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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
File 012
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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 012. 1996-08-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6993.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-23). Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6993

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 012, 1996-08-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6993.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 23, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript PLAIN SPEAKING by Larry Lingle HOUSTON VOICE / AUGUST 23, 1996 11 Now let's get this straight—if you'll pardon the expression— Bill Clinton is a "new" Democrat busily pre-empting the old Republican ideas: Bob Dole really does have a heart and the Republicans are lhe party of inclusion — George McGov- ern, where are you now—and Ross Perot is, well, Ross Perot. And (hat's not to exclude Ralph Nader who just captured the Green Party nod for president (has any gay leader suggested the pink party or the lavender party — nan. that's not our concept of "party" by whatever color). Next, Dole and his latest sidekick. Jack Kemp, with calculated disdain, deny having read their party's platform, let alone feel any loyalty to it's harsh designs. Nader disowned his new allies' written effort and Perot paid for his platform. No doubt Clinton will have a written document tailored to his campaign. Bill Clinton, the New Democrat, approved reformed welfare, hawks a balanced budget, fights crime in the streets and the schools—all ideas once considered Republican territory, at least by the GOP Kemp, who puts passion into an otherwise Dole campaign, even preempted for the Republicans such Democratic icons as Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy who. according to Kemp. would not recognize the Clinton Democracy. Truman would have responded not only "no" but "hell no" to such annexation to such an elitist body politic as the current Republican Party, to say nothing of its religious self-righteousness which ihe Mis- sourian would have railed against with all the vigor he was expended on the Do-Nothing Congress. Say what you will about Clinton's move to the center, at least he has the good sense nut to annex p.ist Republican heroes, the likes of such as Calvin Coolidge, War ren G. Harding. Herbert Hoover. Thomas E. Dewey, Robert A. Tafi Jr., Dwight D. Eisenhower. Ronald Reagan, George Bush or the cleverest of the lot— and the biggest crook—Richard Mil- house Nixon. No, none of these good old boys could ever be placed at the center of the political spectrum, then or now. What are the burning issues coming out of the Republican convention and on the eve of the Democratic bash in Chicago next week? Well . the new center of Dole's campaign is his tax cut which revived ihe tactics of Reagan in 1980 but which even the polls show that Americans apparently aren't sold on this tactic now. The other big issue coming out of San Diego is that of "character."' The Republicans say that they disavow negative campaigning but that their big issue is the fine character of Bob Dole. However, it doesn't take an MBA degree to see the contrast implied with the character of the sitting president. If nothing else. Dole can weigh in with his age as a restraint on the kind of sexual escapades alleged against Clinton. $0 we have a campaign unfolding in which the top three candidates, Dole, Clinton and Perot, all support some form ol tax break, some approach to a balanced budget, each with a version of election reform, and all three supporting maintaining the national defense. And the Republicans, now the patty ol inclusion, are taking the battle for minority votes directly to the Demo crats. They paraded Colin Powell before the nation ami even let him mention those verbolen words, affirmative action and pro-choice OH abortion, before a con- Happy Birthday You Lucky Basset! vention filled with persons not only opposed to those positions, but rabidly so. Then they displayed a black, conservative minister-congressman, former football star from Oklahoma. They would have dragged out Clarence Thomas but, for once, even that partisan judge realized the inappropriateness of the occasion The well-scripted Republican convention attempted to present its best face to Ihe viewing public — thus no Pat Buchanan, in fact, no leading spokesperson from the religious right. The platform itself was approved during a drowsy afternoon session. This also meant that some poignant moments missed included another appearance by Mary Fisher, and AIDS activist, wilh a little black girl with AIDS—her arrival at the convention actually produced one of the more telling pictures—standing with her arms raised as a metal detector scanned her body. Frankly, like many elections before this, the campaign is not driven by ideas or policies hut hy polls and locus groups. All the attention of the Republicans after their convention was not the discontent of the Christian Coalition over being frozen nut of the speeches, but how big a boost did Dole get in the polls. And, then, which poll is more accurate. Even Perot and his Reform Party, meeting on two consecutive weekends in two diverse locations, centered on the pseudo battle between Perot and Lamm, with little or no mention of a platform,. And, unlike the Republican delibera- tions before their convention, the Democrats gathered in Chicago to work out their platform are getting only a passing notice. There are no battles there. So what does the campaign boil down to at this point? Dole is running as Reagan. including the once discredited supply-side voodoo, on a platform of inclusion even as they cut welfare, staunch the flow of immigrants, undercut public education with private vouchers, demonize unions, and slam the door on Gays. The big winners at San Diego were all the lobbying groups hosting the key delegates beyond the glare of the television cameras. And. to a lesser extent, this will be true in Chicago. While much of corporate America, particularly tobacco. has bough! into the GOP big tent—hell, -hey bought the big tent—unions and corporate Hollywood hold sway in Chicago, The big losers, as always, are that vast middle ground of America which Pays ils iaxcs, tries to pay its bills, religiously voie four years and seldom is heard alter the ballots are counted. Yes. democracy's last great hope. at LO&O we have only two -things •to say... 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