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Houston Voice, No. 853, February 28, 1997
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Houston Voice, No. 853, February 28, 1997 - File 001. 1997-02-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6667/show/6630.

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(1997-02-28). Houston Voice, No. 853, February 28, 1997 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6667/show/6630

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 853, February 28, 1997 - File 001, 1997-02-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6667/show/6630.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 853, February 28, 1997
Contributor
  • Michelak, J. C.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 28, 1997
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript One Community! One Voice!o Patricia Neil Warren Page 15 ~~mmam::i::=:==::r::~~"'''';0'''""'·' FEBRUARY 2BTH 1997 ISSUE 853 Terrorism or Hate Crime? by Lee Davis Reac'lions are pouring in from all over the nalwn regarding last r'riday's bomb­ing in Atlanta. The Othe,.,.ide Lounge, a gay and lesbian bar, became the latest addition to c\'l'r growing hate crime sta­tistics usu homb exploded on their patio, injuring five p<•ople at approximately 9:50prn. A "ccond bomb, reportedly mcunt for lnw enforcPml·nt nnd Pmcr­gency pcrsonnl'I, was detonated by a remoto-controlled robot The "Army of God" has claimed resp<msibility in u letter sent to Reuters news agl·ncy. Known for their hatred townrds guys, lesbians and their sup­porter•. th<• Army" publishes a manual thut thoroughly t<•aches anti-abortion proponents how to use violence as a means of protest. ThP manual instructs members on how to nu1kc ond use homhs effectively through the usage of timing devices, bypassrng nlarms nnd propc•r procedure for the uvotclunce of lrnving fingerprints on 1:11ns. It culls alJort1on clinics "uhor­tuurit• s" and d<•scnhcs the battle over abortion as a war" The 70-page underground manual written for anti-abortion radicals became widely known in 1993, when authorities found a copy buried in the backyard of Shelley Shannon, an Oregon hom(~maker imprison<>d for shooting a Kansas abortion doctor und s••lting fire to several abortion clinics. Beyond that, little is known nhoul the group or it.' membership. Congresswoman ShPila Jackson Lee is calling for Commitlet> hearings to end the fear of hate crimes. The bombing in mid.January 11t the Atlanta nbort10n clinic coupled with the ~'riday s bomb· ing, is only n small part of the growmg problem concermng mcid<'nts of hntc crimes across the notion. In 1995, the Justice Dcp.1rtment con­servatively reported 7,947 hate crimes nfforting un estimMed 10,469 victims (most experts argue the number of unre· ported hau• crimes would probably dou­ble or triple the &tHtisllcs). "Hate <·nmes tlrnt nro now ht•1ng tar­t!' l't.(MI ut pn>-choicc mdividuals und our gay und l<•sb1an population must end", said Sheila. "The Atlanta bombings can not be ignored. We can not let llllll~!~l!~I these incidents of violence create an atmo.sphere of fear. These crimes are nothing different than the rash of church burning> we have experienced", the Congresswoman said, "I am asking the House Judiciary Committee to invoke its ov(•rsight pow­ers and hold heanngs m ... rder to scJJd 11 clear mcs­• age I hal hate cnmes will rn t be tolerated. These matters deeply concern me end I want to make sure that md1v1duals engaging in hate rnmes will be identified and pros­ecuted," Jackson conclud­ed. Attorney Gt•ncral Jan(•t Ho no purported "The AnATF agent searches the roof of The Othel'Wlse mghtclub bombing this wct·kcnd at m Atlanta for clues to Fnday'~ bombmg Qf the gay and /es See BOMB page 11 b1an club. m. Legen aye unaway I• s ouston by Jon Anthony In 1971, world.famous opera soprano Maria Cullus hcgnn t<•uchmg an hiEitoric series of &l·minars. In 1996, Tl•rrence l\lcNally's re-cn·ation of one of those ses­sions, Master Cluss, won the Tony Award for best play. Directed by I~eonurd 1'~ogha, nward-winner, Faye Dunawuy portrnye the diva as the National Tuunnt: Company production of Masll'r Class makes its Houston debut nl Jones Hall from J\larch 4-9 1997 as n pres<'ntntion of the 1996-1997 l\lusterCard Broadway Series. Master Class pre><•nts Maria Callas as she lPnds young a~piring opera singers through their paces, challenging them toward excellence. The master Faye Dunaway ma scene from Terrence McNa//y's Master Class. Names Project Receives Monies Peny Dolph of the NAMES Project receives a check from officers of the ADS Memorial Book at Forest Parle Lawndale. class conjures the explosively witty Callas, the artist, nnd her unique genius for dramatic interpretation, while exploring the tempestuous nature and pai=:!-!ionate heart of this extraordinary woman. Faye Dunaway began her theatre tra1mng at Bost.on Vnivers1ty SchbOI for the Arts and went on to become a char­ter member of New York'• Lincoln Center Repertory Company with Robert Whitehead and Elia Kazan, appeanng in Arthur Miller's 'After the Fall". She made her Broadway dehut in •A J\lan For All Seasons". Her critically acclauned starring role Off-broadway in Hogan's Goat led to a distinguished film career which encom­pass(' s over 40 f(•ature films including The Thomas Crown Affair, The Arrangement, L1ltle Big Man, The 'lbwering Inferno, Thn'tl Days of the C,ondor, The Eyes of Laura Mars, end Barfly for which "he won a Golden Globe nomination. Dunaway reCCJved Best Actress Academy Award nomma­tions for Bonnie and Clyde and Chinatown, winning the Oscar for Network. Jn addition to numerous teleV1B1on credits, Ms. Dunaway caplurcd an Emmy Award and a Golden Globe nomt· nation for her role m the highly rated television movie Colombo: It's All In The Game. Recently she documented h•r lift• and career in her acclauned biography Looking For Gat~by. See DUNAWAY page 18 HSO Wows Europe With Sell Out Concerts by Jon Anthony The Houston Syn1phony Orchestra's European Thur, under the musical d1rec­to,.,. h1p of renowned Maestro Christoph Eschenbach. 1s garnt•ring enthusin~tic response from audiences and critics alike. Prior to the HSO embarking over­seas, the Houston Voice made nrrange· ments with Conductor-ln·Hesidence Stephen Stein lo provide our readers with an in"ightful und informative S)11· ops1s of their journey. Tlw orchestra arrive-cl 111 London on Thur,day, February 20 with JUst enough tllllc to prepare for a whirlwind of sue· cessful engagements last weekend thnt included concert performances 10 London, Metz and Amsterdam to •old out crowds al all venu<'S. According to Stem, London was a resounding success for the orchestra "I think this orchestra was ready to take HSO Conductor In Residence Stephet'/ Stem. the pubhc the way tL did. It WolS sold· out, a ranty cons1denng thev have five resident orchcstros," said Stem. See STEIN page 11 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR A Congressional Salute to the AIDS Memorial Book by Sheila Jackson Lee U.S. Represcntntlve, 18th District, Texas On behalf of myself and the entire Eighteenth Congrcs01onal District of Texas, I v.ish you tremendous success on the occasion of the •first Anniversary of the AIDS Memorial Book." It is quite gratifying to know that you arc helping to honor those that have been impacted by the devastation that HIV/AIDS has caused We proudly salute Forest Park Lawndale for their dedication and com­mitment to empowenng the families in the Houston Community that have been touched by the HIV/AIDS virus with the help and support they need Never before in the history of our nation has the need for strong leadership and com­munity nctiv1sm been so vital to the future of our country It brings me great pleasure in knowing that you are taking up your leadership role. As the AIDS epidemc continues to sweep the nation and the world, we must stny constantly aware of the fact that death and suffering continue even as advances in treatment are made. Please know that I will continue to JOin you in the fight for funding for HIV/AIDS Awareness and Treatment until we have totally conquered this dis­ease. Again, my congratulations to Forest Park Lawndale for finding this very spe­cial way of helping the familie' of AIDS victims remember their loved ones. Publication to Publication by Phillip O"Jibway Cruise Magazine, l\lanag;ng Editor I Just received the February 14 issue and wanted to tell you that I love the "format metamorpho~i • you have exe-cuted. I hope the rest of your readers appreciate it, too. Keep up the good work~ Purponed Editorial onends Voice Reader by N Grant Martin I found your editorial celebrating Chris Bell's City Council victory ns an act of revenge against ''black ministers" irresponsible and ofTen!i!ive. I am a white gay man who remembers the shameful repeal of Houston's gay nghts ordinance, yet I supported Chris Bell because of his common-sense ideas for the City, his inclusive politics, and his history of working with the gay commu­nity. Council Member Bell was disturbed, as we all should be, at the clear racial polarization of the vote. Your readers would be better-served by an in-depth news analysis of the role of racism in our community, rather than an editorial which summanly define' the vote in terms of race and praise~ it as "a classic testimonial, if lhE"re ever was one, to what a united community can accom­plish If you seek to be a responsible Voice for our community, you should move our agenda forward by finding opportunities in the last election cycle to build bridges with the African American community - not backward by perpetuating a point­le>< s feud. t Editor's Note: The editorial to which the reader is refemng was not an edito­rial, rather a letter to the editor. The author's name, Lee Harrington, was inadvertently omitted from the letter during production. Letterl! to the editor are the opinion>< of the author and (as stipulated in our masthead I do "not nec­essarily reflect the views of t he Houston Voice or its staff• - Ed 1 MONTROSE AREA UPDATE by Lee Davi> Ever-readv FI oats! So•rec Aubergine sailed again on Friday. Feb. 21 with "The Ever-ready Show•. This wos a unique concept in that performances were held at vari­ous bars through­out that evening. Beg;nning at 8pm and every 30 min­utes after that, fourteen entertain­ers performed one song and then trav­M1ss Edwards per- eled on to the next forms for So1ree. location, thanks to the help of volun­teer chaffeurs. Starting at Venture-N, the show truveled to the Brazos River Bottom, Ripcord, Chnnce•, Rascals, E.Js and firushcd ut Gentry. Many thanks to nil of the participants and contributors to the Ever-ready show for bnnging in over $1700 to Soiree'• 97 fund raising efforts. Surprise, surprise-the leather men of the Ripcord contributed over $500 towards the everung-thanks, men! Soiree's next endeavor 1s their Silent Auction, aptly named "Treasures of Atlantis" which opens at Gentry on Saturday, March 1 ot Rpm. Featuring over $16,000 in ongmal artwork, limited edition pnnt.s, performing arts, fitness equipment, decorative aece:;;sories, pro-. f""'!tonal sCJ'Vlces, memorabilia, a week­end for two m Cancun and two dinner parties for fifty people ot Sausalito Seafood & Pasta Restaurant, to name a few of the goodies nvai 3ble' The action will be open daily through t'riday, March 7 nt mu!n1gbt. A buffet will be served at Gentry nt 6pm on Priday. March 7 to cel-ebrate the end of the nuct1on • Ms. Rich's us ol A Congratulations to Lana Blake on bemg selected the new .Ms. Rich's US of A Lonn will next partmpate m M•. Texas U.S of A Pageant to be held at Lana Blahe, Ms. Rich's US of A Rich's nt a later date. Emcee Victoria West announced that all three candi­dates will be i;oing on to the Ms. Texas U.S of A. The judges had a difficult task ahend of them na compt•tltion was brisk­- but finally named Lana the winner. Night in Black leather Don Gill Productions and Night In Blnck Leather is scheduled for this weekend ut Venture-N This will be a two-rught event with n special social gathenng on Friday, February 28 at IOpm featunng Shnn Corr and her out­rngeous one-woman show. Shan Carr is from San Frnncisco and has been tour­ing the U.S. domg Gay comedy for 11 years. She 1s also the Executive Producer of Out For Laugh$, a Gay TV Comedy ~'how that aired and rents in video stores internationally. People always say Shan looks just like the girl next door, but she responds, "The differ­ence ts that I also sleep with the g;rl next door• Appeanng on Saturday, March 1, will be special guest International Mr. Drummer Ky lo Brandon and many other titleholders. This years beneficiary i' The Colt 45's, n 50Hc):l Charity. :\!asters of C'.eremomcs will he !\Ir. Gulf Coast Drummer I 990 Larry Arbo and Mr. Gulf Const Drummer 1995, John BenaV1des. Please rn.•ke plans to enJoy this specinl evening while contnbuhng to a most worthy cau•e. T T T T T T T T T HOUSTON VOI CE P A G E 2 In This Issue I VOICE Regional News pages 2, 4, & 10 Religion page 17 National News pages 7 & 13 Ans & Entenainment page 10 Columnists Plain Speaking . page 8 Righteous Indignation • page 9 Rainbow Reader · page 14 News You Didn't... - page 15 This 'n That . page 18 Service Directorv pages 24 & 25 lnMemorium page 14 Horoscope page 34 Movie Reviews pages 16 Health/Spons pages 21, 23 & 27 Out in Houston page 29 Communitv Oirectorv page 26 Communitv Calendar page 28 Scene and Heard page 33 Classilieds pages 31 & 32 Personals page 30 F E BRUARY ISSUE 853 F EBRUARY 2BTH , 199 7 EstJCll$htd 1974 as tne Montrose Sw, ,..established 1980 as 111< Houston Montrose Sia< Changed name to The Houston VOKe ri 1991 ncorporating the New Orleans Crescent City Star, Reestablished as the Houston Voece by Thomas Nelson m 1993 811 Westrieunor, Su•te 105 Houston, Texas 77006 (7131529 8490 (800) 729 8490 r .. (713> 529 9531 Email: HocNOlCeCaol.com Corlents copynght 1997 Offi<e 'lours: 9:00;vn 5:30pm weekdays Publsher CndDuren Edotor LC.Mlchellk Edltoral Department J11 lnthonv · Entertainment Editor lH DIVIS Sports Editor ClrelJn l1bens Society Editor AdministratK>n M1111Mn1 Pennlntton . Executive Asst. John TIUPS Administrative Asst. Wnters llc:h annschleldt. DIVI• 111nc1, IH D1V1S.1.1rrv un11t. can •ern111, tn11e 11ms1v. DnN 11c11an111a. ClrelJn ftonns, Chrtst1pller ftun••ulst. Stepllen Schmi.t, l'ltrtcla Mell Warnia c.rtoonost llltSUma Photagraohe<> Sltvtl DIVld. aavlll 11eu P>OducbOn Vlctlr Ptr11 •b1 CrelDtlVI Unllmh.,. format Metamorpho~s VllVen Dtslln areup Adverbs. 1g Sa s Oep~ rl1 nt ltl DIVIS. John TOUPS lnde~l Advtrt1$1r'ft ~:. RcμiliO:..flll.Jl•vU 1en11mln lnd1'9-DIU. StlPhlR SchmldL Bill SbtPPlnl Cla>sil1<ds and Pononals JobnTIUPS Natcmf AdverttS!t\I Representative ftlVlmllll MlrlltUng, r.e. 111511. Westfield. MJ 901-232-2021 N·lllee to Adver11strs ~r«tschld*tot.1etrl•neffttWe$eot_ 19'J6 •P.wlorc~e~dq~.enl.NWi wtde or lubn, copy Of' pflot*°cll huP the Houstgn \be:e IS __ ... .,_~- • OpnaM tlDftssed by Cobnnists or urtoom.n .art not~ m.witt those of the tbn.tall ~e or ts ml1 ~we mtr.A: no L1b6ty for ltlt contete t1pmwd or ir.;6td of Uld ndn .o.r. l.e. ntu of ptr'SCWlS iw'c or de~ rtll or hcbOll• 11 ttie c• • Pllllklbonof ttlf n1meorpftotoer.,tl ol 11rrpersonor oria tlUtcfl 11M1iclHor~11 flt Hou\tOf\ \lolct" no!: IO be con:!rued H lrl)' ilckltion ol thl w'-Ull onett.ll:ionof t.