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Montrose Voice, No. 273, January 17, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 273, January 17, 1986 - File 001. 1986-01-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6689/show/6668.

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(1986-01-17). Montrose Voice, No. 273, January 17, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6689/show/6668

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 273, January 17, 1986 - File 001, 1986-01-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6689/show/6668.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 273, January 17, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 17, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript New Programs Expand YWCA r--"n.'l'J!Bl.:. Offerings "The Newspaper of Montrose" Friday, January 17, 1986 Issue 273 (713) 529-8490 Neighborhood, Inside ' ·~ M~ntr~s~ Clinic Announces New Officers News, inside Mardi Gras Fi ale Planned for Feb. 15 News, inside Commu­nity Center Begins Service News, inside New Liberty Bank Owners Plan for Image Change, Stability News, inside I I Most Competitive Race Yet for President of GPC ANNISE PARKER WINS By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Promising to provide strong leader­ship to strengthen the 370-member Houston Gay Political Caucus, Annise Parker was elected the organ­ization's new president Wednesday night. The 29-year-old Parker, who served as a GPC board member, garnered 84 votes to incumbent president Sue Lovell's 71 in a runoff. Ray Hill, th€ third candidate, received 52 votes. Continued inside State Health Director Changes Mind on Proposal to -Make AIDS Quarantinable Disease QUARANTINE IDEA OUT By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Citing public pressure, state Health Commissioner Dr. Robert Bernstein, on Thursday, withdrew an order that would place AIDS on the state's list of quarantinable diseases. At a press conference in Austin, Bernstein acknowledged that a qua­rantine would not be a viable solution to controlling the spread of acquired immune deficiency. He said he was influenced by public testim­ony at a hearing on the issue held this past Monday. He also agreed with opponents of the quarantine proposal that proper education of the public would be a more viable solution to the problem. Bernstein urged those health care and gay rights organizations who have recently been involved in the quarantine controversy to rechannel their efforts back to AIDS related programs. Continued inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17 1986 ··r Are You Looking To Meet New MEN? Then the Cruise Connection Is Just For You. Monday-Thursday Rent 1 Movie, Get 2nd free* i: . • Roofing • Water Proofing Not Just a Dating Service. This is an Innovative way to Cruise and to meet the men you are Cruising. For Free Details, Send a Self­Addressed Stamped Envelope to: MON.-THURS.: 10am-8pm FRl.-SAT.: 10am-10pm SUN: 1pm-6pm \. 11 I • Remodeling • Tile • Sheetrock/Painting • Carpet • Plumbing/Electrical • Cabinets • Foundations Repaired • Decks • Trim Removeables • Room Additions No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Dlgltal Pager 891-4053 Houston Cruise Connection 2615 Waugh Dr. No. 196 Houston, Texas n006 Happy Cruising! WE CARRY ADULT FILMS 'plus deposit. adult films not included 2016 MONTROSE Houston, Texas 77006 529-5544 808 Lovett ~\_,~~ 521-1015 ..__ __ ~ CAf·~ ~......._----t IAliijjiJ BouleYard Big Bang ~ $1.99 Breakfast .-.=.. Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage and 2 Pancakes 1--arl",,g iou7 $;;,;;;.Qrt'Tn "i>r-a-1 : Valentine's Dinner 1 Mon.-Frl. wHh coupon I I Buy One Blackboard Special at the I I regular ~~C:,:;! ~~)e tor $1 I 1--------------~ ~ ~ . f.1\ ~/J Hours: 7am-11pm Mon.-Thurs lam-Midnight Friday Barn-Midnight Saturday 8am-11pm Sunday Coming in February and March "Scuzz lz Al. Suzz Duzz" Rl CORD D.J. David Oleson 715 Fairview 521-2792 at Would you believe these people are desperately seeking Scuzz? D.J. Lary Thompson 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 JANUARY 17, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 3 Health Director Withdraws Quarantine Proposal By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Citing public pressure, state Health Com­missioner Dr. Robert Bernstein, on Thurs­day, withdrew an order that would place AIDS on the state's list of quarantinable diseases. At a press conference in Austin, Bern­stein acknowledged that a quarantine would not be a viable solution to control­ling the spread of acquired immune defi­ciency. He said he was influenced by public testimony at a hearing on the issue held this past Monday. He also agreed with opponents of the quarantine prop­osal that proper education of the public would be a more viable solution to the problem. Bernstein urged those health care and gay rights organizations who have recently been involved in the quarantine controversy to rechannel their efforts back to AIDS related programs. Bernstein added that another reason for cancelling the quarantine proposal was fear that it would jeopardize the health department's "vital relationship" with the gay com-montrose VOICE ANO TEXAS•~ TAR MONTROSE. TEXAS Population (Ml 1985) 32.000 Cenaus tr1ct1 401 01 , 401 02. 402 01. 402 02 405 02. 400 Ind 404 01 Zip COO• (rOUghly) 77006. 77019 (portion), 77098 Bounded (r009hly) Shel)herd Or 4wet1). Allon P1rkw1y (north), M11n St (east), US 59 (south) Ulitude (MontrOM Blvd It W1sthe1mer Rd) 29•44·13· N Long1lud• 95•22·5()"'W Altitude 40' ELECTED OfflCIALS FOR MONTROSE ~ GrNniU Hous1on Ctty Council {dist Cl 9CH 81gby (113} 222· S9J.3 El Fr1nco l•. H•ms County Comm•uioner (pct n 1001 PrtatOl'I (113) 221-51" W111er R1nlun Constable (pct 1) JOI San J1cmro. 1113} 22,·!5200 o.br• 01nburg TexH House ol Repr ... ntahv• ld1lt 137) 191 I SW Fwy f113} !520-8088 Craig WHh1ngton, Teus Senile (dist 13) 2323 C•rolme '713) 569-4343 M10.ey l•llnd US HcMn4I of Repreuntal•vM fd1st 18) Hll9 S1nith •820 f113J 1~1339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 273rd ISSUE. JAN 17 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DISTRIBUTION 11 500 copies "Weekly In Houslon tP'lrough 140 maJQr d1Str1btitron points In lhe Montroae the Village. the Heights estim•ted pass-on 11t• l•ctor 2 8 •st1m1ted re~ersh1p 32.200 WHlfly 500 cop1e1 weekly elsewhere through 10 other dislr•buhon points tst1m•ted pan-on r1tt factor 2 5 t!t1m11.a rHderah1p 1.~ weekly TOTAL DISTRIBUTION IGUARANTEEDI 12.000 cop1e1 weekly total Ht1m•t•d rHder•h1p 33.'00 wHkly Contents copyright 1986 Office hours. 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg publlsher-«11tor Linda Wyche m•n•g1np editor Connie Woodsmews Pele Diamond n•w.s David Roumfort productt0t1 Scott Cutsinger, Bell 0 Aourt<e ,...,.,thu Steve Warren natlONI tonHPof1delll ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-a.90 Elsewhere Texas (800) 222-1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere U S (800) 225-0227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulholland .avert11lnp d1rector Rick Hiii tccounr extcut1 ..... Found•ng MtmMfl Gre1ter Montrose Business Guild, Gay and Leab•an Press A11oc1a11on N•w• Serv1cH News-One. Pacific News Service Syndicated FHture Serv1c., & Wfltera Brian McNaught. Un1- ver111 Presa Synd1c1te. News America Syndicate POSTMASTER Send addre11 corrections to •oe Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 Sublc11pt1on r•t• m US m •Hied eni .. e1ope · S•9 per yetr (52 issues). $29 per auc monlha (2811au .. ). or S 1 25 per week (less th•n 2e llSU .. ) Back llSUH $2 00 NCh National edvert1s1ng r1pres1nr•t1~e Joe 01S.bato. R1vendell Marketing 668 6th Avenue Ntw York 10011 (212) 2•2·6863 At1ve1t11ing deldlme WednHO•y. 5 30pm.. for •Hue released Frld1y evening Not1Ct to lflvtrt1Hr1 LOC1l tdvert1sing r1te schedule ~en-A w•effectiveOct 12 1_.. andEighl-AwllbeeU.c11veJan 3 11186 RNpons1biJ1ty The MoritrOM Voice doe. not 1uume rnpon- 11bd1ty tor 1dvert11Jng cl11tn1 Relders lhoukt adv•H the nttwtpaper 10 1ny deceptl'f"e edvertislng munity and make AIDS treatment more difficult. The health department chief was quick to emphasize that he did not succumb to pressure from Gov. Mark White in making his decision. The governor has long echoed the beliefs of anti-quarantine advo­cates that quarantine would create an even more difficult situation for Texas. During the Department of Health hear­ing in Austin on Monday, the quarantine was denounced as "plague politics" and called an ineffective means of stopping or controlling the spread of AIDS. But those in favor of the quarantine including Bernstein and Dr. Jame~ Haughton, Houston director of health said those opposed to the quarantine wer~ "overreacting," While Haughton said the "gay commun­ity was a responsible community," he likened the hysteria generated by the gay community concerning the quarantine to that surrounding the platform and candi­dates of the Straight Slate. The quarantine proposed by the State Board of Health last month "would single out acquired immune deficiency syndrome as quarantinable only under certain spe­cific circumstances and only to the extent necessary to prevent the transmission of STEVE D. MARTINEZ M.D. ' INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS/KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON FRI 8:30AM-5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MONA WED., FRI. EVENINGS AND ~ATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONL y 2801 EllA Bl VD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX noos (713) 868-4535 IN TiiE HEIGlffS the disease from an infected person. The quarantine would only be invoked as a last reeort measure .... " The idea for the quarantine was, in part, inititated as a means for giving state health officials a plan for dealing with individuals who have AIDS and endanger the lives of others by refusing not to have sex. The story of Fabian Bridges, the man who at one time said he would continue to have sex with others even though he had AIDS, also prompted health officials to consider instating a quarantine. Mike Sullivan, public affairs director for WCCO, the Minnesota television station who filmed a documentary on Bridges, has, in fact, denied that Bridges was a prostitute. And according to John Bar­nich, a friend of Bridges, it was highly unlikely that he could have practiced pros­titution in his weakened physical condi­tion. Those who spoke against the quaran­tine, including Nate Sebastian, executive director of the KS AIDS Foundation of Houston, said AIDS is the wrong type of illness for quarantine because it is not eas­ily contracted or casually transmitted. "(A) quarantine focused only on persons diagnosed with AIDS would be ineffective in halting its spread, considering the prob-ability that those most likely responsible for transmitting the virus are those who are infected with that virus but not expe­riencing any of the symptoms," Sebastian said. He added that by the time a person is diagnosed with AIDS, he is not infectious and is most often too ill to consider having sex. Since the national Centers for Disease Control has estimated that as many as two million Americans may have already been exposed to the AIDS virus, Sebastian says any type of quarantining to prevent a further spread of the disease would be impossible. The proposed quarantine, as it now stands, does not clearly define the term medical isolation or which persons-those with AIDS, ARC or those who have merely tested positive-poi;e a threat to the health of others. Furthermore, no answers have been given concerning how or where a "quarantinable" person would be isolated or who would pay for the quarantining. Under such a quarantine, Sebastian said persons who are quarantined would be required to remain in "medical isola· tion" until they are cured or the disease ie continued p.4 II 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17, 1986 Annise Parker 18 the neu•/y-e/ected president of the Houston Gay Pol1tical Caucus Annise Parker Wins By Pete Diamond Montro•e Voice Staff Reporter Promising to provide ,trong leadership to strengthen the 370·member Houston Gay Political Caucu,, Annise Parker was elected the organization's new president Wednesday night. The 29-year-old Parker, who served as a GPC board member, garnered 84 vote~ to incumbent president Sue Lovell's 71 in a runoff Ray Hill, the third candidate, received 52 votes. Following a year which saw the defeat of a gay job rights referendum, Parker said the GPC is suffering not only from an image problem in the general population, but also within the gay community She said the organization must work towards rebuilding itself and increasing its pride and political strength. Emphasizing that the GPC should not be perceived as a ",ingle-issue organiza· tion," Parker vowed to work closely with both the population-at·large and the gay community While she said the caucus has bel>n "overexposed" in the media, she promised that it would remain forceful and continue to speak out on issues con ­cerning its members. As the organization's new president, Parker admit.I' the position will be one of great responHibility. "The president of the caucus 1s perceived, rightly or wrongly, as a spokespereon not just for the caucu1<, but for the entire gay community," she said. Knowing this, Parker said it will be a great responsibility to see that the caucus represents the widest possible cross· section of the community. Lovell, who became the group's first woman leader in 1984, was seeking a second elected term a.