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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
File 030
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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 030. 1996-08-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/7011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-23). Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 030. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/7011

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 030, 1996-08-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/7011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 23, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 030
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE/AUGUST 23, 1996 29 Boise Sex Scandal The Fifties were generally a harsh time for Gays and Lesbians in the United States. The decade of conformity, Mc- Carthyism, and atomic hysteria was also a time of repeated persecutions of Gay men and Lesbians, who were subject to firings, arrests, and imprisonment in cities across the country. Perhaps the most famous episode—and certainly one of the best-documented—took place in 1956 arid 1957 in Boise, Idaho, the tiny (pop. 35.000) food-processing capital of the state of Idaho. As in many other places, some of the male students at Boise High School in the mid- 1950s engaged in mutual masturbation. Some of these students, often from the "tough" crowd, would also allow older men to perform oral sex on them, for a price ranging from a quarter to ten dollars. By targeting men who were rumored to be Gay. some of these teenagers were able to collect ever-higher sums of money with threats of exposure. This situation, not all that different from informal male prostitution in other cities, became a matter of public concern on Halloween 1955, when three adult men were arrested on morals charges. A few days later, the Idaho Daily Statesman published a highly inflammatory editorial urging immediate public action and warning that «tte arrests had only 'scratched the surface" and that the youi!* of Boise were in danger. According to the analysis of former Time and Newsweek journalist John Gerassi (whose 1966 book The Boys of Boise remains the most thorough account of the scandal), the Halloween arrests and later prosecutions of several more Boise result-ins. including highly respected citizens, were a part of an ongoing political struggle within Boise's elites. A group of prominent men, who Gerassi calls the "Boise Gang," used the arrests and publicity to attack their enemies, but the scandal grew out of control and ultimately hurt members of the Gang as well as the reputation of Boise itself. One member of Ihe Gang, whom Gerassi calls "Ihe Queen." was an extremely wealthy gay man who was investigated and never arrested or publicly identified. Another member of the Gang was a member of city council who had hoped lhe arrests would eventually reach the brother of a city official with whom he had clashed with. Instead, the councilman's own son was implicated in the scandal, discharged from West Point, and sentenced to three years in a penitentiary for engaging in gay sex. The effects of (he scandal on Boise were widespread. An investigator, fresh from Washington, DC. where he had worked in the McCarthyist campaign against homosexuals in the State Department, came to Boise and interviewed hundreds of gay and straight men-many of whom were coerced into naming gay friends. The police were deluged with calls, mostly from nervous mothers, accusing specific men of homosexuality. Straight men went out of their way to avoid incriminating appearances-even inviting women to parlicipate in previously all- male poker games. With coverage in Time and other national outlets. Boise quickly gained a reputation as a locus of gay activity, leading both anti-gay crusaders and men in the Northwest looking for gay sex to label it "Boysy." But as more men were arrested and some were convicted to sentences as high as life in prison. Boise became anathema to Gay men, and many left town for friendlier locales. For years thereafter, Boise symbolized oppression in gay circles. The 1972 travel guide The Gay Insider included a description of the scandal in its "Idaho" section, along with the warning: Stay out of Idaho." When in 1977 similar accusations of a "sex ring" involving gay sex wiih children threatened Boston's Gay community, the organization formed to oppose a government witch—hunt called itself the "Boston/Boise Committee" in an explicit analogy to the scandal from two decades earlier. The situation for Gays in Boise itself has improved somewhat. Boise's first pride parade was held in 1990. although one participant marched with a hag over his or her head. In 1994, Idaho voters narrowly defeated a Colorado-style anti-Gay amendment. And according to the editor of Idaho's largest gay publication, Diversity, the city now has three or four gay and lesbian bars, depending on how you count. David Bianco. M.A., teaches gay and lesbian history at the Institute of Gay and Lesbian Education in West Hollywood. If there 's anything about the history of gays and/or lesbians you've always wondered about, contact him care of this newspaper or through his E-mail address: Ari- Bianco@aol.com. "Past Out" appears twice a month . DNC Demonstration Site More User-Friendly Than GOP Offered Chicago, IL—For protesters who are looking for something to gripe about at the Democratic National Convention in August, the demonstration site should not be on the list. Claiming to provide an area that is more accessible and conventionally located than protesters faced in San Diego at the Republican National Convention, the Democrats have designated Parking Lot E as the official site for demonstrators to air grievances, on a rotation basis. The 85,000 square-foot space is adjacent to United Center properly "It's the closest, I believe, we've ever had a demonstration site to the credentials area. Clearly it will be within sight and sound of the delegates." says Debra De- Lee the convention's chief execut.ve officer. The area, which was one of two possible sites, was unanimously cho-. sen during a field trip by the CEO. senior staff members, the Chicago Police Department and Secret Service. Bound by Wood Street on the west, Hermitage Avenue on the east, Madison Street on the south and Warren Boulevard on the north, the demonstration area is surrounded by an unobtrusive chain link fence that protects United Center property. DeLee says it is clearly in the Democrats best interest to make sure that the demonstration site is in a good spot. "Surprisingly, most protesters are really not interested in disrupting the convention. They want to be seen, and we want to make that easy for them," DeLee explains. "There will be a camera platform, stage, sound system and porta- pots." The concept of setting up demonstration sites for protesters began in 1972. Both parties have selected sites, near 'heir respective convention halls, for the purpose of protesting since the riots broke out at the 1968 Democratic Convention. Ironically, that one was also held in Chicago on the exact same dates— August 26-29. | Just $1.99/2.49 per minute lor certain optional features. Internet: http://WWW.moVO.COm CiAV OWNI D! Volce-MAlt does not presaeen rallerc and adepts no responsible loi personal meellnQS. 800-82S-1S9B Friends and Lovers Houston's holiest men want to meet you, so CALL NOW! 713-892-5566 A"%eoodes POST ADS Mil! USTMT04DSFRH! RISPOIH TO ADS FRU! vi* r?i3) 77ft-666rj 1-900-820-8799 $4 1st minute & 65* each additional minute • 2 hours access for first minute cost press "8" STEAMY STUDS 1-ON-1 * "Anything Goes" Group Action * Uncensored Voice Mail Boxes $50 Monthly Subscriptions- • MAIL BOX Unlimited Access J214) 761-608$: (Visa/MC, Checks or Money Orders) ^Tr. •*-£■*'*&. Man-To-Man-'fcSJBSR FREE 2 HOURS WITH PURCHASE 6 HOURS FOR $12 CALL INFO LINE 18* -MULTI CHANNEL (214) 761-6066
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