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Montrose Voice, No. 280, March 7, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 280, March 7, 1986 - File 001. 1986-03-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6981/show/6956.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-03-07). Montrose Voice, No. 280, March 7, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6981/show/6956

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 280, March 7, 1986 - File 001, 1986-03-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6981/show/6956.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 280, March 7, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 7, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript mnTllrose Gene Hackman Tackles Midlife VOICE Crisis Scott Cutsinger, Inside ''The Newspaper of Montrose" Frid~. March 7, 1986 Issue 280 (713) 529-8490 o All in a Days Work Mayor Kathy Whitmire and City Councilman George Grea­nias assumed a new profesHion for a Rhort time Thursday The two city officials cJimbed aboard a bulJdozer to partici­pate in the ceremonial demolition of the building whkh formerly housed the Chicken Coop. After the two, with the help of a professional operator, pushed in a side of the building, Greaniaa 888isted the petite mayor in her dismount. (Connie WoodR photos). Demolition Draws Vast Media, Political Attention By Pete Diomond Mcmtrotw Voict• Staff Rt'porfrr It's not oflt·n that thf' demolition of a build ing makes ht'adlim.·s or attracts much atlt•ntion, but Thursday's dt·struction of tht· building which housed the Chicken Coop on Wl"'Stheimer C'ertainly was a well atlend('d <'vent More than 100 peopll» including Mayor Kathy Whitmire, Councilman George Grf'anias and ChannE'l J3's Marvin Zindler. turntd out to watch thf' demoli lion of a bar that many people feel Hymbol· ized one of the- mor<' negative aspects of Lower Westhe1mt'r. Bt-fon· the Chicken Coop was clo8(•d in mid·F<'hrunry, it had developed a reputa· lion for lwing a "hustll'r bar." According to a HpokeKmun for dt·velop<·r J.R. Mc..-Con· m•ll, "ThC' bar wus a diHgrnce for both the hetl'..'rosuunl and homoHexual communi· ties." Much of the publicity and "hype" sur­rou nding the demolition waR criticized by f'Omc> membc..·r~ of the gay community who f('lt invitationM to the event st·nt by McConnell had homophobic undertones. MC'Conne1l's spokesman denied thi1:1 how· ever, nH did Mark SC'hmidt. president of the Nenrtown Busine~s Alliance. Con8idE-ring that MontroRe has a large KRV (.'Ommunity, Schmidt said McConnell could not afford to be homophobic because "he'd be ruined. People would boycott him." lnf'tf>ad, Schmidt, like many others_ set'.s th(' d('molition ru; the start of a revital­ization of Lower Wet\theimer. Mc-Connell. who was unable to atlend the demolition, is planning to build •·Wes· theimer Village," an $8 million shopping <'enter. wht·re the Chicken Coop and sev· eral othf'r houRes once ~tood. Some people havt• oon.-idered this a riRky move consid ering Houston's C'urrcnteconom:y. But oth­ers di~pute this, claiming the media ha.s overstated the condition of the city's f'C'On-omv 0 Ttus is n mn1or step forward m the developmi'nt of L:>wf:·r Westheimer;' says John Savwell, president of Liberty Bank. ·The Montrc>se ('('(ln(lmy is in a very pos~· tive modei. Wl''re sort of like Montrose, Texa8. Seeing the development and vigor that is occurring here is very favorable. Maybe the rest of Houston will eventuaUy catch up to us." Councilman GrorJ{e Greanias. whot1e di1'trict 1nclude...., the Montrose area, said Westhcimer Village •·wiIJ undo a lot of the ne,tative image the nrea has ~Otten. (It) will makf' it a bette-r place to live and it will be perceived es a better place to live." 2 MONTROSE VOICE/ MARCH 7 1986 GET ACQUAINTED WITH HOUSTON'S HOTIEST NEW DANCE CWB 15,000 WATI SOUND SYSTEM 500 PERSON CAPACllY DANCE FLOOR ART/QUIET BAR DJ MICHAEL DE GRACE NRG • 901 N. SHEPHERD at 1-10 •PH. 861-4080 CENTRALLY LOCATED• MINUTES FROM MONTROSE MARCH 7, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 Many Still Think AIDS Virus Highly Contagious By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter During the public hearing held at last Thursday's City Council committee meet­ing on health cards, one of the speakers favoring the health cards claimed that the Rev. Jesse Jackson used to spit on the food of white customers at a restaurant he worked for when he was younger. The woman then proceeded to ask that without health cards to insure a person is free of a contagious or infectious disease, what would prevent a restaurant employee who had AIDS from spitting on her food. The fact is a health card does not gua­rantee a chef or waiter will or will not spit on someone's food. There remains a great deal of confusion regarding exactly how the AIDS virus is transmitted. And while it is not known for certain if AIDS can be transmitted through saliva, research indi· cates ~he chances of this occurring are slim. It is generally agreed, however, that transmission most likely occurs through intimate sexual contact and the use of shared, unclean needles. The exchange of semen, blood or blood products is consi· montrose VOICE Al•W T£XA.<;•«iTAR MONTROSE. TEXAS Popu1a11on (ett 19651 32.000 ee,.u. tr•<:ts 401 01 . .&01 02. 40201 , 407 02. 405 02, 403 •nd "04 01 Z•p C()(lff (rough•y) 77006. 77019 (pon1on). 77098 Bollf\ded (1oughly) St\ephefd 01 !.,.,.~u. Allen P•rk.,.,.ay (riorthJ. Main St fffSIJ. US 59 f90ulh} latitude (Mo111tOM Blvd •I Westheomer Rd' 29"4-4'13''N Long1tud• 95•22'50''W. Atlllude 40" ELECTED OfFICtALS FOR MONTROSE Gao•ge G•NnlM. ~tcm City Coun 4dlts CJ 901 B•fbr f71J/ 112·5933 El Franeo LM. ~ml Courity Comml...oN!1 (pc:! I) J001PrMttYl.(!1J/22i.lHll Wallftl' Rank1n Comtable (PC! I) 301 San J-.10 11131 221·5200 Debra Danburg. Ta .. t HO\lse ol Aep<"tmtah~M (dill 137) llUISW fVtry.f113)SlO-al68 c •lg Wut11ngton Tt!•U S«late (dial 13) 2XJ3Carol1~ !1'3!6594343 M.o-,. l.-nd. US HouM ol ReprHen&at1vM (dial 18) ISllPSm•rl'lfl820,(71J17Ji-73.JP The Newspaper ot Montrose Estabhshed 1980 OUR 280th ISSUE. MARCH 7. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston. TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DISTRIBUTION 10.500 ~ w~k•y •n HOUiton tnro..gh 140 m.;or distnbut•on points 1n ltle MQntrote. thfl l/111age the Helghbl ••l•m•lfld pqs-on ,.,. /acror 2 8 e•l•maffld r••~h•P 19_ 400 wee111r 175 coplft Wftkly elsewhere nriml/fld pq1-on rate factor 2.5 H/1mated rHdership 440 weelrty TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (GUARANTEED) 10.675 copies waehly fofal Ht•meted reedersh1p 29.840 wHlrly Contents copynght 1986 Office hours 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publlsher·fld•' ,, Lmda Wyche meneg•ng ed•t<N Connie Woods news Pete Diamond ~wt Da\11d Aoumfort ptodoc/,on Scoll Cutsmger. 8111O'Rourke1e•ws Steve Warren nenon.J corrnpona•n' ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-8490 El!M!Where Te11as (800) 222-1537 or 995220 Elsewhere US (800) 225-C227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulholland edvef!191f1Q' dir.ctot Karen Myrow account eaec"'·~• FOUflding /i.lumbera GreatfJf MOfllfOH Business Guild Gay and lesbian Prest A1aoc11uon New1 Serwcas New!l-One P1c1t1c Ne.,.,.~ Servi<:• Syntf•<:llfld F••tvre SeFvlres & Wr•tefS Bnan Mr Naught Ur1 verNI PreH Syndical• NE>ws Am«lf1Ca Syndicate P0$lMA'>lER S.nd addreSt corr t1ons to 408 AvOfldala Houlton. TX 77006-3028 SublCf'tpl•Oll rtt/e m US "' , .. 1.a env•lotM $49 pet yetr !5l iuun) $19psr11• month1C261ssuHJ.or$125~.,.,...._ (lftll tn.n 26 6HUft) Bitek IHUft; 1100Heh N•flonel .nven111ttf11eptH•,.l.t1·~e Joe D1Sat>.110 R1vend1ll Matklt'ng M6 6th Aven~ New York tOOll. 1212) 242·6863 AO'...,f111t1g f1ead/1f19 Wednesday S 'JOptt1. lor I.sue relaued Friday f'Vaning NOflc•loadv•t•sen LOUl•dv9rtll!ngrat•~uteSeven.A •s:s•HKl•veOct 12 1994 .ndEight·A.,.,. beefl.c11veJ•n 3 R•tJOmlb•litr 'he Mont1ot.e voe. ctoea not usu,,,. r.-pon­slbi.. ty for Ml~••1111ng d.111M R..oers should •d'tlle 1n.e N'"'~' to any Oecfop"1•e .O•E!rt1S1ng dered the major source of contact with the virus. The results of a study which appeared in the Dec. 19, 1985, issue of the New Eng­land Journal of Medicine revealed that in the analysis of the saliva of 71 gay men with AIDS, only one had the AIDS virus present in his saliva. According to Dr. David D. Ho of Massa­chusetts General Hospital in Boston, in that case the amount of the virus present in the saliva was ten thousandfold lower than the amount of virus in the person's blood. City council delays vote on health card issue. See story p. 7 In a more recent study, researchers have reported finding antibodies to the AIDS virus in saliva. Jn the March issue of the journal Blood, researchers from the Har· T STEVE 0 . MARTINEZ, M.D. IN1ERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUAUY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS;KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON. FRI 8-30AM 5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT ~~~s~b~~ J~~\~8~ BY APPOINTMENT ONLY Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston, TX 77027 •621-777 1 --=- vard Medical School and the School of Public Health report the antibodies are different from those found in blood and protect against some viral diseases. The researchers believe the antibodies may prevent the AIDS virus from being spread through saliva. They have sug­gested the antibodies could prevent the virus from entering tissues of the mouth, esophagus and windpipe, or block the virus' action and keep it from spreading to others. "AIDS is an extremely difficult disease to contract,'' says Tom Audette, Montrose Clinic director. "There h.as never been a documented case of a person contracting AIDS (exclusively) through kissing." Does this mean kissing can be consi­dered "safe?" Responses to this vary somewhat, depending on who is answer· ing. For example, according to an article which appeared in the Bay Area Reporter, the AIDS guidelines in San Francisco call dry, social kissing "safe," while "deep" or "French" kissing is Jisted as "possibly safe." No form of kissing is considered "unsafe." However, in accordance with the national Center for Disease Control, the KS1 AIDS Foundation of Houston recom· mends that '"deep,' 'soul' or 'French' kiss­ing with possible exchange of a volume of saliva should be avoided." Audette adds that "French" kissing should be avoided as a "safety precaution" because it also ia possible to ingest AIDS-infected blood .. Jn addition, the KS' AIDS Foundation recommends that saliva not be used as a lubricant during intercourse. Gumbo Cooks Needed for KPFI' Cook-Off From a Press Release Gumbo cooks are needed to enter KPFT's Second Annual Cajun Gumbo Cook-Off. The contest will be held Sunday, March 23 at Clear Lake Park, rain or shine. The preparer of the best seafood or non· seafood gumbo wins a vacation for two in Las Vegas. The entry fee is $50. Proceeds benefit KPIT FM90, listener supported radio. Entry forms are available by calling 526-4000. The Pure Cajun Music show airs Tuesdays from 5:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m. and on Saturdays, 6:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. on KPFI' ~,. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7, 1986 The ffiontrose Uoice announces a new Public Affairs Column 'l\sk Citq Hall,, Bq Houston Citq Councilman qeorqe qrea n ia s Ever had a problem with C1t4 Hal\? Anq citq service? Perhaps qou're just curious about some aspect of our citq government or the services it is required to perform for its citizens (streets, police, garbage. health, utilitq regulation, or even the zoo) Councilman Greanias will answer qour questions. address qour concerns, or help qou get around Citq Hall 'red tape" Write "Ask Cilq Hall," c/o IDontrose Uoice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 7'2006 (1.Jour q uestion will be answered in the IDonlTose Uoice. Confid en lia\itq can be main tained if d esired. On p ersonal i ssue s, Councilman 4reania s will provide a personal answer.) Startinq in ffiarch in the newspaper of ffiontrose J Qit Down the '3iddle ! ~ and you Qit Down the ;Bow ... J .I ;: J Qit down to the Bra3os and f Dance on Our '3lo' I J Calling all Good Coon-Ass Boys Monday is Your N ite at the BRB Dance 8:00 to closing to all "!}Jur favorites! W;f-Y'Ntl;._!i•in;t:IY'i'm·'.· 2400 BRAZOS Now Serving Corona Beerl (713) 528-9192 BREAKFAST SPECIAL SERVED AFTER Jam NIGHTLY 2 Eggs Any Style w/Bacon or Sausage, Hash Browns and Toast or English Muffin Lunch • Dinner • Sunday Brunch 804 Pacific • Houston • (7") 524-7931 MARCH 7, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 But It's a Double-Edged Sword Montrose Area Gasoline Prices Continue to Drop By Connie Woods Montn)Se Voire Staff Reporter One does not have to read the weekly rig count to know what is going on in the Houston economy. Nor does one have to read the daily newspaper, watch the six o'clock news or listen to radio news reports to know what is happening. Just drive down Montrose Blvd., Ala· bama or Westheimer and read the price signage. It is evident that the price of oil, along with Houston's economy, continues to reflect what is occurring in the world oil market. Read the signage. For regular gasoline the prices at area locations range from 8.5.9 cents per gallon to 91.9 cents per gal­lon. The price of regular unleaded ranges from 89.9 cents per gallon to 93.9 cents per gallon. One service station manager in Mont· rose said the prices will continue to drop. "As long as the crude oil prices continue to drop, the price at the pump will also continue to drop," said the manager who requested that neither his name nor that of his company be used. "What I am seeing on the streets," he said, "is that the independents are bring­ing the prices down." According to an articJe by the Asso­ciated Press, the price of main grade U.S. crude dropped again Monday, March 3, reaching a "below $13 a barrel in the futures market and falling under $20 per barrel in oil company contracts." The article, pubhshed in the Houston Chronicle, also pointed out that the U.S. oil industry has quoted contract prices between $1.5 and $19.50 a barrel. "This is the first time since 1979 that domestic oil companies fell below the $20 per barrel cost," according to the articJe. The price of gasoline per barrel in the community reflects the drop in oil prices. The major oil company service stations in the area, including Shell and Gulf, have dropped more than IO cents a gallon dur­ing the past week. The major companies are now selling their gasoline at 91.9 cents per ga11on for regular and 93.9 cents per gallon for regu· Jar unleaded. The independents. on the other hand, which include Shamrock-Sigmor, Stop-N­Go and 7-11 convenience stores, range in price from 85.9 cents per gallon to 90.9 cents per gallon. "I just don't know what's going to happen with the price," one clerk said. "We heard Friday we could expect addi­tional price drops." For the Houston customers the price drop appears attractive. However, the overall picture of its effects creates ques­tions for the Houston economy. Already affected by the price drops are retailers, restaurants, clubs and even the government funding including the state. SteveShimer,ownerofthe611 Club and the Venture-N, recently pointed out that the price of drinks at a club in Austin, Dallas, San Antonio and other Texas cit· ies have definitely increased and remain higher than Houston's prices. "But with our economy right now," he explained, "we cannot raise our drink pri­ces as much as those other cities have." Once considered the energy capital of the world, Houston now reflects more of what happens in Abu Dhabi than