~ president. As a founding member of the 10-year·old organ­ization, Hill campaigned on a platform to broaden the GPC's base. "The president of the caucus is perceived, rightly or wrongly, as a spokesperson not just for the caucus, but for the entire gay community." ------- Elections were also held for other offic· ers and board member positions. Voting GPC members elected David Fowler to office as vice president, Tony Bell as treas· urer and Dale Beverly as secretary. Newly elected board members include Sam Can· non, Tom Tate, Bob Meyer, Len Reber and Joe Thornton. Write Us! Lettera to the Editor The Voice 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Please be r.oncise. Thank you. Quaratine Idea Thrown Out from pa![e .1 no longer transmisRable. With AIDS, such a person would be required to remain in isolation until death. In testimony at Monday's hearing, Dr Mathilde Krim, an AIDS researcher at thf Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Cente1 in New York and co-chairman of the Amencan fo'oundation for AIDS Rei;earch corrected several medical points within the quarantine propo~al for darificatior and accuracy, including a statement which claimed that "AIDS is .. a commun icablc disease which ... present;; a threat to the public health .... " Krim pointed out that AIDS iR not, in itself, communicable, but that the HTLV III/ LAV retro-virus is. She also said many of the te,ts for AIDS, which would be used to determine whether or not someone should be isolated, are unreliable and can yield inaccurate results. While the quarantine is "apparently based on logic and restraint," Krim said "the proposed rule is illogical and danger­ous and it will have little or no effect in terms of protecting the public health. "It wiU also be rnstly and cumbersome to implement. It will be cruel to those who should be pitied and helped, frightening to quarantined innocents and ultimately demeaning to the quality of everyone's life. It has the potential of opening a Pan· dora's box of horrors." It is possible that fear of a qurantine may cause some people to delay seeking medical attention at a time when they may be the most highly infectious, result· ing in an incn•ased spread of the diAease. Such fears may also hinder physicians from diagnosing and reporting AIDS ca"es. Sebastian and Krim, like many others who oppose the quarantine, favor a rigor· ous public education program to explain the realities of AIDS, how it is transmitted and how a person can protect himself from infection. "AIDS has correctly been called a 'dis· ease of consenting adults' since everyone could know how to avoid it," Krim Aaid. "If everyone did know, quarantine would be altogether unnect•ssary since HTLV III/LAV infection is not transmitted through c11sual sodal contacts." Texas currently does not sponsor any educational programs related to AIDS While the city of Houston has provided some information to the public. it has done so on a limited basis. Calling a public information program a "cheaper, simpler, ethically preferable and more effective solution" than a qua· ran tine, Krim pointed to the fact that such an approach has "dramatically reduced the incidence of venereal infections in groups at high risk of AIDS." Sebastian says the proposed quarantine-the first of its kind in the nation-is "embarrassing" and adds that it is "false hope" for anyone to think Texas is doing something about AIDS by instat­ing a quarantine. With the end of the debate over quaran­tine, Bernstt•in also reactivated the state AIDS task force. According to Dr. Peter Mansell, deputy department chairman of the Department of Cancer Prevention at MD Anderson Hospital and a member of the task force, the group has not met since 1984 and members were not consulted about the quarantine issue ~-----------~ s10°0 : I off ! I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I 1 ar'o/ of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing• Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes •Announcements •Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers• Report or Booklet Copy;ng •Invoices -~: - · SPEEDY PRINTING SERVICE OF TEXAS ' F<1st. Reliable ServKe. Excellf'flt Quality. low Cost 5400 BEUAJRE BLVD. Convernent Southwest locat100 '"""',..,,or c....,.,"'Y ~oc•"' M"J>INoc!q<o CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MlMBER GRfllTER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD, GRf,...TER BEl.UllRf CHl'IMBfR OF COMMERCE Pft'a'"· °""coupon p..r cu'tom<"r <Ind/Of Ofrler, CiVY"()t ~ comlllnM with ot~r dlSCOlXll' °' 'P"Cldf Orft'fl _ __________ _j Rising Insurance Costs Threaten Middle Class Insurance is an area where the market feeds not on people's desires or wants, but on their fears-chiefly of catastrophic losses to life, limb and prop­erty. The skyrocketing of insurance costs indicates people's fears in this respect are greater than ever. By Franz Shurmann Pae1fu: News Serl'iee Spee1al to the Montrose Voice The United States began its history with a tax revolt and ever sinee, Americans have been chafing at their growing tax burdens. Yet suddenly, another big burden has b('('n piling on their individual and collective Hhoulders-insurance. Anyone who pays monthly bills feels the growing weight of insurance pay· men ta. We know from media coverage that malpractice insurance is driving more and more doctors out of private practice. l.Rss well known is th<' growing weight of mal· practir<' insurance many other private entrepreneurs must now b!'ar. "Errors and ommissions" insurance for one soil engineering firm, for example, jumped from $23,000 to $109,000 in one year-forcing the owner to close down. Consumer activist Ralph Nader has reported similar casen nationwide. It is no mystery why this is happening Business insurance goes up because of the dizzying pare of economic and technologi· cal change, making accidents-or "con· tingencies," as the insurance people say-more likely. But Americans also pay higher health insurance because a grow· ing population of the aged needs more medical care. Auto insurance goes up because of more cars and drivers. Home insurance goes up because housing prices have shot up. It is also no mystery what current insu· ranc-e trends are doing to people in this rounlry. The poor are rapidly being squ1•ezed out of the world of insurance. They cannot afford auto insurance, 1•ven though they need cars as much as middle-class people. Fewer of them enjoy private health care coverage even as their Medicare options shrink. That will mean more accidents involving uninsured drivers and more uninsured sick people thrown onto the already overloaded facilities of county and city hospitals. Current insurance trends are also endangering small business. Despite its high failure rate, small business accounts overwhelmingly for the new jobs opening up in the economy. Yet because of rising insurance costs. more and more entrepre­neurs will have no choice but to close shop and go to work for some big organization that can afford the insurance payments. Taken to an extreme, current insurance trends could drive us into a two-tier society where our better-off citizens are snugly enscounced in the job niches ofbigorgani· zations while a huge population of less well-off mills around outside covered by little or no insurance. At the same time, these trends could put small business formations into reverse. A few decades ago, many observer.s, especially liberal social planners, would have welcomed these trends. Big organi· zations were seen as efficient and effec­tive, ~ble to operate on "economies of scale." Planning by government was seen as the be.st way to employ all job-seekers, maximize !'conomic performance, and spr!'ad it around to everybody. Now the predominant views on big organization have shifted dramatically. Big businei;s is no longer seen as supremely efficient and effective. Big government is seen as wasteful. Small scale start· up companie.s are credited with having pioneered the computer revolu· tion. Moreover. big business creates far fewer new jobs than small businesses, and is busy automating as many old jobs as it can. And governments at national, state and local levels have long since reached employment plateaus which they would like to lower even further. Insurance is an area where the market feeds not on people's desires or wants, but on their fears-chiefly of catastrophic losses to life, limb and property. The sky· rocketing of insurance costs indicates peo­ple's fears in this respect are greater than ever. Government maintains defense. police and fire fighting forces to prevent catas· trophes from happening and to deal with them when they occur. It should also assume responsibility for helping people deal with their consequences. Social Security is a trust fund mecha· nism that, in effect, provides people with old age and disability insurance. Despite its troublt·s and generational inequities, it protects millions of citizens against the catastrophe of pennilessness when they can no longer earn a living. Similar mech· anisms could be created for a range of potential ratastrophies, each customized to the special needs of different parts of the population. A general trust fund would deal with ratastrophies involving the uninsured. Calling government in to remedy socie­ty's problems should be a Inst resort, but current insurance trends are so threaten­ing to the future well-being of the nation that in this instance it 1s necessary and justified --------- In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi<e Tired of looking for an apartment in all the wrong places? Ifs time you visited 1920 West Alabama. Enter our gates and you'll realize you've finally discovered the finest in gracious apartment living. We've combined privacy and elegance at this professional adult community located In the Montrose area near River Oaks with easy access to Downtown and the Medical Center. Why hunt? We have It all! One bedroom from $305, two bedrooms from $415. 1920 WEST ALABAMA 529-6798 TOM'S PRETTY FISH INC. Tom Graham Pres. .I y~ Sugar-Sugar Gen. Mgr. ALL KINDS 0 ROPICAL FISH AND SUPPLIES FOR 'EM 2248 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON Ph. 520-6443 sr~ial ~at u1 \O Gaifon 74nJc. f ., 'f i~;-ra-i: Tank, heater, gravel, filter, pump, tubing, hood, lights, dual gang valve, aquarium guide and thermometer All you add is plants, fish & L.va. 5 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17, 1986 Neighborhood New Owners Plan Change of Image for Liberty Bank John and Frances Gordon are charting a new course of progress for Montrose and Liberty Bank (Pete Diamond photo) By Pete Diamond Montroes Voice Staff Reporter Exactly one month ago, Liberty Bank President John Sawvell announced that controlling interest in the bank had been purchased by John and Franceo Gordon, owners and founders of Houston-based Southwestern Surplus, an excess and sur· plus lines general agency. The announcement, which was made at a special meeting of ,;hareholders, was part of a program of changes begun more than a year ago to strengthen the bank and reposition it for growth. As the new owners of Houston'• 918t largest bank, the Gordons represent change not only for the bank, but for the Montroi;e area as a whole. "We plan to change the image of the bank and make it more of a community· oriented bank," says John Gordon, who is now erving ae chairman of the board. As a "focal point of the Neartown area," Gor· don believes it is important for people to "become more aware of the bank and how it serves the community They should also become more familiar with the bank and know something about where they are put· ting their money." Frances Gordon, servmg ai; vice chair· man for the bank, said part of becoming a more personal bank will mean creating a friendly atmoephere and giving custo­mers quality service in such a manner that they ";II want to come back again. Changing the image of the bank and improving that of the Montroi;e area is something the Gordons believe goes hand· m·hand. As Montrose resident,; and bu•i· ness owners, the Gordon,; share a great deal of enthusiasm and pride in the com· munity. "We want the bank to be a part of the area and promote its growth. We also want to make the area a better place to work and live in. We've got the people now that can lead us along that path," Gordon said, ref· erring to a new bank management team headed by Sawvell. "We have embarked on an exciting new phase of development," Sawvell says. "With Francel! and John Gordon holding the controlling interest and our new man· agement team firmly established, we have the sophistication, expertise and strength to serve small and mid-eized companies." "Simultaneously, our commitment to the economic development of the Lower WeF<theiml'r area means that we take a special intere. t in the community," Saw· veil added. Another part of Liberty's move to greater stabilization has been what Gor· don calls a "planned reduction in brokered accounts or monies within the bank," He says that such a move means greater sta· bility for the future of Liberty Bank by bringing the institution "back to where it should be with long-term monies." Proud of the fact that Liberty Bank has an individual loan limit of $1 million, Gor· don says the bank is looking toward to long-term growth, both within themselveH and the Montrose community "We want Liberty to be a bank near where people live and work that is capable of meeting and taking care of all their banking needs. from savings to invest­ments." he added. River Oaks Theater Adding Screens By Pete Diamond Montrose i'o1<'e Staff Reporter Along with "art" film~. popcorn and candy, moviegoers who have been to the River Oaks Theater recently have no doubt noticed some sawdust, nails and two-by-fours. The construction currently underway is the first step toward expanding the tht>ater to a "triplex." Plans call for the addition of two smaller theaters to bl' built on the second floor, each of which will have a viewing screen only one foot less m length than the main screen. Other plans include the addition of an elevator to make the upstairb theaters wheelchair-accessible and Rpecial seating and re trooms for handicapped mdividu als. The expansion project was undertaken to allow a greater numbt'r and variety of art films to be shown at the theater. Since construction will only be done during weekdays, it is not expected to affe<.t the viewing of moV1es. Scheduled completion ofthetwonewtheaters i• •et for mid-April. RINN'S SPEEDY PRINTING 1617 \\'. Alabama Copies 5¢ 527-0027 1/ 2 Price Sale Carbonless Forms ~.">II C:Ol ' ;\T. :1 PART. 81~x 11 • 526.99 500 Business Cards SI ~.99 PERSONALIZED SERVICE: • Letterheads .