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Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996
File 005
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Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 005. 1996-06-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6884.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-06-21). Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6884

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 005, 1996-06-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6884.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date June 21, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 HOUSTON VOICE / JUNE 21. 1996 In Loving Memory Epitaph for Cal Moran It's been a year since you went away; the pain and grief still remain, an empty hole in my heart I still possess, and all I have left is to write: In memorium of the man I loved as a friend, a confidant, a mentor, a father. So few understood; so few can, but we understood; and that's all that matters. And I will carry my load and try to resolve what I can here on this earth until in another lifetime I can see you again. I miss you, Daddy Cal Love your daughter, Jackie STEVEN DOUGLAS ROACH Born: March 3, 1954 Died: June 9, 1996 Steven D. Roach, 42, a resident of Houston, Texas passed away on Sunday, June 9, 1996, Steven was preceded in death by his father, Calvin Bernard, and mother, Clara Dean Roach, He is survived by his brother, Glen Roach of San Antonio, Texas and nephews, Patrick and Christopher Roach and many friends, Steven was an active member of the Executive and Professional Association of Houston and formerly a member of the Miss Camp America Foundation. Steven was also very active in many committees and fund-raisers for the Houston community. A memorial service will be held at Rothko Chapel, 1400 Sul Ross at Yupon, 5 p.m. Thursday, June 13. If you wish to remember Steven, donations may be made to Omega House, 602 Branard, Houston, TX 77006. Pride -What's It All About By JACK VALINSKI The Pride Committee of Houston, Inc. is a non-profit 7501 (c)(3) organization whose purpose is to coordinate and promote events which celebrate the diversity, unity and history of the Lesbian and Gay Community. The organization's bylaws do not discriminate on the basis of color, gender, transgender or bisexual identification, the physically challenged or differently-abled or on the basis of age. Every year this group puts together not only the annual parade, but ten days of events either sponsored by the group itself or in coordination with dozens of community organizations to commemorate, educate and celebrate our pride and to create a path towards a positive future for all humanity not to exclude any segment of who we are as a people. The Story Behind Pride Week Most of us know the story by now, but it always bears repeating. One of the more volatile and emotional social movements in the nation's history emerged on a summer night 27 years ago at a ransacked bar in New York City's Greenwich Village. At 3:00 a.m. on June 25. 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn investigating alleged liquor violations. Until then, raids regarded as routine harassment of bars catering to homosexuals had met only token opposition. Within minutes, however, more than 400 people had gathered in nearby Sheridan Square and a riot erupted. More disturbances followed the next two nights. A minority shrouded in mystery, fear, self-deprecation and loathing decided it had enough. It was the Lexington of a civil rights movement, a gathering of forces and the beginning of a tumultuous march. The true story of events surrounding the Stonewall riots has always been a bit elusive, and media accounts printed at the time appear blatantly biased and notably lacking in factual detail. However, the above quotes tell the story that is most widely known, and the results of that night in New York City can be seen today as our national community grows in both influence and in stature in our society. In 1970. a noted gay activist from Los Angeles named Morris Right (who was born in Texas by the way) was responsible for the 'Remember Stonewall' vigil lhal has become a yearly event around the country. In 1975. the first gay and lesbian march in Texas was held in Dallas as a part of the Stonewall remembrance. Community activists in Houston held a widely attended news conference that summer which announced, among other events, the formation of a political coalition that has become the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus. The Houston Story In 1975, an estimated 200 people held a march in downtown Houston to commemorate the Stonewall riots, which was sponsored by the fledgling Gay Activists Alliance of the University of Houston. Singer and former beauty queen Anita Bryant's appearance as featured entertainer for the Texas Bar Association convention in 1975 brought an estimated 5,000 angry protesters down Houston's streets. The heavily publicized march, headed by such notables as gay publisher David Goodstein and Rev. Troy Perry of the Metropolitan Community Church was in vivid reaction to Ms. Bryant's involvement supporting an anti-gay ordinance then in effect in Dade County, Florida. A few weeks later, Houston's community held its first Pride Rally in Cherryhurst Park to celebrate what has become a national holiday for Lesbians, Gays and their allies. Over 4,000 community activists met at the Astrodome in 1978 for Town Meeting, the first organizational gathering in Houston that included gay & lesbian people from every aspect of Houston society. Former state legislator and vice-presidential nominee Frances 'Sissy' Farenlhold was the keynote speaker, and the meeting was chaired by Virginia Apu- zzo. a leading gay activist who became Executive Director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force in New York. Many of Houston's gay services, including the Montrose Counseling Center and the Montrose Clinic, were formulated and organized at the first historic meeting. During the 1980s the AIDS epidemic hit the Gay community. With little federal and almost no state and local help, the community responded first by dealing with own mortality then by building community institutions dealing with AIDS. Since 1979, the gay community of Houston has