-2 WiotlOIOfinl:abon •The IC!Pf.-anct o1 ~r:ts or opl\IOO' t~\std 11'.ttt11 do r.ot tonsttiAe..., endorwmttrt or CUMlrtff br Ile tbislOflvci(eoritsstaH POSTW.STER ~ _..,, ~bOM IO 811 ~ Selle 105 """""·IX 77006 sw~m·•IJSllfCJmNOIUSINl(l Sl 7~Pft' -.el C_M550ptr6fnCW'!IM .O,l'S_ .O 1O2p't0rY0I-"C ST ~- meM space 5:(Qlnt r T tiil..lrd3Y ID 'wri".ti '4 1111)' for ~~ .. -12:00-C'ilb'11oylor ~"'""'""""rr....,..,._-,.., ~b'J'O'lt ICMrt~tdftadln•tulledtr.>~~ °pe"w"sp'_apie;ro..ln. ....~ ,o_rGdKtoivlf&M.Lldovt_rtcq, ,.,..., r.oircierce, NitlONI C.t1 Nt.~ GutimmUr, Gly ¥tJ .. Hbl'MI PrflS As~ member. Assocw mtmbft Ass«ilttd Pl'eH·l'Ssowtf fttTtier 2 B T H 1 e a 7 What happens if I toke less than the amount of medication my doctor prescribed ? If I skip a dose, con I toke two doses to make up for it? Could the rash I've developed be a side effect of my medication ? I'm on vocation and forgot one of my prescriptions - what do I do now? Will the side effects I'm experiencing go away in time? When I feel better, con I stop toking my medication ? Will hot weather effect the stability of my medication capsules ? Should non-nucleoside RTls be used in conjunction with a protease inhibitor ? With many prescriptions to keep track of, how con I remember to refill them every time? Is being on a "drug cocktail" better for me ? Will my insurance cover my new medication? Is it safe to store my medications together ? How con I best schedule my medications to toke them as prescribed ? Is there any way to relieve the nausea my medication gives me ? Who can help me submit my insurance paperwork so I con get my medication costs reimbursed ? When I feel better, con I stop toking my medication ? Which over· the-counter medications are safe to take with my prescriptions ? I've heard that herbal therapies con interact with certain medi­cations - are the ones I'm taking safe ? How do the new protease inhibitors work compared to other antiretrovirals ? Can there be any question left in vour mind about the imponance of choosing a specialized pharmacy for your HIV care? J{? ith Stadtlanders, you get more than medication. You get reliable home delivery. Convenience and information. And pharmacists expert in HIV, available around the clock. Choose us lo help you manage all of your HIV medications. And your questions. Call 1-800-238-7828. Stadtlande'S Pharmacy C 1997 Stodrlonder USA., Inc. http://ww stodt!andet.com ·=·-··· ••-•k ··----- 'f FEBRUARY 2BTH 1997 THE G LOCATED IN FRONT OF SHEPHERD PLAZA Dpea for Late Night Dining and Breakfast Friday & Saturday till 4am Expr8SS £aat:b .,,.. aad UJI F A K A w w E E 2 181 RICHMOND AT GREENBRIAR • 713-522-7737 • FAX 522-2519 30+ WUNJO "Beyond \rltamins" Does your immune system need a boost? Need help with weight control? Do you want more energy for work and play? Workout need a jumpstart? Tired of aches and pains after exercise? Let us help you! Science joins nature to bring you products that work with your body with No Toxic Side Effects! Feel secure - more than 450 million in scientific research. (They worked miracles for me - bet my "wunjo• they'll work for you!) Let us design a FREE Product Program just for you! Visit our website to Learn More & Order Online too! http://www.io.com/-wunjo Crad Duren, M.D. 1213 Hermann Or., Suite 430 (713) 520-0653 Internal medical practice offering discreet confidential care to the community, including HIV/ AIDS diagnostics & therapeutics Healthcare from the Heart Anonymous TestlRC & CounsellnC Mato• Credit cards & rsonal Checks Accepted urance •Ith Quallfk:atlon Medicare HOU S TON VOI CE P A G E REGIONAL NEWS Chamber to Host Meeting on Tax Issues The Greater Houston Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (GHGLCC) will present a symposium on key tax issues for the gay and lesbian community at t heir next meeting Monday, March 3, 1997. The presentation will be helmed by Kathy Hubbard, a respected community supporter. Hubbard, an Enrolled Agent Ranctioned by the IRS, will answer ques­tions concerning all facets of tax law. Last summer, Congress made over 600 changes, additions nnd deletions to the tax code covering pensions, health pion options, expanded tnxpayer rights, tax free viaticai sales and ndoption credits. "Gay and lesbian tax issues are unique," said Hubbard '"!'here is no spe­cific domestic partnership tax code. We need to look, iSBue by issue, at the facts and situations.· The symposium will focus on some of the most common questions. The pre~ sentation is not limited to Chamber members. Guests are encouraged to attend this informative meeting. The cost for dinner and program is $20.00 for members, $25.00 for guests. All partici­pants arc encouraged to RSVP at (713) 523-7576 by February 27, 1997. PWA Panv at Cate Artiste Cafe Artiste is hosting the PWA !People with Aids Coalition) press party on Wednesday, llfarch 5 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm. Located at 1601 W Mam at Mandell, Cafe Artiste features an ecclec­tic mC'nu with over 25 coffoos and teas served daily. In addition to unique cui­sme, the Cafe features beer, wine and an ecclectic mix of customers. PWA serves 1500 HIV/AIDS clients in the greater Houston area. The Press Party will be announcing events and activities for the upcoming year. For more mformation regarding PWA, con­tact 522.52411 CommunitV leader Receives Recognition The Texas Chapter Association of Black Social Workt·rs beetowed their annual Community Service Awa rd to Audrey Kennerson Gassama, executive director of the Loving Arms Foundation for her outstanding dedication and com­mitment to the Houston community. Gassama has been involved in com­munity a ffairs for more than a decadt• Currently u member of t he HIV Women's Caucus, Gassama has gar­nered an impressive array of accolades during that time. She has received the Our Choice award from Links, Inc., the Mary Eliza Mahoney Award 10 Atlanta, Georgia, and was one of seven recipients across the nation to be awarded the 1996 Hale Humanitanan Award from Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. "I am truly honored to receive this FE BRUARY award," responded Gassama "I feel proud of my accomplishments. But I know that there 1s just so much more that I need to do in my community. I hope to help every HIV/AIDS infected child get the proper medical attention and loving support and care they need." AFH Receives Monies From Magnolia Christmas Panv AIDS Foundation Houston (AFH) received a check of $7,000.00 from a fundraising event held by Magnolia Christmas Party last Dec1·mll<'r. More than 400 people attended the event which marked the benefits sixth year The money wns presen!Rd lost week. The organization reported that because of a generous donation of bever­ages from Kroger, more of the monies raised went directly to AFH. Store Director of Kroger South Post Oak, Bill Underwood, stated that the donation '"came from our hearts: Jonathan Huckaby {left) and Clay Lancon {nght) of Magnolia Chnstmas Party present AFH Chairman of the Board Paul Sofka (center) with a $7,000 check from monies raised at a December fundra1ser. "We know that the funds will be put to good use and help all ospect.a of the com­munity," explained Jonathan Huckaby with regards to why AFII was the cho­sen beneficiary. Huckaby is a Host Member of Magnolia Chnstmns Party. Monies raised will go to help operate the many programs and services offered by AFH. BAHR oners Free seminar The Bar Association for Human Rights of Greater Houston, Im· (BAHR) is sponsoring an nll -day s eminar called Fundamentals of Law Practice Saturday, March 22, 1997. There 1s no cost for the seminar, lunch or the pro­vided written material. Attorneys from a variety of practice fields will focus on basic legal t ransactions and other prac­tical informat ion designed to assist at torney's in concentrating their prac­tice on a specific area or setting up a small firm. Topics for the morning session include: Practical considerations, pre­sented by Connie Moore; Mamtnining clients and obtaining court appoint­ments, presented by Donnid Sk1pw1th; Comprehensive insight on how to handle DUI cases, presented by Greg Class; and a thorough presentation on employment See REGION page 10 2 BT H 1 9 B ""J March 5th - March 9th, 1997 at Community Gospel Church 4305 Lillian - Houston, TX 77007 719-880-9ZSS (one block south of Washington on Thompson at Lillian) With dedication of our newly purchased building on Sunday, March 9th @ 11 am. ervices Nigh y at 7:30 pm Wednesday March 5th thru Sat March 8th and Sunday Services, March 9th at 1 1 am and 7 pm Featured eal< Incl de • Evelyn & Dennis Schave • Ronnie Pigg • Beverly Wells •Joe Wilson Special sic b • The Light Company • Revival • Marvelous Light • Glenn Baker • David Young Come Expecting a Miracle M#M.MIM:MM.WJ ;+.+M?M- PACJE 15 'If FEBRUARY 2BTH 1997 A public health message from the National Minority AIDS Council and the National Lesbian and Gay Health Association 1n cooperation with Gtaxo Wellcome c 1997 Gloao w.aco-1nc OTPl:WO fUIUAlY 1997 •=•-•••fW+-+§ ·------ P A G E B SEE YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT NEW TREATMENT OPTIONS NEW RESEARCH SUGGESTS REDUCING THE AMOUNT OF VIRUS MAY HELP YOU LIVE LONGER http ://www. treath iv. com F E B R U A R Y &! B T H 1 B B 7 NATIONAL NEWS Group Clalms Pentagon Violates Gavs In the Mllharv Pollcv According to the Service Members Legal Defense Network (SLDN), all branches of the armed forces are violat­ing the "intent and spirit" of the Clinton Administration's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Don't Pursue• policy with respect to gays in the military. The watch dog group indicates that the urmed services continue to question, pursue and haraAs gay and straight uni­formed members. Citing documentation of continuous witch hunts, the organiza-tion informs that the number of dis­charges has increased since the pohcy went into effect. "The Administration's pohcy has actu­ally created an environment in which gays and lesbians are worse off than before its implementation three years ago," stated SLDN in a recent press release. The group plans to release a full report documenting specific violations. T T T T T T T T T Washington Governor Vetoes Gav Marriage Ban Gary Locke (D-WA) vetoed a ban on same-sex marriages last week calling the initiative discriminatory, divisive and unnecessary Undetered, Legislative leaders said they will put the issue before the voters. "I oppose any measure that would divide, disrespert or dimini!'lh our humamty," ~aid the Wn>hington gover­nor The measure passed the Repubhcan controlled House 63-35, three vote• shy of the two.thirds margin necessary to override the governor's veto. "Our overarching principle should be to promote civility, mutual respect and unity. This legi•lation fails to meet this te•t." said Locke. Legislative leaders plan to put the me.nsure on the November statewide ballot. As a referendum, 1t bypasses the governor's desk. "The public will pass this. This bill has nothing to do with discnmination. It is about marriage, pure and ~imple," said House Speaker Clyde Ballard. PlAGAl Calls tor Hibernian Parade Consistencv The Pro·Life Alliance of Gays and Lesbians CPLAGAL) urged the Ancient Order of Hibernians (AOH) to be consis­tent in their exclusionary policy ty bar­nng pro-choice leaders from marching in their parade. Since lesbians and gays ure legally excluded from the New York St. Patrick's Day parade becau•e their lives do not conform to Roman Catholic Church teaching•, PLAGAL believes pro-choice pohticians ~hould also be excluded because they do not conform to those same standards. The l.'TOUP wa• refcring to the U.S. Supremo Court ruling m Hurley v. Irish· American Gay Group of Bo.,ton, a 1995 case concerning the exclusion of gays and lesbians from the 1993 Boston Pnrn<lo, fn tho c-ose, tho court ruled in fuvor of 1 lurky on 1'~irsl Amendment. grounds. The group argues that the presence of pro-choice activists iA a double standard that discredits the parade. "It is disappointing to see the [orga­nizers[ abandon its self-proclaimed con­sistency with Roman Catholic teachings only when those who cannot speak for themselves -- the unborn -· suffer the consequences," said Philip Arcidi, presi­dent of PLAGAL in an open letter to Edward J Wallace, president of AOH. "In years gone by, and, we would expect, in 1997, the Ancient Order of Hibernians will apply a forthright criU.­rion for mnrching in the New York Saint Patrick's Duy Parade: It will admit only those whose public standards conform with the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church I rPqur.st thnt you apply your crih.•rion consislcnlly." T T T T T T T T T Clinton Names Communttv liaison President Clinton named Richard Socarides 11• 81X-c111l Assi•tant to the President and Senior Adv1Sor for Public Liaison, lost week. 8oc11ndes was the liaison to the gay and lesbian communities for the White House in 1996, when he served as Special As.iistant to the Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy and Polillcal Affairs. In h18 new post, Socarides will serve the gay and lesbian communities as well as additional constituencies. A native of New York, Socarides was the White House Liaison for the Department ofl.abor from 1993 to 1996. Prior to his stint at l,abor, he was a political odvi•or to Senator Tum Harkms CD-IA). His extensive background includes serving on the Board of Directors of the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund and the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation <GLAAD). In addition, Socarides was one of the principal organizers of the firxl ever White House conference on HIV/AIDS in 1995. Medical Marijuana User Fired A county worker who drives heavy conHtruction equipment was fired for using morijuonu, which he said he uses aner work only to treat his glaucoma. California upproved the medical use of mariJuanu last fall but the federal gov­crnm. ent still considers it an illegal drug. J..nst w1-ek, a panel of experts indi­cated there is ~ome promising evidence that smoking manJuana helps some patients suffering from cancer, AIDS or glaucoma, however, they concluded more study is need1·d. The fired employee, Rob Dunaway, stated that he felt he was being discrim-inated against solely on the basis of the medication he used. "l love my work. It's what I've. done all my life," said Dunaway Dunaway, who claims his doctor gave him on oral recommendation for mari­juana to treat his glaucoma, will ·seek an arbitration hearing on the matU.r via his union. Retired Army Gen Barry McCaffrey, the Clinton administrabon's drug cz.ar, haA e01d workers under federal jurisdic­tion cannot use marijuana for medical purposes, regardless of what a doctor recommends. Oregon Clinic Sells Medicinal Pot An 11legal clinic in downtown Portland for $20 to $50, depending on their is dispenAing marijuana to sick and income. Marijuana cookies are sold in dying people according to last Sunday's $2 packs and pot-filled brownies sell for Oregonian. The newspaper reports that $3. more than 120 putients have found the The chnic opened aner Californrn and Alternative Health Center through word Arizona. vo!Rra in November approved of mouth eince it opened nearly two the medicinal use of marijuana much to months ago. the chagrin of the federal gov~mment Patients who suffer from arthritis, Oregon's lawmakers are considering multiple sclerosis, AIDS and other bills to leguhw marijuana for medical chronic diseases told the paper they can use. The issue has catapulted to the buy an eighth of an ounce of marijuana forefront of P<lhtical debate as a result . --=··· .... ··•¢ ....... 