Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 259, October 11, 1985
File 001
File size: 12.00 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 259, October 11, 1985 - File 001. 1985-10-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6577/show/6552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-10-11). Montrose Voice, No. 259, October 11, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6577/show/6552

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 259, October 11, 1985 - File 001, 1985-10-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6577/show/6552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 259, October 11, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 11, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Neartown Association to Host City Council Candidates The Neartown Association will host a can· didates' night for city council candidates on October 22 ut Bering Memorial Metho­dist Church, 1440 Harold (corner of Harold nnd Mulberry). The program will begin at 7:00 p.m. and will be held in the ActivitiPS Building. Candidates for councilman, District C, and for all councilmen at-large positions have been invited. Vince Ryan, assistant county attorney, will moderate. Questions put to the candidates will address issues which pertain in particular to the Mont­rose and lower Westheimer areas. The Neartown Association has ll<'en active in seeking solutions to the problem of weekend cruising on Westheimer and in encouraging enforcement of city ordinan· ces dealing with sexually-oriented busi· ncsst•s. The association is an educational and civic assodation composed of resi­dents living in the area bounded on the north and Routh by Allen Parkway and the Southwest FrN•way and on the east and we.st by Brazos and Shepherd. Gay Groups Considering aMerger The board of the Gay Rights l'iational Lobby board has voted to appoint a team to negotmt<• a merger with the National Gay Task Force Small groups of members of both boards have been meeting informally for the past several months. ThiA decision marks an agreement to hold formal merger negotia· lions. Both organLwbons have suffered from continuing financial woes. Reports distributed at the GRNL meet· ing describe some of the informal discus­sions to date and outline areas that must be addressed if merger is to be accomp· lished: board composition, staffing, organization structure and location. At this time, everything is subject to negotiation," stated GRNL board co-chair Deacon Mccubbin. This sentiment was l'Choed by GRNL's newly elected co-chair Britt Alkire and NGTF's co-chairs Paul Nancy Roth, head of GRNL Vandenberg and Frances Haneke!, who attendl'd the GRNL meeting. Negotiating team members hope to have reached an agreement prior to NGTF's scheduled November board meet­ing. If a package is ready at that time, GRNL'e board will hold a special meeting to review and vote on it. Any agreement must he ratified by both boards before action can he taken. To cover costs aBSociated with merger discussions, the board voted to establish a "merger fund." Individuals wishing to contribute to the merger fund may send contributions to GRNL/NGTF Merger, P.O. Box 11192, Washington, DC 20013. Montrose Voice ---~- ~~------- "The Newspaper of Montrose" October 11, 1985 Issue 259 Published Every Friday (713) 529-8490 -----~ --- - ~------ o And Away Goes Frankies A tree and the sign were all that remained Thursday of Frankie's Restaurant(formerly Prince's), oornerofWestheimer and Montrose. Prince's was the original drive-in restaurant chain in Houston, with roller-skatmg carhops and gumt hamburgers. But one mustmake way for progress. (Just what IS going to be put on that corner now? See answer next week in the Voice.) Despite Backlash, New Gay Lifestyle Building Inroads to Mainstream USA By William 0. Beeman Anthropolofi•t. Brown l'nivf'nity Pacific New• Service SpeC1al to the Montrosl' Voice PROVIDENCE, Rl.-Just when an anti­gay backlash spurred on by the AIDS scare 1s spreading, the gay community­estimated at some 20 million men and women in the United States-is making the most significant lifestyle shift in its history. Ironically, the shift is moving it away from an underground culture to one much closer to mainstream America. "For years, the only gay culture here was centered on bars and baths," claims the director of a gay chorus in Detroit. "Now we are forming a real, full blown culture of our own." The new social emphasis promotes dat­ing and socializing in clubs and interest groups rather than casual sex; forming long term monogamous relationships and building community ties rather than stri­dent confrontation. Demographics are the key to under· standing the change. Like the rest of the population, the majority of homosexual men and women are reaching middle age. Only a small percentage fit the stereo­types 11een on television or on film. Many, in fact, have entered traditional mar­riages and live in suburbia, forming a huge but invisible gay population indis· tinguishable from their neighbors. Many have gained good jobs and, like most other middle-aged Americans, want homes, satisfying personal relationships, the opportunity to advance in their careers. Gradually, gay publications have begun to reflect concern among their readers for building long-term monogamous relation· ships. Romance has become a frequent theme in The Aduocate, Chn.<topher Street, the New York Natit·e and other publications which 10 years ago emphas­ized sex. All have added large new sec­tions for personal ads for those interested in finding permanent partner~ . Gay introductions and dating services are doing good buisnei;s nationwide. Andrew, who works for Buddies, a New Hampshire-based service, claims to have introduced dozens of men to others who have become "lifemates." "We feel we do a good job, but it is with the cooperation of our clients," he says. They meet, date and really work at building a relationship. We are not cheap, so those men who come to us are usually very serious about finding a lasting partner" New interest groups for homosexual men and women are springing up every· where. There are gay fathers groups, gay sports leagues, aBSociations of gay busi· nessmen, gay lawyers and physicians' organizations, gay choral groups, gay investment clubs and gay political action groups-to name a few. "When we get together," says the presi· dent of a Rhode Island gay professional men's social group, "we realize that, hey, we're all successful college-educated pro­fesssional men. We all have good incomes, own our homes, and are respected in the community, Suddenly we see that being gay doesn't have to he a shadow over our lives." John, a New England college professor, is active in the Gay and Lesbian Ivy League Alumni Association. "Thousands of gay graduates of Ivy League institu-lions are now realizing they are men and women of power and influence," he says, "and they want to make life eaAier for the generations of gay students coming through school. We now hold regular meet­ings and alumni reunions throughout the league. Some of our clas.•mat.es get upset, but more and.more they're ~tarting to real­ize we're just like them-except we're gay." Gay self-help groups, such as Gay Alco­holics Anonymous, are also flourishing. David, a middle-agl'd man in San Jo~e. CA., belongs to Gay Fathers, one of the mOflt active gay organizations in the state. "My problems are not in being gay. They are tn being gay and trying to raise three children," he explains. "I'm basit'ally a very conservative person. My oldest daughter says her privileges are unrea· sonably strict oompared to her friends. She expects me to understand hecaul'e I have an 'unconventional' lifestyle. Well, it doesn't work that way, and I need other gay parents to back me up." In Cleveland, BOme 15 gay bowling leagues have been formed, paralleling dozens of others already in existence in Midwest cities. "The funny thing," says Roger, who has helped several leagues get started," is that no one in the straight com· munity ever guesses thef'e are gay men and women. They don't think you can he gay and a bowler at the same time, I gueea." Gay choruses, now operating in at least 44 cities, are primarily musical organiza· tions but do double duty al' community outreach for gays. "We are amb88Sadors c:ontinued page 6 2 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11, 1985 Letters Regarding District C From Jerry Nicholson I can remember back in 1981 when George Greaniaa was first elected to city council. On election night, Greanias' opponent declared himself winner over Greanias and proceeded to congratulate himself for an outstanding victory. However, within a few hours, a half dozen or so polling boxes in the Montrose were released and Grea· nias was pronounced the true winner. It was a great night for the Houston gay community-but an even greater night for George Greanias. Now I have to wonder if perhaps Coun· cilmember Greanias has forgotten that important event that led to his succes!iful political career? Recently I was dismayed as Greanias said that less than 20% of his district is gay and stated that most voters in District Care Republican and conserva· tive. The fact is, Mr. Greanias tends to downplay his gay support of the past. Also, it was disappointing that Gres· nias would not address the GPC or the gay community regarding an endorsement this year. In fact, on endorsement night at GPC, Greanias' administrative assistant was embarrassed that he was introduced and refused to acknowledge the introduc· tion. I think that it is important to also remember that George Greanias has indi· cated his interest in becoming mayor of Houston. Therefore, I fear that his re­election as District C Councilmember will only ret>ult in part-time representation for the district, as Mr. Greanias spends his time running for the 1987 mayoral elec· tion. District C should not have to tolerate such neglect, and the Houston gay com· munity should not have to tolerate such fair-weather political friends. I, for one, have decided to vote for Carl Denton for City Council, District C. In times like theRe, with so much negative press directed at our community, it is indeed refrei;hing to hear someone stand up and say "I'm pro-gay." AB an openly gay candidate for city council, Carl Den· ton has said that he will back the Kathy Whitmire agenda 100%. Mayor Whitmire must have support on City Council if she is to conunue in her progressive programs and obiective• for our city. At present, Councilmember Greanias disagrees with Mayor Whitmire more than he supports her. Sad but true. As George Greaniru; runs around the city campaigning for re-election to District C (i.e mayor in 191!7), he likes to talk about the future. Perhaps it would be in the bebt interest of the Houston gay community if Mr. Greanias were to realize that the future is now. Item.a in the "Letters" section represent• opinion• of •ome of our reader• and not necessarily the view• of the MONTROSE VOICE. Another reason besides price ... Bute Paint is manufactured in Houston by the James Bute Paint Company. The Bute Company is family owned and operated, and was founded in 1867. Through innovations in science and technology, our knowledge has grown over the years ... but not so large that we have, or will forget you ... our customer. Please remember you are buying a quality product from an experienced company who cares about you. Thank you. James Bute Paint Company 4920 San Felipe at Post Oak Blvd. 627-1120 Light Hardware & Home Improvements Now Available At This Location Gardening Supplies • Wallcoverings Ladders • Accessories Floor Finishers • Olympic Stains And of course, Bute Colorizer Paints MERIDIEN LEASING INC. We Make Your Automotive Needs A Pleasant Experience MERCEDES BENZ 190 E l491mo 380 SL f.4'), mo 500 SEL 72'ilmo CADILLAC ~an Qc,,, ille Fittt..ood Eldor~o 375/mo olbO<mo 435 mo BMW 2'14imo 345/mo ~%/mo 944 911 PORSCHE 425/mo 485/mo si.