it does in its own skyline. Visiting Nurses Receive Second AIDS-Targeted Grant By Pete Diamond Montrose Vmce Staff Reporter The Visiting Nurse Association of Hous· ton, for the second time in just over a month, received a grant last week in sup­port of their AJDS Home Care Team pro­ject, further guaranteeing the program's existence. The VNA was one of 206 organizations nationwide to receive the $20,000 grant, and one of more than 4000 initial app1i· cants. The grants are awarded through Project Hometown America, a program created and funded by American Express for the purpose of encouraging grassroots problem solving. This latest award supplements a grant of nearly $120,000 rE'<'eived in early Febru· ary from the United Way. The Houston VNA was the first VNA in the country to receive a United Way grant targeted spe­cifically for the care of AIDS patients. Together, the grants will support the VNA'H AIDS Home Care Teams, two groups of individuals who provide in home health care for persons with AIDS. Each team is headed by a registered nurse, under the supervision of a physi· rion, and includes a medical soC'ial worker, home health aide, volunteer and physical therapist when needed. The pro­gram requires that the patient have some­one at home who is willing to provide round·the-clock core, or the patient must be• willing to accept a caretaker provided by the VNA 1'0ur AIDS teams hovl' received inten· sive training and deal exclusively with AIDS patients," says Craig Watson, VNA chief executive officer. "The care they can provide allows many of these patients to stay in their own homes where they are more comfortable, have a little more con­trol over their environment and are less likely to contract opportunistic infections than in the hospital. The cost of home care, the very best that we can provide, is also substantial1y less than the cost of hospital care." Based on the number of projects apply­ing for the grant, Ross Rigler, VNA mar· keting director, said the VNA was surprised, but pleased, to receive the grant. "It shows they recognize this as an innovative way to help AIDS patients," he added. Following review at the local level, grant applications were considered by a 72·m<'mber national review team, consist­ing of individuals from various social ser­vicE- organizations, businesses and universities. Recipients were then selected on the basis of how well their projects incorpo­rated new ideas and approaches to solving a problem; plans to raise public awareness of community problems; new people par· ticipating in community service; new ways of involving the private sector, and coalitions of previously unrelated groups. Receiving a grant was also contingent upon a proj("('t being able to match the grant amount with other local funding, surh aa thE' VNA 's earlier United Way award. "Having good home care available is especially important in the case of AIDS patients," Wat.son says. "We are con­vinced, and we are delighted to see that Project Hometown America is also con· vinced, that this new program is highly valuable to AIDS patients and their fami· lies, and also to the Houston community as a whole." Under the United Way grant, the Home Care Team program will be able to operate 808 Lovett until about August, according to Rigler. '"The new grant will allow us to extend the life of the program and serve more patients as well," he said. Another Houston project, the El Pro­jecto de Esperanza (Hope Project), also received a Project Hometown America grant. Funding for that program enables low income families to build their own homes and assume a no interest, no down payment mortgage. 521-1015 Boulevard Big Bang $1.99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage and 2 Pancakes BLACKBOARD SPECIALS DAILY, EVER CHANGING, ALWAYS FRESH 6 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7 1986 Special Variety Benefit Show March 16th, 9pm proceeds going to Lisa Renee Barnes who needs a liver transplant M.C. Zack & Mr. Tracy featuring a symphony of laser lights and special effects honoring Challenger II astronauts by Bob Thompson I I W:q£ lttxil£ 1011 Bell 659--0453 Houston's Oldest Gay Bar ~· -----------, : s10°0 1 ! off ! I CUP THIS AD and attach 1t to I >ULJr next order for S 10.00 off I a~ of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Muitipart Forms • 2-Color Printing• Hyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes • Am ouncements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices SPEEDY PFNN T~;:;RVICE Fast. R~1a~ Smt.c~. Exct'ffmt Quahty. l.QY.I Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. lbl!XkP.&eOIC~Rcxll~M.1pti!'fldqt CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE ll.JSiNESS Gl.Jtl..D. GREATER BEUAIRE CHAMBER Of COMMERCE 1 :~co:~~o.:~== 1 L----------.J montrose VOICE The Nevvspa.per of Montrose is novv a. va.ila. ble a. t a.11 9 Mon trose-a.rea. STOP"fO-- ~f«'~~ Stein & Toklas D E T E CTI VES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. He;:; is $7.so for Murd;;: is Murder is Murder, by Sa,;;-uel Stew;;d. __ address city state .._._.zip Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 To better seme your needs ... TEXAS STATE OPTICAL announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 University 528-1589 T ues.-Sat. 10 a.m.- 6:30 p .m. Closed Monday TSO-South !\fain 4414 S. Main 523-5109 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Sa turday MERIDIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW 325 J09fmo 528t- 395Jmo 7lSi 569/mo '86 CADILLAC o;vm;- J29fmo '86 MAZDA ~- - --~ 626 178/mo '86 MERCEDES BENZ 190E )4CJ!mo JOOE 4981mo s&OSL nsimo ~RSC::t!_E_ 944 398/mo 944 Turbo 498imo --'~6_T9YOTA_ Camry tnlmo Crliu 181ilmo CALL LEE BORBA (713) 97 5-1872 '86 HONDA Accord 159/mo '~l ude 17'/mo ~G UAR X16 569/mo '86 BUICK Skyl.1A 17'9/mo EIK tr.1 27'91mo BETTER LAWilS & CiARDEilS Total lawn maintenance including mowing. edging, trimmrng , pruning, fertihzrng, spra'ling • firewood .~. • lled mulching f.t.i • Azalea feeding • .,:~~':\~ • Debns Remoual .. ~~~ • Complete Tree Seru1ce ' l • Stumps Removed • Total Fencing Services (Cedar, notched Picket, Treated . e tc .) • Complete Sprinkler SQ.stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN q;;~ FINEST 24 HOUR RESTAURANT ~ - ~·~ · ~ · ~ · ~ · ~·~ · ~ 1102 WESTHEIMER , HOUSTON GAY OPERATED 522-3332 A Friendly Neighborhood Bar 2402 Mandell at Fairview 529· 2949 uve Entertainment Happy HOur S-7pm Hours: spm-2am CLOSED SUNDAYS 0 0 0 THE 0 0 LISTKEEPERS 0 0 522-2268 0 0 LET US KEEP YOUR LISTS: 0 0 0 0 *Business *Invit ations 0 0 *Family *Chr istmas 0 0 *Friends *Direct Mail 0 O *Wine *Cassettes O o *Albums *Video Tapes o 0 0 0 ADDRESS LABELS DUR 0 0 SPECIAL TY! 0 lnitJal entry 1 o each 0 Pnnted on pressure SCflSltlve labels 0 O 04each o MARCH 7, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 7 City Council Delays Vote on Health Cards By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Sta(( Reporter If the recommendations on health cards proposed by the City Council's committee on Communicable/ Infectious Disease Control are approved by the Council, the debate over issuing health cards as a means of controlling the spread of AlDS in Houston will-at least for now-be laid to rest. On Wednesday, the City Council was to have voted whether or not to accept a set of recommendations which oppose health cards for food handlers and other food , day care and school employees. Council­man Rodney Ellis, on behalf of Council­man Larry McKaskle, ca1led to postpone the vote for one week until McKasklecould be preRent to vote. McKaskle was the coun­cilman who first prop0t;ed the health card ordim .. nce. A vote concerning two other ordinances also was delayed until next week. One of theRt> ordinances would give the city health director power to close or take pun ative action against cstaliehments where a significant number of sexual encounters oceur that could lead to the transmission of Rexually transmitted diseases such as AIDS. Among the etitabliehments ronsi, dered include adult bookstores and arcadt>s. Tht> Communicable/ Infectious Disease Control committee, chaired by Council· man Jim Greenwood, was formed three months ego to consider a proposed ordi· nonce requiring employees in certain establishments to be tested for any infec· tious or contagious disease end to carry a health card stating that they are free of such diseases. Following a series of eight committee meetings, where testimony was heard from a total of30 spt>akers, seven tentative recomendations were drawn up for sub­mittal to the City Council foHowing a pub­lic hearing. The recommendations ca JI for the Coun­cil to reject the proposed ordinance and not require any group of workers to be screened for tuberculosis, syphilis or other communicable or infectious diseases, including AIDS. In addition, the committee has asked the city to work cloi~er with the KS! AIDS Foundation of Houston, Inc., to educate high risk individuals as well as the gen· eral population about AIDS. The other Councilman Jim Greenwood in council chambers during the "health card" hearing (Pete Diamond photo) recommendations concern the food ser· vice industry and efforts the city should undertake with the Houston Restaurant Association to further educate food service workers in the areas of sanitation and food contamination. Speaking before the committee at last Thursday's public hearing, city Health Director James Haughton said, "The way to prevent AIDS is by educating the public, all segments of the public." Health cards, he added, would not be an effective means Reproductive Rights At Issue of accomplishing this, "Health cards were never used by health departments to protect food . They were always a mechanism for screening large susceptible populations" for infectious diseases, he said. Haughton also cited that 80 percent of the food poisoning outbreaks that have occurred in Houston were bacteria-related and that of these out· breaks, only five percent were attributed to the food handlers themselves_ Haughton added that AIDS, a sexually transmitted viral disease, is not easy to contract and that even families who live with an AIDS patient should have little concern over coming down with the dis· ease. Nevertheless. nine of the 10 people who spoke at Thursday's public hearing favored the reinstatement of health cards. Many expres:--ed fear about the disease and a lack of confidence in specialists because AIDS is a relatively new disease. "AIDS is too new a dil:iease for anyone to call himself a specialist," said John Fafou· takis. Health cards are in the public's interest, he added, because "no action we take here iis going to be 100 percent effec­tive, but at least we can reduce the likeli· hood of contracting communicable diSt"ases." Steven Hc1tze, the outspoken Straight Slate leader who first pushed for health cards in Hou11ton. said the cardinal rule of public health is to prevent the spread of communicable diaeaseh. Despite the comments favoring heaJth cards, the committee unanimously appruved the recommendations, a vote which Hotze said was "not unexpected." He claiml:i this was because "there was no fair, objective, oppotiition voice" in the committee. Hotze l:i&id Greenwood. has had the sup. port of the Gay Political Caucus and that he and Councilwoman Eleanor Tinsley, a second committee member, had control of the committee. Councilman John Goodner, the third committee member, originally favored the idea of issuing health cards. but was swayed by testim· ony presented during early hearings. Saying that the health card issue has "fallen from the public eye," Hotze said "we will see what the council does and consider the options available to u~." Local Representatives to March in Washington By Connie Woode Montrose Vou•tt Staff RePorter While many people will be gathering for the weekly church service or preparing the traditional dinner this Sunday, approxi· mately 300 Texas women will be gather­ing in Washington, DC, for the National March for Women's Lives. Organizers say that more than 200,000 women and men, along with members of the NationaJ Orgaization for Women, will march to commemorate the Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision making abortion a constitutional right. Various Houston organizations, includ· ing the Coalition of Labor Union Women, the Houston Coalition to End Clinic Vio­lence, the ACLU of Greater Houston, the Women's Group, Womynspace, the Hous· ton NOW, and the Texas Abortion Rights Action l.eague, will beamongotherorgan· izations sending repreAentatives to the nation'• capital. Kathy Auden, preaident of Texas NOW, aaid the three-mile march will lead the group to a large rally where special guest speakers will address the issue of abortion and women'a individual rights. "We want them to know that we are not going back to illegal abortion," she said concerning the message of the march. On Monday she will join other reprei-en· tatives to lobby on the Civil Rights Resto­ration Act to restore Title IX which eliminated sex discrimination on college campuses. The week's activities will culminate with a large march in Los Angeles on March 16 which commemorates Intt"rna· tional Women'sDay and National History Week Abortion continues to draw attention and discussion from both elements, the pro-choice and the pro-life groups. On Jan. 22, representatives of both factions were in Washington on the 13th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision. Rrprt'Bentatives of the pro-life groups approached President Reagan to give his support to reversing the legality of abor­tion . According to some, the abortion issue transcends just the physical act of elimi· nating a pregnancy. "If the government can tell us what do with our bodies, they can tell us everything else," said Ruth Sathre, a member of the Collective of Womynepace. "It isae much a lesbian issue as for other women," she continued."There may be times when we need an abortion-maybe caused by rape or something like that." She also pointed out that lesbian women are often political activists and are aware of women's rights. "We have the energy to get things done and are open and suppor· tive of straight women," she said. "Women do have the right to control their bodies and it should be preserved," remarked Cynthia Funderburke, a mem her of the Houston NOW and the Coa· lition Againt Clinic Violence. "No one has the right to trll us 'no.' I am committed to women whether they are heterosexual or homosexual.'' She also pointed out that women should not ht" the property of men. "We still have laws on the books that reflect. this," she explained referring to law stating that a husband can aRsault hie wife and not be charged with rape. "I don't want anyone to control a woman's reproductive sys· tern," she added. Funderburke will be one of the Houston representatives attending the march in Washington. She said she found out a week ago that she had received a grant from the Houston Area NOW for her trip. Funderburke reiterated. "More impor· tantly, the issue may not affect me directly, but I am a woman. I am a femi· nist." In a priz~winning essay at the Univer· sity of Houston last year, Colleen Ellmore, a graduate student. stated, "For those women and men who struggled in the early !960's and !970's for liberalization of criminal abortion Jaws, the Supreme Court's decision in 1973 represented an end to the horror of illegal abortion." She went on to ~ay that "so-called 'pro­hfe' groups have been working at federal, state, and local levelR to pass legislation which would t>everely limit a woman's access to safe and legal abortion." When asked to ret1pond to President Reagan's Jan. 22 comment, " ... sacredness of human rights ... ! support that right," Auden said, "That is exactly what we're ta1king about is the sacredne!;s of human rights and the right to choose." 