7 SATURDAY SnilizR au./Jflll.rjiM Si/Jm1 Ci.udiiJn 0p.llltA .al 8p.m Featuring ot'er $16,000 in original artwork, limited edition prints, performing arts, fitness equipme~ decoratit'e accessories, professional senices, memorabili~ a weekend for two in Cancun and two dinner parlies for fiitr people at Sausalito Seafood~ Pasta Restaurant THE AUCTION WILL BE OPEN DAILY THROUOH FRIDAY, MARCH 7 FRIDAY" MARCH 7 Join us at 6pm for .A Buffet Courtesy of Sausalito Seafood &: Pasta Restaurant THE SOIREE SILENT AUCTION ENDS AT MIDNIOIIT MALESfRIP CONTESTS SUNDAY with Black. Vehrett Spice Up Your Monday at ... New Monday Mex-Buffet - $9.95/person Tortilla Soup & Gourmet Salad 8ar • F,..,..h Qlarrero Quiche • Fieeta Com/7re.ld One of Three Entree.J: Fajita!J, Enchilada!J, Quesadillas with &an11 & Rice Coffee, Tea or BYOB • Free SetuJ"' for Frozen Margarita11 ~ .tVa 11fe ~ He14 t A'7ove F- t 1 We't "V1 .. re ... t. Houetcn n ' FEBRUARY 2 8 TH 1 e e 7 large Selection Of Fine Preowned Automobiles Financing &: leasing Available Call Gary Ramazelli - A Friend Who Cares 281-493-1000 Call Now for Spring Check Up AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING SPECIALISTS 880-4629 100.::v~~:~~~--G (upon Approv•I) All Work fully Gu>r• nleed! rroudh ~rvlng o.,, Community for Our 12 Yr.airs.' 1919 Decatur Hwslon, TX noo7 (Wasllilgton c White . • . between Studemont & Houston A>e.) It always distresses me when I receive a phone call like the one the other day ... ME: LOBO Book Shop, may I help you? Caller: Yeah, where are you located? (Note: I love telling people where our fabulous_new lq~atfqn is.) ME: 3939 MontrQse Blvd, one block south of Alabama. Caller: Do you have booths? (arcade, theatre) (Not~;_ This really makes me mad!) ME: No, sir. We are a Gay and Lesbian Book Store. ([beJargest excjusively Gay and L_esbian Book Store in Texas. t might add.) We carry books, t-shirts, greeting cards, pride wear, incense, candles, compact discs, magazines, and videos for rent and purchase. We are not an arcade, we do not have booths, we do not have a theatre! <CLICK> I guess we weren't what they were looking for. But we are what you're looking for ... LOBO ... it isn't what you'd think and everything you'd want. LOBO BOOK SHOP 3939-S Montrose 713-522-5156 --=··----·•§ ....... p A G E PLAIN SPEAKING by Larry Lingle "SchlDdler's Llst ", Steven Spielberg's epic of the Holocaust, was watched by an estimated 65 million Americans Sunday night, more than twice the number who viewed the movie while playing ID the­aters. This wns the largest audience for a television show this season, except for sporting events. The black and white film was shown without interruption under the sponsor­ship of the Ford Motor Corporation. This, in itself. wns just another irony in the history of the Jewish plight in World War II. Henry Ford, the erstwhile founder of the company, publicly admired the work of Adolph Hitler in the 1930's. After all, Hitler was indu•trial­ly friendly and his buddy, Mussolini, made the Italian trains run on time - no mean feat. Immediately after the war, many American Jews would not buy Ford products as a form of protest. Without anything being •poken, I 1mngine the coincidence of Ford sponsorship of Sundny night's progrnm was rather intentional. I did not watch that night. I hnd seen the movie during its theatrical run and also purchased the film on video, although I have not watched it ngam. I grew up in the midsection of the country, descended from long lines of pioneers who began the trek west in the eigh­teenth century and who slowly trans­formed their Huguenot origins into native evangelical faiths, principally Baptists. I attended school where we were seg­regated not only by race but by religion. There was the black schools and the Catholic schools and no mixing nllowed. However, the .Jewiish community of that town wa• •mall and. as it hnppened, the only Jew in my class became my best friend and also my debate partner While I often visited in htS home and shared meals th<-re. I n<'vf'r hoard n word about the Holocnust. Whatever knowledge I had of that shattenng evening came unexpectedly when I was barely ten years of age. With a working mother and an absent father my maternal grandmother was left. to raise my brother and I. This mcluded a sound grounding in her cherished Southern Baptist faith and many a night we were read to ;:Jeep, not by fairy tales, but stones from the Bible. In the months 1mmLod1ately after the end of World War II, someone, I assume some part of the federnl government, toured the country with film from the discovery of the concentration camps. My grandmother took my brother and I to the local high sthool where the black and white film was shown. My three most vivid memones of the wnr were the map my grandfather kept on the wall to track the advnncing armies, the denth of President Roosevelt, and thnt horren­dous film I viewed on a cold winter's afternoon in the winter of 1945-46. For those who know war from the news reports of Vietnam and the count· less films, in living color, of that and other wars, as well as the all t?O vivid gore which is •tandard fare in movie• and even televiston, it would be hard to 1magme the world as seen through my eyes as a ten year old First, there was no television And my view of World War JI in progress was the the movie newsreel. These reports on the war were always in black and white and heavily censured, such reports avoided •bowing any dend Americans. Dead Germnns were okny, massacred Japanese were prefernble since we were encournged to beheve that they were a subhuman race. CPR can keep your love alh·e e FCBRUAAY° At the age of ten I was not even allowed by my family to attend funerals, lest I see a dead body. The first close rel­ative whose denth I can rememb<:r was my great-grandmother who lived with her daughter, the •ame person then in charge of raising me. Yet my only recol­lection is that one day she was there and the next gone, only lo become nnother tombstone to be visited on high national holidays. So sheltered by my government and my family suddenly I was thrust mto a huge (at lenst in my ten·year-old vision) auditorium to view a film of endle"8 hor· ror, of thousands of bodies, uncovered nnd wasted, and - •till to this day - the most horrifying of all - the gas ovens, .ame still with bodies m them. I have no memory of crying or of anything spoken after the film ended, but those imnges still haunt me. Just as family stones of bemg on the losing side in America's grent Civil War and the later battle of the railroads led me to a fascination with Jesse James, that early film fueled n reading frenzy on Adolph Hitler and the Nazis. And, unbeknownst to me, historical revision­ism quickly set ID after the end of the war and the rnpidly developing percep­tion that the Communist threat was the dominant foe, and quickly a line was drawn between the evil Nazis who ~uld kill millions and the rest of the Germans, even the German soldiers who were, after all, only fighting for their Fatherland. Of course, most Germans did not know nbout those awful camp•. It has taken a half century for •chol· arship to catch up with r<•ahty Of course, mo~t Germans knt•w of the camps, and thousands of regular German soldiers, not iust the SS umts, carried out ma.1:1 ext."<'ulrnns. And worse, the Allies - England and tho Umt"l States - knew of the camps and the exterminations long before the end of the wnr One Roosewlt uid<•, John McCloy. even forhadn: Urn humhin&( of th9 tails Jead1Dg to the camps which woula have at least slowed th<" Hlaught.<.•r and during the worse killings in 1944 nught have saved thousands. Even today, we are finding that coun~ tnes such as Cnnada allowed war crimi· nals to hide, some of whom openly received their pensions from Germany over this same half century Switzerland, long thought to be a haven of neutrality during the war, is under attack not only for h1dmg the us.sets of many of those killed ID the Holocaust, but also for hnving coopcrat<:d with the Naz15 in transferring stolen gold and art to safe havens ID South Amen ca. As the war appeared Jost in 1944, Swiss bankers even convened a meeting with Heinrich Himmler, heud of the SS, and German industrialist to plot ways to pre­serve German assets for a ~·ourth Heich We have a vision of picturesque Swiss mountain tops and discreet banks. Yet when war broke out in 1939 Switzerland wns one of the poorest countries in Europe. By the end of the war it was the second richest country in the world Even the Nazi crononuc minister said after the war that Germany could not have survived three months without Swiss cooperation. On that cold for-off day in 1945 my world was truly one of black and white We had iu•t won what would half a ccn· tury later be referred to as the last pain· otic war. We knew the good guys from the bad. What lime has ~hown is that hfe even then wns really not so •1mple, we only made it app<:•ar so. A half cenlu· ry later has taught us that there are no such simple answl'rs. We huve yet to learn the right questions. T T T T T T T T T . ~ Aroencan Heart aA Association .. ¥ ..,,,, '11-oa..... --· 1 9 B '7 RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION by Leshe Ramsay Is America becoming a nation of cow­ards? People settle their interpersonal con­flicts with each other by keying their opponent's cars, putting sugar in their gas tanks, poisoning their dogs, and shutting their utilities off. Getting back at your opponent without having to face them, appears to be the norm. Whatever happened to settling your differences with your words, or even fists, fnce to fuce? Gangs are now proving their "machis­mo" by spraying houses and garages with bullets us they drive-by in their speeding vehicles. The current genera­tion of gang members don't even bother to get their hands dirty when they go to war with each other Just this week, a gangland shoot out interrupted a Jillie league team practice. The little leaguers were told to hit the dirt lo uvo1d gelling killed by the rico­cheting bullets. Unfortunately, reports of innocent children getting hit by stray bullets from random drive-by shootings have become common occurrences here in Houston. All of this everyday cowardice pales in comparison to the latest modus operandi of the domestic terrorist. They set bombs to go off from the safety of their home. Safely uway from actually having to see the mayhem they cause. A group calling themselves "TJ>e Army of God" has t.1ken credit for the bombing of n Gt'Orgia ahort1on clinic and most recently ,, suburban Atlanta gay club. They informed the Reuters news service that they arc at war with the US gov­ernment. They st.ited that they are plan­ning more actions against abortionists and guys. According lo FBI profiles of serial lx>mlwrs, this group consists of disaffect­ed men ~md women who believe they are fighting a holy b'TOund war against who and what they deem lo be the enemies of God. This past week, homosexuals were nddNl to tho i..rn:,up'e h1l luit.. Pn or to tl1is past Friday'• bombing of the subur­ban Atlanta women's bar, they had focused on murdering abortion doctors. "The Army of God" group has arro­gantly chosen to become judges here on earth lo eradicate the earth of whomev­er they judge to be "sinners" By the way, the bible is filled with •tories of Christ coming to the aid of sinners. There is no moral justification for what the "The Army of God" is doing. "The Army of God• has used bombs at an abortion clinic and a gay bar to attract their real stated enemies- gov­ernment agents. At each location they had planted two bombs. The first bomb wus set to go off to lure the emergency workers lo the location. The second homb wos to go off once they arrived on the scene to investigate. Obviously, this group has two separate targets in mind when they set up a bomb location The Atlanta Journal and Constitution is reporting that the possibility of scar­ing ,via terrorizing homosexuals and abortioni8ts, back into their respective closets is a secondary goal of this group. The "sinners" are used as throwaway victims only to make a point. The Unabomber is a classic case of cowardice. He created bombs to murder and maim individuals in order to call attention to his theories that science has gone too far. He was unable to convince the public of his scientific theory, so he sat back and killed people nation-wide from the beautiful state of Montana. Using a bomb to gel your political point across is something the Irish Republican Army has been doing for years in Northern Ireland. The people of Belfast huve lived with the constant fear of a bomb going off every day for decades now. What huve they gained with all of their bloodshed? How many children have been the victims of their terror? The IRA does have the common decency lo call and warn the police that a bomb is about to go off. Usually, the police are able to evacuate the area. Why is this happening here in America? The American government should share some of the blame for the rise in domestic terrorism. The more our gov­ernment encroaches on the personal freedom of its ciliZ<·ns, lhe more the indi­viduals will react through violence. When lh1• freedom of speech was out­lawed for the anti-abortionists crowd, the murdering of the doctors began Abortion rlinics were fire bombed when the 15' rule went into effect. I believe that both the disastrous &•"l:e at Waco of David Korcsh and the mur­ders of an innoct·nt mother and child by fodernl ui:1•nl8 of the ATF at Ruby Ridge, directly influenct'CI the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma. This administrations use of excessive force hlls l<•d to th1a e udd(>n upsurgo of onti-govcrnml'nt violcncl'. Some citizens feel they ure justified in their anti-gov­ernment violence because they see the government ignoring and trampling their constitutional rights. The fil'!