~ H•.-~UICK l451mo coro11.1"0YOT~S4'mo 975-1985 ~ ~~;;: ~~:~. i::~~ CALL LEE BORBA Supra 2bS mo Chimney Rock at Westhelmer NO DOWN P,\YMENT • LOWER MOMHLY PAY.VIENT • CASH FOR YOUR TRADE I Montrose Voice MONTROSE. TEXAS Population l•t 1985} 32.000 Census tracts 401 01. 401 02, 402 01, 402 02 405 02 4()3 Ind 4<M 01 Zip cod• (roughly) 70006, 77018 (portion). 77098 Bouoded (roug~ly) ShePhetd Dr (wetlJ. Allen P1r1<.w1y (nonl'l) M11n St (HSI), US 69 (touth) L•t•lude (Montrose Blvd 1t We1the1mer Rd} 29•44·13· N. Longitude 95•n50 .. w Altitude 40' ELECTED Of"FICIAL..S FOR MONTROSE Georg• GrNl''liU, Houlton City Counctl (dial C) El ''•nco l:.~:,;r.ii·cf:~t~ l~~~IOnet (pct 1) 1001 PfNIOt't. (113}221-8111 Witter Ranlun. Conttable lpcl 1) 301 San Jacinto. (113} 221·5200 Oebtl 0.nburg. TIXH HouM of Repr .. nt1t1v• (dist 137) 19' I SW fwy f713J 520-8068 Craig WMtungton, Te .. u Setlate (dist 13) 2323 C.rollne. f1131 est-4343 MICkey l1llnd, US Houae ot Fleptesentltrv• (d•SI 18) 191') Smith *820, t 113J 73f>..1"8 The Newspaper of Montrose Establtshed 1980 OUR 259th ISSUE, OCT. 11. 1985 Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 CIRCULATION 9.000 COP•• weekly through 1SO mator d1stnbut1on pomtt 1n MontroM. the V•ll•oe and the Heights Ht1mt1«1 p1u-on r•t• factor 2 8 Htlmat«J rHd1r1h1p 2~200 wHkly plus 1. 000 cop I• weekly through 45 other T exu d11tnbut1on points Ht1m11«1 peat-on r•t• l•ctor 2.5 Ht1m1t9d re«J1r1h1p 2. 500 •Hkly TOTAL CIRCULATION (GUARANTEED) 10,000 cop1• weekty tOIM Hl•m•t9d rHdersh1p 21, 100 WNkly Contents copyright •1985 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg 'fJCJbl'•""'·""""' Londa Wyche ,,,._.,,,, odlro' Roger Lackey office man1ger Mark Blazek Austm conespondent Scott Cutsinger, 8111 O'Rourke Joc1lcontr1but0t1 Steve Warren nat10n-1 corrHpon01n1 Jerry Mulholland 1ccount 1xecut1v1 Rick H111!1ccount 1recCJt1v1 Found1n(I Member• GrHter MOflll'OH Bo11nee1 Guild Gay and Leab11n Pre:N Anoclatron Nt'fltl Slf\'I''' NE!Wt-One. Pacific Nf'M Service Syf>d1c1ttd F11rvr1 Serv1cH & Writer• Brian McNaught. Uni4 veraal Press Syndtclll. Ntw1 .-.mer1c• Synd1ca1e POS'TM~STER Send llddrHI conecUons to 408 Avondale, Houalon. TX 77006-3028 Sub$Cl~pt1on r•t• 111 US 111101«1 .nvetope SA9 per year (52 ISIUH) S'9per1i11montn1(2e1ss~) 0tS1 25per.,., .. k(tn1 then ?e IUUft) S.ck •nuM $2 00 each. N_,tOnal «lv•rfising ,.pr.nnt•t•V• Joe OiSabalO Rtven<ieU Maneung ees 11th A;enue Now Yc>'k 10011. (21 2) 2•2 8863 AdwttJS.Jng OH<ll M TUHday 5 30pm_ f0t blue reteaMd Frt- 0.y -n/ng Notic• to ar1v.,,..,.,., Locel edvert11ing rate schedule Seven-A wa eftect....e Ocl 12 1964 R•ponsJbll11y The Montrc»e Voic• does not assume rnpon­aibility tor adv•r111ing claims Readetl 1h0uld alert the rwws· peper to any dteept1ve advertJltrniJ ()\\··Al~ .... 'Wl., 'I' CAA1' lf \00 cm.FIJ..-· OCTOBER 11, 1985/ MONTROSE VOICE 3 ~v! STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AlDS,tKS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON. FRI. 8 30AM-5 PM SAME DAY APPOlNTMENT MON,_YJED .. FRI EVENINGS AND ::>l\TIJRDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINT'MENT ONLY 2801 B...lA BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX noos (713) 868-4535 IN 1HE HEJGHTS [ii]r±]c;c OPENING SOON The Gourmet Shop Specialist in European Cheese, Wine, Coffee and Pasta Fabian Bridges Leaves Hospital, Finds Refuge with Friends Be A Guest At Your Party Leave The Details To Us Sandwich Platters, Party Trays. Pate, Bartenders, Food Servers Fabian Bridges, the 30-year-old AIDS patient who sent Houston police and health officials on an elaborate search and surveillance mission a week ago, has been released from Ben Taub Hospital and has moved in with friends in Houston. The search through Montrose for Bridges, which stirred media attention nationwide, resulted when a physician at Jefferson Davis Hospital informed health officials that Bridges had AIDS and wru, threatening to solicit for prostitution in Houston. According to Ray Hill, gay activist, Bridges "was not, is not, and has never been a prostitute." Hill said Bridges used the threatening words after becoming frustrated with the social services system in an attempt to find food and lodging. Hill added that Bridges has lived in Hous­ton before and returned to the area to retrieve a van he left behind when he returned home to Cleveland, Ohio. Sup­posedly, Bridges has been receiving regu· lar checkups at Jefferson Davis, a county charity hospital. Although Bridges has had minor run­ins with the law in other cities, he has never been charged with prostitution. He has been followed for several weeks by a Public Broadcasting System film crew working on a documentary. "Fabian Bridges is now with friends. He is not alone, not hungry, and not without resources. He has begun receiving his Social Security benefits and ill working on getting his van running," added Hill. "This who!<.. brouhaha started because he VD Drops in Houston NPU.JB Onr. News S1.•n11rr. Th1•re has hl'en a drastic drop in reported cases of venereal disease in Houston over tht> past two years, says city Health Department offici11h1. According to statistics released by Health Director Dr. James Haughton. the city hos experienced a decrease in syphil· !is and gonorrhea. Both syphillis and gonorrhea have been on a delcine nation· wide, partly because of the fear of AIDS, but Houston has experienced a far larger drop than most other areas went to the doctor. He got the good ol' Bum's Rush and was not going to be mis· treated," commented Hill. "Fabian Bridges is not a criminal, nor is he insane. He needs friends and resourcei;, not media attention, a jail or a mental institution." concluded Hill. Now Booking Parties Highland VIiiage 3926 Westhelmer 681-5614 TllE BEST LI1TLE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVATE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 4 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11, 1985 Photos by Roger Lackey Montrose Mouth More Stripping of the Strip By L'Angelo Miaterioso, Esq., M.B.E. There certainly has been a flurry of activity on and around Montrose this past week. Some of the most noticeable around the long-time landmark. Frankie's Hamburgers (formerly Prince's). It's been demolished No word yet as to what will be replacing Frankie's. but 11 sure does seem strange to see that corner bare. -o- The crews have been working hke mad on the future McDonald• next to Studio 13. It's only a matter of weeks -o- With the Art Festival Weekend approach­ing, the Ivy Compound is getting ready to hold a pre-Grey Party Invitations are on the works. and will be sent out soon. The Annual Grey Party will be held at Rich's on Sunday, October 20. from 3 to 9-a bit ear­lier this year, and a cash bar with all profits will benefit F.O.c .u .s.s. Grey Party T­Sh1rts are available from the hosts. TNT Shirts, and at the door -o- Anyone notice the Rendezvous has reverted back to Its former status as the Boob1e Rock? It seemed rather sad to see men putting that Boob1e sign back on the outside -o- Wh1le most ma1or c1t1es have had 11 for Anything hanging around Mary's? Welcome back Freddie How was Tulsa? ==~-~ years. and Houston continues to quibble about 11, the good news is that Montrose will be getting 11 real soon. What am I talking about? Why the Metro! We'll be riding on the Metro at last. Not the bus. silly, but Hous­ton's newest addition to the club scene. Located in the former Ray's Five & Dime. the Metro promises to be a great alternative to be reckoned with You'll be hosted by one of the most experienced and familiar crews in town So get ready to roll up. Roll up for the Mystery Tour, riding the Metro. -o- 0-Zoo recenty ran some Welch parody spots to the tune of Bruce Springsteen's "Born to Run " The lyrics were hilarious. Including the lines Kathy, I was mayor way back when. when women knew thelf place and the men were all men. All you liberals have had your fun. 'coz I'm Lowe Welch and who says I'm too old to run?" 0-Zoo does 11 again. Listen for more of these hilarious parodies, poking fun at all maior candidates and issues -o-ft was John Lennon Day last Wednesday, October 9 Many people and much of the media celebrated his 45th birthday. Show­biz Today even had livecoverageof the ded­ication of the memorial park. Strawberry Fields, in Central Park. NYC Keep on play­ing those mind games forever Michael at the Mining Co. Union Jack goes high tech The 611 's giant bumper sticker. Get it honey? John and Bill show it off under the new awning at TNT Shirts Mary's 1s celebrating the Sixth Anniver­sary of the March on Washington, this Sun­day, October 13. Holiday-N Specials to everyone in Gay Pride or March on Washington T-Shirts. As always. happy hour prices to anyone in black leather­everyday .