts. toast or bis­cuits. coffee or tea At a bargain pnce -a- Entertainment this week at the Dnscoll Street Cafe and Cabaret include Kim Yvette. Richard Adkins. Mahli McGee and Liz Mendez -C'- lf you ever thought you wanted to become an antique dealer. go by and talk with John or Ed at the Westheimer Flea Market. 1733 & 1735 Westhe1mer They have space availa­ble to rent o- Sunday is the official Houston "Un-Party' at the Venture-N Photos by Jerry Mulholland 11-2"1'::~ Two Houston Names That Mean c{)~ Sunday, Feb. 23, The Party Continues: 12:00 Noon Bloodies and Screws 1125 Happy Hour 'till 5:00 5:00 BRB Steak Nite 1400 6:00 DJ David Royalty 7:30 Showtime! 5200 Cover benefits the Cloggers Free Draft Beer During the Show! 8:30 Brazos Rrver Band-Dancing And Wednesday thru Sunday- '"The Brazos Side Pocket" Quiet bar open-Richard Smith serving! Tuesday & Thursday C&WDance Lessons i;a;r~yi(•J!l;!i•i#i;f:I•Jii•l~!, 2400 BRAZOS =<•I•M !m~1 (713) 528-9192 24 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 21 , 1986 It's Almost • • • And that means a person's thoughts are turning to love, romance and (yes) sex. To celebrate the arrival of the season of love, the MONTROSE VOICE expands its PERSONALS section. And, we make it easy to place a Personals. Just phone us. (We'll bill you later.) 27 Reasons for Placing a MONTROSE VOICE PERSONAL AD ... •Making New Friends (33,000 readers each issue) •Looking for Romance • Sending a Special Greeting • Safer than Writing on Bathroom Walls •A Chance to See Your Name in Print • Alternative to Bar Cruising • Anything Beats "The Quest" • It's Inexpensive • Confidentiality Can be Assured • Saves Gas • They're Easy to Place • Getting Back in Touch with Old, Lost Friends• Finding Missing Persons• Because Your Lover Ran One Last Week •Because Your Lover Asked You To• Forming a New Organization• Mother's Pressuring You to Settle Down• You Need a Man• You Need a Woman • You Need a Ride Across State Lines (Quick) •Seek Safe Sex Partners • It's a Chance to Make Yourself Seem Perfect • Send a Sweet Love Note to Someone Dear • Invite an Erotic Adventure • Send a Proposition to Someone (when you make it public, they can't ignore it) • State Your Kinky Desires (and aee who answer•) • Good, Clean Fun To place your "Personal" in FREE /~ \. 0 Montrose Voice 'Play Safe' Key Ring to first 40 Personals placed* in next week's Voice Received In our olllce In person, by phone or In the mall the Montrose Voice, phone 529-8490 OUR RATES ARE REASONABLE: Just 40¢ a word. (Bold centered headlines are $1 each word, minimum 3 words. CONFIDENTIAL BLIND BOX NUMBERS are $3.)
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