\t and eecond nmrndml'nt.8 ore very clo~ely held rights and freedoms that this administration Sloes no harm in abridg­ing. Decisive action by this administration to find and prosecute the people behind "The Army of God'' is going to be very dif­ficult. The FBI profile describes them as loners, completely anti-social and well armed. Most importantly, they feel they are doing the will of God ... I fear for my family and friends. I fear for my country. And, I four my govern­ment. I .ram lo c4lll IJI 1 1puc L.ly 1f,nu lul\flonrornton'" :l);ripturm of 1o1n:il.1• hle llW11lt1~ Ill 1t1lr M•k of lhr faN' ur onr lunli. 11u1Mr11 tl11111~1&· or lou of \ WOfl 11 lllL!I of ~llttt h. 1ul1k11 M"\f'~ lwiul.'ldlll" or 1l1zzmcg .ttlong •11'1 lh1• blHl\t• l~ll ( ull I ~oo . \II \ · l '\I 10 l1·llni mun· Or \ 1 11 ht1p//v.v...,, umhn org on lht· \\nrlfl \\id,. \\..11 American Hean A -A~!-.-0t.-:t-a-t1on.y HOU S TON VOIC E 9 VILVEN DESIGN GROUP The Epicenter of Graphic Art & Copywriting National Award Winning Design Group Breakfast Specials Served Sat - Sun IOam-lpm and Fri - Sat llpm-4am bA SIC BROTHERS HOU.TON Pardon our Mess­We're Getting a New Look Just for Youl Save Up To 75°/o on Selected Merchandise! BASIC BROTHERS Your Out and Proud Clothing Store 1232 Westheimer • 522-1626 Our Hours: Mon-Sat I 0 am - 9 pm • Sundays 12 - 6 FEBRUARY 2 BT H 1 9 9 7 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Heavv Metal Spoof Prompts Boone Cancellation by Michael 'Mute Los Angeles (API -- A Christian televi­sion network canceled Pat Boone's week­ly go.<pel music show after thousands of viewers called in outrage over his foray into heavy metal, the singer said Wednesday. The Tunity Broadcasting Network on Tuesday cancelled "GospelAmerica," a 30-minute program focusing on various genres of gospel music, including, ironi­cally, rock 'n' roll and heavy metal. Boone said the show appeared on 400 stations worldwide. A call to Tunity's Santa Ana offices Wednesday mght rang unanswered. A Trinity official told the Lo. Angeles Times that Boone has been invited to appear on the network's flal:"hiP show, "Praise," to explain himself. In the mean­time, •Gospe!America" will stay off the air, said Trimly attorney Colby May. Also, the Bethel School and Orphanage in Chattanooga, Tenn., where Boone has hosted a charity golf tournament for 20 years, is considering severing ties with him, Boone said. Boone, 62, said he apparently offended many fundamentalist Christians, partic­ularly in the Southeast, when he appeared m black leather and fake tat­toos on the American Music Awards show on Jan. 27. "I thought everybody saw it for what it was, sort of a parody, JUSl a send up,' Boone said from his Beverly Hills home. • ... Of course, it was difficult for Christian people, who have followed me for years and years. It seemed like I had burst out in some demented way.• The album, •Jn a Metal Mood: No More Mr. Nice Guy,• feature> such tunes as Van Halen'• •panama." Metallica's 'Enter Sandman," Alice Cooper's ·No More Mr. 1'icc Guy" and Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven.• But the sound is far from heavy metal. The music is sung in typical Boone style with an orchestra backing him up. The album last week was listed at No. 186 on Billboard's Top 200 list after two weeks on the chart. Boone, a pop icon m the 1950s and a leading gospel performer for three decades, has said he chose to do the album because he wanted to try some­thmg new "Now that they're starting to hear the music, there's a collective sort of reac­tion, 'Oh, this isn't heavy metal. It's a big band collection of heavy metal songs," Boone said. Boone said he understands that Trimly had to respond to viewers, and he holds no grudges. He hopes it will all blow over in time and "GospelAmenca" can return to the network. "I hope we're all learning how quick we are to judge each other.' he said "I was harshly critical of heavy metal in the past, and the lifestyle of the singers and now that's reached up and slapped me in the face.• Boone, however, contends that ho's fol­lowing a good example with his new leather duds. After all, God used animal skins to clothe Adam and Eve. ''God is into leather . .. The first clothes he made for anybody on this planet, he made them out of leather," he said. T T T T T T T T T REGIONAL NEWS REGION/tram page 4 termination procedures, presented by Mitchell Katine. During lunch, the group will pr.,.;ent an enlightening discu.c1sion on same-sex marriage along with an update on the Hawaii case and its probable impact in Texas. This will be complemented by a brief debate on whether same-sex mar­riage is a fight our community should be involved in and the pros and cons of marriage for gay couples. After lunch, Terrance Baggott will dis­cuss wills and power of attorney for gay, lesbian , bisexual, or transgendered clients; David Elliot will provide guid­ance on helping gay clients buy a house; and Robert Ro•enberg concludes the seminar with an ethics review. For more information, contact Clyde Williams at (7131 2:16-0064 Writer/Director Kevin Smith Slated to Appear at Rice Universitv Writer/Director Kevin Smith will introduce his new film Chasing Amy at a free premiere screening Thursday, March 6 at 7:30 p.m. Produc~'<I by View Askew Productions, Chasing Amy is the third film in Smith's New Jersey tri?ogy, which began with the critically acclaimed Clerks und last years llfallrats. Jn Amy, Smith delves into the ace old question .. can u man und woman just ho friends? Smith will host n question and · answer session uft.cr the scn~ning of thc1 Miramax film . For more information concerning free passes, cull Th•• Rice Thresher at (7131527-4801. Heights Theatre to Present leguizamo·s Acclaimed Show New H~1ghta Thuulru hue JomtKl forces with Talento Bilingue de Houston to bring John Leguizamo'• acclaimed one-man show, Spic-0-Rarna, to the st.age in Houston. Winner of the 1992 Dramatists Guild Hull-Warner Award for Best Play and the 1992 Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Achievement Off.­Broadway, Spic-0-Ramu, uttrnctcd national attention to J.egullamo, a well­known film stur The New Heights Theatrefl'BH pro­duction will prevww February 28 and March 1, 1997. The play opens Wednesday March 5 und runs ~·ridays and Saturdays through March 29. Curtain is at 8 pm. For more informa­tion, call the theatre at (713) 869-8927. Briefs Stone Soup is in dire need of toil<•tries for their clients. The following items arc the most needed: bathroom tissue, tooth paste, tooth bru•hes, soap, shampoo, disposable razors, shaving cream, adult and child diapers, deodorant, laundry detergent and dish washmg d~t•·rgcnt. The organization will provide arrangt~ ments for pick-up, if necessary For more information, call (71:ll 626-6796. CNG, a gay corpcrate network group, will be holdmg their next meeting March 1, 1997 at I p.m. The m<·•·ting will take place ut 1116 Jac-kson Blvd m The Assistance Fund offices. For more information, call Glenn Levy at (7 131 527-4717 IF 'YOU HAVE CANCER, WE CAN HE~ IFN0t lOUCANHE~ l-IOO-ACS-2345 Cl lw.t AMmrml Caixa JIJ21 HOUSTON V OIC..E FEBRUARY 2 BT H 1 a e 7 BOMB/trompage 1 another despicable act of domestic ter­rorism The FBI and ATF, working together with other Federal and State authorities, have been exhaustively examining all evidence and pursuing all motives, including the possibility that the crime was motivated by the sexual orientation of the patrons at the club. We also are looking into the possibility that. this incident is related to other bombing incidents in the Atlanta area." "Although federal hate crime statutes do not provide for the prosecution of offenses motivated by a victim's sexual orientation, existing statutes do provide penalties of up to life imprisonment for individuals who carry out bombings" Reno added. "Under President Clinton's 1994 Crime Control Act, if the crime was motivated by the sexual orientation of the victim", foderal prosecutors can seek to increase any i;ent~nce impo~ed on the bomber. We will not. rest until the per­petrators are brought to justice.• In a letter to Ralph Reed, Executive Direct.or of The Christian Coalition, Human Rights Campaign Executive Director Elizabeth Birch fired off some poignant queHtions. While Reed was quick to condemn the January 16 bomb­ing of a women's health clinic in Atlanta and the burning of predominantly black churches in the South last year, Ms. Birch wonden•d why he had not issued a similar condl'mnation in the bombing of the guy bar. "Leaders from President Clinton to House Spl'aker Newt Gingrich to Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell have denouncl'd ~'riday night's bombing. President Clinton and Atlanta Mayor Campbell both stated they believe the incident was motivated by hatred", "aid Birch. Earlil'r this wCl'k in a rally called by commumtv activists in Atlantaj Candace Gingrich ]oint-d into the queries with ''\Vht•ro llrl' the voires of condemnation? \Vherc is our Pre~ident's voice? Where is the voice of the Christian Coalition?" She also demanded that her brother, House Spenk<'r NPwt Gingrich •penk out us ht• did uflt'r Uw clinic bombing. Later Sunday, Newt. Gingrich issued a state­ment condemning the bombings as "inexcusable nets of terrorism that should outrage oil Americans and can­not be tolt•rat.t:d" Similar sentiments were expre:ised by Kerry Loht>!. Executive Din>etor of the National Gay & J,e,.binn Tusk Force. "As the extremist Right st<'ps up iL• verbal ond legislativo assault. violence against gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people is on the rise. What begins as rh<'t.onc, can oftt•n have trngic conse­qucncus. We <•ncourage t'BI and local law enforcement officials to do every­thing in thl'ir power to solve theoe bomb­ings. They are nets of cowardice that strike out a~ainst innoct.>nl bystanders." The Otlwrside Lounge was half full with moro than 150 patrons when the latest bomb went. off, without warning. "Everybody just. froze." exclaimed Rhonda Armstrong, a hart.ender. "It. sounded like u cunnon in a circus". A rescue worker reported treating a woman with 1t nail dnvcn into her shoul­der leaving u wound os big as a nickel. One victim underwent surgery at a near­by hospital und wos said to be in stable condition "There is no question the bombing is an example of hate cnme's directed at gays and le•bians." said Dale Carpenter, presid<•nt of Log C:nbm Republicans of Texas. "ll should compel! the Texas leg­islature to •1l up ond take notice of what is happening in our country and act accordingly." Even though the bombing occured in Atlont.n, local hur patrons have anxieties and appear to have become "'tense," for fear that. the same situation could con­ceivably hnpp<•n here. Several local bar owners have placed llll'ir door personnel on "full Ull'rt• regarding b11ckpncks, purses, etc. Unfortunnt«ly to many m the commu­nity. the qul'Slion is: "whol are we to do next?" It apP<!ars as though it. has become necessary for gay bu>iness own­ers to be cautious. Community leaders are hopeful that. the incident was isolat­ed and will not create a rash of copycats. If not, community businesses may soon be forced to require customers to walk through a metal detector to gain entrance to any gay establishment-­whether it be o bar, restaurant, book store or clothing store. STEIN/trom page 1 The London concert drew an impres­sive array of industry luminaries. In attendance were four renowned conduc­tors in their own right: Sir Trevor Pinnock (outgoing Music Director of the National Arts Center Orchestra in Ottawa Canada>; Michael Tilson Thomas (former Music Director of the London Symphony and current Music D1rector of the San Francisco Symphony); Famed recording star and Conductor Sir Neville Mariner; and American conductor Michael Stem (son oflsaac). "That is an enormous tribute, not.just to Christoph, but to the relationship that exists between Christoph and the Houston Symphony. I don't remember attending a concert with so many cele­brated conductors," said Stein. "It was a HOUSTON vo•CE p A G E real testament to the symphony." The Amoterdam performance at the Concertgebouw was equally a~ success­ful, albeit different from the London per­formance. "It was packed." said Stem. "Again, another sold-out crowd. They lept to their feet. The Dutch are known for being in some ways coni:tervative peo­ple. It was a very exciting performance." Stein attributes the difference to the Concertgebouw (translation: concert building), which he coins as one of the three great halls of the universe. The other two are: The M usikverem in Vienna and The Philharmonie in Berlin. "Those, for me, are three of just absolutely legendary concert halls in the Universe ... '"Saturday was an enormous day/" intoned Stein "We began Saturday morning m London, England We played an afternoon concert in Eastern France, and we amved that mght m Amsterdam, Netherlands. We were in three countries in one day and in the midst of the day, the orchestra played a concert. It. was an enormously olreuful day and they played a fantastic concert in an incredible concert hall which no one, except. Christoph, really knew. Th be in three countries in one day, and play in the second country a huge con­cert, and play it so well to a great audi­ence is remarkable." The concert hall, the Arllenal, is oon· sidered to be a great contemporary con• cert hall. Stein descnbed the Arsenal as a contemporary hall housed IQ a struc· t.ure, which was the An<cnal. the fort, m Metz, France for over a hundred yea'" "It's a fascinating building designed by the same architect that designed Alice Pratt Brown Hall at Rice University," informed Stem. Stein shared a bit of history he discov­ered while in Europe. "This is for the gay community, of which I am proudly a part of," said Stein. "I found the etymology of the phrase 'drag,'" informed Stein. "It comes from Shakespeare. Because, in the Globe the­ater which they are recreating about 200 yards from it's original place 400 years ago in London, England It. was through the spoken language of Shakeopeare of the theater that coined this phrase • St.em explained that m Shakespeare'< time, all the roles, mcludmg the female roles, were played by men. ~ n result, the men who had to play the female roles wore big, long, heavy fabric gowns and dresses. Since the stage of the Globe is wood, when the men walked, their garment would 'drag' across the wooden boards of the theater Hence, they called them 'drag artist.•.' "This is where the term 'drag' came See STEIN page 12 ., ., FClBRUARV 2 B T H '1 9 D 7 FLORAL DESIGNER Parmme, possibly fullume a for established Montrose area business. Call 9·5 only 713-528-0227 HUMAN RIGHTS Advertisements do not Include all !lie lnfonnation about a pmcription med· !cation. Only your physician Is qualified to decide II a pmcription medication Is for you. - COllCOMITAKrDRUG +~~~~(~) ~~ --* , ___ pom;y_ ,,,,___ -+-- --- -- - -- - ~ --..,,,...,.-... -_-_- +__ ,,,_ _______ ---.s,,..,o:r-:-s-c......-...--., ---- --n!CNS- -- !•2.:1")*1.1.1.=..:.,=_ .6.. :=:.:=2 "0"_' _,,.., __ fld"'O_ __ ,,,,,,..,, ,.__ -o.a-...a..-..ol1-,,_.,.._ ... ,_,.,. ----•.-Vol -fllwa-l>rut--=-"11- CAMPA I GN You've got the power. Register. Vote. 1~0. 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WTIY Miil IWIOUllG -~l­:..'" 5r1:".=:·=.:. ." :"'~:=..