•. naturally. -o- D1d anyone get out the Tonka Toys? Min ­ing Companyhas installed a big sandbox to play in. s,, William of Camelot was busy bu1ld1ng sand castles in it. Actually, it's what's left of the patio bar. It's exposed to make room for the new patio bar that should be complete in about three weeks. Can't wait to see the newest work on Caven Corner TNT Shirts on Fairview & Taft has finally gotten it's new awning That caps off the remodeling and other various work that has been in progress Looks real great John' -o- Fantasy Starr will be appearing in an AIDS benefit coming ·up at Heaven on November 14 Don't miss it. -o- J1m Bush 1s moving to LA. So is Mr August Playsafe. Steve. We'll miss you both -o- Randolph, iust who is Justin Cade?Ooes that mean anything? Skipper has a habit of missing driveways. He was recently puuled out of a ditch Thank goodness for Billy's jeep! The lights go up at the Mining Co. as we welcome Frank Gaven as well as the rest of the BOAT members to Houston. -o- Unlon Jack has come into the 21st cen­tury with its new computerized system. U.J. So lonR to Dirty Sally's own Sir Michael (Earl Gregory photo) boasts to be the first gay retailer to become computerized, utilizing this system to keep ultimate track of everything -o- The Krewe of Hydra will be holding a gar­age sale this Saturday and Sunday, 9-4, at 2612 Stanford -o- The Ripcord will be hosting a party on Oct 20 It'll be an Octoberfest, German theme party complete with German music and food. On November 13, the Ripcord will present a TGRA Western Night in honor of the Rodeo. Specials at the Ripcord include 25¢ draft beer on Tuesdays 6-2 with no cover. and an ''Early Bird Special" with $1 screwdrivers and Bloody Mary's from 7am to 11 am, Monday thru Saturday. And, don't forget Dynasty on Wednesday nights. Also, movies on the back bar each Saturday at 10pm. -D-M1chael Anthony Davidson Smythe For­tesque Robmson (whew). 11th Viscount West Brook, wishes to thank everyone who made his last year in Houston so enjoyable. Especially Dirty Sally's. The Zoo at D.S., especially L W .. wishes Michael farewell and good luck on his new ventures. It's been a joy, love. (Remember daddy, I don't want another Mercedes.) -o- Well, life continues to grow in Montrose. Join us next week, for the Westheimer Art Festival Weekend preview. Panel Votes Not to Reinstate Health Cards Neu·s One Neu·s Service City Health Director Dr. James Haughton says a select panel of doctors and hospital administrators have voted unanimously not to recommend the reinstatement of health cards. The Campaign for Houston Straight Slate has called for the reinstitu· tion of health cards as a way of screening and preventing the spread of AIDS. The committee also asked Haughton to write a letter to the state health commis­sioner requesting that AIDS be put on the list of quarantinable diseases. The original purpose of the committee was to discuss the proposed state guide­lines dealing with AIDS in school age children. Haughton would not comment on those recommendations because they are still in draft form and the state asked the committee not to comment. However, he did say they parallel those put out by the Centers For Disease Control in Atlanta and guidelines issued by the state of Connecticut.· Haughton said the people calling for health cards are spreading panic about the disease when there is no need for panic. The only way to contract the dis· ease is through sexual contact, blood transfusions and sharing needles for intravenous drug use. Gay Engineers to Meet in Austin Houston Area Gay and Lesbian Engi· neers and Scientists (HAGLES) have announced plans to join similar groups from throughout Texas in a statewide meeting of gay and lesbian engineers and scientists. This meeting is scheduled for Saturday, November 9, at the Hyatt Regency in Austin. The prime focus of this organization is a social outlet for technically oriented gay peo­ple. The Saturday schedule has an afternoon meeting at 2:00 p.m. for welcomes, introduc· tions, and a talk by a Texas state govern­ment official. Dinner will be at 7:00 p.m. when an industrial keynote speaker will address the group about new industry. A $.10 registration fee includes the Satur­day night dinne.r. Houston metropolitan resi· dents can contact HAGLES at P.O. Box 666:11, Houston. 77006, or by phone at (713) 4391879 OCTOBER 11. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 6 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11. 198S Despite Backlash, Gay Lifestyle Building Inroads to Mainstream US from page 1 to the straight community," claims Bob, a suctessful Washington publicist who manages public relations for one gay cho­rus. " Washingtonians come to hear us for the music, and we make damn good music. Slowly the audiences start to ask them­selves. 'What are we afraid of from these guys?"' Such optimism contrasts sharply the current public view of the gay community for whom public fear of AIDS has brought new threats of discrimination and per~e­cution Only recenty, two attempts to pass ant1-d1scnmination laws which would have included homo.sexual and bi-sexual men and women as protected groups failed m Rhode 1.-land by slim margins. Oppo· nents claimed during public hearings that passing such laws would "bring the plague of AIDS" to the state. Few gay leader> are willing to give up the struggle to end discrimination , but the emphasis is now increasingly on making sOCial inroads mto the mainstream. "The general pubhc desperately needs educat· ing about the gay community and the best education we can provide is by our own example," claims Terry, a choral laeder from Denver. "At present, there are 13,600 AIDS cases m the U.S.," states Bill, a psychologist speciahzmg in gay counseling m New port, R.I " Public opinion identifies the disease with being gay andofcour>e. ome people Just use AIDS as an excuse to justify bigotry. But a sizable part of the popula­tion would have no trouble with gay rights if it weren't for the disease " It Wiii taket1meand enormous effort by the gay community to help the public real· izethat being gay is not equivalent to hav-ing AIDS, Bill concedes. But today's gay men and women are by and large mentally sound, confident and hardy.They can do it." Straight Slater Ruled Ineligible for Election Neu_, One News Seruice City Attorney Jerry Smith says Cam· paign for Houston Straight Slate candi­date Tom Pohlmann, who is challenging District H Councilmember Dale Corc­zynski, 1S ineligible to be on the ballot for the city council election. Smith says state law state> that a tandidate must be a resi· dent of the city for six months. and Pohl· mann has only been a resident for three months. Dr. Steven Hotze, campaign director for the Straight Slate, says, "Of course it is a political move. It shows how much trouble Gorczynski is in, that they would try to deny people in District H of pro-familv representation." Hotze says he believell that Pohlmann is ehgihle for the ballot bccau><e the city elec­tion cod estates that all a person must be to be a candidate is an eligible voter, and Pohlmann 1s an eligible voter. However Hotze will be checking with the cam­paign's attorney as to Pohlmann's elig1· bility. Hotze contends, "It's n political move by the e1ty councilmcmbers. They are look mg for some kind of technicality somewhere, grabbing for straws, trymg to hold their scats. They arc not going to do it. We're literally going to defeat every one of the/le rascals." " . .. In the heart of The City" $44.00 • FRIE AIRPORT SHl.ITTU ·COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE• WINE • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (large single/double occupancy) • VALET SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservoltons required p lease coll Toll Free 800-253-5263 (Notional} 800-521-£1523 (Ca lif l (415)-44'·51.:1 (Sari fronc1sco: 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 lldvertising Sales for the Montrose Voi'e Pulllishing Company The Montrose Voice Publishing Company seeks an additional full­time or parttime outside advertising salesperson. Commissioned position. Must be attractively presentable & have reliable vehicle. Advertising sales experience not required. Should have honest, outgoing personality. Call 529·8490 THINKING ABOUT BUYING A NEW CAB? THINK AGAIN If you're thinking about purchasing a new car, perhaps you'd be wise to consider I easing. Leasing yout new car from Ascot Leasing Ltd. Inc. means ... • No Capltal Investment • Increase• Credit Line • Lower Monthly Payments • 1000/o Tax Deductible • Ellmlnates Bank Finance Llablllty (In many cases) • Direct Acce11 to • lnvHtment Tax Credit Available All Makes and Models • Slmpllfled Accounting • Convenience • Con1ervatlon of Capital (No • Improved Flnanclal Position Investment In depreciating assets) • Equity 11 Guaranteed • Ellmlnatn Resale Worries THINK ABOUT IT. '85 Regal .. '85 Park Ave. ·es Sky Hawk BUICKS CAO .. '85 Deville Coupe . . . • .. . ·es Eldorado Blarritz ..... . ·es Sdn Deville . . . . . . . _ .. . LIN·MERC ·es Courgar or T-Blrd .... . ·es Mark VII .. . • • . • .-.... . ·es Town Car . . . . ...• . .. BMW ·as 31e1 .............• '85 325e '8S 528e .... . . . 20500Mo 2e400Mo 18000Mo 293111Mo 36000Mo 293""Mo 214'°Mo J4gooMo 317"°Mo OLDS ·95 Cutless . ·es Ciera . . . . . . . .•.. · · ·. '85 9e Regency .....•.... . CHEV Corvette ....•... · · · · · · · · · ·es S·10 Blazer .. . ....... . ·as Pickup . ...... . . . DATSUN ·es 200 sx . ... . ........ . ·es 300 zx Coupe .. ·es Maxima . .. ........... . MERCEDES 264'°Mo MIB 190E ...... · · · 34000Mo M/B 300 SO .. · · · · · · ·. · · .. 399"'Mo M/B 380 SE . . • . · . · ..... THINK ABOUT IT! WE OFFER: CASH FOR YOUR PRESENT CAR• LEASE All MAKES ANO MODELS 24 HOUR CREDIT APPROVAL 1303 UPLAND, HOUSTON, TX 77043 21100Mo 20900Mo 28400Mo 37900Mo 205'°Mo 179""Mo 179"°Mo 279"°Mo 209"°Mo 36800Mo S59'°Mo 617111Mo VISIT OUR SHOWROOM CORPORA TE HEADQUARTERS (713) 973-09s?l!R TROY SMILEY OR GREG SMITH WE'LL BUY YOUR PRESENT AUTOMOBILE OCTOBER 11, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 8 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11. 