8 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7, 1986 Looking for ROMANCE? You've found it! There are an estimated 250,000 gay men and women in the Houston area, and yet many cannot seem to meet the right person! If you are unattached and over 19 years old and would like a civilized alternative to singles bars, welcome to Lambda's Unlimited Dating Service' As close as your mail box. Lambda will let you enjoy single life the way 1t should be enioyed, with ready access to an almost unlimited supply of interesting dates. Lambda's members are gays that are looking for an interesting and fun way to meet successful gays like you With an effective, computerized method, you can meet gay partners for dates. friendship or life-long relationships that are fun and safe' This service is exciting because it enables you to meet gay people who flt your preferences for age. race, residence. personality and lifestyle. Even before you meet, you and your computer­ized match have a lot in common Many find 1t uncanny the way their dates match their personal­ities and tastes. Membership Just tilt out this form and mall it together with the low $35.00 processing fee. and you shall rece1ve a minimum of five dates This membership includes your name hsted in the computer for an entire year. dunng which other new members may be matched to you and receive your contact information on their lists of matches If in the event you meet someone and no longer would like your name to be matched with others, please contact us. If you are not satisfied. we will make a prompt. full refund of your $35.00 membership fee. Instructions Please fill out the form as completely as you can The truth and accuracy of your answers are crucial 1n receiving compatible dates Answer all questions directly on the form. Fill in the blanks for questions 1-4 Answer the remaining questions by checking the description of your choice. Put more than one mark when you feel it is necessary When you complete the questionnaire go back and put a star (* ) next to the five qualtties you feel are the most important A. All lntorm•tlon on every member 11 held In the 1trlcte1t of confidence. Please print clearly. Name Address Coty State Zip By signing this. I agree that Lambda's Unltm+ted Oatmg Service will not be held liable for any behavior of the people I meet through its services Signature Date ---- _ 1 Your age Date of Birth ---- 2 Occupation -------- 3 Your Height 4 Weight 5. Your Sex M_F - 6. Your Race White __ Black Hispanic Other 7. Do you date members of other races Yes _ Seldom _ Never_ 8 Your political stand Liberal Conservative None 9 Your paht1cal interest Active_ Moderately active _Do not care _ 10. Your birthplace US/Canada _Asia _ Europe_ Latin America _ Africa _Other_ dJAW 11. How much formal education have you had? Some high school High school grad Some college _ College grad Some grad school Advanced degree 12. How intelligent do you consider yourself? Exceptionally bnght Above average About average _ Below average 13. What yearly income do you consider adequate? $8.000 or less $9,000 to $14.000 $15,000 to $19.000 $20.000 to $29.000 $30.000 to $49,000 More than $50,000 Does not matter 14. Which Houston area would you prefer to have your match live in? Montrose/Heights Inner Loop North Houston Soutti Houston East Houstol" West Houston B. 1 Which activities/social do yoi.. enJoy? Biking Driving Sailing Bicycling Dancing Studying Talking Listening to music Competing in sports Partying Walking Working _ Eating Creating Art Organizing People Travehng Shopping Fnong things_ Attending meetings Entertaining Horseback riding Camping Tennis Card playing _ Drinking Volunteer work _ Jogging __ Cooking Gambling Rock Concerts Softball _ Computers Seeing sports events Singing _ Going to movies Dining out Aerobics Electronics __ Golf 2. Which do you consider yourself? Non-smoker Non-drinker Light smoker Light drinker Heavy somker Heavy drinker Occasionally expenment with drugs Never use drugs _ Smoke pot Use inhalants Heavy drug user _ 3. What kmds of parties do you en1oy? Loud & lively _ All Quiet & dignified None 4. What goals are most important to you? Wealth _Serenity _ Popularity _ Knowledge Power Respectability ~ 5. Which would best describe your social attire? Jeans/Casual Preppy1Formal Western Drag Leather ·- Transvestite 6. Where do you en1oy going on dates? Movies_ Weekend trips _ Driving around Outdoor activities ·- Museums Sports events Clubs Dinner -·Concerts & plays Dancing Each other's homes_ 7 Which of the followmg words best describe you? Romantic Sociable Lazy Moody Tough Sexy Witty Tidy Well-informed Dominant_ Anxious Reserved Emotional _ Old-fashioned Possessive _Demanding Healthy Quiet Aggressive_ Shy Patient _ Talkative Affectionate Tolerant Athletic Opt1mistim1st1c Curious Self-reliant _ Passive 8. Which of these qualities do you value most m a date? Looks Build Intelligence Patience Honesty Ambition _ Loyalty _ Oaring Manners Passion Money _ Strength _ Punctuality Decisiveness Kindness _Sophistication Seit-assurance Sense of humor _ Understanding Mystery Excitement _Virtue 9 Which applies to your characterist1c(sJ most? Very masculine Somewhat feminine Fairly masculine Very feminine Butch 10. What type of people are you most comfortable with? Outdoor types Cultured Working people Artists _ Average folks Intellectuals Professionals 11 What type(s) of books do you read? Science fiction _ Classics Humor Non-f1ct1on Poetry _Novels Texts Mysteries Fiction 12. What type(s) of music do you en1oy? Rock _ Jazz _ New Wave Disco Classical Country Western Reggae Light classics Aehg1ous Folk __ C. 1 What 1s your current marital status? Never married Divorced Wrdowed 2. Do you have dependent children? No Yes (llvmg elsewhere) Yes (living with me) 3. Do you like children? Yes Sometimes No 4. Are you considered attractive? Yes. very Usually Sometimes No 5. Do you consider yourself? Strictly gay Bisexual 6. How often do you date? Almost every night A few times a week Once a week Irregularly 7 How would you describe your past dating relat1onsh1ps? Meaningful Comfortable Happy Intense Long-lived Superficial Interesting Stormy Platonic No pattern 8. What would our ideal future dating relationship be? CasLal Considerate Physical Platonic Intimate Sensible Exclusive Intense 9 What age group do you usually date? \t varies A lot younger _ Somewhat younger My own A lot older Somewhat older 10. What type of facial and body heir do you find desirable? Smooth hairless face Clean shaven Mustache Beard Hairy legs Hairy underarms Hairless body Very hairy 11. Check the followmg miscellaneous body description that you tmd desirable in e date. Small to average body build Average to large body build Very large endowment Circumcised Non-circumcised 13. Check the tollowmg that best descflbes you Smooth hairless face Clean shaven __ Mustache Beard Hairy legs Hairy arms _ Hairless body Very hairy Small to average body build Circumcised Average to large body build Non-circumcised Very large endowment 14. What are your favoflte bedtime acttv1t1es? Cuddling/caressing Phone sex •·safe sex'' French active French passive Greek active Greek passive Experimental/kinky Now that you have finished the questionnaire, go back and put a star (* ) next to the qualities that you feel are the most important 0. Tell a tnend about Lambda's Unhm1ted Dating Service and you can receive 1/2 price on your next submittal for five names' This is how 1t works. All you need to do is have your friend mail 1n his/her appl1callon with your name filled in the reference area How did you hear about Lambda's Unllm1ted Dating Service? Gay community publication (specify) Friend (name) Club (specify) Other ···p1ease make make a donation to help our friends in our communit_y You may donate. to one or both of the foltowr mg organizations. You may include your donation 1n _the same check or make your check payable to the organiza­tion of your choice. Please specify which organ1zat1on and the amount of your donation KS/AIDS Foundation. or Fight Against 21 06 Please send completed form with $35.00 (check or money order) to· Lambda's Unlimited Dating Service P.O. Box 7418 Houston, Texas 77248-7148 (713) 496-3371 MARCH 7, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 9 Many Cite Rising Insurance Costs Local Club Owners Feel Economic Crunch By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Increased expenses, such as taxes and insurance, required just to open the door, have forced many area bar owners to pass thl:" cost down to patrons in the form of higher drink prices. According to Ed Moniger, owner of E. J.'s, insurance for his bar has more than tripled in the last year. The same holds true for Alan Pierce, owner of the Brazos River Bottom. "Liquor liability alone has increased at my club from $3000 to $6000 to $8000 depending on the coverage," said Pierce. "The total package for insurance is now $22,000, as compared with $7000 a year ago," he added. Pierce pointed out that insurance com· panies really do not want to insure bars anymore because of the liability involved. Based on new third party liability laws, the question remains in the courts as to a club's liability and responsibility for the actions of its customers. The issue lies with the problem of the liability of the bar owner and the, bar­tender who serves drinks to a customer. "We must throw a drunk out of the bar but we are still liable when he leaves," said Moniger. Based on the bar's liability, the cost of insurance has forced bar owners to increase their prices. According to Pierce, he has had to raise his happy hour drinks 25 cents. Steve Shimer, owner of the 611 Club, also raised his prices by 25 cents for the first time since he opened his club. Shiner said his insurance alone has increased by $11 ,500 a year. Moniger said his insurance costs $8000 a year and his liquor liability was $350 five years ago. "For the same insurance coverage today, multiply that$350 by II. That is if you can find anyone to write it," Moniger explained. Shimer pointed out that insurance is not the only reason prices have increased . "We are now paying higher taxes and more to the beer companies," he said. Rising operating costs for area bars are being passed down to customers in the form of higher drink prices (Connie Woods photo) "Based on the state's economy right now, we could see an increase in our Jiquor tax from 12 to 15 percent during the next legis­lative session," he continued. "The bar business pays a tremendous amount of taxes to the state,'' Shimer said. "And here they want to kill the Golden Goose," referring to the lobbyists who would like to close the bars down in Tex88. "The thing that scares me most is losing the bulk of the bars. If gays don't have a place to meet it will hurt the community," he explained as he cited the only three clubs which have been in business for at least 12 years. Shimer attributed several factors to the decrease in club business, including the scare of AIDS, lobbying by Mothers Against Drunk Drivers, the Texas Alcoholic and Bev· ernge Commi88ion crackdown, the Houston Police Department's increased efforts to arrest intoxicated drivers 1eaving the clubs, and more important1y, "The bottom fell out of the oil business and Houston's in troub1e." Shimer also pointed out that each club in the Montrose community contributes a sig· nificant amount to the many projects itspon· sore, including KS1 AIDS Foundation, the contributions to 21.06 and the Texas Human Rights Foundation, and other organizations and groups. "We don't mind contributing. We want to contribute but after a while we run out of money to contribute," he explained. Pierce pointed out that 12 percent of his gross income goes directly to the state. "Every night when I check up I automati· cally set aside 12 per cent for TABC," he said. "That's the money that must be paid and paid on timt> " BBBed on taxes and licenses, Pierce said it cost him at ]east $16,000 a year just to Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz open the door which does not include fur­nishings , inventory , utilities or employees. According to Moninger, the bar owners locally as well 88 members of Bar Owners Association of Texas would like to est.a~ lish their own immrance program. "If we did," he said, .. we could probably save about 25 percent of the insurance cost annually." Treva Neill, an agent with Draper and Associates, said, "Traditionally, insuring a bar which sells liquor is not a good risk for insurance companies." "Liquor liability insurance is definitely a must (for club owners). But it would be conservative to say that insurance for clubs has only tripled," she continued. She pointed out that even restaurants which sell liquor are also having difficulty gettting the necessary coverage. For example, she told of a club and restaurant on Montrose who had coverage but when the time came to renew the coverage the price had rocketed to $25,000 a year for $300,000 coverage. The Jegal climate today has gone her· serk, ''she remarked. "If a person goes into a convenience store to buy a beer and something happens in the parking lot, the convenience store can be held liable." She went on to say that insurance com­panies are hesitant to insure clubs because of the increased liability wherein the bar­tender, the waiter or even the owner can be held responsible for the intoxicated person leaving the bar. "It doesn't matter if they started drink­ing in another bar and enter a particular bar before the effects were actually evi­denL The last place that person was drink­ing could be the one liable if a death or accident occurred." And as Pierce said, "It's a 'Catch 22.' We can't let the drunk stay in our bar and we can't kick him out on the street.'' In addition, he also pointed out that clubs have to have insurance but few com· panies will even consider them and even those who do quoted prices which are all but prohibitive. Physically OK? How About a Mental Health Checkup? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. NeU's America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice Mental health is the nation's No. I health problem. The National Association for Mental Health estimates that there are about 8 million persons who have emo­tional problems which require profes· 8ional help. Inner c>motional stress is sometimes hard to judge from the out.side. For an arcurate estimate, it takes your own sub­jective report. The items ahead are similar to those found on mental health question· naires. Check each true or false to learn where you stand on mental fitne88 . The more honest you are, the more accurate the test will be for you. Keep in mind as you go through the list that there are three strong tell-tale signs of emotional overload: 1.overreactions (e.g., like flying off the handle or being tense often); 2. health changes (e.g. bodily pains and malfunctions); and 3. depression. l. Without apparent reason, I feel sad enough to cry two or three times a month 2. I drink, gamble or smoke too much. 3. I remain in bed rather than go to school or work (once a month). 4. I have been lo&ing, rather than gain· ing, friends lately. 5. I get anxiety attacks (one or two times Inner emotional stress is sometimes hard to judge from the outside a month). 6. I suffer from strong headaches (two or three times a month). 