-=-.:== rAyc c_:es.sn_Jbuslt.l .l. e_drv.1S_WOllS~~_-1~1':_a.7111o" rl~li'lOfllltl.aal"lf"t-C".l"l'l"''l"du"S-· .. iwam_cn __ ....... ___ ,,.,,_,,"""~ primly NSW;t .a::cess ID dr\Q al llil mss miy mnnm h ml of sell'.annstr1110n bot tUtti care prcwGrs.. l-lASURIPHPOUl'CEADl' SUWl __ ll_lllllll--) 25 .. --C-111.). MOC 0054 2fi01-l 1 Somes ol 25 ~ H!lC-2601-21-<1160- H!lC-·2601-25 -oll00- 5 .. tllt ..... ..,....l-Rl) H!lC-2602·11 Bomes<Jl25aQSUleO NOC-2602·25 -<11100- ~"b.~"r.""'~.!/... H!lC-2603-21Bomes .. 60- MAA..,Ol"••--al--lnc ,,.,,,.,,,.,._,by_l-.iones. n_: llld.er ,lltem.:eImm Urlm_ld ~l nc.°""" "h":'C A91311 llUDRDOIFGIUl111.0WO C-.'*"'1111w ___ •- @Ill] RCIKane --HU·. I·N ~~ STEIN/from page 11 from. The theater of Shakespeare, 400 years ago. As a guy man, I am very proud of that," said Stein 'Drag' was not the only word derived from the world of Shakespeare, 'window' is another according to Stein. The origin of window stems from the Globe Theater, as well. The Globe 1s round by design consisting of three to four levels. People would stand on the ground floor. On the second gullery, the middle of the theater, there were 'wind holes' cul in the plusler becaus<• they didn't have restrooms in the theater. Consequently, there was u horrible stench in the lheat<·r. Therefore, the most pnzed seats were on the first floor because il was in the back wall of the first floor, unlike any of the other floors, where there were carved wind holes. Hence, said Stein. the word window. Interestingly, the Shakespearean era may have had an impact on more than just word usage. In a faRCinalmg dis­covery. Stem shared a compelling morsel of historical knowledge. "Most of the people were 1lhterate m Shakespeare's tune," said Sl<'in. "They didn't know to read the newspaper four hundred years ago to sec what wus al the theater that night. So, they hud a huge flag they flew from the top of the theater and people would walk by the theater. If you saw the flag, you knew there was a play that night And, by the color of the flag, you would know which kind of play it was. A Red flag meant a tragedy wa' going to play that day A White flag meant n comedy was going lo play that day A Blue flag meant histo­ry wns going lo play that day. Think of the colors Red, Whit<' and Blu1• four hundr~-d years ago and what th1•y encompass for A.mencu today.• The Houston Symphony Orrlll'stra success in Europe c,m he uttnhutt-"<l to the mush·ry of ~tuestro F-:schl'nbach rapport with the urclwslru. This 1s the tenth anmversary of the symphony's relationship with Esdwnbach, whom Stein d('8C"nlu•<l us u "<·o m~)(·lhng, emo~ t10nal and psychological force:- The orchestra will play concerts this wrt•k in Dusseldorf, Cologn<' and Vipnna Tlw performances will t·ncompnss Berg's Violin Concerto, Rou~t"s Phaethon, Mahler's Symphony No. I in D l\ta.Jor and Bruckner's Sympony No.4 m E·flat Major, Romantic -- all of which will he coverc-d in next we<·ks update of the Houston Symphony Orchestra's European Tour via tlw orchPstra's ccle .. brnled Conductor-ln·Hesidencc Stephen Stem . . "' Amcncan Hean - -A"o-cia-t-1-0.n ·V Research gave him a future HOU S TON VOIC E P A G E 1 2 ..... I!' 8 RU A R V 2 a TH 1 e e 7 Drug Combo Effective anainst AIDS B~aul Recer Washington (AP) - AIDS patients live longer and have fewer infections with a three-drug combination that includes a new protease inhibitor drug, a federal health agency announced Monday. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said that in a drug trial of AIDS patients with advanced disease, those taking a combination of zidovudine, lomivudine and indinavir had only half the cancers, infections and deaths of patients who were taking only a two-drug combination. Dr. Scott Hammer of Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital at Harvard Medical School in Boston, the chairman of the national drug test, said all patients in the study are now being given the opportunity to switch to the three-drug combination or to other experimental regimens. "We have moved very quickly on this." he said. A committee determined last Tuesday that the three-drug combination was very beneficial and recommended the study stop so that all the patients in the drug trial could switch if they wanted to. Hammer said that by last Friday let­ters had gone out to all of the centers and patients in the drug trials, notifying them of the findings and offering patients the chance to select a new drug combination. He emphasized, however, that no patients should change their medication routine until they have consulted with their doctors. Zidovudine is also known as A'lT and lamivudine is known as 3TC. They are in a class of drugs known as reverse transcriptase inhibitor.. The third drug, indinavir, is one of a new class of com­pounds called protease inhibitors. The two classes of drugs attack HIV, the AIDS virus, in different ways The drug trials, said Dr Anthony S. Fauci, "confirm the importance of including protea•e inhibitors in treat­mc nl. tilrul<'gics for patients with advanced HIV disease." "Significantly, the current study pro­vides additional evidence that combina­tion approaches using protease inhibitors can reduce the risk of death." st11d ~'auc1, director of the NIAJD, the agency lhal support«! the drug tnal. Hummer Sllid officials dinoeting the national study moved •wiftly after an independent data and safely panel mon­itoring the trials of the three-drug com­bmation re<"Ommended early tennina­lion and closure of the trials because of the •ignificant benefit for patients tak­ing all three drugs. The trial had tested a total of l, 156 HIV patient.~ at 33 different hospitals or clinics across the notion. The patients had been enrolled in the study for up to u ycor, with a median participation of38 weeks. Patients in the study were randomly assigned to receive either all three of the drugs, or AZT, 3TC and a placebo. "Survival and a delay in disease pro­gression were •ignificantly better in patients receiving the triple combina­tion therapy." the NIAID reported. Among patients on the triple drug combination. there were ~l3 instances of disense progression while there were 66 mstanccs nmong pati<•nts taking only AZT, :JTC nnd a placebo. Eight patients on the triple drug combination died, while 18 among the other group died. For patients with a CD4 T-cell count of fewer than 50 per cubic millimeter, a very low level, "the benefit was statisti­cally significant," the agency said. CD4 T-cells the white blood cells that are a key elcd.ent of the body's immune system, arc the primary targets of HIV. Healthy levels are 800 to 1,200 per cubic millimeter of blood. The Treatment Aclton Group, an AIDS artivist organization, said the results of the triple combmation drug trial "could help to revolutionize treat­ment for mo•t people with AIDS." 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Access Gates ... Free Cable ... Glass Elevators ... Microwaves (?r 5655 Glenmont • Houston H~ ::...'= --······--··*§ ·····- P A G E BOOK REVIEW by Jone Devlin Easy Rawlins is back, and his life is as complicated as ever. Walter Mosely's newest addition to the Easy Rawlins series "A Little Yellow Dog" picks up Essy's life just a little bit beyond where he left off in Black Betty. It's 1963, and Easy has a different JOb now, as Custodial Supervisor at a local school. He likes his job, and feels that things are going smoothly until one day he comes in early and finds that one of the teach­ers needs him to watch her dog. Sounds like no big deal, right? But by the end of the day the teacher has disap­peared and two bodies have been discov­ered, one right on the school grounds. Complicating thmgs further. the two men are, respectively, the missing teach­ers brother-in-law and husband So as usual Essy's in up to his neck and fig­ures his best bet is to find out what's going on before the police do. As with all of Mosley's novels, •A Little Yellow Dog" contains lots of twists and turns, some of them pretty crazy. Yet Easy never steps out of character, following each lead to it's ultimate con­clusion and fighting murder and may­hem every step of the way Despite all this, it's made plain throughout the novel that Easy is no stereotypical hard­boiled detective. He has a family, a son and a daughter, and is more than aware of what his crime fighting life has done to them. Then there's the problem of his friend Raymond "Mouse" Alexander, who, because of an incident early on in the novel is considering giving up his life of crime, and has stopped carrying a gun right when Easy needs him once agam Yet, his difficulties with the new Mouse aside, Easy eventually catches up to the runaway teacher, only to see her murdered in his car apparently over a child's croquet set. Further investiag­tion however, reveals that this teacher, along with her husband and brother-in­law, was involved in drug smuggling, and that she was assisted by none other than some of the other teachers at Sojorner Truth. But try telling that to' detective Sanchez, a man who feels that people like Easy Rawlins are what makes it hard for minorities to succeed in 60s America, and who is determined to bring Easy down. Eventually of course, it all (sort oO works out, but not before sever­al terrible and life changing tragedies have occurred. Easy is lefl. drained and ready, once again to leave the life of the street despite all of it's many tempta­tions. "A Little Yellow Dog" is a tense, suspense-filled novel that you will not be able to put down. It's a great book to read if you love mysteries, and a great book to read if you don't. T T T T T T T T T IN MEMORIUM Joel Langanke Joel Langanke, 34, dmd of lwurt failure due to comphc-Jltons from menm­g> tis and AIDS. A private fun!'ral with family was held Saturday, Feb. 8. Joel, a Houston native, wa• a certi­fied fitne!-ls in~tructor and board·n·rti· fied EMT, as wt-II usu ln.urwr m hfesuv­mg rules for the Red Cross. He was u charter member of the Q Patrol of Houston for over 6 years, and o fornwr Muscles in Action danct·r und club dancer, a former model nnd TWT cover man Everyone will miss his ofT th<• cufT remarks on how he thought and his good humor and heart. A candlelight memonal walk will be held this evening (Feb. 28) ut 1 lpm stnrt­mg at 239 Westheimer (Suzanne Anden1on Propertie>l. Anyone may att!'nd and sny goodbye. Donations may be made to Q Patrol; call (713l528·8An:. Kenvon Clavton Mclntvre Tuesday, ~'ebruary 18 was nwt with the untimely passmg of Ken Mcintyre, u driving factor within the Houston com­munity. He wos u visionnry at creating spaces for individual expresHion and cel­ebration. For those familiar with Rich's Houston and San Dwgo, Ken was the primary motivator behind the orig>nal concept in 1983. His 10tmllve nature allowed him to surround himself with like-minded people who shan•<I his visions and dreams, helpmg him devel· op them into reality. A mun of modest persona and genuine human spirit, Ken touched many lives, leaving behind a legacy which will live on in exisllng and future adventures A celebration of his life will be held Tuesday, March 4 at 7:00pm at Rich's Houston, 2401 San Jacinto. ., 4 t~ Climb! We offer climbing trip> in Wyommi;, biking m !'ranee, hiking in thj, Alps, and much more. Call for free catalog uf actl\"<' vacations fur gay men and lesb1ans. ALISON RDVINIUllSK 1-800-825-9766 FEB RUA R Y 2 B T H ., a a 7 NEWS YOU DIDN ' T SEE ON TV libenv for All by Patncia Nell Warren Despite controversy -- indeed, because of it - the 6th Annual Southeastern Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual college con­ference just stamped its fiery lambda on Bible-belt sensibility. Site this year: Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro. Big lesson of the week­end: anti-gay hate can spark a powerful reaction among fair-minded straight youth and adults. Over 300 students came from every state in the region, for the biggest turnout yet. Co-chairs Allie Sultan and Michael Grantham titled the gathering "And Liberty For AIL" ~'ebruary 14-16 were packed with workshops, network­ing, resource fair, coffeehouse, on-line chats, books1gnings, fund-raising recep­tion, banquet and dance, plus an open meeting to discuss what campus will host the '98 edition. A hardworking vol­unteer corps from MTSU's Lambda Association supported the co-chairs throughout. A pre-conference blast of hate email, death threats, sulphurous sermons and edged editorials had fizzled by opening day. The student organizers simply pub­licized threats to the media. Thanks to their cool, and last-minute efforts by moderate church groups in town, who called for a show of Christian love Jver a show of rnge, the conference went off without incident. The Baptist Student Union, stepping over elders' protests that their action was condoning homo­sexuality, served a big Southern break­fast to the conference-goers, complete with grits. They still believe that tradi­tional marriage is the only permissible place for sex, the Baptist kids explained, but they were uneasy about the frenzy of hate, and want.<.'<i to make a ,J08us-like gesture. Focus of the frenzy was a screening of "It's Elementary." This popular docu­mentary, with its messng(" thnt gradc­school kids need positive info about gay issues, had been protested elsewhere in the U.S. Sultan and Grantham told me that initially the MTSU administration shrugged off their requests for tight­ened security. But after a look at the death threats, and a phone cull from civil-rights attorney Abby Rubenfeld (who got Tennessee's sodomy law dis­mi .. ed), MTSU grew concerned about possible violence. FilmgO<'rs walked into Tucker Theater post a metal detector and campus security. Outside, several squad cars patrolled. But only a few shivering picketers showed up. The film finished to loud applause from the packed auditorium, Keynote speeches came from Turie Osborne, Lynn Shepodd, Paul Yandurra, and myself. David Mixner, also sched­uled to speak, got caught in airline­strike snarls, and was unable to reach Murfreesboro. Mainstream media -- local press, CBS and NBC affiliates - gave this histonc conference the notice it deserved. The campus TV •tation provided positive coverage. Unfortunately, major gay news media were absent. But regional community publications, includmg Xenogeny, did support "Liberty" with enthusiasm. Allie Sultan told me: "I have received dozens of e-mail messages since Sunday! People have already started to become more active in the South ... on Saturday I'm gomg to Asheville, NC, to be al a Jomt meeting with three college LGB groups from the area. (I've been) tslkmg with some heterosexual people in my cla~ses ... it gives me a new, different sense of happineAs to be accessible for heterosexual people as well as the gay community here at MTSU!" Michael Grantham's comment was: ''The responses from across the country are great! They really make us feel like we've done what we've aimed to do. Allie and I hope that everyone feels empow­ered enough to initiate a much needed social change throughout the Southeast and US." Pe,.,.onally, I left Murfreesboro feeling more hopeful. There are growing signs that hate religion will be rejected by the fair-minded among Christian students and adults across the U.S. Indeed, the South is not the monolith of redneck religion that •ome believe it to be. The South birthed Thomas Jefferson and religious freedom. The South was where a black openly gay Quaker activist numcd Bayard Hustin helped Rev. Murtin Luther King develop the civil­rights movement of the '60s. Next year's Southeast conference may well be greeted with more howls of protest. But no doubt about it -- these empowering youth events are denting the Bible belt. !Patricia Nell War,..n is author o{"The Front Runner" and other bestselling books, as well as a wukly published com· men ta tor.) "YES, THERE IS LIFE AFTER BREAST CANCER. AND THAT'S THE WHOLE POINT:' -Ann Jillian A lot of women are so afraid of breast cancer thl'y don't want to he.ir about it. And that's what frightens me. Because those women won't prac­tll'e breast self·examination regularly. l11ose women, particularly those over :15, won't a'k their doctor alx>ut a mammogram. Yet that's what's required for breast cancer to be detected early. When the cure rate is 90%. And when there's a good chance it won't involve the loss of a breast. But no matter what it involves take it from someone who's been thro~gh 1t all. · Life is 1ust too wonderful to ~ive up on. And, as I found out, you don t have to give up on any of it Not work, not play, not even romance. Oh, there is one thing, though. You do have to give up being afraid to take care of yourself. TIA MERICAN CANCER SOCIETY· Gel a checkup. Lile 1s worth 1t Mi¥+.