•Envelopes • Brochures • Flyers • Invitations • Business Fonns •Matches • 1nemography • Business Cards • Typesetting CALL OR COME IN FORA QUOTE GREENWAY PIACE APARTMENTS 3333 CUMMINS LANE HOUSTON (713) 623-2034 New Year's Move-In Special 2 Bedroom/2 Baths with all bills paid Lease by February 1st and Receive 1 Nlonth Free Office Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30 Houri Saturday 10:00-5:00 Sunday 1 :00-5:00 . ' Mardi Gras Finale Planned for Feb. 15 Houston's traditional post-Mardi Gras celebration, "Mardi Gras Finale," is sche­duled this year for Feb. 15 beginning at 10:00 p.m .. It will feature music by New York's Robbie Leslie of The Palladium and The Saint fame. The new location, at 2202 Polk, provides more space than ever before and, again, the open bar concept will be used. To accomodate those traveling from other cities, Advance Travel, with its toll free number, will act as official travel agent for the all night fete. Locally, tickets will be available at Dra· matika. 3224 Yoakum, and may also be ordered by mail from MGF, 3333 W. Ala· barns, Suite 100-B. Houston, Texas 770911. Requests should include $20 per ticket and a return addrei.s. Montrose Clinic Announces New Officers From a Press Release The Montrose Clinic, offering diagnosis, treatment and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases to the innercity com­munity since 1981, has announced the selection of its corporate officers for 19116. Mark Canfield will serve as chairman with Claire Thomas as secretary and Alan Pierce as treasurer. Other members of the Board ofTrustees are Richard Adams, A.R.T.; Rudy Burnette; Richard Grimes, Ph.D.; Lyt Har­ris; C. Edward Jamail; and Sam Nixon, M.D. Serving as ex-officio trustees to the board are Thomas J . Audette, administra­tive director; T. David Bedner, M.D., medi­cal director; James G. Haughton, M.D.; and James R. Kuhn, general legal counsel. Letters In Praise of the Montrose Voice From Loran E Doss It is nice to know that the Montrose VoicP has the largest circulation of any news­paper in the Montrose area. Other news­papers only cover events that happen at City Hall and have an editorial staff that writes about the same general topics. The Voice covers interesting events that happen during the week while giving in­depth coverage. People read the Voice for news and that's just what they get. (Editor's note; Thanks for the compli· ment.) ~n ~moriam KELLY WAYNE WELDON Kelly Wayne Weldon, 31 . died Monday, Jan 13 He was native of Belleville. lllino1s, and a member of First Methodist Church of Houston. Survivors include his father, Clifford W Weldon, stepmother, Luawane Weldon; sis­ter. Cindy Weldon, grandmother. Forabel Weldon, and dear friend, Lee Simpson. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Jan. 15, at Heights Funeral Chapel with Fr. A. Vannorsdell officiating. Graveside ser­vice will be held in Covington. Kentucky. Memorial contributions may be made to the K/S AIDS Foundation of Houston. OUR POLICY l,... Montrose V0tee "" II commemor•te the passing ot MontroM residents and Houtlon gay community memben with 1n announcement Fnenda Of relat•v• of the deceased may provtde ut ¥rilh tecta about tne person·a llfe. l'\amet of the ctosest aurv1wors and bunal arrangements PrOM or verM C8n be &ncfuoed Plclur• are aoprec11ted and ...,.11 be returned Nitme of the decMHd ahoutd be 1ttached to tN phci10 1ntorma11on thoufd be provided to the Montroee V0te• •I the •ff•t pQUib'9 d1te and w•ll be publ•shld 1n lhe ne•I 1v1tlable ec:Mion There -. no chug• tor th•t servtce JANUARY 17, 1986 / MONTROSE VO ICE 7 --~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ......... THE BEST LlffiE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATIIS FREE PARKJNG FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 l'RSlll'\ES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70116 Surprise Package. A New McDonaldS and RonalcfToo. Grand Opening Activities: 9:30am 9:45am lO:OOam • 11 :OOam lO:OOam • 2:00pm l l:OOam · 12:00pm 12:00pm • 1 :OOpm 1 :OOpm • 3:00pm Flag Raising Ribbon Cutting Face Painting by Aurice Momma Dragon Moonwalk (Kids jump free) Ronald McDonald performs "The Big Red Shoe Revue"* Picture taking and hand shaking with Ronald (bring your camera) Jack Yates High School Marching Band Also, Arts and Crafts Exhibits Door Prizes Every Hour 1302 Westheimer *Free premiums for the kids 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17, 1986 Sports Voice Caudillo Wins Fun Doubles By Rich Corder The Houston Tennis Club played Round­Robin Doubles last Wednesday Night. The top winners were Gorge Caudillo and J.C. Barrera. Caudillo won five of six matches, for a .833 winning percentage. Barrera left the courts before he could win his fifth match, ending up 4-1 for a .800 percentage. Paul Brown followed closely with .750, staying to the bitter end to notch his sixth win against two loese, . Only one other player managed to com­plete eight matches. New member Randy Lunsford was not treated hospitably by the other guys as he was defeated eight times. Weather permitting, plans are under­way to play doubles again next Wednes­day. The format for pairing the players has not yet been decided. Thot1e interested in more information on the Houston Tennis Club may call Rich Corder at 524-2151. Tennis Rankings Mostly Unchanged Pat Powers successfully gained the No. 7 spot on the A ladder with a default from David Heiland in last Sunday's Houtex Tennis Club competition. Powers went on to defend his position against Tiny Tim WJth a 6-0, 6-4 straight set victory Two other A ladder members success· fully defended their positions. Sabe Velez defeated Lou Garza 6·1, i'-6. Armi Ala-banza defeated Steve Bearden 6-2, 6-4. One other challenge match saw Eddie Chavez defeat ,Joe L. to continue his climb on the B ladder. The score was 6-4, 6-0. All tennis players who are supporters of the gay/ lesbian lifestyle are welcome to join the Houtex Tennis club which meets at the Homer Ford Tennis Center on Sun· days from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Call David at 926-7171 for more information Sports Voice Calendar & Standings SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Tennis Club 10 30am·1 30pm. Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling League Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling League 7 30pm. Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY; Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten· n1s Center MSA ' Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY; MSA Pool League plays 8pm. various locations THURSDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center Whatever Happened to Baby J ane' MSA Mixed Bowling League 8·4Spm. Stadium Bowl Special Events Feb 14· 16 IGBO-alf1liated Bluegrass Clas­sic, Lou1sv1lle Feb. 28-Mar 2 IGBO-affiliated Spring Break lnv1tat1onal, Ft Laud erdale Mar 27-30: IGBO-affihated Dixie lnv1tat1onal, A tlanta Mar 29-31 IGBO·affiliated MAK.IT, Kansas City June Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas. competing with Hous· ton Tennis Club July 25-Aug 3. 1986· US Olympic Festival, Houston MSA Pool League T earn Standings Winter League, Week 5 TEAM Recem Week Total Matches. Total games DIVISION A I Four611 13-2 5-0 52·23 2 Mary's Naturally ... 4-0 39-21 3 Bacchus II 10-5 4·1 43-32 •Bacchus I 7-8 3-1 37-23 5 Ranch Hands 0-15 3-2 39-36 6 BRB ShOOters &-7 3-2 3&-37 7 Marlon & Lynn s &-7 3-2 37-38 80utl8"'S 15-0 2-2 41 -19 9 Too 611 2·13 2·3 37·38 10 Street Cats 7-8 1-4 34-41 11 The Hole 5-10 1-4 27-42 DIVISION B 1 The Barn 13-2 5-0 51 24 2611111 &-7 3-2 4134 3 The 611 8--7 3-2 34-41 • Kindred Spirits II 9-6 2-2 31-29 5 The Galleon .... 2-2 3().30 6 L1psllck 7-8 2·3 39-36 7 JR's 6-9 2-3 3$-40 8 l<mdred Spirits I t3-2 1-3 30-30 9 Lone Stars 7-8 1 4 26-49 10 Hooters II 2·13 0-5 17-52 11 Hooters• 2·13 0-5 16-59 HouTex Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Jan 12 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim KotCh 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Donny Kelley 4 JC Barrera 5 Arm1 Albanza 1 Oscar Martinez 2 Edward de Leon 3 Ron McCauley 4 Lou Garza 5 Dev1d Garza 1 Thomas Corte1 2 Larry Jarvis 3 Mark Deardorff 4Mr Btll 5 R•CK Knapp I Roy Mendiola 2 John Murphy 6 Ron Bell 7 Pat Po,.ers 8 Steve Bearden 9 Tmy Tom 10 Sabe Velez BLADDER 6 Eddie Chavez 7 Joe L 8 Ronn Rodd 9 Eugene Brown 10 Ron Mauss CLADDER 6 Gabe Herpon 7 Rick Massey 8 Billy Green 9 Randy Moller 10 Steve Bryant D LADDER 6 Rick Martmez 3 Oa1w1d Hendrickson 4 Oscar Ysilss1 7 Henry Eckhardt 8 Rudy Garcia 9JoeD 5 Bill Santa111 10 JV Khnger ELADDER 1 David Moskow11z 2 Howard Brown 3 Randy J1ersclleck 4 Steve Chesn~y DOUBLES LADDER 1 Jim Kitch & Dick Cotten 2 Arm1 Alabanza & David Garza 3 Steve Bearden & Boll Santa11J 4 Ronn Rodd & Richard PrC<Jeant 5 Billy Green & Paul Brown 6 Eddie Chavez & Henry Eckhard! Houston Tennis Club Round Robin Fun Doubles George Caudillo JC Barrera Paul Brow" Ron McCauley Sabe Velez Rick Hadnot T ravtS Wdhs (tie) J v Khnger (I e) Rich Corder Randy Lunsford matches Jan 1 ~ won-lost '11 5-• 833 4 1 800 6-2 750 2·1 667 '3-2 600 2-2 500 1-2 333 2-4 333 1·3 250 0-8 OUCh Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily TAFT Automotive 1411 Taft 522-2190 *Cooling System check a flush $2795 * A/C Charge Be Check $2695 * 011, Filter Be Lube $2495 ASK FOR CHIEF BUTTROCK T me to check your cooling system' £.lU.;. lil;;~J~' , Ir DD~:.JJ.J "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J Adams and Gordon A. Thayer The Guest House welcomes AAHFC JANUARY 17, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 9 Community Center Begins Service to Area Residents By Connie Woods MontroRe Voice Staff Reporter After 14 months of planning, organizing volunteers, community contributions and labor, the Lower Westheimer Police Com­munity Center held its official opening in mid-December. A month later it is business as usual at the center. The 24-hour, seven-day-a-week center offers residents of the community a Houston Police Department-staffed com­munity center. "We are not at our full potential yet," ~aid Sgt. Don Williams, the officer in charge at the center. "But we are definitely getting there." The staff received its deski; only last week after working on tables with boxes for files. More furnishings will be arriving soon including couches and chairs for the re<·eption area and a table and chairs for the community mreting room. We're here as part of the community." He also pointed out that working within the community gave both the officers and the re~idents an opportunity to get to know each other through personal con­tact. In addition to the offices and computer room, the center also provides a commun­ity meeting room for groupi; and organiza­tions who want to hold meetings at the center. Reservations are made on a first come first serve basis. The room is equtpped with a meeting table, chairs and a small kitchen which can be used by the groups. Williams withholds no expression of pride in the community center. Centeri;, like this one, fulfill a dream or goal for the 17-year veteran of the department. The concept of neighborhood centers is not really new. However, the Lower Wes· theimer Police Community Center offers services and staff that other centers do not. Sgt. Don Williams demoru;trates the computer link to downtouon at the Lou·er Westheimer Police Community Center (Connie Woods photo) In the late 1970s Williams encouraged the community service department to decentralize from the one location down­town. He now sees his efforts becoming a reality. Williams credits the community support to the success of getting the center. "Ever­ything has been done by members of the community," he said. Liberty Bank leased the building to the city for one dollar a year. For example, the center is the first in Houston to be open 24 hours a day. Other centl'rs have been open seven days a week. "But this area has a lot of activity around the clock which warrants the center open at all hours," Williams explained. The center provides various service~ to the residents of the community. The front desk officers at the center can take reports from residents so that it is not necessary to go downtown to file report>;. "A resident can file a burglary or van· dalism report here," Williams said. "We file it in our computer which is compatible With the system downtown. The report will be included in the central files." However, Williams explained that the center does not dispatch patrol cars from the center. "In an emergency situation, the call must go through the police dis· patcher." He also pointed out the importance of filing reports. "If we don't know there is a problem in particular, we can't act on it." Williams said statistici; are important to the department to know where problem areas are. With all reports filed in the cen­tral computer, an officer can "call up" a location and a given period of time. The computer will show all the calls or reports for that area during that given time. Another service provided by the com· munity center is information. Residents can go by the center to get information about a prohlem or get questions answered concerning other city departments. He said many people will call the dispatcher Treasure Hunt Rules Hit all 7 bars ONCE for 5 points. Also, points at each bar by finding the listed items from each location. The person col­lecting the most total points wins $500. 2nd prize a trip to New Orleans. 