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson o-8 "Quick, Abdul! Desert' ... One 's' or two?" "Sidney! I made a mistake' ... Deposit the $50 check into savings, and put the $500 in cash into checking!" u ----==- -~---~ "Be back by suppert1me. Hump - And. as a lways. you be careful." "Well, I'm addicted .... Have you tried Carol's sheep d ip?" "Whoopsiesi •.. If this tomb does have a curse on ii, Webster, I daresay we'll be the first to !ind out." The bride, best man and ushers of Frankenstein Fortunes A Puzzling Situation for Aries By Mark Orion For Friday. Oct 11, 1985. through Thursday. Oct 17, 1985: ARIES-Someone from your past will surprise you when you least expect it. Watch for a letter or a phone call out of the blue You'll not only be startled. but something could come from this that may not be clear at the time. Puzzling. TAURUS-Looks like you got more than you bargained for in this one. If a heavy-duty lover is coming on too strong for you, telling you what to do and what not, and how to do it, you're going to have to stand up and tell it like it is. Fun should be fun for two. GEMINI-You have a secret admirer who's just about ready to burst out of the closet at you. Stay open to warm signals and then indulge yourself in the fun this could bring. The person is shy and gen­tle. so your intensity is just what's ordered CANCER-A decision needs to be, has to be made, and while at first you're temp­ted to do it and just get it over with. the best path 1s that of gentle care. Do it easy: show the compassion you're known for. Carelessness could cause pain you'll regret. LEO You could be very successful in an erotic endeavor! The stars this week talk about sex, creativity and money for you. Is it a great novel? A sensual busi­ness adventure? Maybe you know what it's all about already. We leave this combi­nation up to you. VIRGO Your creative energies are very high, especially on the weekends, when you have time to concentrate. Mak­ing something lovely is your own reward for you, but your talents won't go unrecognized. What's pleasurable could become profitable. LIBRA- Things are coming clear again. A retreat into selfishness just wasn't you. In fact. you'll be tempted to go to the other extreme, trying to do too much for others. Then. next Monday or Tuesday, somebody's going to do some­thing nice to you! SCORPIO Freedom calls. You can almost touch it. Whether it's a release from a person. a job, or a place. the opportunity for breaking out to a fresh start will present itself in a way that may be unusual Grab it and gol SAGITTARIUS-Selfish, Selfish' You have a relationship that's on the shaky side, and rather than deal with the prob­lem you're pulling back into a shell. Quit hiding, for heaven's sake1 If a confronta­tion is needed, do it' CAPRICORN-The love light keeps on burning You've got so much to say to this new person that your day-to-day respon­sibilities seem like so many unwanted interruptions in this fine affair. A mutual friend may be jealous. though' AQUARIUS-Any decision you make now will have great importance for the rest of the year Accomplishment is the key word. Through a most unusual turn of events. you might do a great deal of that. Plug away, and trust your hunches. PISCES-Add to a recent take charge attitude a deep emotional involvement, and whoever's on your receiving end is going to get a lot of love and loving. Express yourself vocally as well as physi­cally. They'll know your sounds are real! THIS SUNDAY, OCT. 13th PARTY! 6th ANNIVERSARV OF THE MARCH ON WASHINCTON (LOOK OUT-HOLIDAY "N"!) SPECIALS TO ~ERV ONE IN 8PW T-SHIRTS OR MARCH T-SHIRTS ,~\'\ ,~\'\ ,~,~ ,vt. OCTOBER 11, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 1022 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 528-8851 \~'t.· 11:?1 o't.· ' f: 3 HAPPY HOURS DAILY M-F MEM~ER HAPPY HOUR PRICES .A/J. THE TIME TO LEATHER#EN AFTER HOURS NIGHTLY Excitemen t with a touch of class HALLOWEEN COSTUMES G-Strings for Men & Women Body Glitter, and much, much more! QUEEN SIZES AVAILABLE 10am-9pm Monday-Saturday ·~i(~" '~20 Hwy. 6 N. 859-2023 10 MONTROSE VOICE/ OCTOBER 11, 1985 Films Carla Dunlap in "Pumping Iron II: The Women" David Ogden Stiers, John Cusak, and Laura Waterbur,y in "Better Off T>Pnrf" Four Fall Feature Films to Fascinate You By Scott Cutsinger Montroi;e Voice Film Critic This week's four new films offer every­thing from Patsy Cline to Arnold Schwar­zenegger. For lovers of brawn and muscle, there is either the violence of Commando (with Arnold) or top female bodybuilders competing at Caesar's Palace in Pumping Iron II. The Women. Country music fans can revel in Sweet Dreams, which brings Patsy back to life in the form of Jes:;ica Lange. Hits like "Crazy" and "I Fall to Pieces" sound so much like Patsy that you would swear that they are the original versions-and you would be right. Lange doesn't look much hke the busty, robust Cline, but her lip­synchmg and actmg will definitely win you over. Thrown in for good (or bad> measure is the teen flick Better Off DPad, for those of you who enjoy such thing:;. Director Sav­age Steve Holland was in Houston to pub­licize his directorial debut. and he was obviously proud of his )ow-budget project. Unfortunately, the movie is a silly mess redeemed only by some cute animated scenes and one or two comic sequences. o Commando If you enjoyed the trill and adventure of Rambo, you will probably be disappointed with Commando. With a miniscule thread of plot and a huge body count, thi:; is one of the most wasteful and pointless films I have ever encounterl'd. Arnold "Terminator" Schwargenegger is a former "special operations" officer who is living incognitio with this young daughter up in the mountains. A former South Amencan dictator that he once ousted manages to kidnap his daughter, and wants Colonial ~atrix (Arnold) to kill the current leader to get her back. That's about it for the plot. Matrix has 12 hour' to find his daughter tthe time it takes to fly to South Amenc-a and kill the leader) and he uses his time wisely. First he grab11 Rae Dawn Chong from her car to help him in a tight spot, and then he proceeds to drag her around for the rest of the film (Don't ask why-I really don't know.) He uses a bulldozer to get into an ammo store and then steals enough for a small arsenal. You know it's coming-the one­man war agamst thousands of bad guys where he mows them down by the hundreds. Apparently some mo~ie aud1en· ces are making a game out of the body count m this sick film. Bombs, guns, slashed arms and legs, and even an ax to the grom become so regularin the last half hour that it actually becomes bonng. Even This is a very bad film that no one should waste good money on. The people that like this sort of senseless, violent entertainment probably should not be see­ing something like this anyway. I know that I would feel a little safer if they didn't have a hero/ example like Matrix to fol­low. o Better Off Dead The 25-year-old director writer of Better Off Dead was in town last week, and it is a shame that his film is not nearly as inter­e:; ting as he. Savage St.eve Holland has pulll'd an incredible feat in this young career by arranging Hollywood backing for not one, but three feature films. All before he ha~ proven himself worthy through box office receipts or critical acclaim. After making several inexpensive short films, Holland wrote some scripts and was invariably lucky. He was given $4 million to make a film of hi11 :;cript Better Off Dead, and he made it under budget. After it test-marketed well, A&M Productions the end is an unbalanced and ridiculous Arnold Schu·arunel(Rer in "Commando" fight to the death. gave him $10 million to make My Summer Vacation (tentative title) and be brought that one in under budget also. Holland's third film will begin production soon, just as his first one hits the theaters. He defended his first endeavor as being a "parody of youth comedies." There are the u8ual characters, including the stupid girls, the dumb blonde jock, the over­weight oaf and the love-sick teen boy. There are even characters from other teen films like the teacher from Fast Times at Ridgemont High, the slobbish owner of "Porky's," and the "booger" character from Revenge of the Nerds. Yes, this film has all the ingredients for a typical youth comedy ... parody. Trouble is, there is a fine line between parody and stupidness that this film stum· blee and falls over. This story about a boy who wants to kill himself when his girl runs off with the jock is cliche, and when he tries to "prove himRelf' we become bored. There are some funny little anima· tion scenes to brighten things up, and the family scenes with David Ogden Stiers and Kim Darby as the parents are funny take offs on suburban family life. Yet, overall the movie looks cheap, throws off too many cheap lines, and ends up being as foolish as the genre it is attempting to parody. Holland said that this film differs because "it's not as mean-spirited as other teen movies." This may be true, but the overall effect that the film has on the audience is that the teen years are a farce. The main character (John Cusack from The Sure Thing) seems to be going through all this hell and hassle, for what-a stupid girl who could care leRs. What a waste! The message (according to the director) is that you are never "Better Off Dead." However, if I had to live with Lone's car­toonishly silly family, deal with his ingnorant friends and family, and sit tho· rugh a geometry class that everyone seems to enjoy, I think that I would be much better off . . at another movie. Sweet Dreams It is inevitable that this film will be com- Jessica Lanl(e p/ayh Patsy Cline rn "Sweet Dreams" pared to Coal Miner's Daughter, espe­cially since the main character was introduced in that film and the producer is the same for both films. However, Sweet Dreams is a very different movie which covers a different era, a much shorter time span, and a pretty uneventful life. Thie film centers on the last eight years of the life of country singer Patsy Cline, from 1955 to 1963. In 1955, she first appeared at the Grand Ole Opry and then was a smash on the Authur Godfrey Show in 1957 with "Welkin after Midnight." At the same time she ditched her husband and married an explosive man named Charlie Dick. Sweet Dreams spends a great deal of time focusing on the passionate and tern· permental romance between Charlie and Patsy. It's a seesaw love affair that seems to be getting rockier as Patsy's career rises and her hit songs take her out on the road. The thing that holds them together is that they are both volatile dreamers with a mean temper. It's just that one person is finally reeling that dream of succef!ll and the other is stuck in a rut. Watching this film , we can see that it works as a nice biographical drama, but we really want to know what makes Patsy tick and why her singing style is so magi· cal. Instead we spend too much time with her domestic squabbles and very little on her music and popularity. It's truethather popularity hit a peak after her death in 196.1, but while shl' is alive we get only snippets of concerts and recording scs· sions. The main reason to see Sweet Dreams is Jessica Lange and Ann Wedgeworth. JBA· sics Lange is nearly perfect as Patsy, and ehe never overacts or pushes her character too far. The surprise is Ann Wedgeworth as the mother, who could well nab a Rup­porting Oscar for this role. She has all the beet lines, and really sparkles in a small role. When you leave this film , you may well be humming some of Patsy's biggest hits. Unfortunately, her life was not eventful enough to make a really memorable expe­rience, and all we can remember are the few mt>morable concert scenes. I guess like most mfluentinl singers, Palqy Cline will be remembered for her stirring songs, and not as the character in Sweet Dreams. o Pumping Iron II: The Women It's a bit difficult for a gay, male film critic to objectively view a film centered on mus· cular women, but I'll give it a whirl. While it wasn't the most