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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
File 021
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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 021. 1996-08-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/7002.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-23). Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 021. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/7002

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 021, 1996-08-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/7002.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 23, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript 20 HOUSTON VOICE/AUGUST 23, 1996 Being sure of your HIV status- for your own peace of mind- offers you the opportunity to make better personal choices, lead a healthier life and protect yourself and your loved ones from the virus that causes AIDS. HIV testing is more important now than ever Testing negative can be a great relief, and allows you tii modify behavior to protect yourself from the virus. If the test is positive, there are now better treatments to help slow the progression of AIDS and improve the quality of life. Now there is a new HIV test that provides highly accurate results without blood or needles The new, painless system-ORASURE -tests for the presence of HIV antibodies in an oral sample. ORASURE is available now at your doctor's office and healthcare clinics. AIDS cannot be transmitted through kissing. There have been no recorded cases of HIV linked with kissing or other casual contact. Remember, there is proof that casual contact with an HIV-infected person is not enough to transmit the virus. In fact, it has become clear that HIV is relatively hard to contract, and can be avoided. O Through unprotected sex- Any unprotected sexual intercourse— especially vaginal or anal intercourse—puts you at risk for HIV. Oral sex can also be a mode of transmission although it is less risky than vaginal or anal intercourse. Your risk for HIV increases each time you have unprotected intimate sexual contact. Using a condom or dental dam during sex can greatly reduce the risk of HIV spreading. Q Through blood- HIV travels in blood, and the risk of becoming infected is greatest when you are exposed to blood that carries HIV. If you have a problem with drugs, avoid sharing another person's needle or syringe. © Mother to Infant- HIV positive women can spread the virus to their infants before or during birth. Or, the newborn baby may become infected from breast milk. Because recent studies show that the risk can be reduced when the mother receives anti-HIV treatment, the US Public Health Service suggests that all pregnant women know their HIV status. Talk to your healthcare provider about how to learn your HIV status...and take steps to avoid the spread of HIV. munaam ___tm^*m. __\mm' sOraSure HIV-1 Antibody Tcitlng System No Needles. No Blood. Just Accurate Results. SB SmithKline Beecham Consumer Healthcare
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