3rd prize $1 OD leather gift certificate. It's Easy, It's fun! Confused? Ask the Judge at Each Bar! to get information about other city depart­ments. "The problem or question may not be related to the police department, but the caller does not know whom to call," Willi­ams explained. "The community center will alltiist the person to find the right department to contact, thus freeing the dispatcher for emergency calls." In addition to the front desk officers, the center staff includes four communitv ser­vice officers. Formerly located do..,,-ntown, the officers now maintain their office within the community where they work. These officers are available to talk to group" in the communitv about crime prevention, traffic safety, youth programs and other community-interest programs. One of the offices in the center provides a desk for the Crisis Intervention Team According to Williams, most cases are handled downtown but now the officers can use the local facilities when needed. The Crisis Intervention Team provides several services. The officers can provide counseling for families and for crime victims-like rape. Following domestic disturbances. couples may receive free counseling if they choose, Williams explained. The service is offered free of charge. Another area within the center is availa­ble for patrol officers in the area to use to file reports. Providing desks and nece.;­sary equipment keeps the patrol officer in the area rather than leaving the patrol area to go downtown. "The main thing to come of it (the cen­ter) is it puts the officers in the community where they work," Williams said. "It's the old concept of the officer 'on the beat.' In addition, all materials and labor were donated by companies in the area. The fumitun• and equipment came from dona­tions from the community. The center will ~oon have its own computer syi;tem com· patible with the central system but p~ nded through donations. The Lower Westheimer Police Commun· ity Center is located on Westheimer two blocks east of Montrose Boulevard. JANUARY SPECIAL 6 Months Unlimited Tanning $99'>0 also 15 Sessions for $50"" TANNING DEPOT 1212 Main Bldg. 739-8482 TEXAS TANNING 17 A Woodlake Square 782-6567 Unlinuted membership based on 30 minutes or one session per day MERIDIEN LEASING INC. 325 52k n5i '86 BMW 30CJlmo JCJ5/mo 569/mo '86 CADILLAC ~ille 329/mo '86 MAZDA RX.;> 626 20'llmo 178/mo '86 MERCEDES BENZ 1CJOE 300E 560Sl '144 944 Turbo 34CJlmo 4'18 1mo 7251mo 3'181mo 498.'mo __, 8_6"---TO!OT~-- c.m..,. C~liu 1721mo 185 mo 'B6 HONDA Acconl l'~lucW 15'11mo 11'9 mo 'B6 JAGUAR Xl6 569'mo '86 BUICK Sl<y~rl 11'9/mo El«tr• 21'9'mo ~.- CALL LEE BORBA _......._ (713) 975-1986 ji!!!lii 1'<0 00\\N PA~MENT • lO\\ER MO-..'Tttn PA~ME~T • CASH FOR YOUR TRAOt 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17, 1986 Montrose Live By All Means, See This Independent Woman By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic A Woman of Independent Means might be "a woman's book." I don't know, I've never read it. The plot certainly is sort of an "Everywoman." A woman, born just before the turn of the century, lives through two marriages, one near-affair, three children, as well as the twenties with the crash and the generation gap. But Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey has turned her novel into a one-woman play of universal interest. It's currently housed at Hou,ton Community College's Erwin Hei­nan Theater. It has a lot oflaughR, a few tears, a touch of romance and some quota­ble lines. As is frustatingly usual, I cannot recall any of them verbatim. It's enough to make you buy the book. Besides Ms. Hailey, there are two mag· nificent women who make this play work. One is Barbara Rush, the actress. You've seen her before, I'm sure, doing some pretty wonderful things. She's guest starred on Knight Rider. Matt Houston, etc. and in last year's movie, Summer Lou­ers. She's also been in many movies I con­sider classics-such as Robin and the Seven Hoods, Come Blow Your Horn, It Came from Outer Space, and When Worlds Collide. Well, she doesn't disappoint us in this play either. She' pretty dang near flaw­less. When she revels in, not one but three, death scenes, you not only forgive her, you add it to the glory of the moment. I'd say about 20% of the audience, including me, were visibly wiping tears out of their eyes on the way out of the theater. They were not tears of pity. They were more selfish tears of bt>reavement. We had enjoyed knowing this woman . o much that to lose her seemed a little unfair. The character, Bess Steed Garner, is, of course, the other woman. She is a brass· bound indomitable Texan. She has been raised to think of herself as a frilly pink Southern belle-all soft and vulnerable. But when we first meet her while she is in fourth grade, she is already easily manip­ulating the little boy who will eventually become her first husband. There i11 no sud· den flash of"Aha!" a., she recognizes her­self. Instead, we arc treated to the more realistic, more fascinating gradual flower­ing of self-realization. Do we really fling wide closet doors in one savage thrust? Isn't it usually the unpeeling of layer after layer of onionskin? Ms. Rush portrays Bess with just as admirable a gradualness. As she ages from eight to 78, she captures the true mind- et of each age. She changes her body and voice, as well, with such small graduations that it is only in retrospect that you can see just how amazingly much she has indeed changed over the course of the evening. Director Norman Cohen and set designer Ray Christopher have served Ms. Rush well. There are so many times when a prop that has been unobserved all even­ing is 'uddenly in exactly the right place. Several times she has a letter or some­thing in her hand which i' very important to the moment but which you could •wear you never saw her pick up. She never drinks out of character. Any liquid she gets during the full length acts comes nat­urally out of the action onstage. I mustn't forget costume designer Garland W. Rid­dle, either A quick walk behind a shoulder-high screen, a barely perceptible shrug and suddenly she seems to be wear­ing a completely different dress. And those hats! You should rush right over to see this one! (Sorry. Some puns, like women, are inrresistable.) o Notes Well, I'm back in town (as Melanie used to sing) and boy, was my box full of mail. Talk about the season of no-i>hows. I think it's downright criminal what the Alley's letting playwright Horton Foote get away with. Rather than letting him substitute a different play for the prize­winning Convicts for whatever reason, I feel that the prize should have been passed on to the second-place playwright. The contest was announced to honor not only the winning playwright, but also the Texas Sesquicentennial. This is a blot, not an honor, to our history .... More forgiveable is the bailing out of the Recond-cast Donna Elvira, Rebecca Cook, who is suffering from a per11istent throat ailment. She'll be replaced by Christine Donahue in HGO's Don Giovanni which opens this weekend ..•. The 86-87 HGO season includes some very exciting shows. I'm really looking forward to Gershwin's Porgy and Bess, Verdi's Falstaff and Offenbach's Orpheus in the Underworld. (I'm always a pushover for good can-can.) Next season Texas Opera Theater will be doing La Boheme. (They can always use volunteers. If you want to help them, call Kelly Horn at 546-0290.) .... Houston Symphony Chorale Director Virginia Babikian is retiring from that post-a 1ob she has performed well since Left to right: Terri Noble, Marilynn Thibodaux and LIBa &hofield, who play students in a raJUU:hy school for burlesque entertamers, liven of "Pasties," a mur~r mysury coTMdy that will haue its world premure tonight at ThJ?atre Southwat Barbara Rush i,; "A Woman of Independent Means" now playing at the Erwin Heinen Theatre 1977. She will not be retired completely, though She'll still be the head of the Voice Department, Shepherd School of Music, RiCt' University .•.. The Blue Moon Cafe offl'rs original, live jazz every Friday and Saturday night with no cover. They feature Bob Chadwick on flute and Harry Shepard on electri~ vibes ... . I just called Theater Southwest and learned they are sold out through the 19th. I will be reviewing Pasties, a comic murder mystery set in a school for burlesque per­formers. You might want to grab a ticket now .... This is the last weekend for the delight· ful Painting Churches (at the Alley) .... Yesterday, the 16th, an interesting art show opened in the ground floor lobby of 1600 Smith in the Cullen Center. Let the show's curator, Joan Seeman Robinson, describe it: "For the Texas Time Machine, we asked prominent artists in the state to produce works which interpret Texas history or myth. The theme of the show presents an intriguing paradox, a view of the past in contemporary vernacular. Since the artists do not typically work with histori­cal s ubjects, the re11ult is a fresh look at familiar topics." .•. You'll be able to see recent paintings by Robert Kuegel and Richard Sheehan at the Wilhelm Gallery through Feb. 5. It's located adjacent to the Contemporary Arts Museum .... The Texas Human Rights Foundation is preparing a black-tie dinner benefit for Valentine's Day. Sissy Farenthold will be the gue11t of honor .... Celebrate! And while you're at it, if you find out the birthdate of any local celebrity-your favorite performer or even barkeep (but it must be someone in the public eye), pleaee eend it along to me. 18: Cary Grant, Russ Jones (of Risky Business and TUTS). 19: Edgar Allen Poe, Alexander Woolcott, Janis Joplin, Win· ifred Shaunessy (Rudolf Valentino's wife). 20: Feast of St. Sebastian. 21: Steve Reeves, Christian Dior. 23: Sergei Eisen· 11tein, Franklin Pangborn (who always played the gay stereotypes in the old movies, with much personal good humor). Enjoy! o Openings (Remember, ONO! means One Night Only!) Don Giovanni (Jones, 17)-The legend· ary lover kills an intended's father, who then comes back to earth to drag our anti­hero to hell. Handy-Dandy (U. of H., Lawndale, 17}-a play. Gala Reopening (Galveston's 1894 Grand 0Jl('ra House, a dozen years ofreno­vations culminate on the 18th)-featuring Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme. ONO! Houston Choreographers Times Six (Jewish Community Center, 18)-new works by Camille Hill, Sarah Irwin, Ken Kempe, Christy Miller, Lisa Roll, and Gil· bert Rome. ONO! Fiction by Women (Lawndale, 19)­Readings by Rosemary Minard, Hermine Pinson and Meltem Turkoz. ONO! It's A Small World (Jewish Community Cent<>r, 19, 2:00 p m.)-lnternational folk dances performed by children for children. ONO! Diane Nichols (Spellbinder's, 22) Master ClaBSes (JCC, 22)-Mercedes Ellington and Maurice Hines teach jazz and tap to intermediate and advanced etu­denta. ONO! +- JANUARY 17. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Health ::.''''''' ~''' New Programs Expand YWCA Offerings By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter "We are into wellness-both physical and mental," explains Khaleelah Abdul­Kareem, branch director of the Masterson Branch YWCA. "Our programs here are designed to enhance life to make it better," she said. "People are under more pressure today with faster lifestyleb. Physical activities, as well as social activities, help to reduce the stress in our lives." The Masterson Branch YWCA, 3615 Willa, has expanded its program offerings for both physical act ivies and social servi­ces. Two of the new programs include health assessments and non-traditional swim­ming programs for people with arthritis or physical handicaps. The health assessment program will feature stress tests, blood pressure checks and other health-related assessments for people who want this service. "We have expanded our day hours for personalized visits," Abdul-Kareem said. The personalized visits can help to deter­mine what activities are right for the indi­vidual. "There are more women in the work­force who must also care for their children and their homes as well as other demands," Abdul-Kareem explained. "Through physical activities some of the stress can be lessened." One of the growing programs for women is the weight training. The weight train­ing room has been relocated by the entrance of the building for better visibil­ity. She pointed out that weight training, especially women's weight training, redu­ces stress. Another important activity offering for women is martial arts-self defense which not only prepares women for threatening situations but also provides exercise and relieves stre1<s. After discussing the many activity offerings both men and women at the YWCA. Abdul-Kareem brought her atten­tion to the a;ocial and networking oppor­tunities through the YWCA. "What makes us different (than other facilities) is that we really care-we care about people," she emphasized. "People have a social nature-people meeting people-women sharing information with women." She pointed out that the YWCA may be the only place where some women find out what is going on with women's issues or problems. The YWCA offers seminars, lec­tures and workshops designed for women. For example, the WomenSpeak lecture ser­ies begins Feb. 13 at the Masterson Instruct-Or Margie Martinez, right, works with Rase Davila in the Y's weight room (Connie Woods phot-0) Branch. Other new programs to begin soon include career counseling and resume writing services with a sliding scale to help women prepare for th!'ir futures. With the expanded program offerings at the Masterson Branch, women, men and children can select a program to meet their individual interests and needs. The non-traditional swimming program and excercise water programs are designed for people with physical defects or problems. Designed to meet individual needs, the water programs offer people the feeling of accomplishment. "All people need a release as well as a sense of accomp­lishment which they can achieve through physical activities," she said. The YWCA facilities include a large indoor swimming pool, a weight room, rac­quetball courts and a gymnasium for bas­ketball, volleyball and aerobic classes as well as excercise classes. The YWCA activ­ities are offered to both men and women. In addition, the new program director, Carol Cheatham, applies her training in adaptive physical education to designing new programs for the Masterson Branch YWCA. One of the new activities classes is "new movements." This class is not just a 20-minute workout but a class designed especially for its participants. "We are not really a body shop," the three-year branch director said. "But we do have the facilities for those who wish to work on their bodies." More importantly, the branch director emphasized the need of physcial activities for today's women as well as men. She pointed out that with the changing roles of today that stretis among women has increased. YWCA turobu:• 1rutruct-Or Susan Daily take• a clau through its pacu (Co~ Woods phot.o) 10% OFF I PARTS & lABOR l with this ad FOREIGN CAR SPECIALIST Semi-Trucks & American Cars WEST GRAY AUTO 238W. GRAY 52~2886 • Electrical Work • Converters • Mufflers • Tires • A/C Repair 8am-5:30pm MON.