+•~-----•§ •••••• P A CJ E ~ pend a day at home with. a happy. committed couple who have provided more than th1ny years of quality health care to Houston's gay and lesbian community. Psychotherapist Tony Carroll and his partner Dr. Bruce W. Smith l~~~H TO understand or improve choice of partners end recurring relationship problems .eliminate hurt and disappointment maintain passion. excitement and growth ... overcome the fear which prevents and destroys relationship• unders1and frustration as unspoken desire enhance your communication style + mally. there IS wonderful help and genuine hope for lesbian and gay people who want strong. committed love relationships which lead to growth, contentment. security, fulfillment. and happiness. This <em mar is based on the best new information available. and when used effectively. can begm the transforrnauon of your love relationships• Single Men-Feb. 22 or April 5-$50 Single Women-."1arch 22-$50 Male Couples-March 15-S95 female Couples-\tarch 8-$95 Saturdays, 9 AM-4 PM Lunch Included • Limued Seaung Tony Carroll. L"ISW-ACP P.,ychotherapist 2211 ...;orfolk. Suite 505, Houston. Texas 77090 1 . I 3 ' • 5 2 2 . 3 0 ,, 5 I raesw r1• um Elegant • Mid-Rise Living ..... FITNESS FACILITY IJ>COVERED PARKING .....FREE CABLE IJ>CONCIERGE SERVICE .....CONTROLLED ACCESS BUILDING AND GA TES ..... 8,000 SQ. FT AITRIUM/BIG SCREEN TV ..... ACCESS TO HWY. 59 AND BELTWAY 8 ., '5 771-3565 8800 S. Braeswood Fax 771-9269 FE B R UARY 2 BT H K~ ,-_- " -"'- 1 a e 7 'IVI Cl V I E R E V I E VV S Real life Mob Storv by Clms Rundquist Forget the glamour of Scarface and The Godfather Trilogy, Donnie Brasco is the true life story of the gritty gutter life of mobsters. There is nothing glam­orous about life al this level of the mob. Dire<:ted by Mike Newell, the film is based on the book Donnie Brasco, My Undercover Life In The Mafia, by Joseph D. Pistone with Richard Woodley, which was the source for the screenplay by award-winning writer Paul Attanasio !Quiz Show, Disclosure). The TriStar Pictures and Mandalay Entertamment pre,entation was pro­d uccd by Mark Johnson, Barry Levinson, Louis DiG1amo and Gail Jl.lutrux. Pntnck Jl.lcC.onmc and Alan Greenspan are the excrutive producers. The film stars Al Pacino in nn ironic, self-examnung performance that puts a new spm on his classic portraits of gang­land heroes. Unlike Pacino's preVlous mob roles, Lefty Ruggiero is not b1gger­than ·life Rather he IS 1ust a beaten down, two-bit criminal whose very exis· tence exposes the hypocrisy and absur­dity of the gangster mythology. Paci no is joined by Johnny Depp, who plays Donnie, the agent trapped in the dangerous spaces between his real a nd undercover 1dentit1es Donnie's journey 1s not the usual one for Johnny Depp. takmg Depp mto n complex maelstrom ofmind-gnmes and conflicting emotions. Anne Heche takes on the film's major female role as Donrue s steadfast wife, Maggie, a woman who must walk n very thm hne between lovmg her husband and feanng his secret undercover life. The closer Donrue s mob life comes to touching their family the farther Maggie must distance herself from him, despite her need for him. Pucino, Depp nnd Heche are joined by a cast that includes Michael Madsen, Bruno Kirby and James Russo as 'Sonny Black", "Nicky" and 'Paulie", the loyal wiscguys who Donnie and Lefty both despise and re•pect for their very different reasons. As usual, Al Paci no just does not make bad movies. His performance i• superb. Johnny Depp does an excellent job as well, depicting the dynamics of under- With Lefty's (Al Pacmo, nghV help, Donnie Brasco (Johnny Depp) becomes a "conect ed• guy• m the Mafia. cover life. This film is a groat stretch for O..pp, and really ex~mplifics his acting abilities. This true story of nn undercover FBI agent demonstrates the groat sacrifices thnt law enforcement officers mu•t make in order to protect society. Unfortunately, as m the case of Donnie Brasco, the undercover life can be very destructive to the officer os well as his family. '"Donnie Brasco n ••• film, opens in theaters on Friday, February 28, 1997 and is rated "R". Star Studded Saturday Show Hostess Roxanne lee love Saturday, March 1st 11 pm Eric Cameron Rich Devon De Vasquez Steven Baker South of the Border Night Thursday, March 3rd • 11 pm MC Rashelle Stevens and Byron Norton, Stacey Grummer, Shana St. John, Devon De Vasquez Also, Granny 'S Tacos! Enough With The Casino Movies Alreadvl by Chns Rundquist Trailing on the heels of •uch recent films ns Leaving Las Vegas, Casino, and Get Shorty, 1s yet another gambler's tale of the seedy under­side of casino life. The only difference is this one takes place in R<•no rather than Las Vegas Hard Eight marks the feature film debut of newcomer Paul Thomas Anderson. Anderson's first foray into filmmaking was "Cigarettes and Coffee." a 24 minute film about five characters m a coffee •hop outside of Las Vegas who play out their destiny. It premiered at the 1993 Sundance Film Festival Shorts Program, and garnered the young Anderson a great deal of attention. Written and directed in a taut film-noir style by Anderson, •Hard ~:ight" is a tale of love, revenge and redemption. Professional gambler Sydney (Philip Baker Halli, a dapper man m his SO's, bofnends a down-on-lus-luck young man. John (John C. Reilly), outside a coffee •hop. Sydney gives John a ride to JU.no, where he proceeds to tutor him m the art of making a living as a gambler. As their rela­t1onslup develops, John's confidence and luck in the ca•ino's grow under Sydney's tutelage, and the two men become as close as father and son. Two years later, a now confident well· dressed John IS very comfortable m the cas1· nos of Reno. He still admires lus mentor Sydney, though he now •pends much of lus lime with a new fnend, Jimmy ; Samuel L. Jackson), an obnoXIOUS small-Lime crook mas· querading as a security gu.1rd. Jimmy openly challenges Sydney's influence and an intense mutual dislike develops botween the two men Y.ben Sydney takes a protective interest in another casualty of the glittery nightlife, Clementine 1Gwyneth Paltrow/, a cocktail waitress and part-lime hooke; John is quick· !y drawn into an affair with her. One night Hostess Roshelle Stevens Sydney receives a d .. pcrate phone call from John, who summons tum to a cheap motel. Upon arrival, he finds an unconscious man lying on the bed in a pool of hlood. John explains he was a tnrk of Clementine's who refused to pay. He also tells Sydney they called the man's wife to demand the money Clementine was owed in payment for his release. An angry Sydney tnes to persuade John to leave town immediately with him, only to be told that he married Clementine earlier that Picture: Gwyneth Paltrow m Hard Eight. a tale of love, revenge and redemption set against the seedy casinos of Reno. day Desperate to get them out of town lx·fore the police arrive, Sydney convinces the couple to drive to Niagara Falls until the episode blows over. With John and Clementine safe­ly out of town, Jimmy sees an opportunity to get rid of the old man. Jimmy captures Sydney nnd with a gun threatens to reveal a dark secret from Sydney's past that will destroy his rl'labon· ship with John unless Sydney pays for Jimmy's silence. Tlungs take a dark tum here as the old master confronts the younger gangster 10 an effort to save his rdat.ionsh1p wi&. John, whom he has come to ook upon as a son 'Hard Eight" was produced by Robort Jones and John Lyons, and directed hy Michael Caton, Jones and Frank Oz. Executive Producers are Keith Samples, Hans Brockmann and Francots Uuplat. MAlf STRIP CONTEST at 11 pm with Paivl 2517 Ralph St. at Westhelmer SATURDAY SHOW at 11 pm With Roxanne (713) 527-9071 $1 BudWelser & Bud Ught All Dav and All Night MAU STRIP CONTEST at 11 pm with Palvl Amateur/Talent Night at 11 pm with Dvan Michaels GrannV's Burgers! PAGE 18 ,, ; ,.,_ ~ :\ .. ~ A _, Happy Hour 7am - 9pm Weekdays $1.50 Well 4-7 Saturday • $1.50 Vodka 7am - 6pm ·Mug Club 7am - 10pm • $3.75 Pitchers & $1 .75 Mugs CHURCH CALENDAR Fridav-2/28 • Catholic Ma.•s at 10:00 am; Movie Night "Audience Choice" at 7:00 pm at the Kolbe Project. 522-8182. Saturdav-3/1 • Mass at Dignity Houston at 7:30 pm. 880-2872. Sundav-3/2 • Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church Services "A Study in the Gospel of Mark" and "The 'I' Factor" (How to be a positive influence on others as a wit­ness for Christ) at 10:00 am Praise and Worship, Ministry of the Word, Drama and Personal Ministry. 11:00 am at Maranatha Fellow•hip 528-6756. • MCCR worship services 9:00 am & 11:00 am 861-9149. • Worship Service 11:00 am at Faith and Hope Fellowship 773-4429. • Grace Lutheran Church Sunday school for all ages at 9:30 am Worship Service ut 10:30 um 528-3269. • First Unitariun Universahst Church Sunday Services at 9:30 am and 11 :30 am 526-5200. • Services at 5:30 pm Dignity Church 880-2872. • Community Gospel worship service at 11:00 am & 7:00 pm. 4305 Lillian 880-9235. • Houston Mission Church worship service nt 10:30 nm 529-8225. • Covenant Baptist Church Worship service 1:30 pm and education hour at 3:00 pm 668-8830. • Bering Memorial United Methodist Church Worship servicel0:50 am. Seekers class 915 nm 526-1017. • Church of the XII Apo"tles worship service at 10:30 am. Chapel of the Santana Funeral Home, 5352 Katy Freeway, 665.7903. • Catholic Mass at 7:30 pm Kolbe Project 522-8182. • MCCR Handbell Choir Rehearsal at 7:00 pm 861-9149. • Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County, 402 Church St. in Galveston. Sunday Services at 10:30 am weekly. 409-765-8330. Tuesdav-3/ 4 • MCCR: Empowerment for Living support group & pot luck dinner at 6:00 pm, Gloryland Ensemble at 6:00 pm 861-9149 • PROTECT meets at Bering Church. 520-7870 • HIV Affected group meets at 7:00 pm Judy or Pam at 880-9235. At Community Gospel. • Maranatha Fellowship MCC has groups that meet in each others home for a time of fellowship, sharing God's word, and prayer. Call for the location in your area 528-6756. Wednesdav-3/5 • MCCR Bible Study 7:30 pm 861- 9149 • Worship Service 7:30 pm at Faith and Hope Fellowship 773-4429. • MCCR: Jubilation Mixed Ensemble meets al 6:30 pm Midweek uplift service at 7:00 pm, Bible Study, Lecture Series & Choir Rehearsal 7:30 pm 861-9149. • Gospel Explosion '97 at Community Gospel 7:30 pm 880-9325. Thursdav-3/6 • Bible Study 7:00 pm at Faith and Hope Fellowship 773-4429. • Gospel Explosion ·97 at Community Gospel 7:30 pm 880-9325. If you want an euent listed in this sec­tion, please call Lee at 529·8490 by 12 Noon Mondays. RELIGION by Lee Davis Community Gospel Church was start­ed in 1992 by Alvis Strickland With ini­tial m••<•tings at 1700 Montrose, the church has relocated to several locations culminating in thpir newly-purchased facility at 3405 Lillian St. The church was ulrei1dy in wonderful •hope, howev­er, the memlwrship neroed to make it ' theirs". ThPy have renovated 'everal urerui of the church nnd added the spe­cial touches that make it home. The facility includes a sanctuary which •eats up to aoo, 8 kitchen and fellowship hall, 11 classrooms, 2 offices, a nursery, and a church bookstore. Community's mam focus is the wor· 11hip S(•rvicc, above any programs or out· reaches. "We must ulwuys remember why we urc in existence, to provide a place for people to worship the Lord and grow in the word", said Pastor Chris Chiles. Over the years, the membership has taken food offerings to various com­munity outreaches as a part of their ministry of the church. With the addi­tional room in their new building, they are starting their own food pantry to assist those in need. Community Go.•pel will be celebrating and dedicating their new building March 5 through 9th. For these services entitled "Gospel Explosion '97' , they will be hosting scvcral guests from around the country who will be ministering in the word and in song. The featured speakers include Ronnie Pigg, Pastor of Casa De Cristo Church in Phoenix, AZ; Beverly Wells, Pastor of the Pentecostal Holiness Church in Stanfield, AZ. ~:velyn und Dennis Schave from CPnlralia, WA, ,Joe Wilson, Pirntor of House of Love in Ontano, CA and Chris Chiles. Special music will be provided by Marvelous Light; Glenn Baker from Long Beach, CA; RPvival (composed of Roseanne Lawrence, D. L. Salisbury, and Chris Chiles); David Young; and The Light Company from Ontario, CA. Put them all together and you have the makings for one of the most exciting series of meetings ever! Services will be Wednesday through Saturday evenings at 7:30 and Sunday at llam and 7pm. The church body has been fasting and praying for these ser­vices and are anticipating a mighty move of God. For further information or directions, call 713.880.9235. H OUSTO N V OICE P A G E ~ NOTE BANKERS OF AMERICA. INC. (-~-U.U<04QI Life ... Todat In addition to viallcal settlements Life Today, Inc. can now help with your financial needs through the purchase of: • Annulhes & Sl7UCIUred SettlemenJs • Pnuatdy (ouner) financed. rrwrtgages • lotter)' paymenlS • Prm;onal m]IJry auunis • Busines> TUo/eS • Royallies (713) 892-5433 LllW..11<.11.., .... -..,Y,""'_,_ ... llSlll0 ........ 