7. I eat too much or too little. A. I havf' unusually restless sleep pat­terns. o Answers Every it('m on our list is answered true by most of us from time to time. What decides whether we have a serious difficulty that might require help depends on three fac· tors: I. How long does it last; 2. How intense is the symptom; and 3. How much does it interfere with normal living rou­tines. A favorite question is: Do men have more emotional problems than women do? PsychiatriAUi Frod Ilfeld and Leonard Pearlin of the National Institute of Mental Health surveyed 2299 Chicago residenUi, agee 18 to 64, and found that twice as many women as men sought professional help for their problems. Female respond­ents reported more physical health ail­ments , had a higher level of psychosomatic disorders and took more energizers and tranquilizers than men did. Most of those who reported having symptomi;; strong enough for treatment were rated as ha\.ing low self.esteem and low self-sufficiency The doctors did not find differences in frankness among the men and women. nor were men more likely to deny their problems. One interesting finding was that the single factor which seems to help women most is a meaningful job, particularly one which gives her higher status. If we might add our own clinical expe-­rience to this. a satisfying job is an equally stabilizing influence on men as well and is • a powerful form of psychotherapy in it.self. o Score You may need a mental heahh checkup if you answered more than three items true but keep in mind the following: ' There are no right or wrong answers to the quiz. Any upset, like a setback at work a ~Ot>s of moitey or a broken romance, ma; trigger a temporary swing away from nor· mal pattemA of living. However, most peo­ple snap back and don 't require professional help. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7, 1986 Qu e ~:.:: tion~::: About Heal th ~( j\ ~\tters? lL /. Lp,1 in the ~;Medicine . Chest Beglnnlng April 4. the Medicine Chest debuts in the Montrose Voice. A ser•1ice of the Montrose Clinic. the Medicine Chest will answer readers• questions about heal tr, health care and maintenance . Anonymous questions can be mailed to: The Medicine Chest C / O The Mortrose Voice 408 Ft"ondale Houston. Texas 77006 watch for CHUTES Mr. J't' l/Jt /)m o~I '' Butch Contest Coming Soon Certified PLUMBING ·, • Fast, Fair, Friendly • Your Neighborhood Plumber Licensed and Insured Purveyors of Fine Food & Spirts Open 7 Days a Week Join Us for Lunch Starting at llam 1834 Westheimer 522-7020 Remington Place Apartments ** Special** 1 Month Free Rent 1 Bedrooms $265 & up $100 Deposit 2 Bedrooms $290 & up $150 Deposit 4 Pools, Hardwood Floors, Distinctive Floor Plans, Convenient Location Call Teresa or Pam 965-0589 2210 Mid Lane (Inside 610 Loop. near Galleria) NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE: " T••I Zum Kio," "You Ant Not Alone," " M•I• Couple, " " Ernesto, " "El~" FREE MEMBERSHIP No Deposit for Membenl • RENTl\l GIFT CERTIFICATES llVl\JL.llBLE • SAME 0.-.Y DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECll\l ORDERS • llll TN'ES GLlllAANTEEO •:. Don Baker to Appear at Houston Fundraiser A fundraising reception in support of the Texas Human Rights Foundation's effort to repeal the Texas sodomy law will be held this evening, Friday, March 7, at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel. A $20 donation is requested to help offset legal fees, which are expected to exceed $150,000 in the Baker vs. Wade appeal. The reception, scheduled for 6:00- Don Baker, Dallas actiuist who instituted the 21.06 challenge 8:00 p.m., will be held in the Castillian Room of the Shamrock Hilton, 6900 Main at Holcombe. Don Baker, plaintiff in the case, is expected to attend, as are Tom Coleman, THRF executive director; Barbara Jane Anderson, 21.06 state coordinator; and Gene Harrington, 21.06 Gulf Coast coordi­nator Gay Atheists are Threatened Prom a PreH Rtleaae American Gay Atheists of Houston reports that its Houston office has been receiving threatening mail from the Ku Klux Klan, among others. Don Sanders, national director of the gay atheist group, reports that the KKK of Pasadena, Texas, recently sent a greeting card addressed to "American Queer Athe­ists" about two weeks ago. Attached to the inside of the card was a calling card from the Ku Klux Klan. The calling card has pictured on it a machine gun and a robed man riding a horse along with the slogan, "God, Race and Country-Join the White Christian Army." Shortly after receipt of the greeting rard, Sanders reports having received a number of various mailings addret;sed to a "Bruce Gaylord." The mailings have included religious tracts, as well es adver­tisements for weapons like rifles and machine guns, and even an advertisement for earth-digging equipment. American Gay Atheists has turned this matter over to pot;tal inspectors becauAe it is believed this mail to be an indirect threat against members' lives. American Gay Atheists also reports that Dial A Gay Atheist Hotline has been invaded by computer hackers who have figured out the serurity code into its auto­matic telephone answering device. Break~ ing the Recurity code has allowed the hackers to delete the Atheists' message for one of their own, usually religious or obs· cene. Traps have been placed on the line in on attempt to catch the perpetrators. "An extremist group like the Klan, or a bigoted individual is trying to shut us up, however, we refuse to be intimidated We've come too far to turn back because our closets are not fit places for gays or atheists anymore," concludes Sanders. American Gay Atheists is a national organization headquartered in Houston with 600 members nationwide. Montrose Business Guild Adopts Development Plan By Connie Woods Montrosf' Voice Staff Reporter The Greater Montrose Business Guild adopted a four-part plan to promote and coordinate the development of the greater Montrose area at the guild's regular busi­ness meeting held Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the Backstreet Cafe meeting room. According to President Phyllis Frye, the guild appointed a subcommittee to review plans by developers and to coordinate that development. In addition, the subcommit­tee will work with a coalition of Montrose organizations, as well as establish the "Adopt-a-Block" program to enhance the Westheimer Colony Art Festival and tern· porarily disregarded areas of Montrose. The guild, one of two major business groups in Montrose, also plans to initiate projects such as park grounds upkeep, community rummage sales, and flag pro· jects. It is also planning to sponsor a second annual "Share-a·Bration. Frye announced that the membership drive will end March 13 for businesses who would like to have their entries in the annual guild di rectory. She pointed out that businesses may join at any time. However, to have the name and infonna· tion in the directory, which is distributed at the Westheimer Colony Art Festival, members must meet the March 13 dead­line. The guild also discussed its plans for the Business Building Workshops, Mayor's Luncheon and Trade Fair set for Satur· day, June 28, at the A11en Parkway Inn. The workshops will feature speakers addressing business and management concerns. The fundraising project adopted at the meeting wi11 be the operation of beer and soft drink booths during the Westheimer Ron Sanches displays a smoke detector at the February meeting of the Greater Montrose Business Guild (Connie Woods photo) Colony Art Festival. Ron Sanches with Citizens Against Crime presented the monthly program at the February meeting. The focus of the presentation concerned home fires and safety. Sanches pointed out several important aspects of dealing with home fires includ· ing that everyone in the household should know where to go if a fire breaks out. The next regular monthly meeting will be held March 26 at the Backstreet Cafe, 1103 S. Shepherd, at 7:00 p.m. MARCH 7 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 COMEDY WORKSHOP '2105 SON HllP! (Al SlllPHIRD) LOVE ME OR LEASE ME TUES. THRU SAT s.<o PM W tt A.N A00 ONAl SHOW FRI & <AT AT II 00 PM HSK CONTRACTING .I •Roofing (All Types) •Remodeling •Sheetrock/Painting •Plumbing/Electrical •Foundations Repaired •Tree & Trash Removal •Insulation •Water Proofing A Full Service Contractor •Tile/Masonry •Carpet •Cabinets •Decks/Hot Tubs •Room Additions •Concrete •Fully Insured •References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small --==--:::::::--' 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 ---- 12 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7, 1986 9150 S. Main 666-3464 proudly presents SPORTS MONTH Show your M.SA or M.SL. ID and pay No Cover and get Happy Hour prices all the time during March! Schedule of Events Sundays-Happy Hour All Day/ All Night Tuesdays-Beer Bust 6pm 'til Closing with Country Western Dancing Wednesdays-Free Sphaghetti & Dynasty Night Thursdays-10¢ Cocktails (with $5 cover) TGIF Fridays 8-lOpm $1 well I $1 long necks SaturdCJY'"Sunday Biggest Country Western Dance Bar Live D.J. Ram Rocha Coming Sunday, March 16, GLHU Benefit tor 21.06 ~~e the ~tars• •···· Southwest Funeral ---- Directors MEMBERS ONLY Monday-Thursday 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Reni I Moyje, cei tncl Free• "Deposit Required ·ooes Not Include Adult Movies 2016 MONTROSE Houston. Texas 77006 529-5544 Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily ~CJ TAFT AUTOMOTIVE, 1411 'l'AF'l', 5 22·2190 * Oil Change $2495 * A/C Check & Charge $2695 * Check Cooling System $2795 J)()N°T NJ<~GLEC'T BETSY GENERAL REPAIR AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION ELECTRONIC TUNEUP AIR CONDITIONING S~. Pa~rlick's Day March 17 ~ And there's going to be Party in the Pages of the Montrose Voice Call now and reserve your space for St. Patrick's Day. And be a part of the party in the pages of the March 14th Montrose Voice MARCH 7, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 Films Hackman Tackles Mid-Life Crisis in 'Lifetime' Into the poor girl's dreary life comes Blane McDonaugh (Andrew McCarthy), a rich kid who fulfills her dream to be asked to the prom. Unfortunately, the bubble quickly bursts when she finds that his "rich kid" peer group won't accept her Blane gets plenty of pressure from these so-calJed friends. who insist that she's just poor white trash. The romance soon falters, and Andie is left holding her prom dress without a date. wm she have to stay at home and feel sorry for hen•elf? Maybe she will have to go ~'ith Duckie tGod forbid). Or, maybe she'll get her prince back if she goes to the prom alone and looks lonely. I must say that while the movie is sweet and engaging, the whole ending is very poor. Andie's homemade dress is given a big build-up, but when the big moment comes it looks like a Wieners Dept. Store special. Then comes the big finale, which was tacked on when the preview audien· ces didn't like the slightly downbeat end ing that it had originally. fops on the acting list is Annie Potts (Ghostbusters, Stick). a super actress who deserves more comedic roles. Here she is Iona, a record store manager lost in the sixties funk. She has all the snappy lines, and a fabulous array of wigs and wacky clothes to dazzle us. Gene Hackman, Ann-Margret, Ellen Burstyn, Amy Madigan, Ally Sheedy and Brian Dennehy (left to right) star in "Twice in a Lifetime," a look at a family in crisis and the different ways in which each of its members confronts the possibility of divorce Molly Ringwald is on screen almost the whole time, and she really is a hard­working. commanding young actress. Slightly daffy but very bright, Ringwald'• character is looking for her niche and hav­ing a hard time of il The character Andie takes her blows and bounces back, finding out quickly that life and people are often By Scott Cutsinger cruel. Montrose Voice Film Critic o Twice in a Lifetime Gene Hackman is one of America's most ingenius but overlooked actors. From Bon­nie and Clyde and The French Connection to The Conversation, Superman and Under Fire, Hackman has proven that he is an artist of great versatility and unus­ual skill. Perhaps because he often portrays com­mon, everyday men and doesn't possess that star "look," people tend to overlook his performances. However, in Twice in a Lifetime he really outdoes himself. The star of an ensemble film examining the shambles of divorce, Hackman truly deserved an Oscar nomination this year (but didn't get it). Hackman's character Harry has just turned 50, and he's hit one of those crisis periods in his life. He plods to and from the steel mill daily, going to bed as his wife Kate (Ellen Buratyn) is getting up. It's all routine, and he has no major changes to look forward to in life. A trip to his favorite bar on his 50th birthday changes all that. In the midst of his friends and their celebration he spots a sexy new barmaid. Audrey (Ann·Margret) turns out to be a vision for Harry­sorr:. eone new and wonderful who gives him that spark to feel new and alive again. The affair begins innocently, but then the family finds out. Kate breaks down because she feels that she has given all and has now lost everything. Harry's children treat him like a dog, and his friends are appalled. But Harry is sure that he must leave his family behind and make a wonderful new beginning with Audrey. When Harry leaves to move into his own apartment, family members are crushed at first. However, life goes on and soon everyone is picking up the pieces. Kate fixes hprself up and heads out on the town with the girls toa malestripjoint(Whata treat!). Plans for a marriage of one of the daughters starts to occupy everyone's time, and soon everyone falls back into a pattern again . Still, the film dwells on the affects that Harry's absence has on the family. Daughter Helen (Ally Sheedy) decides not to go to college, and gets married instead. The other daughter, Sunny (Amy Madi­gan) becomes bitter and resentful because her example of what married life should be is washed down the drain, and she's afraid that her marriage may do the same. Everyone's ideas about love and marriage are suddenly turned upside down. The problems with Twice in a Lifetime lie in the fact that it is often too plain and everyday. What saves it from boredom is the extraordinary actors and actresses that make their characters so real. It's almost like watching major stars doing a made-for·TV movie because we've seen this interplay done similarly before. The screenplay doesn't help because it is very cliche. ("What have I done to deserve this?" cries Kate.) Many scenes contain dialogue that seems vaguely familiar, and some seem like outtakes from romance films we've seen before. Ann-Margret's character is warm, but she seems like the usual "other woman" and often comes off as a floozy. On the positive side, Twice in a Lifetime is a must see for the characters and their interrelations. Amy Madigan (an Oscar nominee) is strong as the daughter who can't and may never accept her father's actions. Ally Sheedy is at the opposite end of the spectrum: quiet, understanding, and accepting of new ideas. As the divorcing couple, Hackman and Burstyn are a marvel. We rarely see Hack· man as the total villain, and we can clearly see both conflicting sides through these marvelous actors. Burstyn's charac· ter is a gem after the divorce when she emerges into a new life like she's coming out of a cocoon. Hackman is at his best when facing the trials of the new life he has chosen. This film is no masterpiece, but it will gnaw at you and make you think a little. Director Bud Yorkin has come a ways from Divorce, American Style where Deb­bie Reynolds and Dick Van Dyke ended up together and still fighting. o Pretty in Pink Director, writer John Hughes showed audiences that teen movies could be inte!