-SAT L----------..J 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17, 1986 Films 1986's Early Movies Not Worth Standing in Line 'Black Moon' & 'Head Office' Can be Skipped By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic This week's newest filmo are two that you probably won't have to wait in a long line to see-if you want to even bother. Both are destined for cable and videoland before summer, so you might want to hold out for some good coming attractions like the new Woody Allen or Bette Midler's Dou;n and Out m Bnerly H•lls Black Moon Rmng is a little action/ adventure from New World Pictures, the masters of low budget Tommy Lee Jones and Linda Hamilton star m this tale of stolen vehicles complete with a futuristic race car that can hit 350mph on tap water Unfortunately, the film doesn't have enough fuel to make it fast-paced or ener· getic enough. Head Office is a weak attempt at a comedy about the horrors of the corporate jungle. Judge Reinhold (Beverly Hills Cop) stars with a bunch of cameo per· formers in a zany look at company execu· tives who all seem on the brink of madness and su1C1de. Supposedly, many of the characters are based on actual Hollywood studio executives. That could explain the sad state of the movie busmess today. c Black Moon Rising A well intentioned "B"-movie can often be a lot of fun Throw some stock characters into a nifty plot, and sometimes the stu· dios come up ,,.;th a fast-paced little mati­nee hit (for instance, last year's King Soloman's Mmes). Black Moon R11J1ng isn't a good film by any means, but it is well-intentioned and well-designed The screenplay (by Hallo­u ·een director John Carpenter) shows promise, and the actors really dig into their roles. In the end. what the film really lacks is the crisp pace and editing neces­Rary (actually essential) to an action pic­ture. Tommy Lee Jones (Coal Miner's Dauxh· ter) plays the lend man Quint as sort of a low-rent Clint Eastwood type. Squinting his craggy face, Jones does his best to keep the action moving along. First he steals a computer disc (for the government), but then loses it when he stashe>< it in a high­powered car that is promptly stolen. Getting the tape back takes up the bulk of the film. The car has been stolen by sophisticated car thieves who take their autOB to hidden parts of a huge skyscraper to be rebuilt. Robert Vaughn and his assistant Linda Hamilton (from Termina­tor) head up a high-tech operation where expensive cars disappear off the street and end up resold somewhere in Europe. Their skyscraper is a literal fortress of elaborate elevators, alarm systems, and car recon· struction that is a highly secret operation. Quint devises an elaborate ploy to break the security system using lasers so that he can get to the car (The Black Moon} and his tape. The movie ~ort of gets bogged down here, concentrating on boring details and a " less-than-breathtaking" execution of the plan. Only in the last 10 minutes is the movement and editing colorful as Qumt devises a hair-raising scheme to get the Black Moon out of the skyscraper when they get trapped. The final stunt is almost unbelievable, but it is beautiful nontheless. Black Moon R<&ing is chock full of"B" actors popping up in small role,;. Bubba Smith is a mean government agent, Richard Jaeckel is the car engineer, Wil· liam Sanderson (the head brother on Tommy ue Jones stars aa Quint in "Black Moon Rumig" JudRe Rf'inhold stars as Jack Issel, thf' unambitious son of a senator in "Head Offic"" " :-lewhart") is a mute mechanic, and even Kl'i'nan Wynn shows up as a dying engi· necr. Director Harley Cokliss manages to keep everyone in place and doesn't let anyone ham, hut he doesn't appear to have the right touch for a caper like this. His film plodsalongtoodiligcntlywithout much involvement or emotion for the viewer. This film makes a good Saturday"rnmy day" matinee film or a in-eat drive-in fea­ture. A little action, a hint of sex, and a flash of violence combine with a serious cnst and a nice script to make this a "B"· plus flick. With a little larger budget, a flashier editor, and a bigger star, Black Moon Rising could have het"n a smash adventure. As it stands now, it's just a mild diversion that will quickly disappear. o Head Office The first film of 1986, and of courRe it's a bitter disappointment. I was really hoping for something great to report to start the year off right, but instead Tri·Star Pic­tures whips out this feeble and trying comedy. Head Office takes us into the harried and harrassed world of ruthless execu­tive& caught up in big business. INC Inter· national has every type: paranoids, movers and shakers, backstabbers, and even women sleeping their way to the top. But beware, in this company you can be at the top one day and without an office the next. Jack Issel (Judge Reinhold) is a sena· tor's son who rises in INC because his dad is involved with the company. Company chairman J. Helms (Eddie Albert) makes lssel a vice president of public relations in only one week, then nearly fires him when he speaks his mind on TV about how big business really is. Topping it all off, Iese! ha11 fallen in love with Helms' daughter Rachel-a major protester against her father's attempts to ruin a small town by closing a factory. Whl·n Issel deals with his precarious new job, we are introduced to a wacky array of office workers who . eem to come from the pages of National Lampoon. Two of them, Ilanny Devito and Rick Mom ms, kill themselves in the first half hour One man pops pills maniacally, another thinks he has eight months to live, and another will sleep with anyone to get up another rung on the corporate ladder. Jane Seymour (Someu•here in Time) is totally wasted as a slut who we usually sec on her hack with legs in the air. Weare not given any poHitive busines11 women, and Seymour should be ashamed to continu(• such a blatantly sexist stereotype. Surely 11he has better things to do with her time. The film's plot bumpR along with one stupid comedy scene after another. A few are funny, but most seC'm to go way over· hoard on bad taste and timing. Only Judge Reinhold seems to have a grip on the right style, acting a bit naive but still pushy enough to get what he really wants and ne..ds. All the rest of the characters seem like a bunch of buffoonR. Although Head Office is basically a satire, it never explores any of the social or political issues that it raises. Writer/ di rec· tor Ken Finkleman has instead gone for the cheap laugh and low comedy. Eve­ryone but Reinhold and Lori-Nan Engler (as Rachel) teeter on the edge of overacting in a tragic nttempt at 1.aniness. This comedy is prei;ented by HBO Pic­tures, and that's t>xnctly where it will end up very soon. There's a lotoftalt>nt wasted here on another stupid script, and it's really a shame. Hopefully this first picture of 1981i is not an indication of things to come. 1E:xAs S 'IAI'I·J O PTICAL w!;; Dr. E. Burt Denton & Assoriatcs OPT OMETRISTS TSO-\ illa~e 2:1IC. l 'niH't\il~ 528-1;>89 . TSO-So111h !\fain 1111 :'\fain .'12:1-:i JOI) JANUARY 17, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz True or False: What You Don't Know Won't Hurt You? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Ne11·., Am1·rtra Syndical/' Spt'l'Wl lo th1• Montro.•e Vmc1• Coping with anxil'ty is very much an indi­vidual mattt·r. Imagine two personi; about to undergo similar dt•ntal work. One asks the dentist what hi• will do, how much pain is involved. and what the aftereffects will be, Pt<· Tht• other prders not to ask any ques­tions and rlistra<"ts himself by looking through a magazine in the waiting room. The fi rst patient is known as a monitor, one who seeks information about the str<>ssful <'V<'nt ahead; the other is a blun tn. who tunes out and would rather remain plensantly unaware of the futu re. Who will show less stress or discomfort during and after the dental visit, the moni­tor or the hlunt<>r'I Profp~sor Suzanm• Miller of Temple Univnsity, J'hiladelphia, fi nds that the answ<'r to our qut'Stion depends on a number of factors. Sh<> ha~ done consider­able n•se1m·h on thl' question of whith typ1•s of personality can hcst endure future unxil'ty in medical situations. When it comes to «oping with unxi<>ty h1·r work shows that most persons full clt•arly into two categories (blunters and monitors). I.est you think that it's hest to " ll't it nil hung out," and that the fact­gath<' ring monitor is lwtter off than the ohlivious hlunkr, you might he wrong. Dr Milin concludes from almost a d<'cade of Rtudy that this may not always he tht• cast• To find out 1f vou t1·nd to he a moinitor or a hluntt•r, tnk<'. thl' quiz, then read on for anSW('rS. Vividly imagine you ar<' on u plane, :10 minull's from your dt'stinntion, wht•n it unt•xpt'dt·dly goes into a deep dive, then suddt•nly lt•vl'ls off After awhile, the pilot a nnoun<'t'8 that nothing is wrong a lthough thr rest of the rid<' may hnough. You, however, are not convinced that all is well. Chc<"k all of the statementi. which might apply to you. I would. I. Carefully read the information pro­vided about safoty f<•atures in the plane and mak1• sure I kn<•w where the c>mer­gency exits werl'. 2. Mah small talk with the passengc>r be11ide mt•. :I. Watch the end of the movie, even if I hud seen i I bt•for('. ·1. Call the stewardt·ss a nd ask her exa«tly what the prohl<>m was. fi. Ordt•r n drink or tranquilizer from the steward!·ss. Ii. Listen «arefully to the engines for un usual noist·s a nd watch the crew tos('(' if tht•ir h<•havior was out of the ordinary. 7. Talk to the pnsscngl'r beside me about what might he wrong. 8. Sdt lt• down and read a book or maga­zint• or wntt• u lettn. Copyrig ht 198.'l. Reprinted by permis­sion of Dr Suznnnt• Miller. o Explanation: How mul'h should n doctor ll•ll a patwnt ht'forn tn•ntm1·ntor surgery'! Will knowing nhout an up<~•ming <>vent create mon• hurm thun g1KKI'! l>r. Miller «ondudt•s that mm·h of it d1·pends on the patient's pernon­ality. Extn·mt'ly vigilant types who com pulsivl'ly ask questions nhout what th1•y foci• may create mur1• worry (and physio· lo1iiml upst•t) than is nrcessary to d1•al with the cvt•nt. (llr. Miller found that high hlood pre11Sure patientJ< are twice us likely to he monitors than hlunl<'rs.) On the other hand, strong blunters may miss important facts which could redu<"e their anxiety and help them to cope better. Aftc>r studying hundreds of subje<'ls, she finds that one style is no more effective than th<' othl•r. How well a person will fare> in an unpredictable event depends upon the "fit of his <"haracteristic style to the individual situation." This means that if you area monitor, it's probably bt•st for you to get information (hut not an excessive amount), and if you arl' a blunter, to rc<"eive little information uhout your C'ir<"umstanres. Monitors do hest wh<>n they get what they seek and biunters do best when left in the dark. These coping styles are usually set by the age of six yl'ars. Dr. Mill!'r finds that in times of extreme anxiety it is best to tune out fear and deny thnt things could go wrong. Putting the matter out of mind usually promotes a relaxed physiology, a necessity for most medical emergt•ncies. At the Universit~· of California one scientific study of more than 60 pn~surgery patients showed that blunters had fewer post-operative compli­cations <i.e., infl'Ction, bleeding, fever,etc.) and were dischar11ed sooner than moni· tors. Unde Luigi {second cousin to Aunt Clara) i.s no longer with us, but hi.s recipes live on! Come wJock the secrets to his "dishes delicioso" 1-r-' by joining us at Say • Cheese, Friday and Saturday, January 1;n}t & 18th, as our Italian • · • Chef prepares wonders before your very eyes! Partake of free samplings and discover some of Italy's best cheeses. And while browsing, take advantage of our sale on fine Italian rareties such as: ' ... . .. .- ~·· .:.. · So, "hen faced with danger ask rnur­self: Will the mformation I gather heip me to do something constructive for mvself or am I powt•rlE:ss to do anything ab~ut th•• outcome? o Score Items I, 4,6and 7 are the reaction patterns ofmomtors. Item 2, 3. 5 and 8 are those of hlunters. If you checked at least three monitor reactions or at least two blunter reactions, then that is your characteristic coping ,;tyle with situations of anxiety Reg. Bel Paese®-lta.ly's best known all-purpose cheese wit11 a fine buttery texture. . ....... .. ................ s7 . .f5/ lb. Pinna Romano-A natural well-aged Italian grating cheese that's made from sheep'5 milk ................................................. S6 . .f5/ lb. Pannigiano-R.eg,giano (Parmesan)-A rich, 5picy, sh.arp but not biting cheese, one of Italy's oldest ........ ;S7 . .f5/ lb. Auricchiol!