fascinating subject for an evening's viewing, it was by no means a boring one. The event is the 1983 Caesar's Cup com· petition held in Las Vegas for women bodybuilders. We follow several women as they prime their bodies for the "battle of the buldgee." This is no Jane Fonda wor· kout. These women really put their bodies on the rock and bite the bullet. The major threat is Australian Bev Francis, a powerlifter whose massive body is a threat to the "femininity" of the contest. Many of the judges (and even some of the contestants) feel that women with buldging bicepts do not qualify as "womanly." It becomes a battleofinsecur· itiee and sex appeal, with many slightly· developed women using things other than their body to attract attention. As competi· tor Rachel McLish says, "My hair is as important as my body." The film treats the workouts and final competition as a documentary, but we quickly realize that this has all been staged for this filming. The interactions betweE'n friends and lovers seem staged and awkward. with many screaming to be cut from the film. However, many of the ladies (especially Carla Dunlap) have some interesting views on the competition that are well worth listening to. Of course, the final C'ompetition is the film's high· light, and it's well worth wading through the first half to watch. Surprisingly, the subject of lesbians is never approached, although many of the characters are obviously of that orients· tion . Instead, we are only shown the rela· tionships between the women who have boyfriends or husbands. This is a strange omission, onl' that for this type of film should surely be explored. Maybe they wanted to shatter the myth that all women bodybuilders are lesbians. but it's silly to ignore the ones that are obviously there. Pumping Iron II pre.;ents a po!litive view of tht>ee women that makes them seem less bizzare. The photographers doa beautiful job of photographing the women so that even the bully Bev Francis seems like a Greek god. Not a big crowd· appealing film by any mt>ans, Pumping Iron II is for men and women who can appreciate a new definition of femininity. And, of course, for those who just like to gawk at a well-toned woman's body. HAIR LOSS­NEW MEDICAL TREATMENT Male pattern baldness occurs when the hormone DHT acts on hair folli· cles. Proxidil a is an advanced combination of topical DHT-block· inii agents with the hair growth­sbmulator Minoxidil. It commonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does not. Call today for a consultation. Peter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite ID, 5401 Daehwood, Bellaire 661-2321 OCTOBER 11, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 -presents- .A mrJti-nuilU. thtatriud rnnt, mttcn by Emily M"""· ,;_,,.,:~·; of ~eeuuo,.~ •• ·c;.1\'-c;. '"" The cOllfmcd cop and Sister Mary Boom Boom. Tbe murders of Hartty Mille and the Mayor of San Franc:Uco. Tbe candlelight proccaioa. Tbe trial of Dan Whitt. Tbe~c"dcfCDK, Tbe 7-~ ecntcocc, The White Night Jliota. ~,.,~ ~ .. , ::,q ~ ~e 'I 'I ~,,,~ ..:-'''~ ~\J# '------------'------;1,l1j-•;,t October 10-Nwember 10, 1985/ForrestrPRtUm.s, call228-8421. Alley The11tre/L1irge Stage/615 T~APmue . ... ~nd on the Alley's Arena Stage, HELD OVER through November 17 ... A ... MY NAME IS ALICE," a sparkling musical revue featuring five gifted song & dance women. Don't miss It! For reservations: 228-8421. ST EA K N I G HT Wednesday Nites-7:00, 14°0 Steak and all the "fixings" and DYNASTY on the Patio Brazos River Band-Live-7:00 to 11:00, NO COVER INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIAL THURSDAYS H If p . N. h 8:00 to Closing- DJ David Royalty a rice lg t All Drinks DANCE ON REAL PARQUET- NO SPLINTERSI Included call for details Member fiGBG WE SUPPORT THE CARL DAVIS FUNDRAISER Sunday-Oct. 13- at THE RANCH Carl will be missed by all of his friends at the BAB • Bl\AZQS BIV!:'B BQll'TOM HOUSTON 12 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11, 1985 Sports Voice Rebels Def eat the Herricanes, Yet Fall in Softball Rankings Despite a 8-4 victory over previously unbeaten Herricanes, Marion & Lynn's Rebels fell two games behind to third place in Houston Women's Softball action last Sunday The Herricanes remain in first place in the division. The Rebels, who formerly held second place m the A Division, now tie for third Wlth Coffee Beans after the St-ans out· scored them 5-3. Also, the Coffee Beans shut out the Ducks, 5-0. The Hollywood Bears took over .-econd place in the A Dn'lSion with two wim;, 9-5 over the Ducks and 9-5 over the Bacchus Boozers. In the B Divil!ion, MCCR Angels took over the top position by soundly defeating Undercover, 11.0. They strengthened their lead with a 6-3 win over Latin Express. In other WSL action. the Herricanes sobered the Boozers, 13-5; Sport slowed down the Expre88, 9-2; and Undercover licked SoftTouch, 10-3. With two weeks of play remaining, WSL action really heats up at Heights Lions Field. Latin Express will try to fight their way out of the B basement by facing Undercover at 9:00 a.m. and SoftTouch at noon. MCCR will try to field off a chal· lenge by SoftTouch at 10:00 a.m- Under­cover will be seeking a second place poeition at 11:00 a.m. against Sport. In the A Division, the Hollywood Bears and Coffee Beans will renew an old rivalry at 1:00 p.m. The Duck,; will try to hand Herricanes their second los8 at 2:00 p.m. Bacchus hopes to get their first win when they meet Coffee Bean8 at 3:00 p.m. The Hollywood Bean; could take over the number one spot after their contest with Herricanes at 4 00 p.m. The Rebels will close out the day's action when they face the Ducks at 5:00 p.m WSL League elections will be held in two weeks on Oct. 20 at the field . All league members may vote The League is planning two fundraisers for November. On Sunday, Nov. 3, from 3:00 to 6:00 p.m , a barbeque will be held at Bacchus. The cost v.ill be $3 per plate. Also, a Midnight Bowl will be held at Post Oak Lanes on Friday, Nov. 15, at 10:00 p.m. The cost includes breakfa8t and prizes Wlll be awarded. With 1 Week Left, Bacchus I Still Ahead in Pool With one week remaining in the MSA Summer Billiards League, Bacchus I con· tinued to hold a healthy lead. The Ranch Hands held second place. The Barn and Lipstick followed close behind in third and fourth places, respectively. The 611 III stepped up to fifth place after receiving a forfeit from EJ's. (Thia past Wednesday, October 9, was the last night of play with each team fac· ing off in position rounds. The results will be reported in next week's MONTROSE VOICE.) Team captains are asked to let Debbie Scoo know the number of people, from your team, who will be attending the Pool Party on October 27 Anyone interested in playing in the Winter League can contact Dennis Lord at 660-6752. Sports Voice Calendar & S tandings Regular Weekly Even ts SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston Tennis Club 9am-Noon. Homer Ford Tennis Center Houstons Women·s Softball League compet1t1on. 9am·6pm, Heights-Lyons Field, Shepherd at 13th Women's Bowling League Spm. Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling League 7 30pm. Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: Frontrunners. Golf Center, Her· mann Park - MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY; Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY; Houston Tennis Club plays 7 30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool League. 8pm, m sponsors' clubs THURSDAY: Frontrunners Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Sta­d um Bowl Special Events Oct 12 13 Annual Texas-OU Tenn!S C!ss­SIC, Dallas Nov 9-11 Houston Tennis Assn 'Hou-Tex V' Women's Softball League OIVISION STANDINGS FollO'W•nfl Week 5 Won LOOI P<1 GB A DIVISION Herrlcanes 6 857 HollY"'ood Beers 4'h 2'h 642 1 'h Maroon & Lynns Rebels 4 3 571 2 Coffee Beans 4 3 571 2 Ducks 2'h 4'h 357 3'h BacclW5 Boozers 0 7 000 6 B DIVISION MCCR Angels 5'6 'h 916 5poft 4 1 800 1 unaer~ 3 '3 500 2'h Solt Touch 2 3 400 3 Llll1nE•P<_. 'h 5'h 083 5 RESULTS Oct 8 Coll .. Buna s. Oud<S 0 Herricanes 13. Bacchus Boozers 5 Hollywood Bears 9, Docks 7 Coffee Beans 5, Marlon & Lynn's Rebels 3 Hollywood Bears 9. Bacchus Boozers 5 Manon & Lynn's Rebels 8. Hemca.- 4 MCCR Angels 11 Undercover o Sport 9, Laton E•press 2 Undercover 10. Soft Touch 3 MCCR Angels 6. Laton E><press 3 SCHEDULE Sunday Oct I 3 Latin Express vs Undercover, 9em MCCR Angels vs Solt Touch. 10am Sport vs Undercover, 1 tam Lat an E>press vs Soft Touch, noon Hollywood Boars vs Coffee Beans. 1 pm Herncanes vs Ducks, 2pm Bacchus Boozers vs Coffee Beans. 3pm Hemcancs vs Hollywood Bears, 4pm Manon & Lynn's vs Rebels Ducks. 5pm MSA Pool Leagu.e Standings Summer League FOLLOWING WEEK 21 TEAM ThlS Week Matches so lar, Total games 1 Bacchus 1 1s-o 17-4 200-115 2 Ranch Hands 1S-O 16-5 18&-127 3 The Barn 11-<I 15-6 207-108 4 L1pst1Ck 15-0 1>6 191·124 5 611 II - 15-0 15-6 17&-137 6Stree!C•ts 9-6 15-6 174-141 7 JRs 13-2 14-7 197-117 8 Bacchus II 8-7 14-7 1~130 9 Kindred SplrotSI 4--11 13-8 172-1'3 10 BRS Cowboys 13-2 11-10 151-164 11 E!J's 0.15 10.11 141-174 12 Too611 10.5 9-12 174- 141 13 K1ndredSpor1ts II &-9 9-12 155-160 14The81t 5-10 &-15 148-167 15 Al's Pals 7-8 &-15 138-177 16Salty'sShoolers 0.15 &-15 115-200 17 Ranc:hefooa G-15 5-16 127·187 18 Hooters 2-13 4--16 108-192 19 Yard~ 2-13 4--17 107-208 Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder mlllch• throogh Sept 30 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Rand•ll Dickerson 3 Rock Hadnot 4 Donny Kelley s Ron Belt 6J C Barrer• 7 R•ch Corde< 8 Rick Dupont 95hy wm1e 10 Anni AlbanU EXPERIENCE THE WXURY!!! DRIVE THE CAR OF YOUR DREAMS FOR LESS!I Cash for Your Trade ... No Down Payment CADILLAC OLDS '86 Sedan Deville . ..... . ........ 27800mo. 186 98 Regency 27800mo. '86 Calais . . . . . 18400mo. '86 Fleetwood . 32700mo. NISSIAN TOYOTA '86 Sentra 12700mo. '86 300ZX . . . . . 27900mo. '86 Cresida 25900mo. 186 Celica ..... 17800mo. BMW MERCEDES '85 3181 ....... 26goomo. '85 325E . . . . . . 33goomo. 185 190E . . . . . . 35400mo. '85 300 . . . . . . . 48000mo. Domestic ALL MAKES MOTOR LEASING Foreign ALL MODELS SAN J>.C1N'TO 10700 Richmond ]Bl B 6 Suite 100, Houston, TX 77042 - 5 6 Serving You Since 1926 A DIVISION OF SAN JACINTO MOTOR CALL DEBBIE OR ROBBIE A SINf~~, l_EASE QUOTE~ PEH'.ONAL RATES MAY VARY UNION ~A CK SPORTSWEAR HAIRCUTTING Endle•• Summer Suntan• $3 With package of ten 30-monute tanning sessions at $30 1 21 2 WESTHEIMER A full service salon Mon.