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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
File 015
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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 015. 1996-08-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6996.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-23). Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6996

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 015, 1996-08-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6996.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 23, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 HOUSTON VOICE / AUGUST 23, 1996 GOP continued. (Continued from page I) polls, the end result was less than informative. There are many different viewpoints in both parties. That was not apparent at the Republican convention, nor is it likely to be so at the Democratic convention that starts up August 26. The selection of Jack Kemp as Bob Dole's Vice President was the only surprising revelation during the whole convention period. The highlight of the entire convention was the unconventional address administered by Elizabeth Dole. She demonstrated with verve her political acumen and is by far Mr. Dole's best political asset. He would be wise to use her during the campaign quite frequently. Dole delivered her speech on the convention floor rather than from the podium and did so without the benefit of a teleprompter. Her performance was astounding and refreshing. As for the gay and lesbian community, we were non existent. Not one single speech addressed gay and lesbian issues with the exception of Mary Fisher, who gave a stirring speech concerning AIDS research and funding. Of course, considering the ill-fated 1992 GOP convention in Houston where gay bashing was the norm, our community fared quite well. There was not one utterance of gay bashing during the entire four days the convention was convening. ACT UP protesters clashed twice with supporters of Pat Buchanan, forcing officers to form a human barricade separating the protesters. but there were no reported injuries or arrests. Bob Dole has indicated he "welcomed" the support and endorsement of Log Cabin, the gay Republican group. While, that in itself is surprising, it demonstrates that our community has its work cut out for us, if we intend to make inroads into the Republican party. The major theme of the Republican convention was taxes. The Dole/Kemp ticket will campaign on an economic package that reduces taxes 15% over 3 years and drops the capital gains tax from 28% to 14%. The ticket promises to make it the primary campaign issue and for good reason. Taxes are one of the most important issues to the electorate. Whether or not the party can ride to victory on that issue alone remains to be seen. All in all, the convention provided the electorate with an elaborate production similar to an infomercial. The public is left to decipher political salesmanship from reality. The most disappointing element was the lack of proper debate. Debate is good for morale and imperative for proper political growth. It also encourages compromise and politics without compromise is non-productive. When the Democrats convene next week it is unlikely that they will publicly display their points of contention with one another as well. Unfortunately, the public loses a chance to grasp the significance of the political process. They do have the final say however and they II deliver their verdict on November 5. Rough Night at the Remo Room Air Force continued. (Continued from page I) of the military, those who bring them had better be prepared to back them up." Ms. Dillard testified that she and Ms. Meeks began having asexual relationship in Virginia in 1992 and continued after Ms. Meeks transferred to Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Ms. Dillard claims she eventually moved to San Antonio at the request of Ms. Meeks and was "her wife, essentially". Tigar, however, said just because Ms. Meeks let Ms. Dillard live in her home while Ms. Dillard did free-lance work and studied for an exam to enter medical school did not mean the two had an affair. Ms. Dillard testified the relationship began crumbling in 1994 and that a female air force officer became involved with Ms. Meeks. Jonie Isner, a prosecution witness and longtime friend of Ms.Dillard, said she attended an "engagement party" for the two women in April 1992 and that she once saw Ms. Meeks kissing Ms. Dillard's chest. Ms. Dillard testified their "intense" relationship included oral sex and that Ms. Meeks wrote about it in letters and cards she sent her. "Those are not the letters that a friend would send to a friend. Those were passionate letters that one lover would send to another," prosecutor Maj. James L. Flannery argued. Tigar, however, questioned the authenticity of the letters and argued that written words are not evidence of gay sex. Tigar also argued that even if jurors believed Ms. Meeks is gay but didn't think she committed sodomy, they would have to acquit her. Jurors, all officers of higher rank than Ms. Meeks, issued a "courageous judgment" that should encourage "all members of the military to seek only to serve their country honorably and to do so without undue and unwarranted prying into their private lives, Tigar stated. Ms. Meeks could have faced dismissal from the military, loss of her retirement benefits and up to eight years in a military jail if she had been convicted. She had refused a plea bargain offer by prosecutors that she plead guilty to an assault charge (the gun threat). An officer with 19 years of active-duty service, Ms. Meeks declined to discuss her military future or her sexual orientation. The government's policy against Gays in the military was highlighted in the