> American Provolone-The all-natural, fully aged Provolone, a classic Italian favorite .................................. :S7.95/ lb. Tugullio Pl!'slo Sauce-Freshly ground swel!'I ::J ~ buil with grated spices and cheeses ................. CJo;;> La con.\erve della nonna tomato sauce (me"aning " Your grandmother 's [:::l ~~ rl!'cipe)" -Bella! .................. ........... ~ Jo;;> "'- A s Unde Luigi always wed to ay, / '):.\\ " A goooI reo. pe 1• s passi. on,. ,, L earn ... In at I he meant this weel.cend at Say Cheese. 14 MONTROSE VOICE . JANUARY 17, 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson ., Gross stories "Hey, look. No. 1 we're closed, No. 2, I only work here, and No. 3, we don't like your kind in here anyway." ''So what's this? I asked for a hammer! A hammer! This is a crescent wrench! -· Well, maybe it's a hammer. _ Damn these stone tools-" "Don't be 'froid, Dug. Me teach him sit on finger .... Closer, Dug, closer." Whenever geese pass through tunnels Practical jokes of the wild Fortunes New Friends for Pisces By Mark Orion For Fnday. Jan. 17 1986. through Thursday. Jan. 23. 1986 ARIES- Outside interests and influen­ces play a major role in your activities this weekend Days hold loving and sharing and end with a chore or so. And your employer will finally see all the strong points in your work. Recognition in the form of a long-awaited raise and/or pro­motion may be on the way TAURUS- Next week will be one of those weeks you wish for more hours 1n a day. Both socially and on the job. you are just so busy. Your dance card is full. But no matter how hectic things get, don't forget to pay attention. GEMINl - Recen~ thoughts have turned to old pleasant memories. A call to the source of those thoughts this wee­kend will rid you of some lingering guilt feelings. Also, more concentration on your current domestic surroundings will prove quite rewarding. CANCER- You are feeling so good about yourself- and justifiably so. Let others know it. This will be a great wee­kend for going out with friends Just don't overdo it LEO Yes. we heard. You may have been a little depressed lately but that should all end this weekend. You may want to make amends to acquaintances for your recent blue mood They will probably understand, but you have to make the first move VIRGO Certain decisions you have avoided making require that you spend some time alone this weekend. Enjoy the serenity of a quiet evening at home. You'll be surprised at how things come together when you spend a little time in quiet thought LIBRA You won out in a dispute with a close friend. But was rt worth it? Next time. try not to be so stubborn when it comes to trivial matters Realize that you really do like the other person. SCORPIO You've laid the ground­work for your latest project. Now just sit back and wait for the results. Be patient. These things don't happen overnight. SAGITTARIUS- You finally under­stand your feelings for a special person. Try not to listen too much to what others think. You know how you feel and that's what matters CAPRICORN - You did a great JOb controlling your temper at work in recent days and people around you noticed. Your gift of self-control is going to get you places Plus someone you've been watching has begun to notice you Pay special attention to details this weekend, including grooming and dress. AQUARIUS- Everybody seems to be asking for your opinion. Without totally avoiding the issue, try to avoid confronta­tion. What you say today may be repeated to you tomorrow PISCES- Your ability to get along with the eccentric will benefit you in social circles next week. Step carefully and you will find yourself meeting new and inter-esting friends · C.1986 Gay and lesbian reading ======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe sex, edited by John Preston, $8.00. The AIDS crisis has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but it has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex­pression. Herc, over a dozen of today's most popular gay writers present new short stories that imaginatively eroticizc safe sex Contributors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Many Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and ·I R. Witomski. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher, by Eric Rofes, $7 00. When Eric Rofes began teaching sixth grade at a conser· vative private school, he soon felt the strain of a split idenmy. Here he describes his two years of teachmg from within the closet, his difficult decision to come out at work, and the conse­quences of that decision. ~SfCOfiD CHflfiCf 5 a novel bV flonne De Veer SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7.00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely! Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have th~ love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand· some and unpredictable Mark. ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and le~bian youth. edtted by Ann Heron, $.1.95 Twenty-eight young pco· pie from all over the US and Canada, mostly in high school, share their 1:oming-ou1 experiences STOLEN MOMENTS, by John Preston, $5.00. Who say~ heroes can't be gay! In the fourth of the "M1ss10n of Alex Kane" series, Kane and his partner Danny Fortelh head for Houston. There, they take on a media baron who is intent on using homophobia to build his tabloid's circulation Also available: Sweet Dreams, Golden Years and Deadly Lies; each 'lar­ring Alex and Danny; $5.00 each. EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00. Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start1 Enter Mick, a lover from the past talking about their future; Garrick, a first-year teacher looking for conjunc­tions, and not necessarily in the class· room; and young Dean, an oversexed Dennis the Menace making all A's in some very advanced biology IRIS, by Janine Veto, $7.00. The retelling of an ancient Greek myth of love, devo­tion and vengeance - this time with a lesbian theme. REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $4 95 The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na· tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7.00 This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stem and Alice B Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stones. JANUARY 17, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 THE LA VEND ER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Mamy Hall, SS.DO. Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of 1 eally know how to go about choosing a therapist, and how to be sure we can get the most out of therapy! Mamy Hall, herself a lesbian therapist, has written the fin,t book ever to address this sub­ject. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halcgua, $4.00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner cay for Montauk, work, and the sea. She tells her story with a combinauon of pamful innocence and acute v1s1on, beginning wuh the man in the fine green car who docs not mourn the \,Olcnt death of a seagull against his windshield. The simplicity of Halegua's style 1s rem1msccnt of The Color Purple, it is a powerful story of a girl's sudden entry into a harsh maturity MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $13.00. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. !Oversize paperback! THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay, trans. by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun­ther is fifteen when he arrives alone m the Berlin of the 1920s. There he dis­covers the boys of Friedrich Street, and the men who stroll by and speak with them. Soon he is spotted by Hermann Graff, a sensitive and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored with Gunther. But love docs not flt neatly m· to Gunther's new life as a hustler. . Gunther's story was first published m I 926. For today's reader, it combines a poignant love story with a colorful por­trayal of the gay subculture that thnved in Berlin a half-century ago DANCER DA WKI:'\S AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by W1llyce Kim, $6.00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls. 'A wonderful, np-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hopmg she wntcs a dozen more." "The book of the year," writes Feminist Bookstore News ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. The story of a teenage love affa1.r that should have been simple but wasn't EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 00 Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at I I pm Keith Keller 1s a white banker with a IO o'clock bedtime - and muscle. to die for This story of the1.r love affair 1s one of the most engross­ing - and funniest - you'll ever read. ·:············TO ORDER······ ···· ····: Enclosed is$ ___ . Please send the books I've listed below !Add $1.00 postage when ordenng iust one book: 1{ you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: l. __ 2. ~------------~ 3· ---~- 4. ~------------- 5. Visa and mastercard accepted: please send acct. number, exp. dare, and signature name address city----- statc ___ ztp ___ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIO"IS Dept P-5 40 Plympton St ·. .........••~ ~~~~~~ ~t.~ .~~~ ! :~. ............· 16 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 17 1986 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose V0tce. a general c1rculat1on newspaper having published continu­ously for 1 year or longer. is qualified to accept lefjal notices affecting the news­papeor' c1rcL1lation area of Montrose CARS & BIKES MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE --- ASCOT LEASING. LTD. 1303 Upland 973--0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LeiSiNG'- 10700 Richmond •100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE RIVER OAKSiMONTROSE Newly renovated luxury duplex Two bed­room. t ~ bath. single car garage, off street parking. hardwood floors in dining room high efficiency ate washeridryer. large closets and other luxury features. 5590 plus utol•tles 524-4067 Responsible tenant waotS iO'ieaserenta'i property for long periOd on inner-Loop area Send complete details to P 0 Box 27267t Houston TX 77277·267' Montrose RieeM8d1cal cen,e;a,;a. large upstairs duplex for rent Hardwood floors in IMng room dining room and sun room Free cable washer' dryer. fresh paint Call after 6 00 pm. 522-2526 MONTROSE! RIVER OAKS UH graduate music student looking tor roommate to share large 2br apt New carpet and appliances 24 hr security PoO~ sundeck cable. aundry. all gay quiet Yourshare 5100dePoSlt $195tmo ( 1 yr lease) 112 ut11Jt1es No drugs. drunks Prefer student or profe$s1onal Call evenings 527-0,Ei60 Garden Oaks. remodeled 2br architect's dream house. $130,000 with $3000 down payment Owner financed lease/ pur­chase available 681-11676 Burlington Apartments GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in Montro11e Area. Small community, Adults only, Nice pool, Large closets, Big windows, Free mouie channel, Well maintained 1 and 2 Bednn. Effective rent from $249 3502 BURLINGTON 523-0249 MBHM, M'l WELL. OSCAR. IF CXllL 'i ?,\11!\l'()I~ YOU"RE GOING 15 GETTING TO LIMIT SWALLl).JE.D uP YOURSELF 10 ~ THE EFIR:n JlJ)T Cl'JE, nID 'XEMS Lll<E A CHOCE Luxury Condominiums Now Leasing with option to purchase. Great location . 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FOR SALE SHELBY FINE ARTS Spec1allzmg m limited ed1t1on prints by nationally and internationally known artists Salvador oa11. 8111 Marlow Bea· trice Bulteau and others We offer art investment seminars, special artists exh1b1ts, free home and office consult&· tions For more mformat1on call or write Mark Roden, 3846 S Gessner Houston, 77063 (7131 784-4467 FOR YARD SALES See ads under Yard Sales" at the end of the Montrose Classified MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS RubS-Ronn1e (1n10";;'t) 528-3147 WELL, l'M BACK AND YOUR BACK never had 1t so good' Massage by 8 111 O'Rourke MST 869-2298 ----ni"E CADILLACOF TOUCH Body work •I 111 beat. D of ET (713)622-4530 BODY MASSAGE Full body massage Hot 01 n or out Bruce 622-0370 PERSONALS Gay white male couple 30'utable. mature. Seeks similar for fnendsh1p Reply Blind Box 273-L Clo Voice 1960 area. professional, GIWIM, 29, 6'2", br/ gr, 170. honest, stable. non­prom1scuous and discreet Seeking same for friendship and/or possible relation· shop Reply Blind Box 273-H Clo Voice G1w1F, 27, dark hair, dark eyes Sincere. professional. fun-loving Love music. dogs. travel. him_ Seeking ltke-minded G 1W· F. 25-45 for friendship. Possible relat1onsh1p_ Not into drugs or bar scene Reply Blind Box 273-W Clo Voice G W•M, early 3CYs. 5'8" . average weight Looking for good friends and possible relat1onsh1p I'm honest. professional, kind of shy. but very sincere I'm ordinary but well rounded Wrote 6427 H1llcroft No 248. Houston. 77081 Uncle Lu1g~P1ease sen~~ for Pesto Aunt Clara's tastes like Bou1lla­ba1ssa1 Say Cheese GlBtM wants to ,;;-eet others Michael 772-7049 HUNG-HISPANICS CALL 868-4172 Stable. quiet college grad. G W· M. 24. 5·11·. t55. discreet Wants same. 21-29. for friendship. possible stable relation· shop Send photo, shon letter to Blond Box 273-F Clo Voice Craig from Minneapolis says hello We met at R1ch·s on Dec. 8th Later we talked at House of Pies l"d like lo know you better I gave you my address and I'm hoping you11 write soon Long distance perhaps. but at least Its sate May visit Hous1on again soon 612-87 4-0515 Want to meet that special person yet to enter my life A man 25-36. straight appearing with trad1t1onal valties, clear thoughts, and a happy spmt I'm a 28 brown, blue. 6'2", 168, professional EnJOY my work, typical social act1v1t1es and meeting new people If sincere 1n your interest. please wnte Blind Box 273· R Clo Voice. sob.Tmrealand'meep coming back You're growing on me--Gary w1M. 34. hairy. masculine. bottom. sin· cere. talented Looking for non-smoking, tia1ry. masculine top, 35-45 Stable for poas1ble relahonstl1p. Reply Blind Box 273-G Clo Voice Gay wrestling' UncensOred 1nfop1xpax $3 00 NYWC. 59 West 10ttl. NYC 10011 PHONE SEX Our service connects Horny Guys 24 ors a day Do 1t now for less than $3 50 an hour (415) 346-8747 GWM. 35, 6'1''. 