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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
File 006
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Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 006. 1996-08-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6987.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-23). Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6987

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996 - File 006, 1996-08-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7015/show/6987.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 826, August 23, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 23, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript S8^ .m.Uu^Yalu.e.b ty StjWMWjtl £40€«dvi faff pay HOUSTON VOICE /AUGUST 23. 1996 5 School Rules New shoes, new do's, and a fresh box of crayons were what I used to look forward to each school year. That, and catching up with family members around the dinner table, reunited after the kids and our parents spent weeks and months at camp, visiting cousins and enjoying assorted vacations. I used to look forward to writing those "How I Spent My Summer Vacation" essays, preparing months in advance, inventing chilling tales of backpacking through the Yucatan or critiquing the Masters at the Louvre. I loved school. School was beyond the breath-to-breath supervision of the extended family. School was where I could experiment with being free, hanging out with the girls my folks deemed unseemly, or "acting like a public school kid" at St. Agnes Academy. School was a relief, an escape from real life. My kids love school too, but not for the same exhilarating choices. I don't get it. They're so . . . different. They go to school to "get to be normal"! They like normal! They like cloak rooms—hey, we're friends, right? I can tell you this: My kids like closets! On his first day of first grade, my son Jose' came home gloating. "I know something you don't know" he singsonged with all the authority in the world. "There are other shapes besides triangles! Ms. Femme showed us! And triangles come in other colors, nol iusl pink." I had wanted my kids' education to less elitisl than mine had been. Maybe I had tried to be too broadminded. Perhaps I should see if there were still desks, uh, "spaces" available at Butches and Beaus School for All-inclusive. It had been a temptation to enroll Lawrence in their pre-kindergarten Dykes and Tykes program. But he was a timid child, as if uneasy being four years old with a green Mohawk and pierced nose. The school's catalog was enticing. "We encourage our students to assertively Act Up! Take Pride! And Parade around in their mother's clothes!" But Lawrence cried and clung onto the grease-stained legs of my coveralls and begged not to go to school there. He wanted to go to "normal" schoo In a compromise reached under duress, this family now celebrates Real Life all summer and suffers through oppressive cultural experiments during the school term. This season we marched in the Lesbian and Gay Pride Parade, celebrated with the Metropolitan Community Church in Dallas and partied with the Houston Pride Band in Corpus Christi. We worshiped at the San Antonio AIDS Foundation Casa of Care and took part in the March on Austin for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Rights. We completed our AIDS Mastery Workshops. So what will Jose' write his summer vacation essay about? "I'm gonna write that I spent [he summer at a Christian youth camp with my cousins," he said. Lawrence say's he's moving to Beaumont to live with his dad. Jazz is on vacation. This is one of her archived favorites, ll was previously published in another periodical . EDITOR'S NOTE: Jazz, its one of my favorites too. Good luck with your new job. —db The True Story of Lesbian Couple to be Film LOS ANGELES—Academy Award Winner Debra Chasnoff (DEADLY DECEPTION) announced today that her next project will be Karen and Sharon . based on the true story of Karen Thompson and Sharon Kowalski. Written by Jan Oxenberg. Karen and Sharon tells the story of Thompson's heroic and highly-publicized eight- year batik' to be reunited with her lover, Kowalski. after Kowalski was severely injured in a car accident. Chasnoff will direct and will also produce the project with Wendy Braitman and Michael Ehren- zweig. "It seems that most people have a hard time imagining that gay people can bring the same depth of love to Iheir relationships as heterosexuals, and that our commitments to each other don't deserve the same status as straight marriages," say's Chasnoff. "I'm excited to bring this love story to Ihe screen. I think it will touch a wide audience with a very different message. we are at a great stage with the project, which was originally developed at HBO. The script is in place and we are now finding the additional financing." In St. Cloud Minnesota. Karen Thompson and Sharon Kowalski bought a house together, exchanged rings, took vows of a lifetime commitment, went to church, and tried to keep their love a secret. The accident changed all that. Kowalski S parents—who denied their daughter was a Lesbian—decided lo take her to a nursing home hundreds of miles away. Thompson, a two-time Ronald Reagan voter who had never used the word **ga) ' to describe her- sell was forced to tell them about her relationship with Kowalski. Eight years later. after une of the country's most bitterly contested cusrody battles, Thompson managed to convince the doctors, the courts, and the world, that Thompson and i Kowalski were indeed a family that ™ deserved the same respect as a married couple. Debra Chasnoff wrote, produced and directed Deadly Deception . which won the 1991 Academy Award for Best Short Documentary. The film received 25 other international awards, including top prizes at festivals around the world. Her latest project. It's Elementary (which recently won best documentary at the San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival), is an inspiring feature documentary about addressing gay issues in elementary school. The film will be screened at OUTFEST'96 and other pro mi tie nt film festivals throughout the fall before its theatrical release. Jan Oxenberg is the writer/director of the critically acclaimed American Playhouse production. Thank You and Goodnight . She was the creative consultant for The Celluloid Closet and is currently writing for the new Marshall Hersko- vitz/Ed Zwick series, " Relativity ," on ABC's fall schedule. Producers Wendy Braitman and Michael Ehrenzw-eig are principals in EBS Pro- ductions, a San Francisco-based firm specializing in international co-productions and financing. They are the associate producers of The Celluloid Closet . directed by Academy Award winners Rob Epstein and jL*„a.N Friedman. HBS Productions ls currentl) developing The Dark End of the Street . a new film by Academy Award winner, Steven Okazaki. Braitman and Ehrenzweig are the founding directors ol |] FC0N Ihe jmei-na. lional Film Financing Conference Which is ;in annual mirkei in, produce seeking financinB *„, liul(.p(.nderil films-
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