· situations that were not full of the usual obligatory rudeness. Now comes Pretty in Pink, a Hughes·written drama that exam· ines the highs and lows of adolescent friendship, peer groups, and especially love. Molly Ringwald is Andie, a girl similar to the characterin Sixteen Candles but a little older and wiser now. She still has a "geek" friend (Duckie this time) banging around her, but this time he's madly. m love with her. She also has to contend with an out-of.work father, and living on what many people call the "wrong side of the tracks." Andrew McCarthy (St. Elmo's Fire) is a small disappointment in this film. I think his character is just poorly written, but Blane sort of bounces back, and forth from a cute smiling kid to a dumb, inconsider· ate fool hanging with the wrong crowd. His best friend Steff (James Spader) 1s a terrible stereotype as the ignorant. blonde rich type. Only Jon Cryer (No Small Affair) as Duckie manages to make an interesting male character, although he is irritating at times. Pretty in Pink is not an altogether fasci· nating or probing film about growing up, but it is intelligent fun. ligent and still be entertaining. Films like Romantic tension is generated when Molly Rrngwald creates a love triangk by Sixteen Candles and the Breakfast Club re;ect£ng her best friend Jon Cryer's {right) amorous advances for wealthy new contained believable young people in beau Andrew McCarthy in "Pretty in Pink" ------ 14 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 7 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson "Mom! Allen's mokin' his milk foam!" ~ l§l Slngle-cell sitcoms Clumsy g ho sts "Sorry ... - ·re dead." "Now watch this He'll keep that chicken right there until I soy OK ... You wanna soy OK, Ernie?" "Mr. Ainsworth - Colling Mr. Aill1nsworth _ tt you're wrth1n the sound of my voice, Mr. Ainsworth, please give us some kind of sig n." Fortunes Cancer Takes a Break By Mark Orion Fo1 Fnday, March 7 th1ough Thursday, March 13. 1986 ARIES You've entered a period of dras­tic transition. It has mainly affected your outlook on life. You seem less worned about work and fmances. The change is long overdue and should bring about the realization that life is to be enjoyed Share your new attitude with fnends, but don't be too frivolous with money. TAURUS Now 1s the time to spend concentrating on occupational matters With a little extra effort. a promotion may be waiting Be creative when tackling job tasks. Give everything that extra effort Superiors are certain to notice your work and the extra income will be needed for a long-needed vacation GEMINI -The cnt1cal twin of your sign speaks up at just the right time. You care­fully analyze a situation and make just the rig ht move. Your uncan ny knack for see­ing beyond normal insight impresses just the right person. They now look at you differently Now relax and let the loving twin take over CANCER You've been so busy lately that it's time to stop and smell the roses They are blooming all about you, but your time has been all so limited Take a break. A short vacation may be the answer You know how to live. You just need a little practice right now LEO -You were candid about your feelings. Now ypu're a little embarrassed. Not to worry, your secrets are safe. Your trust was not misplaced. You should feel a little better after shanng ·the burden with someone you feel comfortable with Now that you've gotten 1t off your chest, get ready for a marvelous spring. VIRGO-You are not one to procrasti­nate, yet you have been delaying some at-home chores. Try tackling the work one step at a time. You'll find that the tasks get done and there's still plenty of time for that enviable social fife of yours Recruit some friends to help. LIBRA You're dissatisfted with your home surroundings It's a perfect time to move something You won't fail even 1f it's just the planter in the corner. or maybe, yourself. Shop carefully. Decisions you make at this time will be with your for some time to come. SCORPIO You will snap out of that blue mood It's been hanging on for far too long As you approach (he Ides of March, others should beware. As you find yourself feeling better, you will be something else to deal with SAGITTARIUS -There's a reason you can't get a certain someone out of our mind You have been smitten with the romantic touch. Face it lt"s been a long time since you felt that special warmth. The other per­son's special glow also means something Tell them how you feel CAPRICORN You re1ect a proposal which was bound to spell disaster It would have caused hardshtp both on the domestic front and in the workplace Be proud of your good judgement Be prepared to heed a call for volunteer work Others need your abih· ties AQUARIUS You survive a minor cns1s and no one is the wiser You keep your chin up through the entire matter You handle things on your own You should be proud of your independence as life goes on and you're still on top PISCES This 1s your time of year It's birthday time You're not getting older You're getting better end everyone 1s get­ting the message While you celebrate. don·t ignore health and fitness MARCH 7. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 At the River Oaks 'Sheer Madness' and 'Before Stonewall' By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic The River Oaks Theater will have two films of interest premiering for short runs this week. The German women's film Sheer Madness will play tonight and Sat­urday at 5:00 p.m., 7: 15 p.m., and 9:30 p.m. with Saturday matinees at 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Also, the out.standing gay docu­mentary Before Stonewall will be shown next Wednesday and Thursday at 5:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m., and 9:15 p.m. Sheer Madness is a deep, involving drama by feminist director Margarethe Von Trotta. Two very different women become entranced with each other and start to cause problems for themselves and their husbands. This is not a lesbian love story, but a relationship between two women who meet each others' needs through companionship and helping each other emotionalJy. Ruth (Angela Winkler) is a disturbed woman who paints black and white copies of old masterpieces and seems on the brink of suicide. Her husband seeks out Olga (Hanna Schygulla) to be a friend to her. Soon the women are inseparable, and the husband becomes jealous of the affecton. ~ First he causes Ruth to not be able to exhibit her pictures, then he tells her that he made Olga be her friend. The delicate balance is destroyed, and Ruth attempts suicide. The husband obviously likes Ruth as a weak, quiet woman and cannot deal with her emergence as a stronger woman The film builds to a shocking conclusion that makes a strong feminist statement. Von Trotta tries to show tenderness and admiration between, but her attitude towards men is obviously very loathsome. Hanna Schygulla as Olga and Franz Buchrieser as Dieter in Margarethe von Trotta 's "Sheer Madness" We get the feeling that men in the film only want women for themselves, and try to force their ideas and characters upon them. Sheer Madness moves at a very slow pace much like a Bergman film or Woddy Allen's Interiors. However, the pace seems necessary to build the fragile relationship between these people who are tyring to keep and gain identities. Schygulla and Winkler are very good, and if you enjoy thought-provoking women's films, this will command your attention. Before Stonewall is a moving documen· tary that played at the Houston Film Fes­tival last year. A fascinating look at the groundwork that gay men and women layed for liberation, the film examines the people, places and events that highlighted gay life in the twenties up to the Stonewall revolt in 1969. Using rare footage, interviews, and stilJ photographs, the film seeks to help us understand how the gay liberation move­ment came to be. From the twenties and thirties when being caught gay meant rui­nation or suicide, to the McCarthy Era that literally swept hundreds of govern· ment people from their jobs, we see that "homosexuality is not really a dirty word, unless you get caught." The joy of watching this film is the mounds of trivia that it presents. We see clips from an all-gay cast in Oscar Wilde's film of Salome, movie musicals featuring drag queens that couldn't participate in the service, and talks with the people who started the first gay magazine, Matta chine. We are asked to think about what cowboys did with themselves out on the range (to the tune of" La vendar Cow boy"), and see how the Kinsey Report shook things up with its note that one of every 10 males was homosexual. While there is a great deal of fun to absorb, there is also an underlying thought on why gays emerged when they did. The film shows that after the fifties shakeup, blacks and women came out to protest in the sixties and the gays joined in silently. Gradually they came out on their own, but they did so in suits and dresses to prove that they were good, employable people. The era of the hippies changed all that, and soon gays were protesting and eventually rioting as and for themselves. I like this film a lot because it is impor· tant that people understand why and how we have gotten where we are today. We still have a long struggle to reach that time when being gay and being "seen" gay is not dirty. Check out your history, and try to gain a respect for the people who fought so hard just to be the way that they wanted to be. A Television Commentary 'Bobby' Not Welcome on Network Television? By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic Two weeks ago on Saturday, Feb. 22, CBS quietly slipped a movie called Welcome Home, Bobby into viewers' unsuspecting homes. While thesubjectmatterwasheav· ily gay·oriented, the film received little of the grand publicity that greeted similar network films like Consenting Adult or An Early Frost. Even the cable show "Broth­ers" received more press than this film did. What was CBS trying to pull, playing this nice movie about a young man "com· ing out" on a non-audience Saturday night? Were they afraid that the story of a teenager who meets an older man and falls in love would raise the ire of church· mongers and the Moral Majority? I'm sure that they were more than a little scared FT&nkly I think that the CBS executives took one to'.ok at the movie and shook their ht>ads in dismay. Obviously the film was well·made and intelligent, but what were they going to do with it? Well, they decided to run vt>ry few of those juicy "look what'~ coming on Saturday night" ads, and n~t let reviewers have a tape copy of the movie until the last minute. I tried to obtain a copy to review, but CBS Channel 11 said that they received their copy too l~te, .and the major daily papers had to rev1ew lt at the last minute. It'• too bad that a lot of people did not Ree this very good film The bulk of the story concerns what happens whe.n Bobby is picked up in a gay area of Ch1c~go by narcotics police. At home he faces silence, and at school he faces ridirule because everyone thinks he's a faggot. Actually, he's not really sure that he is gay at all. Bobby has a steady girlfriend, but she begins to rt>ject him too. His father accuses him of ruining the family name, even though they don't understand what aC'tu­ally happened with the older man. Actu­ally Bobby just enjoyed being with him because the man paid attention to him, bought him nice things, and even gave him his first experience with sex. Bobby is caught up in the adolescent confusion because he tried to make this man a lover/ father, and in the end he got hurt. While some of the film seemed a bit stifled, it was obvious that the film was not just about a boy dealing with peer pres· sure, but a gay teenager dealing with prejudice, acceptance, and sexual identity. With only a handful of straight friend• to help him, it's no wonder he's about to have a breakdown. Too bad there is no mention of a gay hotline or switchboard-only a sympathetic gay teacher who can only write on the blackboard that he is gay and can't say it. The ad for this film in TV Guide was fairly blunt, but still very silly; "A Stu­dent. Star Athlete. The Perfect Son. Homo­sexual?" This makes homosexuality look like Romething bad, although the film did not treat it as such. We are left with an open ending, but we know that the boy is probably gay and will not be ashamed of that fact now There were a few major flaws in the movie, particularly the scene where Bobby (Timothy Williams) comes screaming down the stairs to the dinner table dressed in drag. This causes a confrontation with his father, but it seems too silly and out of place. I couldn't believe that this boy would go to such absurd extremes just to prove his point. Also, the father is another In a wild. dramatic ronfrontatlon with his father, Bobby Cavalero fTimoth)' Williams) dresses 'n drag, in "Welcome Home, Bobby," which u·as recently aired on CBS one of those silly jerks who refuses to listen to any reasoning. (Are all dramatic fathers like this?) When the father and son suddenly make up at the end, it aJl seems too happy and pat for what has gone on before. It's toa bad that CBS hid this flawed but well·intentioned little gem to avoid poor publicity. I thought it was as good as or better than most gay-themed tele\.'ision movies. and I applaud its brave explora­tion of a little explored subject. If only CBS had the guts to be bold enough to push its really "good" shows. Then again, at least they had enough gumption to air it at all. 16 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7 1986 New Players Join Houston Tennis Club Rich Corder, acting )adder director, reports that the 1986 new membenhip drive for the Houston Tennis Club is off to a good start Already the challenge ladders reflect the new competition. Travia Willia had taken over the No. 8 rank on the B ladder with his 6-2, 0-6, 6-f win over J.V. Klinger when another new January member jumped him. Randy Lun1ford won thi1 put Sunday, Feb. 23, 6-2. 7-6 aa he took the second aet tie­breaker 7-3. Third new member, Ed Far­ley, got on the Top Ten ladder with hi.a~. 6-2, 6-4 come-from·behind win over Rich Corder, to take over the No. 6 rank. The newest dub member to be reckoned with is Andrew Morris. new to Houston from England by way of Z•mbia and Saudi Arabia. Morris took ovet the No. 5 opot on the Top Ten ladder from Rick Had­not 6-1, 6-2. Then he went ahead and played around with Corder 6-0, 6-0. Thi.a Sunday, Morris gets a match with No. 1 Robert Holmes. Andrews is bound to be playing in Iota of upcoming tournament.a, but it i1 believed it will take a West Cout tournament finals before he meet. any 1tiff competition. The H?uston Tennis Club welcome. all it.a new members. Interested playera of all levels of ek.ill and experience are invited to call Rich Corder 524'2151, for more infor­mation on the club. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi'e Sports Voice Sports Voice Calendar & Standings HouTex Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matche- through Feb 23 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Donny Kelley 4 Pat Power 5 Eugene Brown 6 Steve Bearden 7 David Garza 8 Thomas Cor1ez 9 Eddie Chavez 10 Tiny Tim BLADDER 1 Sabe l/elez 2 Lou Garza 3Joe L 4 Ronn ROdd 5 Larry Jar\11S 6 Mark Deardorff 7 Mr 811/ 8 Rick Massey 9 Randy Miller 10 Bill Santa1t1 CLADDEA 1 Rick Knapp 2 Gabe Herpm 3 Henry Eckhardt 4 R1ckM1rtinez 5 Da1w1d Hendnckson 6 Rudy Garcia 7 David Moskowitz 8 Randy J•erscheck 9 Steve Chesney DOUBLES LADDER 1 Steve Bearden & Bill Santa111 2 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregeant 3 Edd•e Chavez & Henry Eckhardt Houston Tennis Club Challenge L adder matches through Feb 8 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Robert Holmes 6 Rich Corder 2 J C Barrera 7 Oscar Martinez 3 Arm1 Albanza 8 Edward de Leon 4 Aon Beu 9 Aon McCauley 5 Rick Hadnot 10 Billy Green BLADDER 1 Randy Moller 2 Steve Bryant 3 Roy Mendiola 4 Da1w1d Hendrickson 5 Oscar Ysass1 6 Audy Garcia 7 Travis W1lhs 8 J.V Klinger 9 Joe D 10 Howard Brown MSA Pool League Team Standings. Winter League. Week 12 TEAM Recent Week. Total Matches. Total games DIVISION A 1Four611 ... 