155, brown/blue. People tell me I'm good looking I work out three times weekly. Architect with stable hie, onto kissing, cuddling and lots of healthy. safe sex Seeking like minded guy 2()-40 for sharing and possible relat1onsh1p. My photo for yours Write and tell me about yourself. Let's see what happens Reply Blind Box 272-W Clo Voice Mature gay couple seeking other gay per­sons on the Splendora/ Porter area for friendship and socializing Call Larry or Tom at 1·68!H507 ------- GWM. 32, 6' blonde/blue. nice build. masculine. stable. honest Wants to start '86 with mascuhne, stable, honest. GWM, 28-40 Not onto heavy bar scene w•th health secual appetite but not prom1scu ~ ~~!t1~~~h~~al g~,:~,: 8 ~e~trr5~?t1~ phone number appreciated Reply Blond Box 27<>-T. clo Voice WICKED~LY- -W-ITT-Y -T-S-HI-RT-S ~ Over 200 designs $1 .50 gets full cata­logue Public Image. 495 Ellis St Suite 204. San Francisco. CA 94102 OUR POLICY on SexuafiY-Exphc1t Adver­tising The Montrose Voice does not believe that humans engaging 1n consent· ing sexual acts with one another 1s immoral Our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relationships. encounters. adventures. etc. All advert1s· 1ng .should, however, not contain Ian· guage that would offend an unsuspectonQ reader A CLASSIFIED AFFAlR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can ahow you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their new bOok. ··c1ass1f1ed Affairs," they'll tell you how to write an ad thal really stands out, what to expect when you place or respond to an ad, and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean Send$8to ·c1ass1f1edAffaors,"Aly­son Pub Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St . Boston. MA 02118 (Also included will bca coupon for $5 off on your next Personals 1n your choice of 25 gay publications, 1nclud1ng the Montrose Voice) - PLAY SAFE Safe sex 1s fun, erotic Play safe. for your sake, for your partner's sake 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat • SUNDAY: .Frontrunners .run JAN JAN from Memonal Park Tennis Cent.er Sun 17 18 JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 19 20 21 22 23 Cr11eria f tr ..... :in r Calendar ari Mr R1 1 Event or group must 1pec1ficalfy pertain lone t1t'lbor1 ~ ii Monvose 0t Houslon 1 gay e.,,mm .... ly u , an maior crty. IUltOt national h0hd1y or ma10r n1ttonai gay event 2 Str1cuy comme1cial everits not included 3 Busil'IM.S, C•v•c ano social gro1.1p1 and lhetr events are gener1Hy quaftl•ed 4 Politicar ev,nts where or:ty one v1tw ol 1 subtect candidate or party I• dOmlnant not qU11bf1ed For 1ckht1ona1 mformauon or ptlOne nvmbet$. k)Ok for the aponsot1ng organ111t1on under "'Resources Typestyles indicate events' location. Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Area lnt8fest SELECTED EVENTS • FRIDAY: Baytown Lambda meets THROUGH 7 DAYS 730pm Jan. 17 • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough·• lesbian-feminist program, KPJ<'T, FM-90, 8:15·1 lam • FRIDAY: Montroae Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR. 1919 Decatur • SATURDAY: KS/ AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montrolle, no. 501, llam • SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays !0:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Cent.er vou·o THINK A GU~ LIKE THITT WOutO t...W\NT TO KEEP TO THE 510£\.JALK. • SUNDAY; Choices meets lpm Jan. 19, Masterson YWCA, 3615 Willia • SUNDAY: Parents FLAG meet.II 2pm, Jan. 19, PYesbyterian Center, 41 Oakdale • SUNDAY: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bo-:vl • SUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling IA>ague, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanell • SUNDAY: Overeat.era Anonymous meet 8pm Monlro•e Counseling Cent.er, 900 Lovell • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm al Stadium Bowl, 8200 Brae..main •TU~;SDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennie Cent.er • TUESDAY MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm • TUESDAY; Montrotie Symphonic Band meets Dignity Cent.er, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm • WEDNESDAY: Great.er Montro~e Business Guild meets 7pm Jan. 22, Brennan's Restaurant, 3300 Smith • WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold • THURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennie Cenlt'r • THURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPJ<'T Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: Cleie, Lesbian Mothers Group, open meeting Jan.2.1, Dignity Ctr. • THURSDAY· Mixed Bowling IA>ague, 8:45pm, Stadium Bowl 8200 Brat'llmain ' Montrose Voice Classified Advertising Theso r•tes apply o t ' n w regular diapJay 1dv•tt4lng rata call our Ollpi ·rm _29.i A THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type, centered. are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold head Imes can also appear within the text or at the end of the ad, and arealso$1 per word, with a minimum of $3 per line) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type 1s 40¢. (Add1llonal regular words m "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not m all caps are 55¢ each. Add1t1onal BOLD WORDS 1n all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 40¢ THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this Is~ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55C EACH Additional bold words like thia In text are SSC each. A DDITIONAL BOLD, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer. make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance, and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25%. BLIND AO NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll conhdent1ally forward all responses to your ad to you by mail or you can pick them up at our office. Rate 1s $3 for each week the ad runs (Responses will be forwarded indef1n1tely, however. for as long as they come m.) ORDERING YOUR AO: You may mail your ad in or phone 11 in. You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard, Visa. American Express. Omer s Club or Carte Blanche Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Class1f1ed ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed m that week's newspaper Ads received later will be placed In the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006-3028 It will be for­warded, unopened, to the advertiser Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A word" 1s considered anything separated by "spa­ces." except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment is a recognized word 1f 11 stood on its own A complete phone number, 1nclud1ng area code, Is 1 word City, stale and zip is 3 words bold line bold line lexl words bold line Use add1t1onal paper 11 necessary CATEGORIES D Announcements 0 Accomodat1ons (lodging for Houston visitors) O Cars & Bikes 0 Commercial Space 0 Dwellings & Roommates 0 Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale 0 Models. Escorts, Masseurs 0 Personals D Pets O Rides O Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AO UNDER _ IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY,' OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line). regular words in text at 40¢ each ___ ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLD ALL CAPS 1n text at 70¢ each. Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad m 11 mailed to me, $1 25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times ---weeks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount tor 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) 0 Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged. as indicated below) an add1t1onal 0 $29 for 6 months or 0 $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT D Check enclosed O Money order enclosed 0 Cash D VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge O Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge 0 Amerc1an Express charge O Bill me If charging. card expiration date Credit card number Signature Name Address Phone(s} for verif1cat1on of ad, 1f necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5·30pm JANUARY 17. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 17 ~IONTROSE RESOlTROES SELECTED STATE N ... T ORGANIZATIONS ~r OwT-ten Ann of T• (BOAT) 720 Brazos ~ AIJSbn---.. 512) 412-3333 AIOS Achon CounollFtderatOn of AIDS Related Organazat ons 1115..; lneliopendenc11t Av SE w .. rungton DC 20003 (212) !>41-3101 6-y & LMbian Press Assn-P08 A Old Chellea Sta Ntw Y()ftl NY 10011-(212• ~8622 Gay Rights Na1 lobby POB 1892 WaSh1ngton DC 20013- 1202) S4&-1ll01 Human Righi' C.mpa1gn Fund POB 1396_ Wuh· 1ngton DC 20013-(2021 M&-2025 Lambda legal Defen&e 132 W 43rd. NPw YOik NY 10039-(212) 944-9488 Letbtal\/Gey Rightt Advocatn-POB 822 Aust n 78767 Mede Fund tor Human R.ghta-POBA OtdChel ... Sta. New York NY 10011 (212) 989-&622 Nat Assn or BuStness Counclls Bo• 15145 San Francisco CA 9'115- (415) fSSS.6363 Na! Aun of Gay & Le$btan Demo Clubl-1742 Ma• Av SE. Wastungton 0C 20003-(202) 547-3104 Nat Gav Health Educ Foundatton POB 784 New ~':} ~= (212) ~ :3 or Or Gree1'1berg Nl!t Gay FbOhlS Advoeatet $40 Castro San Fran­osco CA 9014- 41$ 063-3624 Nat Gay Task Force NOTFI .., 5th Av Ne'# van. NY \0011-(212) 741-~ NGTF'"a Crisfali,.... 800) 271 704-4 (outside Nft'* YOJk St.le) Rural Coe tiOn c.o Wal rr-.Z.ngN Bo• e.·1 Bium TX 76627 T11 Ga'(1.esbiln Tasli: Fore. POB AK Denton 18201 (117) 387~8 .JS T18n$vest te--Transeauat Contact Svc 1017 8 E Pike Seattle 98122-(206) 624-0266 ATTENTION ORGANizATION_S_ Check your listing We I 1st here each week name of organ1zat1on. address, phone. regular meeting dates and times. and ~n8~~~r~~.~~~:~o~~=~t1fn f~r~a~~~~s!~"f~ ! Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE­INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY Aid tor Alos~17772"66-52&-6071 ~ilehOr~f Chmr:POii 86734. 772Sl; A Place In 1he Sun-522-7695 ACLU-1236 w Gray -52•:s925 ~-529--3211 (Gay~ & Ln-b~,.-n~S-w-tc-,,_­board) A-rnencan Gey AthetSta-POB 66711 77166 ~27·9255 Ailr'O°"R81nb0w Soctety for the Oeef-520-0732 (TTY) ~~B 66054 77266 meets 7 30pm 2nd Ttwrs. Women 1 Christian Cir 310 Pacific Azuleo Womyn·s Magazine 8130 SW fwy •335-21i&-S237 ~:r~~,':,J.2,~-Robert Moon. dir 209 Bering Memorial Un1led Me11ioa1st Ctturcn- 1440 Harold-62&-1017 S\IC 10:50am Sun ~ices-----uni11TI7ted-P08 70996. 77270 529- 3211 cGav & Lesbian Sw1tchboardl meets tpm 3rd Sun, Masterson YWCA 3615 W1h1a. · SOcial ra1~~ frg~teme1e Frtday1 Sunday brunch Chnst1an Church ol the Goad Shepherd 1707 ~~rose 1vc 1pm Sun Bible study 7 -30pm Church of Chr1s11aR Faith 1840 Wes1he1m« 529-8005 IVC5 10 45em Su~ 81~9 study 7 30pm W«J Rev ChrtS A Rice. pastor Cltizen;;o;-Human Equalt~ POB 3045 77253-680-3346 937-3516 meet2ndTuea.Hou House 1817 fanrun 9th floor act1V1ty room Clecs. Lestuan Mothers Grovp-Sarra 473-3708 meets 2'nd & 4th Thurs, Dignity Ctr Chppers-342-6502 ------­Cott 451-meeu. •t Brazos Rf\ler Bottom 24-00 Braz.01-528--9192 ~lee 710<_P_u_bl_oc_H_oa_n_h_Awarenes1-POB 3045. 77253-52~ 522-5084 Sharing Group tor the Worried Weir meet Fri 7-Spm Montra.e Counseling Ctr ~~~~6'1 =~·~~~5;ct~3°&.~m11tee {C-Comnlunity Gospel Ctr 3207 Montrose 521 OS11 Svcs 11am Sun. 7 30pm Thurs CoMoreg1t1on Aytz Chay1m 1840 Westhei~r-688--8997 728-5181 IVC & toeill 8pm 2nd & 4!h Fri ESOPS Pnvate Professional Social Ctub-961~ 9876 Fecserahon or Charities Un!led for Social Servi· ~=:~~b~~tu~S.8::~ ·~r;;u~~:.,' MOtltrose Chnic. Monlrose COunsehng Ctr lit Un1tarian"Churct1 5210 Fannin 526-1571 l\iC 11 1Sarn Sun Frori"trVMers~8019 or S.lvador 629-- 1288 runs Sun Tuea & Thurs Memortal Park Tenn11 Cir GiYi'° Al-,.-.-S-ha-,-,,,-gE_x_po_r_>enc_e_(_GASEl-528· 1311 528-0891 Gay & LHbian Mormons-1713 Wesltle•mer •6040. 77098-56&-1413 (Hou) Gay Pride w-ec;;;,m nee POB 6682• n266-Stan Ford 523-7644 or Cl thy Lenat\fln 8611-6256 Grealer MontroseBuSI~~ 630-0309 or Bruce Wooley 5~ meets 7pm •th Wed Brennans Rest 3300 Sm1th The Group thetlter workShop-Joe W~ 2204 meets 7pm Thurs O.gn1ty Ctr. 3217 Fannin Haz;r;;teti'PrOduCt1ons-2615 Waugh Or •266 n006 lesbian concerts hee mailing hst Homophlle lnterfJ1t~a;;c&::n9'M4nOr'- 523-6969 HOU -A-•e_a_G_a_y_&_L-e1-b-1a_n_E_n_g-,n-.-.,.-~&· Scienhsts-POB66631 77006-439-1879 mee1s 7pm 4th Tues Hou Bar Owners Msn (HOBO)~o Br&Uls River Bottom 2400 Brazos-52&-9192 meets 2pm 2nd w_""------·---·- Hou Commun ty CIOwns-862~8314 Hou Counc I of ckJbs -526-8054 Hou Data Prot.UK>na s~ 664~59 meets 7 30pm 2nd Tues "°" Gay Health ~tes 711Cr9'48 Meets 730pmts1Sat Hou Gay Students Assn 747_,-30_98 ____ Hou 1n1er-Fatth A .nee- contact through 1nte-­grl1yfHou t-Qa Motorcyde Club- -c/O Mary I 1022 West· lleimer-52&-8851 HOU"""North Professionals-POB 38'0 Humble 77347-8>11 It 821-7126 meet 7 30pm 2nd $At Hou OUtdoor G'O<JP !HOG) 52'·3641 or Jim 68(}-31 .. HoU renn,-. c.ub.:R.chit ~4-21~1 ptay 9am. f'IOOn Sun & 7 .J0..9pm Thurs Homer Ford l enn11 Center I H lnc--POB 16041, 77222-69'-t732 529-701' affiliated groups are Interact, B uamo 1 A Place n the Sun. Montrose Art Alhance Gay & lesbian Arch11191 Of Tx. Gay & Lnb.l•n Sw1td'lb0ard Montroae Symphonic Beno t>oard meet 7 30pm 111 Thurs (vaned kXations) llducabOnal forum 7 30pm 3rd Thurs 17'Gerso11 Speakers Bureau POB 391 Befla re 77401 '669-4064 lnlegrityfMou (Ep11copa1 an)-POB 66008 77266-524-1489 meets 7 30pm 7nd & .(th Mon Autry House. 8265 Main •ntetad-P08 1604' 71222-529-7014 KPH ~ FM-9o-cla l.Ovett Blvd-526- olOOO Bl'ffkthrough mbian..femmt1t pgm Fri 815-11arn w Ide n Steen .. o-r pgm ThUfa 7 ~ 900pm In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Vot'e KS Alt>S f.'oundation 3317 Montrose Box 1155 77006--524-2437 AIDS Risk Reduct on (Sale Se.x) WorkshoPS 8pm 2nd & 4th Mon n con1unc tion w th Montt'O$e Counaetlng Center j9rry Keuttman Cancer Funcl-778-4106 Krewe of Hydrll-811 Graceland 8 II Mercier 7211-1032 lim"bdli Ctr Gay A'c:oholica & Alanon i214 Jo Anme-s21.9n2 ... est>tan/Gay Resource Svc-Uruverarty ot Hou •800 CalhOun. box 309 77004-74!H2S3 ._,. 