case of Colonel Margarethe Cammermeyer. She was dismissed from military duty in 1992 due to the ban. In her challenge to be reinstated, federal district court judge Thomas S. Zilly ruled that the Government had discriminated against her solely because of her status as a homosexual and failed to demonstrate a rationale basis for doing so. Walgreens continued. (Continued from page I) such as the Houston Voice would not be allowed was "because it was here before." He argued that they could not let lhe Voice be there because then they would have to let all the publications, such as The Houston Press and Public News, etc. be distributed. He had no response to my statement that I knew for a fact that The Voice had been distributed at the store, at least at the old location, because that is were I used to pick il up. We at The Houston Voice feel that it is totally unfair to allow one magazine and not other community publications. It is a violation of our constitutional rights of free speech. We are asking the community to support placement of The Houston Voice ai the Walgreens Store. If you are a customer there, please ask them to carry The Houston Voice. Publications are sometimes restricted based on grounds of "community standards". Walgreens needs to know that community standards in Montrose and the Lesbian/ Gay Bisexual/ Transgendered Community means "fairness". Radio Music Theatre is proud to announce the premiere of its brand new comedy Rough Night at the Remo Room by Steve Farrell. The show stars RMT regulars Rich Mills, Vicki Farrell. and writer/director Steve Farrell as •"The Fertle Family. . ."a large clan of singing Baptists from the tiny town of Dumpster, Texas. In this new adventure "big city" problems "" wack>' Fertu have come to town in the form of crime, drugs, and even a homeless man! To make matters worse, the unintelligible Doc Moore is trying to deliver some urgent news, but no one can understand him. The end result is a fun night of laughs, music, and more strange characters than you could fit in a Winnebago. Rough Night at the Remo Room premieres August 29th, then follows the usual RMT performance schedule Family is at it again at Radio Music Theatre with shows every Thursday and Friday at 8:30pm and Saturday at 8:30 and 10:50pm. Champagnes, wines, beers, cappuccino, and munchies are available throughout the show. Admission is $14.00 and reservations are required. Tickets may be purchased in advance at Radio Music Theatre (2623 Colquitt, near Richmond and Kirby). or by calling the theatre box office at 522-7722. Justice Delivered The Justice Depart meni reached agreements with an 111 i n o is -based moving company and one of its local agents that allegedly refused to help two Philadelphia residents move because a neighbor with AIDS was pres- eni at the moving site. The agreements, which were reached June 27, resolve a complaint filed by the Justice Department last October in the US District Court in Philadelphia. The complaint alleged that in July 1994. the Bekins Van Lines Company of Hillside, Illinois, and Schlloer Enterprises, Inc., its local agent in Philadelphia, violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by refusing service to two individuals who were moving from Philadelphia to Scot- tsdale, Arizona. According to the complaint, a Bekins- crew arrived at the home of David Homan and began to assess the property to be moved. Allegedly, when the company employees encountered a neighbor whom ihey believed had AIDS, they refused to load any of the belongings. There is no evidence that AIDS can be transmitted through casual contact. "This agreement will help send a message to businesses that it is unlawful to discriminate against a person because they or their associates are infected with AIDS or the HIV virus." said Deval L. Patrick, Assistant Attorney for Civil Rights. Bekins Van Lines of Illinois has agreed to include a policy statement in its procedural manual that addresses the transmissions of infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS in relation to the packing, loading and transportation of household goods. This man ual is distributed to each of Bekins' more than 400 agents around the country. In addition, the company has agreed to pay David Churchill, the individual with AIDS SI 2.000 and Robert Rosen- baum and David Homan. the individuals whose belongings were to be transported, $10,500 and $7,500, respectively. Under a separate agreement, the local Philadelphia affiliate, Schlloer Enterprises Inc., will adopt the parent company's non-discrimination policy and will ensure that its Operations Manager and current dispatchers attend educational seminars about the ADA. The local company will also pay $14,500 to the US Government. Title III of the ADA prohibits businesses from discriminating against persons who have an association with individuals with disabilities. Testing positive for HIV or having AIDS is considered a disability under the ADA. In 1994, the Justice Department reached an ADA settlement with the Philadelphia Emergency Medical Services after they refused services to an injured individual with AIDS. The Department also reached settlements with dentists in Houston, New Orleans and Connecticut who refused to treat patients who were HIV positive or had AIDS. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), AIDS can only be transmitted by sexual contact with an infected individual, exposure to infected blood or blood products, and from an infected pregnant woman to the embryo. Guidelines for community organizations or individual writers interested in having articles printed in The Houston Voice Please slop by or send a selfaddressed stamped business size envelope to: Guidelines 811 Westheimer//105 Houston, TX 77006.
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