celebrated Gay and Lesbian Pride Week (alternating with Lesbian and Gay) with a full schedule of events in late June. Where We Are Now This year we are celebrating 'Pride Knows No Borders' in a year in which 'out' has truly been 'in' —in the news, in the world spotlight. The involvement of gay and lesbian people in the election process and the seemingly endless debate over the military's anti-gay and lesbian policy have ushered in, at last, a time of intense attention to our issues in the overall public. Gay men and lesbians, our lives, goals and political movement have received more serious coverage in the mainstream media, print and electronic, in the past six months than they have in over a decade. Public opinion polls continue to show that while most Americans support equal rights for gay people, the majority of Americans do not understand that no federal law protects lesbian and gay people from discrimination. Most people do not know that it is perfectly legal to fire someone in the 41 states that do not have civil rights protection based on sexual orientation. Driven both by the positive attitude of our government's new administration and the swift and fierce negative backlash to the changes from the radical right, role models seem to suddenly be crawling out of the cracks in the pavement. They are everywhere, coming out or coming forward in droves, and iheir appearance has coincided with a reexamination of values, policies and approach in society at large. Just as the participants in the parades and the marches on Washington and state capitals represent a cross-section of a broader gay and lesbian society, our community is a microcosm of society itself. Considering this, we are about as much 'like everybody else' as we are ever going to get. That we define our vision of a nebulous 'everyone' deserving of our respect and emulation in terms of a minority within society that rejects us is an irony rooted in self-hatred. In the wake of 1993*s March on Washington for Gay, Lesbian and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, and with this year's flood of positive media portrayals of gays and lesbians, it would appear that pride, diversity and being Out are good for us after all. It is true that sexual orientation is only one aspect of an individual's personality. However, historically and in today's political climate, it is not gay and lesbian people who have made the biggest deal out of it. While we are consistently described as an aggressive and powerful lobby, in truth we are only now regrouping from an overwhelming blow the AIDS crisis landed on our energy, leadership, organization and political firepower. Meanwhile, those whose political agenda it has always been to deny us basic human rights have maintained their presence and power and have become more aggressive. If we are here celebrating that we have a responsibility to support the weary warriors who do more than their share of our community's work. We also have a responsibility to personally participate, each in our own way, and to offer our leaders the insight and guidance they need from a broader and more representative community. We have reason to celebrate. But now is not the time to compromise ourselves back into a closet of obscurity, even a padded one with a view. We make positive strides and withstand negative aggressions from silence to celebration. Another way to reach us! You can now send your letters, news leads, and other correspondence to the HOUSTON VOICE by e-mail. Address to: HouVoice(5Jaol.com. i VOICE ISSUE B17 June 21, 1996 Published Fridays Established 1974 as the Houston Montrose Star. re-established 19B0 as the Houston Montrose Voice, changed name to The New Voice in 1991 incorporating the New Orleans Crescenl City Star. re-established December 1, 1993 as the Houslon Voice 811 Westheimer, Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77006 (713)529-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fax:(713)529-9531 Contents copynght 1995 Office Hours: 9am-5:30pm weekdays Crad Duren/publlsher Jack Leonard/general manager Matthew Pennington/production manager EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Deborah Moncrief Bell/editor STAFF WRITERS Jon Harrison. Mark Henry, BR McDonald, Carolyn Roberts, Javier Tamez, Glen Webber CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Jon Anthony, Sam Dawster, Andrew Edmonson, Kerry Kadell. Chris Lambert, Curt Morrison Jazz Paz, John Reed CARTOONISTS David Brady, Scotty. Earl Storm PHOTOGRAPHERS David Goetz. Kim Thompson ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Lee Davis, Carolyn A Roberts CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS Maggie Bralick NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Rivendell Marketing, P.O. Box 510, Weimeld, NJ (908) 232-2021 _Pa*1jel or complrte reproduction of any advertisement. news pUcie or torture, copy or photograph from Ihe Houston Voice is specifically prohibited by federal statute _Opm«ns expressed by cokimnuts or cartoonists ere nol necessarily those ol Ihe Houston Voice or its staff and we assume no Uaoilrty lor Ihe content expressed or implied of ia<d articles or likeness of persons living or dead real or ficlionrt in the cartoons -Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization m articles or advertising m the Houston Voice is not to be construed as any indie ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ said person or organization —Tlie appearance of advertisements or opinions expressed "Wrem do nol constitute an endorsement or guarantee by The Houston Voice or in staff POSTMASTER Send address correa-ons to 811 Westheimer. Suite 105 Houston. TX 77006 Subscription rale in US (by carrier or US Mail) (1 75 per week (M5 50 per 6 months or 191 00 per year) Display advertising deadline 1200pm CT Monday lo reserve space, 5 00 p m CT Monday to fum-sh ad copy, lor Friday publication Classified advertrs.no deadline noon CT Monday lor Friday publication Responsibility We do nol assume man-art respon.ibiMy lor claims by ndvertisers bul readers ere asked lo advise the newspaper of any susp"*** of fraudulent or decern, adv^,,^ er«susp.c*C4is^»'n**^'*»*'™_ „_ Member National Gay Newspaper Guild. Gay » Lesbian p,MJ Assoc-ation, Assoorte member Assorted Pre,*,
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