-Sat. 10-7, Sunday 12·6 For appointment call 528-9600 OCTOBER 11, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 We're the Montrose Voice. We're the publication everybody is reading! END OF SEASON SALE!!! S0°!o off Swimwear!! S0°!o off Sleeveless T-shirts!! This is because we're the publication that works hardest each week serving the community with professional news cover­age, mass distribution and the most fea­tures. ALSO Before the cold weather hHs Leather Jackets now 35% off! Leather by Boots at the t<tpcoRo 526-1719 LE~~n ~;>o v I COT~ ustom Room 11 Fa1rv1ew 526-2668 B • .lo.un no. atthe 526-1902 For advertising information, call our ad sales department, 529-8490. We'll show you that Montrose Voice advertising real­ly works. It's really effective. It will really bring you new customers- next week. International Printing Specialists #/Jr«' need '#~ on f!JJafte1t' uu can f!l1/U/n£ it/ Our Ser vices Include: * Design & Layout * Business Cards * Business Stationery * Flyers, Brochures * Price Lists * Menus * Office Forms including: * Blank Paper Stock: Continuous Forms, Invoices, Copy paper, letter & legal size Purchase Orders, Mailing * Large Mailing Envelopes Labels, Tabs, Interoffice Forms. * Delivery * Wedding Invitations, Social Announcements & Brides Bout ique Please consider us for your pr inting needs - Call 683-0450 so our Sales Staff can assist you with your next printing order. 4520 W. 34th • Houston, Texas 77092 • Telephone: (713) 683-0450 14 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11, 1985 Deadlines Pass; Stage is Set for November By Linda Wyche Montrose Voice Managing Edit-Or With this past Saturday being the filing deadline for candidates in the Nov. 5 Houston municipal elections, and Sunday being the last day for voters to register, the stage seems to be set for Houston's bian· nual race for City Hall. Incumbent Mayor Kathy Whitmire will lead the slate as she was the first one chosen in a drawing for ballot positions. Former Mayor Louie Welch, Whitmire's closest contender, drew the sixth position and will follow all other candidates in the listing in the mayor's category Other mayoral candidate•, in order of ballot position are, John McCabe, Willie Mae Reid, LB. " Lock" Chambers, and Susan Director. In District C, which includes Montrose, Carl H. Denton drew the top spot on the ballot with incumbent George Greanias to be listed second. Straight Slater Charles C. Carter will follow GreaniaR, and Sam Johnson wi11 be the fourth and finalcand1- date listed for that position. There arc five candidates for council­member at-large Position L They will appear on the ballot as follows: John Lee Hudson, who decided against a run for mayor; Dick Slemmer; John Marcus Cashin; incumbent Jim Westmoreland, and Pnt HnllnrAn The four candidates for councilmember at-large Position 2 are Margaret Hotze, mother of Campaign for Houston leader Steven Hotze; Eleanor Tinsley; Dorothy Stephens, and Jeff Wallace. Incumbent Jim Greenwood will lead off the ballot for at-large Position 3; followed by Curtis Perry, and David L. Justus. At-large position 4 has the most council candidates with F.N Williams, Dick Hite, James Forreter. Anthony Hall, Bobby E. Mills, and O.J Striegler, appearing in that order. • SERVICE PLUS TAFT Automotive =till! 1411 Taft 522-2190 * Cooling System check I flush $27's * A/C Charge I Check $26" * Oil, Filter I Lube $24's I.me to cnec~ VO<Jr ig s(Stem• ASK FOR CHlfF BUTTROCK 1411 TAFT-522-2190 -. LoUlc Welch Mayor Kathy Whitmire ~** Mo!"-trose e ~ *At eEcliEn The fifth at-large seat has Elizabeth Arnold, Judson Robinson, Bill Anderson and Straight-SlatPr Jim Kennedy. There are two candidates for city con­troller. lncumbant Lance Lalor is first on the ballot. He is followed by Doyle Sewell. City Council on Tuesday denied the Campaign for Houston Straight Slate one box voting, which would have allowed voters to punch one box and vote for all of the Straight Slate candidates. Council did, however, unanimously approve having the words "Straight Slate" follow the can­didates name. Council acted chiefly on a recommendation from City Attorney Jerry Smith who said that the city charter HOSPITAL INSURANCE MAJOR MEDICAL Ages 19-34-$45.30 35-49- 50.84 50-64- 70.01 Monthly Bank Draft Insurance Office 523-9822 Group Rates Individual Issue allows for the designation even if council voted against it. This past week was alRo the deadline for candidates to report on campaign revenue and expenditures. At present, Whitmire has raised about $1 million compared to Welch's $750,000. When Welch entered the race, his backers said they had already amassed pledges of $1 million. Welch relies heavily on large contributions of $5000 or more. Much of Whitmire's funding came from fundraisers held previous to the January referendum. Some of those contributors have since joined forces with Welch. Whit­mire campaign staffers say the mayor, seeking a third term in office, has a $1.2 million budget. Most of both candidates' campaign funding will go to media related projects. Schedules for both candidates will acrel­erate rapidly as the Nov. 5 election nears. Both candidates are planned to make joint appearances on Oct. 12, Channel 13; Oct. 15, Rice Design Alliance; Oct. 22, Congre­gation Beth Yeshuran; Oct. 28, Channel 11; Oct. 31, Rotary Club of HouRton; Nov. 1, Channel 8; nnd Nov. 3, Channel 2. At·cording to Sue Lovell, president of the Houston Gay Political Caucus, the group registered between 2000 and 2500 voters in a massive voter regiAtration campaign. The caucus believes that getting out the gay vote will be the key to victory for prop­onents of equal rights in Houston. Houston May Be Targeted by Insurer Houston has been named in a memo issued to health and life insurance underwriters by the Lincoln National Life Insurance Company of Fort Wayne, Ind, as a city which may "probably" be selected to be among those which will be used to screen for "po11sible" homosexuals. Lincoln National is attempting to screen out possible AIDS victims by using mari· tal status and residence information. The insurer wants to use age and resi­dence to screen single and divorced men between the ages of 20 and 49 who live in New York, San Franscisco and Los Angeles. Miami and Newarkjoin Houston on the liRt of "probable" residences. The memo also advised underwriters to check for indications that "lifestyle, hab­its or medical history suggest a person is one of the AIDS risk groups. It also dis­cussed the possibility of using an AIDS virus screening test The Lincoln National program would also include many single heterosexual men and c-ould lead to discrimination of single men within the workplace. A spokesman for Lincoln National said the suggestions resulted from the high medical costs inc-urred in the treatment of AIDS victims. Interfaith Alliance to Sponsor Religious Fair The Houston Interfaith Alliance, a group t•ompo8ed of members of ten churches and religioui; groups, is sponsoring a RcligiouH Fair on Friday, October 18, from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and on Saturday, October 19 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (coinciding with the Westheimer Art Festival), at Commun· ity Gospel Center, 3207 Montrose, opposite Liberty Bank. The fair will feature repre,;entatives from most of Houston's gay oriented reli· gious organizations who will provide information about religious services and other activities that each organization provides. This will be first time that a reli­gious fair has been held in the Houston community. Man Charged With Sex With Minors News One News Service A 32-year-<ild liquor store clerk has been charged with allegedly having sexual encounters with several teenage boys under 17. James Wild, of the 2000 block of Wes­theimer, was arrested Tuesday and charged with sexual assault with a child. Bond was set at $5000. Vice officers say a 14-year-<ild runaway told p0lice that Wild engaged in sex with him. A search ofWild'e home uncovered over 100 photographs of boys in a variety of sex acts, police say. The snapshots included about 40 different boys, police said. Montrose Bookstore Clerk Among First Convicted Under New Ordinance James R. Garrison, a clerk at Studz Book Store, 1132 W. Alabama, was, on Tuesday, among the first of three bookstore employees convicted under the new city ordinance regulating adult bookstores and arcadl'B. Garrison David Cordon and Ervin L. Okl'ly wer; each convicted on citations after undercover agents raided their stores Sept. 6. The Claes C misdemeanors carry a fine of $500. Charges were dropped against Dean ·Longworth. another defendant in the case. Attorney Charles Rice Young. who defended the four. said he would appeal the case. Young argues that bookstore clerks are not "operators," and therefore should not be punished for managerial violations. Young plans to defend more clerks as their cases come up for trial in Municipal Court. Vice officer R.E. McFarland testified that after buying tokens from Garrison, he ~ntered the arcade section where he used tht> tokens to activate a movie show· ing two men performing sex acts on each other. According to vice officers, none of the adult bookstores in the city hav~ appl~ed for or recieved, the new permit which req0uires minimum lij!'hting standards and requires that all managers have an unob­structed view of peep show areas. COFFEE SHOP 1525 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 529-2289 BUYONE­GET ONE FREE $5.10 VALUE Cheaper Than Eating At Home! WITH THIS COUPON PURCHASE OUR CHICKEN FRIED STEAK AND RECEIVE ONE OF EQUAL VALUE OR LESS FREE! One coupon per party per v•S•t Not val"1 m combm1t1on with any other discount offer Expires 10117. 85. .J ----------- Stein & Toklas DETECTIV ES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardner. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real-life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER ~. 95 in bookstores or use tl11s coupon to order by mail. He;:; i; $7.so fo-;:-Mu7d;; £; M;;;d;r is Murder, by Samuel Steward. name ----------- address ___ ---- city - ---------- state ip ____ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 2 FOR 1 BREAKFASTS 8 30AM·IOOOAM Ch@vlte,Jec MIXICAN FOO!l .\\ HEFJ: TllE IEAl111F\!l rroru M!IT 811 RJCHMO~D • HOUliOS • j!z.2)61 OCTOBER 11, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 £JU11il£)~' 'I fJ):Ui;JdJJ "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS· Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer T EXAS S TATE O PTICAL CE~ Dr. E. Burt Denton & Associates OPTOMETRISTS TSO-Village 2515 University 528-1589 . TSO-South :\fain 4414 .\fain 523-5109 Both Offices l 'nder 'ew Owne1 ship and .:\fanagement {!