10-2 107-73 2 Bacchus I 6-7 6-3 w-ea 3 Ranch Hands 5·10 6-4 97-83 4 Mary·s Naturally 7-8 7-4 95-70 Too611 10-5 7-4 95-70 6 BAB Shooters 10-5 6-5 75-90 7 Bacchus II .,. 5-6 80-85 8 Marion & Lynn·a 5-10 5-6 78-87 9 Street Cats 6-9 5-7 92-88 10 Outlaws 15-0 4-7 97-68 DIVISION B 1 The Barn 11-4 10-1 104-61 2 The Galleon 10-5 6-3 96-<;9 3 L1pst1ck .,. 7-4 96-<;7 4 611111 5-10 7-4 95-70 5 Kindred Sp1nts I 6-7 6-5 89-76 6 Kindred Spmts II 7-8 5-6 94-71 7 The611 4-11 5-6 77-88 8 JR"s ,, .. 4'6 82-98 9 Lone Stars 10-5 2-9 54-110 10 Hooters II 4-11 2-9 47-111 11 Hooters I 4-11 1-11 60-120 Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston and HouTex Tennis Clubs 10:30am-1:30pm. Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling League Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling League 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memonal Park Ten­nis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League,• 7pm WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League plays 8pm, various locations THURSDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center Houston Tennis Club 7:30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center Whatever Happened to Baby Jane' MSA Mixed Bowling League 8 45pm, Stadium Bowl Special Events Mar. 27-30: IGBO-afflliated Dixie Invita­tional. Atlanta Mar. 29·31 IGBO-alfiliated M.A.K.l.T., Kan­sas City May 24-26· 6th annual " U.S. Gay Open' National Tennis Tournament. San Francisco June: Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas July 25-Aug 3. 1986· U.S. Olympic Fest1val, Houston Labor Day Weekend. 1986: Women's Softball "86 World Series. New Haven, Conn Shake the habit. ~ Salt. It's responsible ~ for a lot more than seasoning your food. It can also contribute to high blood pressure. a risk factor for stroke and heart attack. It's a habit you can't afford not to shake. A American Heart V Association WE'il£ FIGHTlr\G ~ 'JCURUFE MARCH 7. 1986 MONTROSE vou:E 17 Montrose Live Evelyn Thomas talked about her career before gn.•inR a rou~inl( Mrformanee at NRG this past weekf'nd f Pete Diamond photo) National Recording Artist Performs in Houston Evelyn Thomas is Motivated to Help Others By Pete Diamond Montmsr \/01u Staff Rf'porter Add to the list of notables who are making sur<·esHful eomehacks in the mu!"ic indus· try one more name-Evelyn Thomas. With h(>r current releaf.ie, "Reflections/ Sorry Wrong Number," at numbt·r 18 on Rillboard's hot dance/ dii:oco chart, Tho· mas seems t.o be well on her way toward ('Bming herself a name again in dance music. Her previous releases were "High Energy" and "Cold Shoulder." A fourth reh.•ase, "How Many Hearts," is expected out later this month. Thomas, who for the past few years haR been doing "a great deal of studio work in New York," was in Houston last weekend performing at the grand opening of NRG. Procr(•ds from her Sunday night show bcnefittrd the KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston. Brfore her debut Texas performance, Thomas fondly rrflected on a great deal of her c.,·are-er, her "bubbly" personality (as she coils it) clouding over the rtality that show business isn't always glamorous. She paufied for a serious moment, how· ever, when asked how she felt about hav· ing proceeds from her show benefit an AIDS-relatt"'d organization Thomas explained that like USA For Africa and United Artist,,,.; Against Apartheid which wE'rr fighting for a cause. she felt this was her opportunity to help others, to help peo­ple who had supported her in the pB.Bt After all, she says, "That's what love is all about." And, when you enjoy singing and per forming as much as Thomas does, doing a benefit is even more enjoyable. ••1 like to express a prn;itive image," she says. ''Peo­ple nN'<i that now. Something that is very, very positive, something motivating and uplifting." Motivation is obviously something that has b('en a driving force in Thomas' life. With h('r mother as her inspiration, Tho· mas began singing at the age of seven. But the choral director at her church never let her sing solos and put her in the baritone section, she says. But she pertiervered and began singing profet-1i-;ionally whE'n she was 13. Later, the reverend at her church taught her how to projec't her voiCE' and use her talents. Then, at age 19, she made her first recording, a gospel album entitled Something Special. The following year she recorded The Bread of Presence, a religious jazz album. with an 18-piece orchei:;tra. Feeling the need to become more diverse and to explore areas of music new to her, Thomas joined a local Chicago band, the Mood Mixers. She sang with the band and ''mixed moods." as she says, for three years before landing a recording contract with producer Ian Levine. With U-vine's assistance, she recorded "Neither One of Us" and in 1972 recorded "Weak Spot," which went to number five in London. As Thomas continued. singing her popularity continued to grow. How· ever, late in the 1970s, music began chang· ing, disco began dropping in popularity and, as Thomas says, times were difficult "if you weren't Diana Ross or the Bee Gees.'' So Thomas moved to New York and became involved in studio work, singing and writing songs. While ''singing is like sec.·ond nature" to her, Thomas says that even today, when she has time to herself. she enjoys writing. "I write whatever comes to mind," she says-love stories, plays, songs, even war stories. Like sing· ing, Thomas says writing is a means of expression for her. Recently. however, Thomas said Levine contacted her and approached her with the idea of doing a "high energy" album Thomas agreed and recorded an album of "mOHtly high energy music, versatile R&B· ish and rock·iRh" songs. •·1t went to number one in seven coun· tries. It wai-; very successful. but was prob­ably biggest in Germany," she says ... I went to plaCE's I ne\.·er dreamed of going. I did one show (in Europe> where I had to climb a ladder to get on stage" Thomas laughs about the incident, but admits it wasn't an easv feat in high httls and a sequined gown.· Nevertheless. she says she enjoys the •·adventures" of her performing career and considers hers~lf successful. "I could be less successful than I am. But I will be more successful in the future." she save with an air of determination. "I've al~ays interpreted other performers music. Now I can say what I want in my own songs Thomas believe!'; that liking the music she performs helps her put more feeling into her singing. "Suet:ess is being happy with what you're doing.'• she say~. "I'm very succeNSful because I'm doing exactly what I want" 18 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7 1986 Barb-Tongued Pessimism at Comedy Workshop 'Love Me or Lease' Parodies the Dream Lifestyle By Bill O'Rourke M()n/roap \loiee Theater Crit•c There are a lot of nice things to be said about Comedy Workshop's LOl'E' Me or L~as~ Me! The songs by Bil! Fagan, Jim Patterson and Michelle Watkins are quite pleasant. They're forging Coward. too. This time there is some really pretty four-handed keyboard work There is a beautiful vignette in which a man fantasizes about his dream girl just as he realizes that his estranged wife is the right woman for him_ In this routine there 1s warmth, humanity, and fulJy-rounded characters. It also has my favorite comic line of the evening when tuna casserole is given clas8 by being renamed "cooked sushi." Frank Militello makes improv into real art. The plot of this show-and it's tied together into one unified plot-compares easily to a few cla.ssica: Dear Brutus, The Iceman Comf'th, etc. It shows how people may need their dreams but when they are given the chance to achieve them, some­thing deep inside their personalities keeps them from actually accomplishing them In a mythical city called Houston, televi· aion ads ft>aturing a bechained Michael Cowlick sell Everlasting LlfeHtylyeApart­menl. 8 which come with a free VCR Most people who move there to find the dream life11tyle wind up acknowledging them­eelvN to be losers instead. We watch Joe McCutcheon as a sort of proto-nerd blos· soming •nto a real failure. The only resident& who are happy there are an older couplet including Cheryl Ho). liday) who lived there before it became this chic machine and who love both voyeu­rism and trapping people into watching their ~tides of their vacation trip to the Ship Channel. Oh, yeah-and one randy young stud who has mush for brains. Ifhe were female, he would be labeled a bimbo on sight. Having seen through this whole sorry mess, Joe's character is given a chance to bring the suffenng forth into the light of morning. But does he? And ruin the dank O'Neil parallelism? Are you kidding? Well. that's the whole plot. Most of the fun is in the digressions anyway. If barb-tongued peHsimism is your dish, you'll lap this one up. o Notes Two new theaters! The Actors Workshop opens their new Rpace in Chinatown right across 59 from the Convention Center tonight. !That's at 1009 Chartres.) And early in April, Chocolate Bayou will be opening their temporary spot (until they get their new theaterli built) upstairs from the TUTS offices and rehearsal hall. (That's at 423.5 San Felipe.) Starting next Thursday, Houston Ballet will tour 14 cities in little more than a month. They'll be doing Giselle and Peer Gynt Next season will be the Alley's 40th. They'll start off with Lillian Hellman's Another Part of the Forest. After it cloHes here, it will tour the entire country. The bookings are being made by Columbia ArtiRl.8 Theatricals, whose president Ken OIR<m commented, "The Alley is one of the most outetanding theatrical enterpriRes outside of New York today. It commands a national, if not international, reputa­tion." . "Crazy Like a Fox" fans! I'm sure you realize that John Rubinstein is Artur's son. Did you know handsome John is com­posing the music to a show headed for Broadway? lt'a called Orphan Train. Mar· vin Hamlisch is writing one, too-Smile (based on the 1975 beauty contest comedy movie). Meanwhile, Stephen Sondheim's latest show is a collage of fairy tales, like Rapunzel and Jack and the Beanstalk. . . Set aside next Sunday evening. You'll want to join the Gay Political Caucus at Kindred Spirits for an evening with Roma­novsky and Phillips. This crazy. campy cabaret duo delight in the fact that they are off-stage lovers. Houston folk singer Rawslyn Ruffin will also appear .. . Several galleries are saluting the Ses· quicentennial. Christ Church Catherdral has Jean White's barns. buildings and blue bonnets. The Museum of Art of the American West has portraits of The Twelve Immortals. The River Oaks Gallery has old Texas maps and prints. And Texas Notables has Bethea Ward's new views of old Houston. Local photographer/ collage artists Mary Ann Papnek-Miller has a one­woman show opening in Chicago this eve­ning . •.. Audition: Hadleyuillf' (a new opera based on Twain's The Man Who Cor· rupted Had/eyburJ(); eight men, nine women; one prepared selection, preferably in English; 318 (11:00 a.m. · l :00 p.m.) and 319 (2;00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.); info: 630· 7264 .. ' Celebrate! Birthdays; 7-Maurice Ravel. 8-level-headed gay journaliRt Pat Califia. IO-John Rechy. the sexual out­law himself. 11-Salvadore Dali of the melting clocks. 12-Jack Kerouac, and V aislav Nijinsky, the ballet dancer who caused quite a scandal in Moscow when he danced without a dance belt. Enjoy' o Openings Fiedler's Favorites (Music Hall, 7)­Houston Pops conducted by Newton Way­land. ONO! HSPVA Chamlx>r Orchestra (Denney Theater, 7) A Lifeline (Risky Business, 7)- 0utrageous song and dance celebrate the search for happiness in a world sometimes chaotic. Meet Don Baker (Driscoll St. Cafe. 7)-a reception. Texas Human Rights Founds· tion. ONO! Meridel Rubem;t.ein (Transco Tower 7)-preRenti:; a slide show I lecture on her photographic works. ONO! Some Enchanted Evening (Actors Workshop, 7)-a Rodgers and Hammer­stein revue. Siesta Fiesta (or Mexican Madness) and Paquita (Jones. 8, 10:00 a.m.)-advan<"ed studentM from HouRton Ballet Academy's professional program dance two new works by Ben StevenRon. ONO! Festival of School• (Music Hall, 91- Tm;hiyuki Shimada conductR. ONO! Concert Chorale (First Presbyterian , 10)-music by Sht-aring and Paulus. Guest (·onductor Dale Worland is a fre­quent guest on Prarie Home Companion ONO' Merlin the Magnificent (Spellbinders, 11. 10:00 a.m.)-for children. Hal Tennyson (Tranquility Park. 13, noon)-Jazz! Freebies. ONO~ Ei·nythmg in the Garden (Main Street, t:n-startling comf>dy about the corrupt­ing power of money. Eisenstein is fooled by his ou·n u·rff''B disguise during Tf'xas Opera Theater's upcoming production of Strauss' operetta, "Dre Fledermaus," coming to the Tower Theater on March /.1and14 at 8:00 p.m *Rooms * Remodeling *Homes *Kitchens *Baths * Creative Environments K.J.'s PREVIOUSLY JACKS ARE BETfER @ CLUB 11830 AIRLINE 2 blocks South of Aldlne-Bender 445-5849 HOURS: NOON-2AM HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12-7pm, Double Drinks, 75¢ Beer SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY Free BBQ, Volleyball ALL NIGHT HAPPY I HOUR 7pm-2am Lip Sync Contes DOUBLE DRINKS 10pm CASH PRIZES WEDNESDAY DOMINO'S PIZZA PARTY 8pm THURSDAY $1 Bar Drinks All Night POOL Tournament DYNASTY NIGHT $4.00 entry Wide Screen TV Winner Takes All, Spm ~- FRIDAY SATURDAY 1~ ~' NO COVER! ~ PARTY!! PARTY!! PARTY!! HELP WANTED-ALL POSITIONS NEEDED (ask for Kim) MARCH 7, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 ROCK "N" HORSE Newest Women's Bar (Men Welcome Also) Grand Opening Saturday, March 15, 8pm-2am, with Western Band & Dancing DRAFrBEER 75¢ Ha_ppy Hour $100 Regular Well Drinks $!25 Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-7pm Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4pm-2am Fri.-Sun. lpm-2am Narene Kee-owner Kelly-mgr. 5731 Kirby 520-9910 ~n 2ffilemorimn WOODY DEW February 28. 1986 RONALD L. LEAVITT Ronald L. Leavitt. 42. of Houston, died Feb 25, 1986 after a long illness. He was born m Ponca City, Oklahoma on July 19. 1943 and is survived by his parents, Mel and Imogene Leavitt, of Newkirk. Oklahoma: brothers. Glenn Leavitt. of Houston and David Lea­vitt, of California~ and very dear fnend. Oscar De La Rosa. of Houston. Memorial services were held Feb. 27 at St. Anne's Catholic Church with Rev. Vince Dulock. C.S 8. celebrant In lieu of flowers. contact Oscar De La Rosa. 528-6604 for the Ameri­can Cancer Society DAVID LANE SCOTT 1950·1986 'The time of my departure has come. I have fought the good fight. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith 2 Timothy, 4. &-7 David Lane Scott died March 1. 1986. at the age of 35 from an extended illness David was born and raised in Southern California and resided 1n Houston. Texas. for the past six years David ts survived by his beloved companion and friend of 10 years. Marshall Bennett. He 1s also survived by his canng family. mother, Margie: father, Charles daughter, Laurie; sister, Margo; brother Chuck: niece, Adonna Mane: and numer­ous nephews. nieces, cousins and friends David was employed as a petro-chemical equipment estimator and was a member of several area avian interest groups His work and care for God's feathered creatures will long be remembered His family and fnends are comforted by the knowledge that he 1s at peace. Donations to the David Scott Fund may be accepted by contacting (713) 529-2776 or (713) 531-7472. David 1s interred in Mem­orial Oaks Cemetary in Houston, Texas O~ POI.. CY T!