11811 •SSH104 llilllftl':l!l.:l3SW!llllll. SlJN'DAY 11 ~ ~~J~P~ An evangelical ministry with celebration services of Praise, Prayer and Study of God's word. Bible Cla<>s: 10 am (Nursery provided) 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Handicap accessible) (Montrose at Hawthorne) For info. on weekly home group .. call 528-6756 American Heart a\ -A~so-ci-at-i-on.y Medical miracles start with research -. Gtd lnu YOU, u Ctru 1h111 t•• LOVING EXPERIENCE. Servin5 the Gay, lu~ian, Bi-sexual Co111munity of Catholics & Friuds. Bm1111 a put tf Di91ity U.S.A. SERVICES Saturdays 7:30 pm Traditional Mass Inclusive liturgy celebrated. Cal and pre11 4 for our Social Events l SchedulH. Todos bienvenidos! (Full details m '115 - '% Gay and Lesbian Ye/Jo" Pages) In the Heights at 1307 Yale Suite H e (713) 880-2872 Catch The Bering Spirit A Place for Everyone ..[&. BERING MEMORIAL I~ ,,, UNITED M ETHODIST CHURCH ~ V' A Reconciling Congregation Where persons - reqardless of sexual orientation. qender, ethnicity, aqe - fully participate in the church's life and ministries as loved disciples of Christ. 1440 Harold at Mulberry Sunday School .... 9:30 am Sunday Worship ... 10:50 am (713) 526-1017 .. 7 FEBRUARY 2 BT H -. a a 7 THIS "N THAT The Divine Miss M., a.k.a. Bette ltlidler, will produce and star in the big· screen vennon of Green Acres. Midler will play the Evn Gabor part in the film about the city couple who high-tail it to greener pastures, literally speaking. Should be a boot!.. Oprah \\ infrcy and John F Kennedy, Jr. are collaborating on a book Ltled 500 Ways to make America Better. Winfrey asked her viewers to send in their suggestions for inclusion in the tome. Winfrey will devote an hour to the book upon comple­tion .... Music phenom LeAnne Rimes new album Unchained Melody: The Early Years debuted at the top of the album charts in Billboard Magazine this week. The country ingenue is currently on a nationwide tour with Alan Jackson .•. Tina Turner will debut her U.S. tour with a live performance in Houston on May 2 at the Cynthia Woods Pavilion. Tickets for the show go on sale this .Saturday at all Ticketmaster out· Jets.. The much publicized 'will •he or won't she' coming out episode of ABC's lmc,tge .. until tHey get to know you, it's what's on the surface that counts. With that. do you \\.ant your un:lge qu1ckl}· 'PLbhed on paper' Or do )'Ol> want I !owe of Cok:man to .nk a l:x:tter iolY. THE IMAGE •NKER ~ House of Coleman Fme Pr1111111!: & Grapl11cs 90 I WEST ALA' li.(M·A ;. HOUSJo'N; l'x .. 7700?> ,4 *s;'if~ 7 J 3 • .5 2.3 •;"2 5 2 1. • IF AX 7 13.524. 2 6 4 ~ . ' . Tllf; PAAT'{ c:!lf<CCAIT, IJOT FOIZ HIM. CREADTIVE UNLIMITED 22 19 Richmond • 7 13-526-5190 Check us out at http://members.aol.com/ creADtive email - creADtive@aol.com HOUSTON VOICE P A G E sitcom Ellen is tentatively slated to air April 30. TV Guide reports that the sit· com character will indeed come out in the episode. Veteran film-star Laura Dern will most likely piny Ellen's Jove intere~t and the aforementioned Winfrey is considering plying Ellen's therapist. The episode would air in time for the J\lay sweeps .... Robert Urich, cur· rently undergoing treatment for cancer, "'111 be the host of the new ABC medical serie:i Vital Signs, which will showcase real-life medical dramas.. . Madonna will perform at this yearn O"car ceremo· ny despite being overlooked for an actress nod. The pop-icon will sing You Must Love Me, which was nominated for Be.'t Song .... Tum Hanks will produce a 13-part HBO •eries about the 12 manned Apollo missions. The series is •lated to air in December in honor of the •pace programs 25th anniversary. Country music •tar Tammy Wynette is suing American Media Inc., the parent company of the National Enquirer and Star magazines, for libel, defamation and invasion of privacy. The music leg­end was dismayed at continuous reports from the gossip rags citing she was crit· ically ill .... Elizabeth Taylor is in great •pirits and looking forward to returning home. At press time, she had not been released. Taylor underwent successful surgery this week to remove a benign brain tumor. She turned 65, February 27 .... Roseanne has just signed to play the witch in a new theatrical production of The Wizard of Oz which bows at Madison Square Garden for a 48 perfor­mance run beginning J\lay 7 through June 1. A tour is possible .... Andrew Lloyd Weber's Sunset Boulevard will close Man:h 22 The musical , based on the Billy Wilder movie, starring Gloria Swanson, about aging Hollywood •tar Norma Desmond, was a disappoint· ment. Although the show was a sellout with original star Glenn Close, it fal· tered after Betty Buckley and Elaine Page took over the role. The show did not recoup its $10 million production costs. The London show, with Petula Clark, ends April 5 ... TriStar Pictures is set to make a movie about the Village People. The group however is concerned FA YE/1rom page 1 Currently, Ma. Dunaway cun be seen as u New Orleans barmaid in the Jlhramax hostage drama Albino Alligator din.-cted by Kevin Spacey and co-starring Jllatt Dillon and Gary Siniso and for Showtime, Ill•. Dunaway Rlnrs as Phylli• Gold. the irrepressible and loving mother who discovers that hn daughter's unborn son is in all probabil· ity gay in Twilight of the Golds opposite Garry Marshall. Ills. Dunaway is active in the development of fputure films and TV projects for her own company and will be producing and stamng in tho film ndaptation oflllaster ('Jass in 1998. With Muster Class, plnywright Terrence McNully won his sc-cond con· secut1ve Best Play Tony Award, having won the 1995 pnze for Love! Valour! about revealing how they emerged from the gay and drug cultures in the '70's, according to Variety .. Sir Georg Solll, 84, is celebrating his 50th anniversary as a symphonic recording artists. Thu Hungarian-born conductor, with more Grammya than Michael Jackson or Madonna, is best known in the U.S. for his tenuro at the powerhouse Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Said Solti of his first recording in 1947 of Beethoven's Egmont Overture with Zurich"s Tonhalle Orchestra· "I was bad, the orchestra was bad, everything was bad ".... The Empire Strikes Back, Special Edition won the battle of the box-office hands down. Star Wars: Special Edition was second. Empire zapped $22 million over the week<•nd. while Wars accumulut<'d $11 million. The 'Star Wars' juggt•rnaut is skyrocketing to new r<.>Cords. The first re-issue has earned $1 16 million in three weeks, catapulting it to the box· office champ of all-time. The previous title holder was E.T. The la<t of th~ tril· ogy, Return of the .Jedi. onginally slated for release 1\1.irch 7, has been postponed to March 14 T T T T T T T T T Compassion!, whith 1s currently l.eing mnde into n feature film from his screen play. For thl! Kand<or und Ebb musiral Kiss of llw Spider Woman, he received the 199:J Tuny Award llis plays mcludc Lips Togl!lhcr, Teeth Apart, The l.ishon Traviata. Frankie nnd ,Johnny in the Clair De Lune, It's Only A Play, A Perfect Ganesh, The Rink, and The Hitz. Tickets are avuilable at 1111 Ticketmuster locations including Blockbustc•r Music, Foley's, Hundalls and Fiesta Stores und ore priced from $40.50 • $46.50. To charge by phone, cull 71 3-629·:J700; for groups of 20 or more, call 1-800-889-8457 Performance tnm•a ure Tuesday through Friday at 8PM, Suturday at 21'1\1 and RPM and Sunday ut 2PM and 7PM. l'luasc note thul the rnatinl'e on Saturday, Murch 8 will he signed for the heanng unpaired The TDD# for tickets is 1-800-755·6244 1 B FE BRUARY 2 e TH 1 o e '7 Ir A ~TORY WE VE HE'ARD ~ MANYTIMES BEFORE.GAY ME"' ~. ; '~ ~·vp v ,,,.--- · ...... ENGAGING IN WHAT THEY tt•i) THOUGHT WAS SAFE SEX, PROLONG P 0 0 ONLY TO CATCH HEPATITIS A ~of t'\Etf,> flO'f THE MOST COMMON SIDE THROUGH ORAUANAL EFFECTS AFTER RECEJVING • CONTACT OR HANDLING \·i~ w HAVRIX ARE HEADACHE OR A A CONDOM THE VIRUS RARELY KILLS. BUT IF YOU I I ;l ASK YOUR DOCTOR OR GET HEPATITIS A, VOMITING. ABDOM NAL PAIN. JAUNDICE ~oy 6t ~ ttS'A"'ft'TiS A FOR MORE l"IFORMA N AND DIARRHEA CAN ~ A .iD MAK SURE DEBILITATE YOU FOR WEEKS f::t FORTUNATELY THERES HAVRIX, I II PL ASE S TH WORLD S FIRST VACCINE MPOR A SA Of\ Boy, ~+tOllU> 1\IE 0 Gt>\ +\AV~ x: Pharma<• t 1 ·=·····-····k PADE 19 FEBRUARY 2BTH 1997 Hepatitis A Vaccine, Inactivated Havrix ·aSe.e. -ccu--..- 1Prb•r y,-,....c c. .'*.t lclall li .I.i,....,..._.._. na. .S t.oidllto(wlin1qe INDICATIONS AND USAGE; II.Mu JS mcatad for actN9 -·'-~2yoarsafage ..... nstd ..... aused by hepa!illS A wus IHA'/l. l'Mlart llMllll!la"°" -beCllOllll<'.ad1<1east2-U-mPl)OC18Cf e._,,.mHAV COllTlWNDICATIONS liamx IS COO!ralndteated tn peo­ple with known hyper>enS>•"IY m any canponent of the ViCt'.10 WARNINGS ih"8 - been in '-" of ana~· IBl!s/nplly!acmid reac1JOllS fQflow1flg convneioal use of lfll '3Ctllle " - COUll!lle1 Do not gMI ldlitioial llljOC· flOllS m - llPO'N!IElllll ~tMtv reactons - 1H1M1x11jOCtNln ISee CONTRAINOCATIONS.I He$lali::S A has a ....a ti<elv ~ mi!Jation perm Hepa"tis A,_,,.maynot-hepa!JtisA-111hose w!1o llM en &necognized he!la'M A inf1lctlal ll the nme of wcmatla1 -llOnally rt may not - infectial " - """' do not - ptOl8CllYI antibody !JtefS lahfw;l 1111 - = needed .. confer irotec"m ... notbeendel!tmloedl PllECAUTIONS As wi!ll any po<entOr1I vacaie 111 bet> opinop1¥ine ovadatle foruse """"of ~or ana­phytaaoid f!8C!Nn C2ldelay- I pcssib!e,"' llOOfJle Wl1ll any fltlrile lllne:s or actr.e in!ectial. except wtien 1111 phy>IClln !JeliMs wtltlllolding vocone entads lhl !1eall! n:t. 131 • au known pracau!>0'1S 'D imeni odve!se-.111dud11'41-pateots' 'tistoryb' ~'Dlh!SorSllNlat-. -w!lhCBU!KJllm~-~or I bleeding disorder. or peqife tal;;ng entit:Oagulalts. Do not llf!Cl<t!Dabfoodvessal Usea_.,_.,lllerilenefdleor prefllled lj!1!1g8 for M1Y fl3!'en!. \\le> g.;mg conctJ!lt 13tttlyw:holhervacanesor'G ""'Je!l"filleneedlosand .:Otforentll\fllCIOl~leS As wi:h any vactle. - m ITlttllllOSIJWm person$ DI' i:er:ons recetV!"J lllTU1Q.Sl.W!SSTVe therapy, 11:ee.;>ee!!d"""""._'l\8Ynotbe­Clrc1ftOPM11S. MtUfeMlis. ..,,i,..111 of f.ertilrty· Hawvr has not been eva!Jated for ts camnogernc poten\181. ""'-pot!ll!iaforpotentiatforimpom11lllltoffertJ!iry l'npaocyc.._, c. -~-­... Deen - Wl!!I II.Mu It IS olso not - wtw!llerl/rlrixan...,,.falalhaml""""-m ·~_,,.,,oranal!ICl~capaoty liMI - ..... ~-orllydctearly-klSnot ... _._l/rlrixlSPC!l!llllltlmlnmilkBecause .,..,, .tugs .. oIC!l!lll " - .. cautJOn when ~llavrum•IUSlll!l- 11.Mu" ....a mlerated and h9tf'l -and eflec· !MllOdti- F1'!y inbm ponents. ,.,,_ or gimdians of !lie benefits andnstsof--1/a>ru. Forpencns ....... q m enCemic or epidernlC nos. consult arrent CDC ...,;. mes~ _.re klcaJes r.....iers shou1d tile all oocess11Yprecau!JllnSmlMlidccraactwilll.or-"""of· contamonatedfoodorwa!l!r IMa!Jonof '"'"""'1\'loilow"'ll a COllllllete vaconatJOn sdte<Me has not been establisf1ed. ADVERSE REACTIONS l/rlrU has been genm!!>/ w.i1 -AsW>lhlll~--··­ble lhet e.<panded coomiercial use GJ 'Ile vacoll! could ,.,...1 ... adverse~ The most frequentfyreponed by....,_s oclin!tal tnals was "1j8C'JortSl\e"""""' 156'11. of edu!ts; 21'11. of-"'~ drentheadad>e11•'11.ofedults;iess""'19"atcr~ Olhe< sol ted and ll\SQllCrted ........ listed below loclMaco 1'11. • 111"- ol fftjOCli-: lnfbation remess. .s.w.e.!. . •angue fever 37 S"Cl. 'lllla1Se onorex:a locidnc• <l'lo ol ~ Hematana. f)MltJS • ..,,, -~-.--trlC!inf!<' 'lalS; 1Mnmm1I pa dilnt>ea dy$gellSia. ""1llttng; llly1!!lVr..lalgdeiln.: >-pa!l:y: l!n>oef f1-Dnltepso"d"e" "..".*..".".".." ~myalgia bra- MdruoaolNfotylllll Safety data were - fnlll two acldi:ional sourtm on wllJdl.arge~wn-l:lenClJ!treak oemng wll ell •.930 n!-were mnuuzed wi1h a lingledoseofo::her720El.U or1440El.U ofl/Jmt.f'le wa:me was wefl-tofemed and RO senous llMlr>e a..-enis um'3CCltll"°"wererap:irted Owrafl iesst!allll'll.of vaconees ,_...,sole ted _.,.,.,,... rvents follow­"' 11 the YllCClllO The .,.,,. conmin sollC ted local -.. .,...wespan11ftie ec1la\Slll! ,_...,.,22.3'4of StJbieO" 24 hours n c1ec:easing m 2 4'11. by n on on 1 foetd ettucy uia1 '9.D37 clltldren received !lie J60 El~ dose - The - nntnOl1ly ,_..., -.. ...... _. ll1jOCllOl>~:O - 19 5'11.1 and - ,a 1 '11.1. raponaj following '"" doses of Hwu Other adwrsl rvents were ""-and a1m111nll1!111D the con-llol V3CC4le Engenx-8" IJiepatJns B Yaccine. - P_ril ..... R.,.na. llare~._uof _,. ........ __ Havnx..ice merlet - rdlde!lle~localizedodema;~· ~-SOllllllfefa;-.flUlldlte.he!>­tl! ltJS; ervlfllma mult!onne ~ qzoedefna. ~ lynqolwdeuo;'""" """"'""1s.~. climnlSS. nei.rOQl!llj l!t'l!hllS. pnsttiesia. Guillaon-Sant ~-""""""-~ cqenitll abnormalily The us °"'*"""" of - and ......, SeMces has - the Yacone _,. EWll\IS Roi1ormo System tvAERSJIOoa:ept-af IUSllOC!ldo.stMlllSot.er !lie ~of any ...... irdut!in;i. but not hmoted m.111erepor11ngotmn:s~bytheNationalO.ld· -VAf!IS- lonns a"n"d" i'nAftlcrmt aolfi a119 I0S6.' lTlXheH IlO22ll·-7lr9e6e7 - for HOW SUPPLIED J60 El.U,115 ml.. NOC 5816DDHJ1 l'actage of 1 ..--..... noaU.illSml.. NOC5816tUJ7-01l'atkagt!of1 ~le­doselriat ~OC 5816Q.837-02Pa:l:aQeof1 tnl•lled "lf1l1V8. NOC 5816Q.837-05 Paclage of 5 prefilled synnges "''lh S/11-tnch~- 1440 E..UJml.. NOC 581llM35-01 Padage of 1 ~ vial. NOC581ro.835-05Pa:kageof s pref;ned syronges.,•lh 1-tr<h~- Mnfacl1n! by s..dllONM 8-lloM 81ologte1ls D""1n"tlu!!=dby~S.r tllKl_ 8-___c ols f'!li1adolPllO. FA 19101 BRS.-+!AISA ClSo:ilhl:line Beedlam. 1996 -111rogiS!eredll3demaRof $rniWCltll8 Beeclmt A**** .. ST AR ~n~•~ 1201 Suite D Weatheimer Tel: 521·7785 We are open ~1-F 10-8 Sat 10-6 Sun 10-5 Anytime you buy 3 or more produrts you savr 10%. We proudly feature Christine, :\ataaha, Fred and Matt formerly on West Gray! Short Hair r---§ye ___ l $l5 . l $2 off ! Long Hair :H . , $18 : au:rcut : '--- --- ------' New Research Study in HIV-Infected Volunteers with Oral Candidiasis (Thrush) Receive: • Thorough mcd1cal and laboratory exammation< and medical history • Free Stud) Drug • Qualified part1c1pants will be compensated for their time and mvolvemcnt If interested please call Kevin Grimes, BS at (713) 792-4929 Ir you aren't fihng your tax returns or answenng IRS letters, th(re are consequences. You may face cnmmal charges, you may not collect your refund 1f you're due money back, and your propeny may be seized Don't wall for that to happen Getung your overdue taxes settled may be easier than you thmk Do ii now ... adl 1·800·829-1040. It's in your intenst. ·=·-··=-·•;" !M------ p " 0 Ii BILL CLAIR FAMILY MORTUARY 6 Private Cremation S~7S Complete Cuc ud Coaa:rll I« I~ P•mily • Complete F...,...al • Pro-Arranged S0<vicos In-Home Services • Pro-Need ln&u"anco • Al lnsu-ance Poicies Honored 522 9030 2603 Souttrnore - Houston, TX noo4 i. 132r. e.~,~~it;! ,., (713) 529-1414 .,, ......... • Alignment • Brakes Exclusivf • LEsbiAN/GAy CAMpqnouNd OpEN All YrAR I Pns W£1cOMF 150 ACRES of SEclusio11, o ... LAkE Li"1fS fOll,f 1-888- 875-7596 ,,-.,oil ~ ••• The Powers 01 Psvchic Science 11 is the m•ddle of !he night and you hear the door slam. When would he slop comong home so la!e and s1art paying attenlton to how you feel? Slop being depressed and wondenng "Is he !he right lover for me?" "Will he come back?" "Is he seeing some· one else?" Vicloria helps w1fh all problems. She will clear all nega· bvtty. Will guarantee lo re!um loved ones in minutes. Overcomes all your problems • love. bad luck, lonhness. and success. S!an seeong !he happ•· ness of your future. Immediate solubons to all your problems 'Servrng the Community" 713-928-9080 1540 Telephone Rd. llUS1111. Tl 71023 u ..... "*9 tlk.ty '°...,."' ........... ..m. .. •prtvMe<.l!A /,z.,,,..,..,.llkety• ~·tutt•r-- / -r..n, =-- -~~.