2 30pm alternate Tues SpmdSetop Room 2nO floor Un vers ty Ctr Le1 Us Entertain You Weekend pro,ect OrHOU Council 01 Crubo-~ The Lrttle Cl'lurcri.-212 Fargo-5:n-n95-;;c; • 2:30pm Sun Livm{i-wa-t.~ .C.~ llu-rch---2-11_-64_1_2_1s.--~10pm, &ve1 8pm Sun Hohdey Inn Mam & Blodgett. ReY Jeanne Leggett Lone Star Nuc:h1t Group-POB 740572 77274 c;;;;;-We1the1mef POltee Sub-Stateon-802 Westhe1mer~529-3100 l1.1ther1n1 Concemed-meeta at Grace Luth&­ren Church. 2515 Weugh-521-0863. 453-1143 meet 2nd & 41h Tu_es___.•_•en_m_,gc.•~---­McAdory House-c/o KS AIDS Foundahon 3317 Montrose Box 1155-624-2437 Men Against Deception Counesy Clut>-POB 541871 7725• 529-3211 (Gay & lesbian Sw1tdtboard) meets .bt-'N"ee~ly Metropolitan Community Churci'I of t~ rectton (MCCRJ-1919 Oeeatur-Ul-9149 po1· lu<:k dmner 7 30pm 1st Sal monthly IVCI 10 45am & 7 15pm Sun & 7 15Pm Wed memt>er· &tup inQuuers clas 7 30pm Mon ecllJClhon crass• Tues & Wed eves iHOU'; Metropolit•n Wind Ensemble 529-9610:" Meets SI Stepl'letlS EPl'SC:Opaf Churci'\. 7 30 Wed MontroseArtAi'hance-6&4·1732 u,s...9314 ~ 5331 atriU.?e llf-i Inc. meetJ 2nd Mon Montrose Business Guild see Greater Montrose Bus Guild Mon1rose Civ•c Club He NNrtown Assn Montrose cim1c-803 Hawthom.-528--5.$31 oPen Mon. Tue Thurs 6-9pm Mootroff eoUntry Cloggers--tSG-8861 meet 7- 1()pm Fn MCCA Church 1919 Decatur ~Counaei.nQ-~veu-;-203- ~7 AIDS victim support group 6 30pm Mon Women's Suppon Group 7pm Toes AIDS R11k AeduCl)()O. (Sate Se:x Work.1h0ps 8pm 2nd & 4th Mon '" COl'1JUnchon w th KS AIDS Founda­tion ~o:;,1ro1eS1ngers -gaymenschorul-M ke526- ~':'~':'lt Soltball League-POil 22272 77227- Montrose Spofts Assn (MSA} aee spec he sub­group Montron Symphonic Band POB 66613 g,~f;:,:n a~te7L3:l':: T- 0.gnrty MOllE-S2fl.MO"E 5-7 proiectMonlrose Counse ng C&nter MSA Mon Noght Bo... -ng--play $tad um l•- 8200 Bra~n- Steote 692~'597 Montrose Watch- sub;roup Neartown Assn Mustangs meets et the B1m-110Pac tic 528· 9427 club night Ttturs Nauonal Gey Health Education f®°ndatton 523-5204 Ni.b0na~t~Or~g-a-n7iz-a-ho_n_f7or Women 1NOW} Les· bllin Rights "rask Force POB 440'22 77244 Nurtown Assn Montrose Civic Club)-141;;1 West he me meet 7pm 4th Toes Neartown eusinen Alltance-529-7010 - meets 7pm 2nO wees L berty Bank 1001 Westhe.mer ~ Freeoom Chnst-an C!'turci'I -829 Yale 863-8377 l\'C$ 10om Sun Overea!HS AnonvmoUS-c. o Mo--ntn;;; Coun :.nrnc:,:r ~t-=~~~:o~~ Bering Church. 1440 Ha>'Old Plrents & Friends of Lest> ans & Ga~ Parents FLAG 464-6663 mee!S 2pm 3r<: Sun. Presby tenan Ctr 4 0.kO.te f>ark People c. o Neartown Commun ty F rehol.Js&- 741-2S24 Paz y ld)Ot'IC>On-l'OB liOflOe3. 772S0-8112- 14l'li fJre1byterl1n1 for lesb1ant(iay Concer,.. Presbyterian Ctr 41 Oekdaa. 52&-25&4 meets 7 30pm 2nd T lie Pres1d9nts Club past presidents Gfle) POB 66844 77266-523-G02• Recreational .. and Fund Comm nee-Mustang Club prOject Rice Umv Gay Lnbian Suppc>rt Group-529-- 3211 Gay & lesbia.n. SwitchbOard') AothkQ Chapet-1409 Sul Ross-52'-9839 ~Tx counselsng tor hfe-tnreeten1ng illnesses 522-50&1 SOC ety tor 2nd Selt--rrn-Ess) Gu I Coast Trantvetllte Chapter--POB 90335 77090 SOc;iety tor lhe PromotlOft 01 Amazon Slido­Mao<: Mm (SPA$M)-P08 70996. 77270-Gay & Lnbaan S._.. lehboud 529--321 1 ~u e Co soaa ctub-C/o The eam 710 Pocil>c-52&-9427 l:r Gay Roc:teo Aun- .()rawer 119' POB 66973 77006- 526-5001 BAYTOWN-Baytown lambda Group-427·1378 meets 730pmocldfn _ ---- CON~OE co;;-roe Arellambda GaYM--:co9i 3"-6470 Conroe Area LntMans Kathy at (.t09 756-9069 meet 8Pm 2nd & 4th Fn GALVESTON-Lambda AlcohOtic:s Anonymous-763-1401 Metropolitan Community ChurCh of Galveston lstand- 1824 Broacw.-y 76$-7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Post by Phone) AIDS Hol ne~3211 AMBULANCE- 22-2-3--43_4_ ___ 'rp 654"'"'°40 °' 236- ., .. , weather---8-44·7•71 ADS BY THE INCH In add1t1on to our reg ar class1f1ed rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by the inch " When buying by the Inch you can include special art logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3"' $49 4 WEEK RATE 1 • $24 2"' $34 3"' $44 13 WEEK RATE 1 ' $19 2"' S29 3" $39 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17. 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To cxtvertlse in this page. colt 529-8490 dunng business hours ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 1t fisted here in the Montrose Voice whertttrtera11y thousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through e Vo1ceCl1ssif1ed Call 5~8490 Pay by check or charge 1t on your American Express, Diner's Club, MasterCard. Visa or Carte Blanche AUTO SALES LEASING MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE --- ASCOT LEASING, LTD. 1303 Upland 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN J ACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond #100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see ·ears & Bikes" on Montrose Class1f1ed' page AUTO REPAIR . Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates Alt Work Guaranteed Ma1or/ M1nor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electncal Repatr 526-3723 2716 Taft ALL PAINT & BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland, SS!}-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WEST GRAY AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Grey, 528-2886 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Tafl, 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE NEARTOWN KARZ 1901 Taft, 524-8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIR & BODY S~ 2001 Harold. 522-5255. 52&-1940 BARBER SHOPS. HAIH SALONS Tummy's Barber Shop, Hair cuts $9 00 House cans $15 00 & up For info 528- 8216 BOOKKEEPING S8e also 'Tex Preparation· category COUNSELING Dan Kuchars -Counseling 5~9004 DANIEL J. KUCHAAS 5~9004 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Housron, TX 77006 Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appomtment (713) 524-0538 EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL m~ ~~~~e~~rn.1~2~~~69 52 8- 1589 & SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FUNERAL DIRECTORS -SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch, 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE Vf~ICE FURNITURE RESTORATION THE FURNITURE STRIPPING SHOP Stripping. refinishing. repair 1913W1llard (Montrose) 5~7833 GIFTS PARTY GOODS TIS THE SEASON 1966 W Gray (R1over Oaks). 520-5700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOURMET SHOPS SAY CHEESE 3626 Westhe1mer (Highland Village). 621- 1825 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS OLYMPIA FITNESS & RACKETBALL CLUB 8313 SW Fwy, 988-8787 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Oashwood #10, 661 -2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOME AIR CONDITIONING -----riME FOR A/C REPAIR? $25 plU9 part1. CALL 1143--0398. JEWELRY KENESCO LTD. 1101 Post Oak Blvd. "9-558. 680-8286 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MEDICAL CARE STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. 2801 Ella Blvd. suite G. 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PET CARE Neat As A Pin Cleaning Introduces Pet care at your home! Your kenneling days are over.' We walk. talk. leed your pets or plants AT HOME We can even clean your house before you return from business or pleasure trips Call Us At 523-7797 PRINTING SPEEDY PAINTING __ _ 5'00 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAX PREPARATION INCOME TAX SERVICE Professional computer checked Reasonable rates Tax deductible 713- 784-1266 TIRES ••• ·~.. 529-1414 ~ TME11tlf f'&ACE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks West of Montrose TRAVEL TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangments All services FREE. Open Monday through Friday 9am-5 30pm. 2029 Southwest Fwy • Houston. TX 77098 (713) 5~8484 - VACAT'iONIDE/.s? See · vacations· following· On the Town" on the previous page VARIETY WHOLE EARTH PROVISION CO. Alabama at Shepherd, 52&-5226 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VENOING VIDEO --VIDEOSCOPE 2016 Montrose. 52!}-55'4 SEE OUR OISPLA YAO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VIDEOTREND 1401 California. 527--0656 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ~-- IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOLDEN WEST VIDEO Rent videos at 40¢ each. NO late charges. time hm1ts or deposit Adult videos available 541-3485. Free delovery C 0 0 Also see "Aduit'VidOO" category -- To place an AD in the Montrose Voice . . . Just phone us ! 529-8490 10am S: 30pm lo.eel days Ads can be charged over the phone to a major credit card OR we can bill you tater Keep your working parts in order. a·a American Heart V Association \M'RE FIGHTING~ 'rOJRUFE In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi<e .. ~Play ~S~e! What a Show! By the staff of the Montrose Voice I couldn't believe it was happening at JR'• in the first place. Then I couldn't believe so many people could fit into one place. I'm talking about that great show last Sunday night. Kandi Delight, Dione Martell, and that ever-so-crazy Tiger Lil staged a wonderful professionally produced evening of enter~ tainment. Even saw some dyed in the wool "can't stand drag" folks having the time of their lives Honey, talk about having fun. -o- Jerry Reid will be offering drink specials "du Jour'' on Mondays and Thursdays through Saturdays at Mary's. Also, Pickles and Mana are anxiously awaiting their forth­coming wedding, naturally -o- Mary's now hosts more personalities tht Sybil herself with new additions Sandy (Venture-NJ and Ricky Martin (Metro, Numbers, Old Plantation, Farm House, etc. etc. Did I leave any out?) Miss Sybil should be so complex _ naturally. -o- The Ripcord and Mary's are planning "Scuzz 1z az Suzz Duzz" for February and March. I'm afraid to ask. -D-LJnc/ e Luigi (second cousin to Aunt Clara) is no longer with us, but his recipes live on at Say Cheese in the Highland Village Shop­ping Center. -D-Bunny's out of town, so the BRB 1s having a BOOT Party tomorrow night from 6:30 to 9:30 -o- Cutter'• Restaurant and Bar will open Janu­ary 30 at 804 Pacific with a varied menu, late night breakfast, and different Sunday JANUARY 17, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 19 Montrose Soap brunch menu. It's going to be great to have a restaurant conveniently located in the heart of Pacific Street again. -o- There is a major convention happening in Montrose next week. The Houston Guest House is hosting the AAHFC. These are the people who run those wonderful health and fitness clubs. -o- Having problems with the rudest of the native Houstonians-cockroaches. Get Results. Take it from those who know. These people are the exterminators of death. When they finish, you'll feel sorry for the bugs. -o- Found a cure for the mid-winter blues. Thirty minutes at the Tanning Depot and you feel like you just came back from Aca­pulco. And. their 6-Mo. Special will have you looking just grand come spring. -o- With so many grand Montrose social events, it 1s often necessary that one carry the proper business card. Rinn'• Speedy Printing has 500 for $11. 99. -D-Sy/ via Reyes continues to entertain at the New Drl1coll Street Cafe and Cabaret. Catch her act nightly. And catch their lunch buffet daily 11 am-3pm. -o- The Voice is always lining up new ma1or distribution points. We're somewhere around 150 now and that's twice as many in Montrose as either of those other guys But we're still adding more. If you know some­where that you think should be distributing the 'Newspaper of Montrose," please have them call us. Or you call us and we'll call them. It'll be good for us, good for them and good for Montrose ", .• In the heart of The City" $44 00 • FRIE AIRPORT SHllTTLl ·COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE • WINE • • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL IRUJCFAST (large single/double occupancy) • VAlll SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates ReservatlOl'ls required plc;.:ise coll Toll Free 800-253-5263 (Natooool) 800-521·4523 (Calif) (415)-J.41·514~ (Son Francisco) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 -o- Remember Montrose Auto Repair is now at 2716 Taft, on what has become "Auto Repair Boulevard," with Taft Auto and Neartown Karz also on that street. If you have to break down somewhere, let 1t be on Taft. -o- HSK Contracting can build that addition, remodel that room, add those cabinets. or whatever See their ad in this week's Mont­rose Voice. -o- Vldeotrend is now selling copies of 'Taxi Zurn Kio," "You Are Not Alone." "Male Cou­ple," "Ernesto," "El Deputado" and others Previously they were renting them. But now you can buy your own copies. Order today -o- Meanwhlle, over at VldeoScope, they're let· ting you have a second movie free when you rent one, but only Monday to Thursday. It's a bargain. Conditions apply so check the ad. NOW AVAJLABLE FOR PURCHASE: "'Taxi Zum Kio," "You Are Not Alone," MM.re Couple," MEmesto," MEI Deputado" Order Your Copy Todayl • RENTAL GIFT CERTIFIO.IB AVAILABLE •SAME 0.-.Y DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECW. ORDERS •ALL TAPES GUARANTEED 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 17, 1986 January 25th Jimmy Spaulding and John Sims Heaven, in conjunction with: • Chrysalis Records • Video Poot and • Stretch Limousines ( 520-3081) Video Premiere Paul Hardcastle's "Just For the Money'' on Chrysalis Records Door Prizes-AH Night T-shirts, Buttons, Records, Posters and a Grand Prize Win a pair of concert tickets to Pat Benata(s Friday, Feb. 7th. concert, $100 Cash, plus Stretch Limousine to pick up you and a guest for the evening. PARK ONCE_ _PARTY ALL NIGHT Pacific at Grant (713) 521-0107
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