\e MontroMI Voece wlll commernor.te tne p ... ng of Montrose residents &!'Id Houlton OIY community membefl 1Wlll't an•~ Fliends or re&anves o1 tne dec::eueO mty provide us 1Wlll't l.::ts abouf the person·, lli9 names aflhe dONst knlYOn and buNI arrengernenrs ~ orverMcanbe1~Ptc:!utaare~11C1.ndWIAM Ntul'Md N.-nt1 of the oecaaec:t lhol.Jkl be .a.ched to tl'le photo Wonndon should be prowtdecl 10 Irle Montrose Voece alttleArtlestpoul!*daleandw1Ube~ the11ext svan.IM editJon There • no c:tw;e 'oi' mq MMce AMNTION NIGHTCWB ENTERTAINERS Singers, Piano Acts, Impersonators Please make sure the Montrose Voice has a goad qua11ty (preferably in black and Whrte) publicity photo of you 1n our files fa use when our adver· tisers are engag<ng your services It wouldn't 011en hurt fa us to have sev& rol photos of your sml1ng face Thank you The Montrose Voice THE NtwsPAPER Of MONTROSE 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 20 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 7 1986 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS EX-230I MEMBERS Can 529-8091 LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose VOl:ce. a general c1rcula11on newspaper having pubhshed continu­ousJy tor 1 year or IOnger, is qua!Jl1ed to aeceot leoal notices allect1ng the news-pa cir• tat1 m area ol Montrose CARS & BIKES Fe 1972 M• .. :edt -s SEL $4 500 Call 52'!t-1:>1U Nffd •car? Bad erect it? Call Chuck 529- 1849 -S2 Yamaha Ma.um 750, 4 500 mites e.1ce11en1cond11ion $1700 Lee97S-t872 66 BMW 12!io Red. S3t8 per month lee 975--1985 86 Honda Accoard XU, $228 per month 1..ee 97$-1985 '83 Votvo 2CO $8295 Lee 975-1985 "8• Olds Cutlass. 20K miles. $7895 lee 97S-1985 '84 Chrysler Lazer 18K mt~. $72-st) Lee 97S-1985 MERIDIEN LEASING .ee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE "'Spec&al $100 oft rent Montrose. low deposit. bus line. pool, welf-ma1nta1ned M\JSt see to arnr..,. at 524-9351 Burlington Apartments GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in Montrose Area. Small Community, Adults Only, Nice Pool, Jacuzzi. large Closets. B111 Windows. Free Movie Channel, Well Maintained I and 2 Bedrm. Effective Rent from $249 3502 BURLINGTON 623-0249 MONTROSE APT POOL ~t~:,U'}~~~~~~~o~nw~~~e~-~~~~ ming pool for summer Central IVC, GE apphances. mini--bl1nds and more 1 BR at $315. 2BA at $375 plus security deposit & electric 308 Straltord at Tan Discount on 1 yr Lease 523-6109 - WOODLAND HEIGHTS Clean 1 bedroom garage apt $250 fJ68.. 3055 Fin1shmg duplex remode11ng March 8 and 15. at 635-637 West 17 St near She­phe< d Slop for coffee and see orcall 974~ 7158. or 871-9386 Fair rent. nice landk)fds Luxury Condominiums Now Leasmg with option to purchase Great location Large beauhful swimming pool & Jacuzzi Controlled entry security Remote controlled garage entry High efficiency AC & heatrng Free cable TV One bedrooms from S375 ($150 deposot) Two bedrooms from S650 ($250 deposit) 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appointment 524-0830 Montrose 1br apt 11..ots of windows. hard· wood floors_ ce1hng Ian enclosed deck Pets okay $265 plus bills 5~8-4060 1 bedroom condo, M~ Center area Washer/dryer 24hr security Home747- 6410. work 462·9090 MONTROSE DUPLEX 2-1. l1v1ng. dining. breakfast. central a;h ce1hng tans. hardwood 664·4211 Roommate to share 2-2 on Timmons Lane S 100 dePos1t. $225/m()(llh No pets or smokers Serious cans only 85G-0769 Evenings DWELLINGS ANO ROOMMATES Non·smo•ung ma1e lo share Heights hOme, w td. privacy S235 . ...,ut1ht1es 86' 1510 EXCELLENT LOCATION $180/mo for efficiency apartment Mont rose/ tower Westhe1mer 1rea 523-4483 GwM seeks roommate, large. 1 bdt Sum· m1t area 71H22-0370 Roommate for 2 pJus 2 apartment High· way 6 at Beechnut Washer/dryer included $175 plus 112 ut11111es Male or female 561-5665 1120 WEST ALABAMA APTS 1920 W Alabama. 529-6798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GREENWAY PLACE APTS. 3333 Cummins Lane. 623-2034 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Small-quiet Montrose comple• New paint. new double door ice boxes. $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 pluselec. Also ava1J.. able 2 bdrm 529-8178 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Class1lied Call 529-8490 ~~:.~=acrub1.t ~J~~:~~~-c:;.;,:c4:5d or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED HAIR STYLIST NEEDED Well estabhshed Montrose h11r salon 1nteN1ew1ng stylist w11h lollow1ng Paid v•cations. high commission. fully equipped salon 528-9600 David Hair dresser and manicurist lease or commission Pnvate salon Centrally located West U I River Oaks/ Greenway Ask for Jolene 520-6600 Muscular male models are needed imme­diately for the country·s ~admg male magazine by professional photographer 1n Houston for the next two week sonly In search of Te•as talent Call lor nterv1ew and appomtment 523-4340 SALON DANIEL Rent a chair 1n Houston's best salOn Be your own boss Call or come by 2431 B1ssonnet 5~9327 EARN 10(:rs working spare 11me at home RUSH sell·stamped, addressed envelope 2870 N Towne #136 P< mona CA 91767 Dept -J3 PERFORMING ARTS Ticket office personnel soughl full/part time. Excellent verbal skttls required Base plus commission Cal" Ms Knipp alter 11am 526-5323 {MISC.) FOR SALE BIG SCREEN TV Must sell b•g screen TV $500 "'r b4. t otter 529-1510 FOR YARD SALES See ads under Yard Sales at the end of !he Montrose Class1hed MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS Rubdown. you place. $2f $2~ Call Van. 558-8912 RUBDOWNS Ronme- -528-3147 TYPISTS! SHOE SALESMEN! You need a low-cost. non-se•ual mas­seur' I am one Bill O'Rourke 869-2298 TOP TO BOTTOM Re!a•tng and soothing deep muscle mas­sage by bodybuilder 568-2544 - THE CADILLAC OF TOUCH Body work at 1ts bes! D of E.T (713)622-453( PERSONALS GwM 5-10· 155 Brown1brown. mascu· 1rne_ professional. en1oys en1erta1ning !ravel, candlelit evenings. music and rom· ance But more 1mpQrtan11y- shanng expenences Please respond P 0 Box 37333. Houston. TX 77236 Ha11y men/ ha1rlans ad11st Into $200 Hair. 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 Gay wrestling• Uncensored 1nlop1•pax $3 ()()- NYWC. 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 GWF, 33, 5'5", 155, professional, educated. sincere (Sag11ta nus) wants to meet emotionally mature female. 27-38 En1oy theater. movies literature. art and qi • .oet evenings at home Not interested 1n smokers. drug users. role players or gamesters Reply to Bhnd Bo• 280-1 c/o Voice and eoclOle phOtograph I am 1nleres1ed 1n contacting people who G:m~~a~~~Pa1i'0B1~0Q.~~~rk~n ::.2~:/ GwM. -53: 5-:-2 .. 17s-. BVGr Very active En1oys dancing. tennis. beach, sports, outdoors. quiet times with tender loving care The finer thmgs ol lite. No drugs Prefer non·smoker II you are younger. straight ac11ng. active and want to enJOY hie with an older, stable, fun loving man that is still young at heart. mind and out­look on life Then tell me about yourself with phone no And I'll reply Reply Bhnd Box 280-J c/o Voice GHM. 5'7'' 140 Areyouyoung"Mature1 Responsible? Maybe you'd like to spend an evening with me Send me any picture of youro;elf. your name and address and I w1ll return same I am discreet and I don't play games Response P 0 Bo• 27354 Houston. Te•as 77(127 GWM, STABLE, 36 A slim and horny botlom seeks non­smoking top thru 40's. who'1 lh1ck, hung and horny tor deep and sat1sly1ng sale ~~xply :1~~b~e0•1~~tke~0 ~~:~onsh1p - - - GWM. 23. 5·11··, 150. Br1br. attracttve. clean cut. looking !or someone 22-30. relationship and goal 011enled to share what life has to ofter I know what I wan1 and I'm going for 1t Are you? Tell me about yourself and I'll reply Reply Bhnd Box 279-P GBF would-like-to meet a t1sh Ouiec. hon­est. sincere. 35-40. Reply Blind Bo• 279-L c/o Voice GWM 35. 5·11·• 155. br1hzl. professional. sincere YES' Air. food and water eio:1st outside the Loo pi Anyone else live 1n West Houston and want to meet others m Mem­orial area En1oy cooking_ mov•C!!' theater. talking and laughing For fun. lrollc. lnendsh1p and a sate romp 1n !he hay. reply Bt1nd Box 278-S clo Voice NUT-FllOL-MEDICAL MIRACLE Nutr10I- Europe·s fastest selllng_ proven hair growth product now available. Also Nu Skin skin c•e products D1stnbutor· ships available 527-9801 anytime HOT --- Gay white male. 29. 6', 165 tbs brn."hzl with beard seeks similar for dalmg and possible relat10nsh1p Only real men need apply Reply Bhnd Box 277-S c/o Voice Letters to the Editor The Voice 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Play out any fantasy, fetish. desire that turns you on with handsome. uninhibited GWM Write now Let's get together soon Reply Blind Box 277-G c/o Voice Leath« master. 36. seeks masochist 25- 40. into sale and sane S&M Send photo and letler describing fantasies and l1m1ts Novices con. 1dered Reply Bhnd Box 277·A Clo V1 :e LESBIAN ANO GAY COUPLES Volunteers needed tor Master's thesis study on decision making m lesbian and gay couples 1-1', hours of your 11me completely confidential interview by les· b1an student (512) 690-1693 evenings or weekends PHONE SEX Our service connects Horney Guys 24 hrs a day Do 1t now tor less than $3 SO an hour (415) 346-8747 OUR POLICY on Sexually-Exphc1tAdver· t1s1ng The Montrose Voice does not beheve that humans engaging m consent· mg sexual acts with one another is immoral Our readers are encouraged to advertise here 10 seek relat10nstups. encounters. adventures. etc Alt advertrs· mg should. however. not contain Ian· guage that would >fiend m uns11spect1ng reader A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have actl\le tun or play fh'!~1 :~·~~.~~~:A?t:;r~n~~:.~1~ ,!~ you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to e•pect when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those tunny llttle abbrev1a11ons mean Send $8 to "Classd1ed Alla1rs.' Alyson Pub, Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St , Boston. MA 02118 (Also mcludedwlll bea coupon tor $Soll on your neio:t Personals in yourcho· ice of 25 gay pubhcat1ons. including the Montrose Voice) PLAY SAFE Sale,.. 1s tun. erotic Play safe. for your •ake. for your pmtner's sake YARD & GARAGE SALES M(1v1ng Sale Ev1 rythmg must g1 1204 Welch. Apt c HL 1 _Id goods, pl 1nts 520-6870 10em-5pm daily LARGE 4-PLEX SALE Assi•rted otf1cesupphes. d1rectorscha1r1. ~~~~~~~~~~~~b~~~~~~~~~~I:~ Fehpe Sat & Sun 8th & 9th from 10to5 HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 1t here then stand back for the crowd Call 529-8490orv1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement Please be roncise. Thank you. .,,,.,,,~, ______ ~~~ ADS BY THE INCH In add1t1on to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word." you can purchase space here "'by the inch_" When buymg by the inch. you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1'" $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1·· $24 2" $34 3" $44 t3 WEEK RATE 1·· $19 2"' $29 3" $39 In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice Montrose Voice Classified Advertising ;:,:,~ ;::r:,:,Pff,r,;.; ~':t.,-::,e,;::nl.'f'.;h~-:~=~ ~n_7;;r,,., F<N rttgul•r d••P'•Y W.-.rt•smg THE HEADLINES: Headline words 1n bold type, centered, are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can. also a_ppearwithin the text or at the end of the ad, andarealso$1 per word, with am1mmum of$3per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 40¢ (Additional regular words i· "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each_ Additional BO' WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 40C: THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $8.00 Then each add1!1onal word hke this 40¢ THESE THREE LINES All CAPITAL LEITERS CENTERED, BOLO, $9.00 Then each add1!1onal word like this 1140¢ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WOADS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE sse EACH Addttlon•I bold wordl Ilk• this In text are SSC: each. ADDITIONAL BOLO, All CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C: EACH LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance .. and deduct 15% Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25%. BLIND AO NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number. We'll f~en~~epn!~a~~/g/;'j'c'::.dA~1:~fs5fg~ire:a1g~~~=~~~ ~~~ubts~Ri~~~~~~e~a~ifii~ forwarded mdefln1tely, however, for as long as they come 1n.) ORDERING YOUR AO: You may mail your ad in or phone it in. You can pay by check. money order, Mastercard, Visa. American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Class1f1ed ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper. Ads received later will be placed in the followmg week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AO: Address your envelope to the Bhnd Ad number. clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 7700fr3028. It will be for­warded. unopened. to the advertiser Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A ""word'' is considered anything separated by ''spa­ces," except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word 1f it stood on its own. A complete phone number. including area code, is ~ word City, state end zip is 3 words bold line bold line-------- text words · ---------- bold line Use add1t1onal paper if necessary CATEGORIES- D Announcements D Accomodat1ons (lod~ing for Houston visitors) D Cars & Bikes '6 ~~~~~~~~tr~~~~ ~a~~~~n&s,~~~~~:i';!r: D Models. Escorts. Masseurs D Personals D Pets D Rides o Travel D Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER . _ . _ . ____ IN THE ··GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY," OPPOSITE PAGE bold headlme words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line) · ---regular words in text at 40¢ each ALL CAPS regutar words in text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLO ALL CAPS m text at 70C: each Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 11 mailed to me, $1-25? ---­TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Tim ff weeks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) D Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged. as indicated below) an add1t1onal D $29 for 6 months or D $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT; D Check enclosed D Money order enclosed D Cash D VISA charge O MasterCard charge D Dmers Club charge D Carte Blanche charge D Amercian Express charge D Bill me If charging, card expiration date Credit card number Signature Name Address Phone(s) for venf1cat1on of ad. 1f necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays lOam-5 30pm MARCH 7, 1986 I M ONTROSE VOICE 21 MONTROSE RESOlJROES snECTE0 STATE. NAT ORGANIZATIONS e- <>--•Aun ol T• (BOAT). 120 Brazos '902 A.,.t•n.(5111•72·3333 AIDS Ac'llOl'I Courlalo-Fedoal'•IOl'I of AIDS All .. t.O Org•nlHhON. 1115\lr Jnctepend9llOI Av SE WMhington. DC 2CXI03. (2'2) 5'7·3101 Gay a LltblWI Pf•• Atsn. POB A. Old Chel- SI• New Yott. NV '!0011. {21:2) M1H622 Gav Rigfll• N.i Lobby_ POB 1892. Wuhinglon. DC 20013.(202)54-1801 ~n Rigl\tt CMnJlo'lgn F11nd. POB 1388. W•lh­ington. OC 20013. (202)5'1,2025 Intl G•Y As1n. AfSL, Boi ~- S·l0125 Stockholm Sweden. phone •'6-1 " ao so L#Tlbdlo leg .. 0'1tnM. 132 w '3rd. N- voni. NV 10039(212)9«-"81 L..t>IWl!Gay R•ghll AclvOCll ... POB 822. Aust•n 71787 ""I ANn ol e1..111.- Courtt~• Boll 151•5. S.. Fraoc<eco.CA .. 115.(·U5)185-6313 Nllt Atln of G•y& LWbo•nOemoCtubs 17•2Mau Av SE. WUl'b"(11on DC 2CXI03. (201) 5'7·3lCM "'-! Gly tt.llh EOOC: foundalhDn. P0B 78' New VO<\;_ NV 10038. 1212) 543-f,313 or Of a-berg 17131513-520' ""t Gay R•gtits Actvocat•. 540 C.tro. S.. fr.,.._ ciaa>.CA .. 11' 1•15)153-382• ...... Gay htk Forc41 <NCiT'F) 80 5'tl Av. ~ Yott NV 10011. 