-.-. -­- -==-~ =...-::::: e o F e 8 R U A R V &! B T H ., B 9 7 HEALTH by Lee Davis Donor Pool Shrinking A shnnking donor pool is delaying flome sight-restoring operations, accord­ing t.o the Lions Eye Bank of Texas at Baylor College of Medicine. "Increased governmental regulation and testing have reduced the supply of donor tis­sue," said Mary Beth Oanneffel, Executive Director of the Lions Eye Bank of Texas at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston "Cornea dona­tions are needed now more than ever. During "National Eye Donor Awareness Month" in March, lours of the Lions Eye Bank of Texas will be offcrt-d Speakers ore also available to address school and civic groups. "Donor designation is easy," said Ms. Oanneffcl. "Get the facts, indicate your decision on a driver's license and/or donor card, and share the de<"1sion with your family." For info call 713.798.5500. Genital Herpes 1\venty percent of Americans have genital herpes, but only two percent know they have the disease. Low aware­ness of genitul hcrj)('s combined with n ruung incidence of the disease has prompted SmithKline Beecham to initi­ate a hroad-hase<l, dirC'cl-to-con.sumer gt•nil.al ht'rpcs education und awareness campaign involving thought-provoking print advertising in leading women·f-1: books und rity magazines. They have nlso initmtcd u consumer 800 number. a sexunl health television segment hosted hy prominent physicians und a unique wt·b s1tt~ E:cl inn fun. yt•t highly informa· t1vc, cufc c·uvironnu·nt lb reach mfo COn("('rning the disease und th<' latest treatment developments, dial J.1!118-645-4444 Tu access the info online via Cafe Herpe, visit httpJ/www.cafcherpc.com. svringe Exchange AIDS Action Council, the nation's leading AIDS advocacy organization, «'<"ently culled on President Clinton and the lO~th Congress lo heed the results of two foderal report.' relea.•ed within the last week which indicate that synngc exchange prob'nlm> are an effec­tive means of curbing HIV infection umong 1ntruvenous drug users and their families. A D<·partml'nt of Health and Human Services report released recently reviews the comj)('lling body of research that demonstrates that syringe exchange programs do reduce HIV t runsmisswn among mlruvenous drug users, their sexual partneri:i, and their childn•n. Additwnally, the report shows tlwre is h ltlc compt'lling evidence that syringt• exchange programs encourage drug u.i• Tlw n•port comes on the heels of n Nutwnal Institutes of Health con­t> cnsus pa11el conclusion last week that syringt- (•xrhange programs can and ohould pluy on tmpo..Umt role in HIV pn•v(•ntion Prescribed Maraiuana The Trnmns for l\lcd1cal Rights recent­ly pollucl 1,002 Am<'ricans concerning physiduns ni:;:hts to prcsc-nbe man1unnn for med1c111al purposes. By a 2 to I mar­gin, Am<"ncnn vot<'rs favor allowing doc- If you are what you eat, why not cut back on fat? tors t.o prescribe marijuana for medici­nal purpo.<es for seriously or terminally ill patients (60 percent favor, 30 percent oppose, nine percent don't know and one j)('rtent refused lo answer). Americans believe that doctors in states like Arizona and California, which have passed medical mariiuana initiatives, should be able lo prescribe marijuana for medical purposes, and they don't believe the federal govern­ment should penalize those doctors for prescribing manjuana (68 percent say doctors should be able to prescribe, 24 pcrcent say federal gowrnment should pcnalize those doctors, two percent don't agree with either notion. four percent are unsure, and one percent refused to answer). For info on Texans for Medical Rights, call 713.975.6270. Diabetes Risks People over age 40 who are at high risk of diabetes •hould be tested yearly for the disease even tf they don't have symptoms. ''By diagnosing diabetes before symptoms develop, physicians can intervene sooner with medication and recommend life-style changes lo minimize the complications of this poll'ntially deadly disease,' said Or. Alan J Garber, Baylor Professor of Mt-dicine Risk factors include u family history of diabetes, obes1ty-C$pccially being more than 30% owr the standard body weight for your height, age- people over 50 being at greater nsk, and ethnic back­ground- His.panics, Afrtcan~Americans­and American Indians nre more likely lo dl'velop diabetes nnd run a greater risk of romphcat1ons. New Power Foods Great Circles, Inc., makers of Great Circle's Recovery Power ~'oods, is the first of its kind in the marketplace offer­ing consum<·rs the advances that have bet•n mado in nutntionnl ..c1ence in the laHt few decades. Great Circles Power Foods Boasting no artificial navors, Arnie Koss, developer of the product. says "the mnin~trcnm products use casein, which he says can be difficult t.o digest and may pose allergy problems lo some peo· pie. Our fut system is unique. In the mainstrcum. culture, fats arc not ronsid· ered to he good, hut they are actually necess:iry for the body lo function prop­erly, \\re uso ,1 combination of c:inola oil and nee bran 011 and structure lipids to support health recovery and wellness. These are not included m nny other mass market products. The objecttve is very aum'_ir to Earth's Best, and t.lus IB to creuto the best possible product m tlL category- that 1s the connection • Amen.c an H eart .~ Association .. Flghbt>J ,...~ oi.e... OlldS>ok• ·····-- P A G E y ~"\ .s WHERE REAL MEN sf/tif STILL DANCE! NIGHTL Y:Caged Heat/Men Behind Bars! Our Shameless Male Dancers! The Hottest Studs from all across Texas Perform Live for You! First in Texasl Check Out Our Home Page. http:/ www_pacificstreet.com. Fridays 7 ~'!!Ji FORE1PL~ No Cover till 9! Saturdays: 9 pm_ LEATHER & FLESH FANTASY NIGHT! Party with the Best! No Cover All Night in E.m1k;_ Leather! Sundays 7 pm. MALE OVERLOAD! No Shirt! No Cover! No Kidding! Houston's Lowest Regular Drink Prices! $1 .25 Well/ $1_75 Beer $3.00 Call/ $3.50 Premium & $1.25 Schnapps! Wi,.'fEll SPE&iAU Every Night: No Cover for Club Members in Club Colors! 710 Pacific Street Houston, Tx. 713/523-0213 Gtartt floor vance Now Open at Noon Daily 521-9533 Horseshoe Dt111ce lights · OPEN DAILY AT NOON - Shots of Cucrrn '2"' & Southern Comfort '2'0 - Montrosc's Biggest Danccfloor · ALL Country l\lusic - Dance to your choice of l\lusic._.not a DJ's . Only gay bar in Houston \\ith a new shuffleboard · Food Arnilablc . Handsome l\lalc Bartenders · Come sec the horniest pool room in Houston {Jurnces/ s23.1211 Show Bar Shiela Lennon E\'t•ry Wednesday at 9 pm Faees llillld faery Saturda) at 9 pm Open Daily at 10 am Home Bar of The Royal Sovereign & Imperial Court Home Bar of Wassie Empress XII Ruby Stone 1100 Westheimer · Houston 2 1 ... A Q A q Don Gill Productions presents NIGHT IN BLACK LEATHER'97 In Memory of Lady Victoria Lust FRIDAY FEBRUARY28 10:00 PM A One-Woman Show starring SHAN CARR Cocktail Party and Buffet at SPM SPECIAL GUESTS An Incredible Evening of Entertainment with a Fashion Show from Leather by Boots March 1, 1997 10:00 PM Benefiting The Colt 45's 501(c)3 Charity kyle Brandon International Mr. Drummer, Kyle Brandon Comedian, Shan Carr • Mr. Gulf Coast Drummer, Don Woods Mr. Texas Drummer, Doug Decker • Ms. Leather Pride, Tiffany Swanger -=·-···=·•-•§ ±+-•·-- Friday, February 28 • 9 PM till ?? G!J~ Guest Bartenders on the Top @I" Houston Area Bears Sunday, March 2 • 5 pm till ?? Snacks on the "Farside" Guest Bartenders - LVL PWA Charities Show at 8 PM presented by Jerel Mc Neil, Emperor XIII PAGE 22 'f' FEBRUARY 2BTH 1887 SPORTS CAPSULE by Lee Davis Plentv to Spare! The Montrose Monday Night Men's League reports Division A is headed by Beat The Meet Again, We Go There and Eclectic Twits. Five Easy Pieces, Thirsty Wives Club, and Spank My Feet lead Division B. Richard Nickerson bowled High Scratch Grune of 259 and High Handicapped Game. Don Burken bowled High Scratch Series of 670 end High Handicapped Series. Bowling is at Palace Lanes at 9pm on Monday. Call Tom at 522.9612. The Inner Loop Sunday Evening League reports standings as We Go There Too in lat, Please Don't Eat The Daisy in 2nd and Ti tty Ti tty Wang Wang in 3rd. For the men Bob Roberts bowled High Scratch Game of268, Series of721 and High Handicap Series. Dwayne Pavelka bowled High Handicapped Game. For the women, Linda Dees bowled High Scratch Series of 536 and Terry Shannon Game of 203. Nancy Malandrino bowled High Handicapped Game and Series. For more info call Tom at 522.9612. Bowling is at Palace Lanes at 7pm on Sunday. The Wednesday Night Mixers reports Gutter Bumper in 1st with Gutter Trash in 2nd and Charley's Tunas in 3rd. For the men John Laehy bowled High Scratch Game of 214 and High Handicapped Game of 277. Rich Meyer bowled High Scratch Series of 536 and Scott Allbee Hii:h Handicapped Series. For the women. Terry Shannon swept all categonea with High Scratch Game of 247 and Series of 66.1. Call Tom at 522.9612. Bowling is at AllH' 8outhway nt 6:30pm on Wednesdays. The Monday Night Women's League bowls at 6::JOpm at Al\1 F Southway on l\1ondnys. Balls R Out is in 1st with Murks-A-Lot in 2nd, Bitches in Beautiful Shirts in 3rd and TAZ Club in 4th. For more info call Pat at 281437 .6218. The 12th Annual Miss Bowler Beehive H.t.-vit•w will b(' held ol .Santa f<"e Bur & Patio tlus Saturday, Mar J at 7pm. The bowlers will delight you with their wit nnd antics, all m the name of rais ing money for the designated charities of the Texas Jnv1tntionnl Tournament. No admission, with hnppy hour prices end loads of entertainment. Free Fishing Trip The !Uunbow Fishmg Club is holding a drnwing for a free trip on the Texsun II of Galveston worth $60. Tickets are $1 Bobbie & Chester of the Rambow Ashmg Club. and are available at EJ's from Robert White and Lucy end et the 611 Club from Chester Dickerson end Bobbie Frida. The drawing will be et the March 15 Barbecue & Shnmp Boil at EJ's, 2517 Ralph St. at 6pm. The winner docs not have to be pre"ent. The barbecue will run from 2pm to 6pm and will cost $3.50 a plate. Everyone is invit.<.>d The next Ilmnbow outing on the 70- foot deluxe deep •ca fishing boat will be Sunday, June 22. The cost for the 12- hour trip i• $60 with a $30 deposit due now. The club will also be going out in April on the New Buccaneer end in Mey on the Cavalier, both out of Galveston . For info and to get on the free mailing list, call 713.523.6381. Wimertest The National Gay & Lesbian Business Alliance will host the 4th Annual Lake Tahoe Gey & Lesbian WinterFest. This non-stop ski event circuit party will be held from Wednesday, March 12 through Sunday, March 16. Special package rates, including dis­counts on American Airlines, accommo· detions et Lakeland Village Beech & Ski Resort, plus lift tickets and party passes ere available by calling NTS Vacations et 1.800.886.2623. vonevr The Lone Star Volleyball Association (LSVA) invites all interested parties to play in their Winter Season '97 Leagues. They ere actively seeking individuals to play in ell divisions. Please call their HotLine et 713.8784629 or go to the Univ. of St. Thomes Jerabeck Center and piny a couple of games with them. LSVA meets each Sunday from 4 :30- 7pm (Recreational & Intermediate Leagues) end also from 7-9:30pm (Competitive & Power Leagues). All are welcome to join this diverse group (male/female). Remember, the action begins Sunday, Illar. 2 at 4:30pm. let's Plav Ball The 2nd Annual Genye Allen Memorial Softball Tuurnament is sched­uled for Saturday, March 8 et Memorial Fields #4 and #5 This ell-day, women's/co-ed tournament egem bene­fits the PWA Coalition of Houston. Sponsored by Bunch-o-Posies, Java­. Java, Kleinhrook Ammal Clinic, MCCR, Pct D .. pot and The 611, the entry fees are $100 per team. For more info, or to sponsor, contribute or part1C1pate, call 864 .0871. Strike Her Doti The Houston Women's Softball League ( HWSL> is i:-ruring up for onolher season of piny. They welcome nil new coaches, teams and/or individual players. Games will tentatively begin March 15 & 16 with their Pre-Season tournament. For info call Trish at 713.688.9468. HIP Hop at the "Y" Get fit at The Cossaboom Family YMCA at 7903 South Loop East, nenr Gulfgate Mell. Their Indoor Heated Pool offers the community swimming instruction year-round for all ages es well a.> a variety of water exercise class­es. They are also currently offering Hip­llop Dance clas~es for ages 12-15 years of age. For more info, stop by their front Bervice desk or call them at 713.6434396. HOG Tripi The Houston Outdoor Group <HOG) will be camping at Sulfur Springs Camp near Colorndo Bend State Park, near Bend, Texu< from March 14·16. If you need info concerning HOG or the camp­ing trip, please call Darlene at 864 .0082. MSl wants Youn As the Montrose Softball League (MSL) enters its 18th season, the MS!.. Board of Trustees 1s getting the word out to all previous league members that they want you back! As the league continues to grow, we miss those former members who dropped out of the league for what­ever reason and they would like to have you return. Over the past couple of years, the soft­ball league has greatly increased in membership end last season saw the rclurn of many members who were instrumental in keeping the league alive in past years. lllSL gets off to en early start this year with the Lone Star Classic taking place over Ea•ter week­end end regular league play begmmng the following Sunday The final week­end of play is June 22. See SPORTS page 27 --=·-···--··•§ ...... P A G E AWESOME NEW GYA ONTROSE! NEVER A WAIT FOR TONS OF NEW EQUIPMENT! • NEW CYBEX • LIFESTRIDES • PRECOR TRANSPORTS • NEW NAUTILUS • LIFEROWERS • HAMMER STRENGTH • AEROBICS • LIFECYCLES • RECUMBENT CYCLES • FREE WEIGHTS • LIFESTEPS • NEW PURETAN BEDS • INDOOR RUNNING TRACK • NORDIC TRACKS • FREE PARKING L · sr t.,,nance ror Pre-Grand Opening Savings & FREE IN/TIA TION! 4040 Milam HOUSTON, TX. 77006 713-524-9932 Friday~ 2 3 FEB RUA R Y 2 8 TH ., a a 7 S E - R V I C E D I R E C T 0 R V Atriumlte5~ A-Mid-l.Mng -. EWf)Ofle l.ool<I Up To You. One Bedroom Apts. from $460 Two Bedroom Apts. from $635 GALLERIA AREA --t·Hou·-· TX noe1 Olllce (713)1161·7188• Fu: (713)1161-2111 Elrgant Mid·Ri5' Living·Whrrr rvtryonr looks up to you One Bedroom Apt. from $455 Two Bedroom Apt. from $645 Southwest Houston Area 8800 Braeswood Houston. TX no31 Ph (713) 771-35~~ I Fax (713) 771·926:J l Large Inventory of New & Used Tires et Competitive Prices : Auto Repair & Service Foreign and Domestic Cars : ~------------------------ - - - --------------~ 1411 Tart Houston, Texas 77019 Pride Finance Used and New Cars & Trucks Cynthia Chang Annette Kalandros (713) 789-5755 Pag er (281) 624-9728 MM#M.MIW...OW4!•1!'§ tw.++w 71
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