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Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996
File 014
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Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 014. 1996-06-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6893.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-06-21). Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 014. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6893

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 014, 1996-06-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6893.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date June 21, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE / JUNE 21, 1996 13 What Is Pride? Pride Knows No Borders. That is this year's theme for the annual celebration we all know as Lesbian and Gay Pride Week. All week there have been events in honor of this ritual that will culminate with the parade this Sunday. Aside from all of this, what seems to be remiss is the reason for which we are celebrating. All too often the Gay and Lesbian community capitulates the pride ceremony's origins into nothing more than a block party. Granted, our community is celebrating its culture's pride and that is important. It is equally important that our community understands the significance of this celebration in terms of our heritage—past and present. Many people in the community are unaware of Stonewall and it's historical impact on our civil liberties. Nor are they aware of the inroads that are currently being fought on a daily basis by many individuals who have decidedly taken an active role in the political process to ensure that we as a community have a voice. Too many younger members of our community are completely unaware of the laborious efforts that many of the "elders"—anyone over 30—have involved themselves with in the name of obtaining equal rights for Gays and Lesbians. As a result, some of the freedoms, and most of the tolerance, that exists for us today stemmed from the efforts put forth by those community "elders." Our community owes debts of gratitude to the following individuals for their (often unheralded) efforts on behalf of our cause: Gary Van Ooteghem, Marion Coleman, Ray Hill, Annise Parker. Bill Scott. Marion Panzer and our very own editor Deborah Bell. If these names are not familiar to you, they should be. Irrespective of their politics, these individuals contributions to our community are immeasurable. They are an indelible part of our history. And they are not alone, there are numerous other individuals who deserve mention. Unfortunately, the fight for gay and lesbian civil rights is far from over and unless the next generation is willing to get involved and pursue that agenda, we may lose the battle. Perhaps then, the importance of community involvement would resonate. I certainly hope our community does not have to endure such wake-up calls in order to mobilize themselves into action. That would be a travesty. So, celebrate Lesbian and Gay Pride with all the fervor you can muster but ask yourself during the process what you have done to contribute to the successes to date. To be sure, not all of our community is resting on their laurels, just the majority. There are many fine young individuals who are working within the parameters that "pride has no borders." The Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus (HGLPC), the African-American Lesbian and Gay Alliance of Houston (AALGA), the Log Cabin Republicans of Texas (LCR-TX), the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), etc. All of these organizations and a host of others are able to exist because of their dedicated volunteers. Although each organization may have different approaches, they are all working for the same cause, gay and lesbian civil rights. That in itself is worth championing. Two Who Lead Houston is lucky to have two leaders in this community who have demonstrated beyond a shadow of doubt their commitment to equality. Like the aforementioned leaders, these two individuals are the rising leaders of today and their accomplishments to date speak for themselves. I am of course talking about HGLPC President Pat Gandy and LCR- TX state President Dale Carpenter. Pat Gandy as President of HGLPC has been impressive. She has used her power in that position to make sure that our community has a voice. Gandy has been astute enough to realize that our community is diverse in many ways. Some of us have children, some of us own property, etc. Gandy has made a concerted effort to ensure that our concerns are addressed in many facets of public policy. Although Pat Gandy and I would probably disagree on most issues, she has earned my respect and that of the community's through her actions. She is a woman who means what she says and stands firm based on her principles. That is called leadership. Dale Carpenter's term as state president of LCR-TX has been equally as impressive. Carpenter has only been in his position for less than a year and he has catapulted Log Cabin into a major force as a gay and lesbian civil rights organization in the state of Texas. Like Gandy, Carpenter has demonstrated his uncanny ability at leadership, something that is all to often remiss in today's political circles. Carpenter, an attorney in Houston, is one of the most dedicated individuals I have ever met with respect to obtaining equal rights for us. While it is not politically popular in our community to be a Republican, it is precisely within that party that the bigotry must be confronted. Carpenter knows that too well and has had the courage to take on such a daunting task without a moment's hesitation. Log Cabin's current dispute with the GOP demonstrates his unwavering commitment towards achieving the group's goals. Keep in mind, that it is far more difficult to confront your adversaries on their home turf than it is to work for inclusion in an organization who is not as vehemently opposed to your agenda. I consider myself to be lucky indeed to have the opportunity to work with Mr. Carpenter. It has been inspiring beyond comprehension. I would like to remind my readers that neither Gandy or Carpenter receive remuneration for their efforts. Nor does anyone else who participates in those organizations. Both of these leaders do so out of conviction and they should be respected for their commitment to our community, regardless of their respective political ideology. Equally important to any organization are the members and volunteers of those groups, such as Matthew Huston (HGLPC) and Tirey Counts (LCR-TX). I am not attempting to diminish their contributions, to do so would be inappropriate. Motivation stems from good leadership. Without it, it would he difficult for any group to accomplish much. Gandy and Carpenter have a vision for their organizations and the depth to follow it through. For that we can all be proud. Finally, the biggest disappointment to our community of late was President Clinton's announcement that he would sign the pending Defense of Marriage Act, if it is passes Congress. It was an act of placing election year triumph based on short-term calculations over long-term goals. This bill does not just deny us the ability to get married, it denies federal tax, welfare, pension, health, immigration, and survivor's benefits to same-sex couples. Such an act of abandonment towards one of your most ardent group of supporters at their hour of need is cowardice and deserves to be castigated. WHEW HILL IBEE2ES m WU, * Please Designate a Driver * Sunday, June 23rd Following the Pride Parade, The Men of Summer present: HELL NIGHT! The Party 96' After being punished by the summer sun! Keep Your Cool With: « 6 Giant Air Conditioners! * 8 Hot Bartenders to fulfill your needs! «s Hot Damn Frozen Over waiting on the Patio! And You will Sweat with: 4 Sinsational Dancers in the Cages of Decadance! * Our Steaming Laser Lit Dance Floor! * Sinful Dance Music! ssThe Lowest Regular Drink Prices! $1.25 Well, $1.75 Beer, $3.00 Call & $1.25 Schnaaps! ALL NIGHT-EVERY NIGHT! Pulse Pay Now Available! 710 Pacific Street 713/523-0213 ^ No Cover B4/llpm If You re In 70s Drag Disco-Jockey Tony Powell #> ^a^ X-t*^ Hi .75 Cents Well B4/11PD1 $1.00 Draft Pints BIG ' HAIR CONTEST 2524 McKinney fthe Old Axiom Space) (13 • 237*0029
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