121117'1-6«>0 NGTf'1 C•• .... ne, (IOO) 221-7044 (OUWOI ~ VorkSltl!el Rural C:0.hl1Qt\ CID W••llr·bngN, Boa 1111. Blum TX761127 Tit Ga~'1...tl•n Tatk for<:e. P08 Al<_ Dlnton 79201.111713117-f.2111 USTrmn-l<t&-Tr.,1ex1,111rCOnlllCIS...::. IOt7-B E f>Wte_ S-tle. •a1. \20&l R~ Hairy ilien1 Hi1rlan!adi-;;t--tn10 s2:00 Hair. 59Weet 10th. NYC 10011 ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your listing We list here each week name of organization, address, phone, ~81t~!a~, ~;:~~? ~:~~ ~,n~~~~~~in an.~ incorrect. mail correct mformat1on to ~he Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY A.d-for Al-OS. pl '641,_ -772t 526-&. 77 ArlA clpeii. 6 ;· -;ct ;1-~,.1 ioQB 6873' 77298 A'Pl•ce in The SVn.52"2-i695 ACLU. i2lti W GraY.524-5925 - Aios H011ine. 52i=32111G&L Sw•tchbo.7ci1 ,A,m..;. ,c.---naay Atiw.91.---Pc>e iant 1726&~ Ai1-;o A-;,rCIO,,.. Society !Of 1~ o;., _Sr o:-0132 (TTY) ~Asen. POB" ~4. 77286 mee!S 7 30pfn 1nd Tnurs. women·1 Ct1n1t.an Cir. 310 Pae1!1C ~:~~Orn;ni M•oazrne""i130 SW Fwy "335. BiYOUSTu-s;og.r; Reibert Moo;.. d1r 20tStra1- tord. 86&-30&4 S.---;ng Memonii'lii1te4 Method.ii' Cti~1''° ~=~.~.k1!'~e!:fai:~15fl.~3~Ju°na~8PG~ Pnde Wee« pet 1how •pm Jun 28 Choice1UnlllTllitidS:z9=321.i((fi.LS";,.,~) Cnr;;t;;.,chUrchClf th.000d 5h9"hefd. 1101 Montrou tvc 1pm Sun. Bible lludy 7 30pm ThuB CtiU;"CtiOfehmj;"".0 Fa1th.-18'° Wmlh;"m.- 529-3005 ava 10 •Sam Sun. Bible 1tudy 1 30pm Wed. A .... Chr• A Rice. p,illor CtiUrCn-01tniROck~•siiivCiSun10~ c.t.ift-lor Human Eq y !CHE). pQ830'5~ 77253.~6,937-3~'18 mffl2ndTues.2•1' Gramercy Ciela. L..t)oan Molhen Group. S.,f-a"473-3708 meet• 2nd & "ti Thurs. 01gnrty Cir c.;ppe;;:-34u502 - --- C014si---o.-;,..11 euu. pr9i·m"'.--" &ll----OS R1vw Bottom. 2.-00 Brazos. 526-9192 COmn:i11iff-1or PubliC H"e.iih-Aw1rer;;t1. P08 3Q.t5. 772S3. 528~. 522-SOM "Sharing Group !or lhe Worned Well"' meet Frt, 7-8pm Montroae Counu11ng Cir ~~~2;fJ:'.i7CjIBt~.J:mm1u" -iC- ~1~S~~~1~~n.~1~~~~~tr0..~1~ ~nz~:1~~~·1~m~~:,::yi~~~~ &Blodgett ~ieiGi;Pr;-(t;\Veeti pet show •pm Jun 18 Benng Church ~1.n.. 228-iSOS- ~ Deml.>COmrn.itee olGPC. 526-8834- - 5harmiSIU(fyGr~ Avond11e.S2+955-t­o;; naFO!Mldibon 2700 Muot.. S2'-Sii1- g;~[;NW~i~~~,2 ~!,.S:· 5za: .E.S,O, PSfiriv81i Pfot•aooni1 Social Club. -96,-:. ~.,,On o1 ChM1t.•unltfll tor 6oeta1 s;;: ~:,,~~~~:S~~':~b~u~~:;~o~"'M:nt?~ Clinic, MontrOM Couf'IMtmg Ctr lit Un•W•8" Cnu;(;h.5210-F.nn.l\.-526-15711ve 1115am Sun Fr~tr11nner1. Joe-----520-8019 Or S.tv•dOr 529- 1218 run1 Son. Tue1 & Thurs Memorial Part i:!'i"!.'u~~ 1 Gay Pr!Cll' WMll; 1port1 dey t1et1ta- ~·l~. ~;~;-n-•r;r;g ExPeroerce(GASE). 52(1- GIY& L•b11n ArCn-.~ .. ol Tx 11!~1•teo111~i inc ~& 7~1~Y~;3on •. 1713 w9.1h91mtW' G;y & L ..b 11ilS1uo9M Ann 11 Uo!H_ Boi31• '800 C.lhoon. 53-3111 (G&L Sw•tGhboud) Gai ile.b11n S••tehbo;td· POii ei5gl1m6 529-3211 ,,,1orrne1ton, c:ounee• ng_ relerra11 TTY_ AIDS Hotline Giy ,_.1,-;,--,; Fi7ends. ~i8s.36'33 o~ Switchboard Ga)--Fl1h;ri 32'11F..,n1n. Sii-Olll -­G& L'H,ac,.n1e1iJnldo1 POell00921. i72i"CJ:-S21- ~~ ='.:::0"; J~d21Mon D1gn"y Ctr, Gey GayNur;..Ail."at'ICtl~ G.;P.Op1e 1nChnat •• ;, Sc*'K:9 80~-Bli"&.1- 1a.re n401.~1&42 Gay Poktial C.ucu1 (GPC!. PC86666' 77266 521·1000' m.u 3217 F•nnin 1st &3fd Wed. can· d1dale~1ng m~March. m~1pd..o­bne Mar 3 lor general c~• endofMm9f'!ll A.pr 2: pnmary eMK:11on May 3. a.y Pnde Week com· mun11y sward• d1fW'ltr Jun 11, Gay Pnde WMI!. Spotts Plf'k Rally Jun 28 (Hou) Gay Pnde Week Comrn11tM. POB 66821. n266, Stan Ford 523-764-t or ca1ny Lenahan ~~1~1~1;f,:r~;:PJ~~·~9-"~ c:ommemcnhon ol raid on M1ry·11tent1t1ve) Jun 20: Spott1 D•Y-' Ou'W'I• (tentative) Jun 21. W•Uc tor Unity (lenU1t1ve) Jun 22: OJ Sp1noll (lent•­ll'le) Jun 22: MonlrOM An AJ111nc. uhtbit 7 30- llpm Jun 23. "The Group·· live thNter pre1entat1on Jun 2• O.y ol Remember1nce (tentative) Jun 26. Gay & L•b•an H11ptna Un.­dos event Jun 27, GPC community -•rds di~ Jun 27. Benng Church pancake brNklul 11am-.3pm and pet show 4pm Jun 28. GfNter Montrou Butmeu Guild bu11nen bulld•ng WOfkshop & trade lair 1tentalrvel 9 30lm-3 JOpm A.lien Parli: Inn Jun 28. ~ontroae Symph0n1c Band concert 11ent•l1ve1 Jun 28. Lower W•th•mer-Waigh Dr parade 5 30pm Jun 29. GPC Spott1 P•rtl: Ralty Jun 29 Greater Moni""r0M e ..... n.. Gufii"-Pi'y1._ Frye ~:· ~~. ~:s~;:.1h.f.~~ ~;:! pherd_ board mfft•f'\g 2nd01'3rdThurs. bu11n .. building workshop & lf'IO. lair flentahve) ltJOlm-3 30pm A.lien Park Inn Jun 28 The Group" lhwiter .... Crt.hOP J09 ·wi.111 522· 221)( meet• 7pm Thurs 01gn1ty Cir. 3211 Fen­~~:___~ Pride Wet* presentat•on_Jun 2• Hazelw1lch Product1or., 2615 W•ugh Dr •266. 77006 lmb1..-. concerts. lrM marbng 1•1 Homoph1le lnterl••th Alhuce. 729 Minor. 52l- 0969 Hou Aru G&L E~1neer1 a.··sclen1111i. POB 66631. 77006. 439-1879 meet• 7pm "h Tun Hou Bar e>w-...etSA.1n (HOBO). e108r-.ZOs A-;;., Bottom. 2400 Brazoa. 528-Q192 meet• 2pm 2nd w .. Hou Commufl1ty CiOwrls~~-iJ14 Hou Council of Clubs. 5~e<i4 Hou~1uon.ia· !23-6922. IM-6•5i meet• 7 30pm 2nd Tuea HOU -f-1~ & Dr.ii Corps. David Wa!ktlf tn1."952- 27761ft• 8pm Hou Gay Hearth"Ao.OQ?es Stew Burtoii. 7~ 94'8 meets 7 30pm 1st s.i H0u Gay StudeiitiAnn. 1•1-30ii- ~ 1~ All••nc• Co;;t'ici'ihroui'ti lnfeg(•ty!Hou HOU Motorcycle c1ub C;O Mary 1. 1022 Westl'I• "*· 52&-tl851 HOO-~tea11or.11. PCB ~Hu~ 713'1. Bit& et 821-7126 me« 7 30pm 2nd Sat Hou Outctoor Group (HOG\ 521·)&41-oiJim 680-31 ... ~~~;-~: S~~Ho~·i:~:~!~~ 8t~y hM~~~~t~~IN;~=n~~~·,::~~~,~ ~.~~ San Fr•ncisco, GayPndeWMk•port1day(ten­tatlY8) Jun 21) VM Inc. PCB 18041. 77222. 894-1~ •llll1•ted groups are 1n1eract. e·zumo'• A Place in the Sun. Mo,,trOM An Au111nce. G&L Archives ot Tx, G&L Sw1tchbolofd. MonlrOM Symphonic Blind. bolord meet: 7 30prn ll!Thursivar>edloc• t.or.). e<lucatlCINll lorurn 7 .JOpm 3rd Thurs Ingersoll SpHk•1· Bu,..._._ POB 391 &;tt;ore 77'°1.~ ~~·~;~~~.;i:,or~·2,:o,~1= Autry Ho-...e. 6265 Ma•n ~i;;•ct (over'°group~. POB 180'1:71222 ~ KPfT ~o. FM-flO_ it11-LIJV9n 81vi1 526-'(IOO •1.~ ..,=m- !~~h~ 'es:'.'!~·'=~~,:~·;:: KS'AIDS Fo.Jiii'1.otl. 33iTM0rirou eOa -115~ 77006. 52+2•37 Jerry l<aullm11n Cancer Fund. 77._,ro& Krewe ot Hydre. 811 Gr1cet•nd. Bdl M•ci• 726- •032 ~da·Ci~~1cl & AL1nMl21' Jo Annoe. 521-9772 Le1b•n/Gay Re.Ource Svc. UniV'er"'i.1Y olHou 4800 Calhoun. boa 309. 770G4 7'~1253 mM11 2 30pm aiternate Tues, Sp1ndllllOP Room 2nd lloor,Umvers1tyCtr let Us Ent1111U1n YOO We...9nd. Pfot9ct Of Hou CouncU ol Clubs. 526-&QS.4 The L1lt1e Churcl\.-212Fargo. 52~7815-lvCS 230pm Sun L~mg~211-M12fs-10c>"1) lve1 6c:im Sun. Hobday Inn M••n & Blodgeu Ae¥ J .. nne Leggert Lone Star Nud•t Group:'POif7'°572, 1727' LOwer-w-hm.t Poke Sub-$tat10ft iOz Wei· th .. mer. si..3100 ~ncett..id.fneetiat·G,..ceLul1'ler111 Church. 2515 W•ugh_ 931-<1648 meet 3rd Tues evenmg:s McActory Hou.. e10-KS:A1os Founoat:on.3.3t1 Mon1roae Boa 115S. 52+207 ~fe1~~·;;~~3~~91lw~c~:i meetsb1-weerllty ~~~~~c~~~~~-~u:": ,~';~,:-~· luck dmfl«" 7 30pm 111 Sit morlthly IVCS 10 •Sim & 7 15pm Sun & 7 1!1pm Wllcl member· .ti1p mqu•ref'S cta1 730pm ""'on edUcatron classee Tu• & Wed ev• Met1opo1.1&ii--Pentecoila1 Churih- ea&:02ao 1vCS 2pm Sun. Benng Acil~rl•el 810g. M>Jlberr, at Hawthorne The body of Christ mv1tes you to come worship the Lord with us at METROPOLI· TAN PENTECOST AL CHURCH on the corner of Hawthorne and Mulberry streets (8eflng Memona ~ Acttv•ttes Bldg > We are a born •gain. sp1r1t-Mled church where you Clll"I worship the Lord as the spm1 leeds Our servtce 11 Sund9YS at 2 OOpm under the teaderatup of the Hoty Ghost For more mform•tion C•ll 68&-0280 tHouJ Metropolitan Wind E.nsemb••- ~9610 Meets St Stepn.. Eptlc:opel Church. 7 30 Wed MontroM An Alhenee. 894-1732. 861-9314 869-- 5w33..2- eft•l•ete l!H Irie:• meets 2nd Mon_ Gay Pnde -.tublt 1 »11prn Jun 23 MontrOMBus1neuGu11d -Great•MO,;;-OM Bui Guild MontrouChurchofChr11t.1700MonlrOH 777· 9216 1vc 11am Sun Montrou C1v1c Club - Neartown Alin MofltrouCllnic. 803Hawthorne. 528-5531 open Mon. Tue. Thurs 6-ipm MontrOH Country Clog991's. 456-8861 mM! T- 10pm Fn MCCR Ctiurch. 1Q19 Decatur. West -rdHo s.•r130pmFeb23BRB.7pmMar2 Kindred Sptnts ·c1ogg1ng el IU Bell 10 '5Pn'I Feb 28. 9 30pm Mar 1_ 8pm Mar 5_ The B•rn MontroM counscriong Ctr. IOOLO¥ett .m-sn- 0037 AIDS 'llci>(TI aupport group 6 30pm Man; women·• Support Group 7pm TIHIS Mool•OM Singers. gey men·s chon.11. M•ke526- ll•O MOtil'roM So1tti.111L9.-P. POB 22212 -11iii 524-31" GayPrldeWMtlapor11day(tent.l•ve1 Jun" M~;:o..~;;-1MSAi-.ff1pec11ielub=' group Gay Pnde Weel< sport• Cl8Y (tentatwe) Jun 21 ~~roae Symphonic8•""· POB ee61J 7T296 527-IMs.t meel 7 30pm Tum_ Oignrty CU 3217 F•nrnn_ afhliBe ld"i Inc; Gay Pride Week concert (tentat1Y8) Jun 18 MORE. ~MORT 529-0037 11c0tiohsm OU'IPll· t.9111 l•eatment pgm. pro,ect MontrouCo!#!Sel­• ng Ctr MSA::M-or\N1gtit Bowhng_ play sla'd;um LaMI 8200 BrH1m..,1, St..,.. 692·•597 Gay Pride "!Mk 'PC!!!! day (lentat1ve) Jun 21 ~=-Zi~~;;r,~··;i.;~~"9J1~:1~'1.= 8200 8'Hsma1n. 6-y Pnoe WMll; &ports d9Y ft.,,lll•Wll.lun21 MSA~ 1B1llardi\LHgue Debbie icon~ 1358 or Defln•s Lord ~752 Ga~ Pride weea &pQrtSCley <tentalr••) Jun 21 ~J!'.vt=\=~~~~J,~ ~ Pride Weell •Pottl day tentat•...rl Jun 21 M<JnlroM Watch: aut>gr~~ Neartown A11n Nation.I Gay He.W-. Eautat1on Founo.tion. 523- "'°' =~~Cf~e'~o=~~~~~-- Ne1rio-7"A----un1Mo~c.v·c-CiUbi ii13 W•~meet7pm'1nTuet r;.,,~;;eu;----A111W1C9. 5&1010" """'' 7pm 2nCI 'Wed. Liberty Bink. 1001 We1th.,mer N;;friHdOm Chnll••n Church. 829 Ya1e.86J: 8377 1vcs 1o.m Sun O..er.-fl Anonymw1. eto MonlrOM Cour!M1- 1ng Cir. 900 LO't'1111. Peggy •t 526-4015 meet1 apm Sun. MonlrOH Counseling Ctr. & 8pm Wed Benng Churct\ 1''° HarOld P1refil1 l Tr...,dl of Lesb••"' & Gay• (P11--efi11 FLAG). ~ mffts 2pm 3rd Sun. Pre&by­ler•• n Ctr. '10akd•le p.,~ ~Pi~o N~,.,,~""-,~Co~mm_un_ny Fire­house. 74'1-252• Paz y L<beradon. P08 800063. 77280. 862="1478 Prffbyteril-;;s' · tOr-L.b1u,1Gay eonc;;,;­Pr• by.,.1en Cir. •1 Oalldale. 526-258' meet• 7 30pm 2nd Tue1 fi;ea101MICiU0--(P911 prwidllnts GP'C), -PQe 86144 77288. 523-602• Reer..tl0Ni1l"Ma Fund CommiatM Rftgadls .. - Re~. "*'1isat ..,ea.•n. 110Pl~ic. S2&- IM27 Club night Thurs fi,ceun .... Gay L•l>.l"SuppottGroiip.529-32•1 (G&L S•otchtlGll'd) RO!h110 cr..,.1 'o408 Su-IRoss. 52~983i SharYh Gt -,.-.-eo-..-et"'!i Tor ~;a18ninQ :·,:2-·.;;=~.= .. ,~ n~,"~Eu)Gu1!-COU1 Trana- e Ch1Pter POB 90335. 77090 soei.ty '°' the Prr'lnot1onOIAmi.z~ M.:>Chltfl'\ !SPASM . POe 70998. 77270. G&l t~=~.~~=-c;~c-""-:"'-~~,~"~""-CIO Yhe e;n 710 Pac1lic, 521HM27 Tx G.Y Rodeo -As-so-r=ro=RA-1 ~Ho-,--,hap; DI"•- 119' POB 66973. 77006. 526-5001 meet 2prn Mar 2 Ba cc nus. 523Lovelt Gay Prlde Weeti 1porU d8'f' ltentahvel Jun 21 ~R--;-gM, F~diit.On~5CO;nmon. wumi 522-2824 Tx Rod.r-s Clo R~ 714 ~ 521-2712 WWBBo ...l irlg.- Myri 723-1455 bowl-, li)pr;; Sun. Pott 0911 Bcw1 ng Ui"M Gay POCS. Witff sportaclay-119fltat•ve)Jun21 W1111 fof' Untty Gay Pnde WMll Comml!lee Gay Pnoe w• ,,..1 .. "1:en1.W.t Jun 12 w..iaiya;;F~1:0.1t11P.~­W• theltnel' ~ Artl A.SA"ioo1 w..ttii"'* •113. 521~133 potter col'lt9lt oeedl1ne noon r:,~!1~~:;o'.e;-'ob,'X:'=~ Spr>ngArt Wh9i: -Ever -H.-w;,n.ci 1o&iW- Jane M .. o :::. .1. 4~p-:'T~;u!'ta~L•~~~ t::e Weelt •POPU oay : t•ntattve) Jur> 21 Wom.nl &o.hng LMQue. o.b.- er~ 1358 !ipfT'I Sun SC.dlUM Lann. 8200 erH~maon, Gii)' Pnde Weell lporll day {tenlatNe) Jun 2 women·· 1..0bbrY A.Jt .. nC9.-iCti91 .. & 52t.o.li Women• Scittbi1~gui"~OO. 77008 C.ltty or C.rotyn 868-6256 Gay Pnoe W ... ll)Ol'IS day Henl'1rvel Jun 21 Women• Wl)r!O Sefi91 L•bor Day Wffkend_ Nf'w Hav9n Conn won:!,"~'!·~~~ ~siO BAYTOWN- -- - - 8'y10,,.., Lambda Gro.ip, •27· 1378 730pm odd Fn Corvoe A-;.e.-c.rnbda Gav AA. 4091 3""""647a C"oriroeA-l'ffLnNn1 Ka1ttyatjio9J7~11f.ii meet8prn2ncl&41hf" riALVEsfON-Ur'!' IOde Alcot'lollCI An0f1Ymout 763-T•O'I 22 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 7, 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To 00..ertise in th1S pooe COii 529-8490 during business houfs ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep it hsted here 1n the Montrose V01ce where hterally thOusands turn each •eek - VOICE ADVERTISING °WORKS_ Advertise your professional service through aVoteeC1ass1f1ed Call5~8490 Pay by check or charge 1t on your American Express. Diner's Club MasterCard. Visa or Carte Blanche AUTO SALES LEASING FAMILY MOTORS 5210 Buffalo Speedway. 667-6804 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIDIEN LEASIN_G_ __ Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also -C-a~ & Bikes' on '·Montrose Classif td. page AUTO REPAIR WHEELS AND-TRIMS T .fops, hubcaps. wheel covers tires Insurance claims welcome. 50'll. off dedUCl1ble 681-5345 ALL PAINT I BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland. 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WEST GRAY AUTO {TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Gray. 528--2886 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or1M1nor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electrical Repatr 526-3723 2716 Taft AUTO REPAIR I BODY SHOP 2001 Harold. 522-5255 526-1940 TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Taft 522·2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE NEARTOWN KARZ 1901 Taft. 524-8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS .D.a..le..s , B. .a rber Styling. 940 He1ghiS Bi;d Tommy"s Barber Shop. Hair cuts s10"00 House calls $1500 & up For info 528-- 8216 Super Head Dino's Barber Shop 302 w 11th at Yale (Heights) 863-1520 Haircuts $6 & up Open t1I 7 weekdays BOOKKEEPING See also "Tax Preparation" category CONSTRUCTION / CONTRACTING Bur HouM Lnellng I Foundation Co. 681-5345 Mkttown Air 521-9009 HSK CONTRACTING 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DATING SERVICE Midtown Creations - Unique Glftt and S9'Yk:H 521-IOOI DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Houston. TX 77006 Monday thru Saturdai, Hours by Appointmer'lt (713) 524-0538 DOG GROOMING ---iNNER CITY DOG GROOMING 801 Rk:hmond Monday-Fnday 7.30am-6 30pm Easy drop off and pick up Call 520-7667 EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL ~~~~ ~~11~e~~rn. 1~~~H:69 52s--1s89 & SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 528--3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FUTONS FUTONS For the REST of your hfe' Custom made, 100'Jb cotton 526-0911 GIFTS PARTY GOODS Midtown CrHtlont Unique Glftt and Servk:H 521·9009 TIS THE SEASON 1966 W Gray (R1over Oaks). 520-5700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOURMET FOODS ~other used them Your grandmother used them Smee 1868 quality Watkins Spices and home products. Free catalog. Herbs" Spice Rack. 314 Fowler. 713-861-1621 GOURMET SHOPS SAY CHEESE ~~~ Westhe1mer (Highland Vr lage). 621· SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS OLYMPIA FITNESS I RACKETBALL CLUB 8313 SW Fwy. 988-8787 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #10. 661-2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOME AIR CONDITIONING Midtown Air 521-9009 TIME FOR A/C REPAIR? $25 plu• p.,tli. CALL 643-0398. LIQUOR LIQUORS "DELIVERY SERVICE" WAUGH DRIVE LIQUORS 1402 WELCH at WAUGH 5&9964 DORIS and ROGER-ORIGINAL OWNERS M/V/AMEX MEDICAL CARE STEVE 0 . MARTINEZ, M.D 2801 Ella Blvd suite G. 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS DR. C.E. FONTAN I ER Diseases of the Colon & Rectum * Colonoscopy * Hemorrhoids * Constipation * Rectal Bleeding Medical & Surgical management 872-7676 Answered 24 hours 210 West Greens Rd. Houston, TX 77067 MOVING MOVEMASTERS Boxes. too• Visa. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 630-6555 PEST CONTROL RESULTS PEST CONTROL & SANITATION 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE 00 IT ALU Printing and developmg enlargements. 1umbo prints. film. Kodak paper. 2615 Waugh Dr S:Z0..1010. PRINTING RINN'S SPEEDY PRINTING 11S17 W A.lab.ma, 527-0027 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667·7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAX PREPARATION TAX RETU
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