§) RT~ \@)XOHRrlse NAUTILUS FOR MEN & WOMEN *COUNSELING ·so NAUTILUS MACHINES *SUPERVISION *SAFE UVA TANNING BEDS *WHIRLPOOLS *COMPUTERIZED BIKES *UNIVERSAL *DYNAMIC AEROBIC CLASSES *FREE WEIGHTS *WET & DRY SAUNAS *VERY CLEAN *AIR CONDITIONED * $30 with Free Financing * 2900 RICHMOND ('*" G1'11nw1y Plea) PHONE 524-9932 16 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11, 1985 o The Winning Poster "The Colors of Fall" by Jane Ledebuhr Art Festival to Continue With 'Block of Art' Format Members of Houston's art and craft com­munity, good food, live music and enter· tainment will all be a part of the Fall Westheimer Colony Art Festival, say the organizers. It will be held Saturday and Sunday, October 19 and 20, from 9:00 a.m until dusk each day. And once again the "official" area of the festival will be the full block of the Liberty Bank Building, including front and back parking lots, bounded by Westheimer, Montrose, Lovett Blvd., and Yoakum. Last spring's festival was the first appearance of the "Block of Art" format for the popular semi-annual event, which is co-sponsored by the Westheimer Colony As1<ociation and Liberty Bank. "Even the$! donation for adults did not cause a problem smce everyone was told the proceeds would be used to combat the degeneration of the lower section of Wet;· theimer where the sexually oriented bus1· nesse.s were making that portion of the busy Houston street into an economic blight," stated "Rock" Owen, area home owner and president of the Westheimer Colony Association. The association will again ask a $1 donation to enter the iuried art area with Police Asked to Remove Gloves Newt1 One News Service Gay activist Ray Hill has asked Houston Police Chief Lee Brown to order police officers patroling the Montrose area to take off their rubber glovei;. Hill says some police patroling the lower Westhcimer strip are wearing rubber gloves for fear of catching AIDS. Hill said he finds the practice "personally offen· 8JVe. ,. "Certainly there is no need for police to go to such extremes," said Hill. Chief Brown agreed to look into the mat· ter, said Hill. funds being used in the association's con· tinuing efforts to "clean up" the area. they said. A major portion of the funds from the Spring show hat; been donated to the Lower Westheimer Police Community Center, which plans to open this month in the 700 block of Westheimer The layout of the new design is arranged so that no artists with like categories will be placed next to each other and there will be wide aisles allowing for easy acce"s to each booth, organizers said. A variety of foods and drink will be found in the bank's drive-thru teller area on the comer of Montrose and Lovett. Music and entt>rtainment for the two­day event will be provided by Signature and Johnny Band the Bad Boys, who will play rock 'n roll classics of the sixties. Mike T., the Mad Hatter Magician on Stilts, will display his "light of hand in the festival area. "To make it easier to find the artistt; or crafts persons you are seeking, there will be directional signs and lisL' of the artists by booth numbers. We found many of the new visitors to the festival were not famil· iar with the fomt and back parking facili­ties of Liberty Bank. Therefore, there will be maps showing the artists' booth space. Also for convenience, there will be four or more entrances for the public to gain entry into the festival area," announced "Char· lie" Zindler, festival director. Since the official fectival is contained in the "Block of Art" on the bank's parking lot, the 100 to 900 blocks of Westheimer will not be dosed to automobile traffic, said Zindler. Propt'rty owners in the area, however, have leased space for exhibitions to com· mercial vendors. The major difference between exhibits in the official Liberty Bank block, and those elRewhere, is that Festival organizers insist that exhibitors at the bank display only individually· created works of art wh ile most exhibitors in the other are.as will be selling maRs· produc-ed commercial material. Winning Poster Chosen for Art Festival "The Colors of Fall" was the theme for the poster deRign contest which accompanies the semi-annual Westheimer Colony Art Festival. All of the 105 entries to the con· test used the brilliant colors of the Autumn seaRon. Jane Ledebuhr's winning poster fea· tures a fuschsia border with a bough of yellow and fuchsia leaves extending from the upper righthand corner of the 20" x 26" poster. The center focus of the poster is a falling leaf making a ripple effect in a field of aqua water. For the first time in many years, the color black is not seen in the winning entry. Used as the annoucnement for the popular outdoor fei;tival, this year's poster will be officially presented to Rock Owen, association president, during the Westhei­mer Colony Gala for all the artists on Fri­day, Oct. 18. At that time, Owen will prei;ent Ledebuhr with a $500 check from the Westheimer Colony Association for her creative design. "With the largest number of entries in the fall contest, we can say that each of our honorable mentions and the winn ing design followed the 'Colors of Fall' theme and used the browns, red, oranges, yel­lows, green, blues, maroons, and rust that exemplify the fall colors," announced "Cha rlie" Zindler, festival director. The poster, as well as T-shirts showing the winning design, will be for sale at the information booth of the two-day show. Past festival posters will be available as well. Honorable men ti on posters were created by George Tumey, Debra Page, Lori Stiff and Tim Chambers. J udging the Fall pos­ter entries were Jan Whitaker of Whitaker Advertising, Gary Null of Midtown Adver­tising, and artist David Anderson. 11o:i. C>FF'PA~nmr Cl'B'lS'rl "10o1:15f!n>tnt lo e A/C. REPAIR ~1 ,~ • VW SPECIALISTS~, -: & FOREIGN CARS a: I:» ~~~~ • OVER 10 YEARS ~I li;l SAT EXPERIENCE c > • ENGINE .JI lz CARS OVERHAULS 0 0rRUCKS • ELECTRICAL z1 r WORK C l:icvcLES ~I 10 a: ~ TEXAS ST ATE ~I ,~INSPECTION STATIO "': I~ 238 WEST GRAY !'! I~ 528-2886 ll:• Of'tN z SAM 530PM I~. TWO LANES I>• FAST SERVICE ~• AUTO REPAIRS ~ I~. MUFFLERS • TIRES • CONVERTERS ~I 12.?'!.lO!i.,O!E, ~R,ll ~D.J;:'~'!,l~Off.l Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily BIJOU VIDEO SALES THE NATION'S MOST POPULAR MAIL ORDER HOUSE FOR GAY VIDEO This month save on the f ilms of Jean-Daniel Cadinot France's master of gay pornography HOT ON THE TRAIL TOUGH & TENDER SEX BAZAAR DREAM BOYS BECOMING MEN SEX DRIVE $5495* each For charge orders, coll 1-800-932-7111 (In Illinois, coll 1-800-572-2369) ., .... by INll. Mnd coatw't <her:k ""0 or ~A MC or AiN• ~" with •aplratioft ••• olo'V ••lh a ttol• INftlltlofyOVONOl9f'll ~ludongo~ct-g. ( SJ Jor IM 111 tape $1 frorHCh9dclioNitapt)CS'dindicot• ~ftwf' 7ov ftffd VHS 0t a.to formot ~SI for catroloo -4th--~ f'Cll yo¥Clr9 ..... 2' I~ Dept M BUOU VmEO SALES TllE ?'IW WOE() EXPERT.f --1349 N. Woll~ Chp. ll 60610-- ::E = •Prices good until December I, 1985 . Good reading for you ===============~from===============~ A•L•Y•S•O•N PUBLICATI O NS DEADLY LIES, by John Preston, $5.00. Who says heroes can't be gay! Ever since his lover was killed by a homophobic coward, Alex Kane has fought for the safety of gay men everywhere Herc, he takes on an unscrupulous politician in­tent on spreading homophobic propa­ganda. !The first two books in this series arc also available, at $5.00 each: Sweet Dreams and Golden Years.) YOUNG, GAY AND PROUD!, $4.00. Gay teenagers have no place to go with their questions This candidly-written book addresses such concerns as: Am I really gay! What should I tell my parents! Is it a good idea to come out in school! How can I tell if my best friend is gay! BETWEEN FRIENDS, by Gillian E. Hanscombe, $7 00 In this innovative and widely-praised novel, Hanscombe uses the lives of four very different women to explore 1ust how suongly our political beliefs shape our everyday lives. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher, by Enc Rofcs, $7 00 When he graduated from Harvard, Eric Rofcs began teaching sixth grade at a conservative private school. Soon he felt the strain of a split identity - between "the gay Eric and the teacher Eric;" here he tells of two years of teaching from within the closet, and his difficult decis10n to come out at work. DANCER DA WKJNS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, $6.00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls: "A wonderful, rip-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she writes a dozen more." "The book of the year,'' writes Feminist Bookstore News. .......... ,.. .., . ..., tN\1•1 f l Ut11• • f•._u I \I I \ 111111 EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00. Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start! This story of his life and loves 1s the funniest gay novel of the year. IN THE TENT, by David Recs, $6.00. Tim, seventeen, has no way of express­ing his attraction to his schoolmate Aaron, so he is left with frustration, humiliation and guilt. But in the middle of a camping trip, a storm traps the two of them in a tent with two other boys, and the issues can no longer be avoided. Faced with a life-threatening situation, the boys must rely on each other. THE SPARTAN, by Don Hamson, $5.95. In the days of the first Olympics, gay relauonships were a common and valued part of life. The Spartan tells the story of a young athlete and his adven· tures in love and war, providing a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our history. OCTOBER 11, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 THE LA VEND ER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to psychotherapy for les­bians and gay men, by Dr. Mamy Hall, $8.00. How many of us really know how to choose a therapist, or how to get the most out of therapy! Here, in a refresh­ingly readable style, Hall addresses that critical question, as well as what to ex· pect from therapy, danger signs to watch for, and when to get out of therapy HOT LMNG: Erotic stories about safe sex, edited by john Preston, $8.00. The AIDS crisis has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but it has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex­pression. Here, over a dozen of today's most popular gay writers present new short stories that imaginanvely eroticize safe sex. Contributors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and T R. Witomski. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7 .00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely! Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark. THE HUST L ER J O HN HENRY MA C KAY TllANSLAT f IY H 1 £ '-T l;EJlllU DY THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay; trans by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun· ther 1s fifteen when he arrives alone in the Berlin of the 1920s. There he soon learns how to pick up a few extra dollars on the street. One of his customers is a sensitive and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored with Gunther. But love docs not fit neatly in· to Gunther's new life as a hustler. . . The Hustler was first published in 1926, in Germany. For today's reader, it combines a poignant love story with a colorful portrayal of the gay subculture that thrived in Berlin a half-century ago. FIRESTORM, by Gerald Wening, $6.00. Most gay fiction takes place in an urban setting; here is an exception Firestorm tells of two men who fall m love in a rural midwestem town, only to have religious homophobia dramatically alter their lives. CHOICES, by Nancy Toder, $7.00. A popular novel about lesbian love that depicts the joy, passion, conflicts and in­tensity of love between women. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioh, $13.00. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic terrttory m which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. (Oversize paperback! b) Samud M. Strwud cudhor o/ r~ Pfiu:I AnJros t-tonn MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, $7 00 This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stones. TO ORDER Enclosed 1s $__ . Please send the books I've listed below !Add $1.00 postage when ordering 1ust one book: if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: I. ---- - - --- ---- 2. ------------- 3· -~~~~~~~---~ 4. ------------ 5. Visa and masiucard accepted; please send acct number, exp. date, and signature name address city ------ ------- state zip ___ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept P-5 40 Plympton St Boston, MA 02118 18 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11. 1985 Execution of Justice Is a 'Must See' Montrose Live By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Vo1Cc Thtt:ter Critic: Execution of Justice, currently playing at the Alley, is a "must ~ee." Any objections I might have are minor quibbles. Any praise I might lavish, dil· uted by my reputation as a, perhaps, too easily satisfied reviewer, will fall short. Presented at any time, this would be an insightful evening. Presented now, it is nothing short of brilliantly brave «<:hedul· ing. We must all hope that it will bring thi!l city back to its senses before election day. It certainly should at least break the gay voting bloc out of its lethargy. Should the arts be political? Yes. The arts must be free to talk about anything and everything. The best arts are always relevant. Why do you think they want us to ;tart labelling records with blue-pencil tags. Bowdler even bowdlerized Shakes· peare. Perhaps Execution should come with a note from the Surgeon General: This play, if seen and discussed by enough people, could mean the death of bigotry. This staging is multi·media. Scenes from the Oscar·winning documentary The Time of Harvey Milk are included. Yet this is quintessentially a theatrical work. At times there are two, three or more things going on all over the stage. They eye is unsure where to focus. This is well thought out to give you an accurate sense of the confusion which must have dominated the city of San Franci~c at the time. It's not all one-sided, either. In the midst of all that tumult, I became unsure of my own long-held beliefs. I wondered if I really would have voted Dan White guilty of two charges of murder one. How could the pathetic creature, convincingly por· trayed by Brandon Smith, have been so shattered by something he did with malice aforethought? Yet the facts are there. He did bring a gun and extra bullets into city hall, step­ping{?) through a window to avoid a metal detector. He had not carried that gun for several months before that day. Having killed one man, Mayor Moscone, with two shots to the body and two more, delivered from a foot less away, into the head, he then reloaded that gun and walked the length of a city block to kill another, with three bullets to the body and two more, in a coup de grace, to the head. John Newton is excellent as the defense attorney John Wylie is even more fasci­nating as the prosecutor. Given the facts above, it is understandable that he entered the courtroom overconfident to the point of questionable competence during the jury selection process. We can see him real· ize what we know with our hindsight was coming. Because an all-American boy (an ex-cop, ex-fireman) was being tried for the murder of the first openly gay man to be elected to major office in America, the S1SU>r Boom Boom (Paul Hope} and the Cop (Gerald J Quimby) illustrate the opposing views held by San Franciscans during Supervisor Dan White's tnal for the as&assinationb of Mayor George Moscone and fellow Supervisor Harvey Milk in "Execution of Justice" In a scene from the Alley's production of "Execution of Justice," Dan White's aide, Denise Apcar (portrayed by Sandra Galeota), is questioned by prosecuting attorney Tom Norman (portrayed by John Wylie) inanities of the twinkie defense were given far more power than he could have sus· pected going in. To see him fighting futilely on behalf of reason does not let us dissolve in self-pity. Itis morally uplifting. Enraged, indignant or merely thought­provoked, you will leave the theater feel­ing stronger than when you walked into it. CharleA Krohn does an admirably upstanding job as a friend of Mayor Mos· cone, who I must admit has up to now always been the forgotten man in this inci­dent forme. As Krohn's character points out, Moscone and Milk, ironically, had always argued against the death penalty. White, who had always argued in favor of it, didn't get it. He got six years and seven months, the maximum for voluntary manslaughter. That sentence lead to whole-scale riot· ing. That was nine years after Stonewall and nearly eight years before today. Half price tickets can be purchased at the Alley Box office between noon and 1 :00 p.m. the day of the performance. And don't forget the Showtix booth in Tranquility Park. o Notes Hazelwitch ProduchonR' Pokey Anderson announced at the Execution of Justice benefit, they raised $750·$1000 each for the KS/AIDS Foundation, the GPC, and the Gay and Lesbian Switchboard. Per-sonally, I was shocked by the number of empty seats .... Demand for tickets to TUTS' A Chorus Line has been so heavy they've done some­thing they've never done before­scheduled two eight performance weeks. The added seven performances will make 15,000 new seats available. The run begins Oct. 22 .•• ' Gideon Toeplitz, the HSO executive director, said, "We had more subscription revenue in hand on opening night this year than we earned in all last year." And they ain't finished, yet! Toephtz also announced that the HSO and its musicians have come to a new two year contract, a full five weeks before the negotiating deadline. "The musicians' actions are unprecedented in orchestra labor history. We are deeply grateful to them for their cooperation." ... The Museum of Art of the American West is currently showing "Unknown Land," some of the first drawings to reach back East from the old West ... . o Openings Learned Ladies (Stages, 11)-Moliere's witty comedy of true love hitting around snobbish dilletentes, transferred to Paris in the 1920. Surrender, Houston! (Risky Business, 11)-Dorothy Gale is gueRt hostess for the Houstonian Awards. "Tootsie," "Miss Mona," and "Marvelous Marvin" are in heavy competition. Boys from lndianna (Gilley's), 12). ONO! Hickory Hill (West University Com­munityCenter, 12)-a traditional blue­grass band from Avinger, East Texas, and Homegrown, a Houston family-plus-one that combines bluegrass with ole time music. ONO! Witold Lutoslawski (Jones, 12)-The Polish composer conducts the HSO in a retrospective of his own works. Gone to Texas (Autry House, 13)­Chocolate Bayou presents a sesquicente­nial salute based on letters, memoirs and songs from Texas in the 1880s. Meet the Artists (McMurtrey Gallery, 13, 1:00 p.m.) of the HGO's production of LaBoheme. Freebies. ONO! Shakespeare Lady (Museum of Fine Artll, 13)-Estelle Kohler, a memberofBri­tain's Royal Shakespeare Company as Fanny Kemble. ONO! Dana Carvey (Spellbinder's 15)-"The Big Butt Carvey Boy," Boss favorite, and winner of the San Francisco Stand-Up Comedian Competition. Don't forget the Rocky Horror Show, the live one, still plays there Saturdays at 12:30 a.m. La Boheme (Jones, 17)-contains the sexiest aria ever written. Night of the Liuing Couch Potatoes (Comedy Workshop, 17)-"From the land of Herculon and Naugahyde they came, clutching remote controls and dog-eared copies of TV Guide. Paul English Ensemble (Museum of Fine Arts, 17)-Jazz. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi'e OCTOBER 11, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 IBM "Wheelwriter" 3 and 5 Typewriter Supplies IBM " Easystrike" Correctable Ribbon Cassette and " Easystrike" Lift-off Tape Cassette NOW IN STOCK ! ! ! IBM "Ouietwriter" 7 Typewriter Supplies GENUINE IBM SUPPLIES I ' I I I I I I OF COURSE I I I --- COLUMBIA RIBBONS&. SUrrt.lf.S ,.. ~ r' 8939 BUNNY RUN ~ -~ ~ HOUSTONTEXAS 77088 713-999-0947 13 CONTINUOUS HAPPY HOURS 7am-8pm 6 PATIO BAR NOW OPEN STIFF DRINKS ICE COLD BEER HOT MEN New Sound-Live D.J.­Great Music D.J. MARDI COLEMAN ALWAYS:50¢ DRAFT BEER 13. Adams. Ltd. COMING OCT. 17th-GUEST D.J. MIKE COOLEY Hyde Park 528-9079 20 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11. 1985 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES !he Montrose Votee, a general c1rculat1on newspaper having published cont1nu­ousfy for 1 year or longer. is Qualtf1ed to accept legal notices aHecting the news· paper's cuculation area of Montrose CARS & BIKES 73 Ptymouth, beautiful cond1t1on lnd1- v1dual $1250 622-4530 - -- STUBBS CYCLE - 4436 Telephone Rd 644-7 535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 97:;.1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING, LTD. 1303 Upland 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond •100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE Townhome Med Center/Hermann Park, 2·2~. 1550 sq It garage fireplace. defuxe k1tctien $695'mo plus ut111t1es ~26-8520 811W M looking tor roommate "'3i8 or female to share 2 bedroom apt $260 Cable tv and bills paid Call Don 522-6643 Neat I br MONTROSE apt Secure Con· vement to bus hnes $275 plUs HL&P 5~ 9079 ®) BURLINGTON ARMSAPTS. **Holiday Special** $ 100 Deposit 6 mo. Lease 7th mo. Free 1 Bedroom $28()00 & up 2 Bedroom $3()()00 & up Under New Mgt l ~0 Call 521-0972 . ~ • . -~ - - . ---~ WESTWOOD MALL AREA Beautiful home, ~2-2. $68.000. Fore· closed, $100 down payment Easy quahh· cations 524-5730 FORECLOSURE PROPERTIES Partners to buy equ•ties and foreclosed homes Small 1nves1ment 524·5730 FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED 3 bedroom house 1n Heights large l<rt· Chen. W D piano S225 plus hall uht111es No smoking CaU Karen 869-S f 39 2 WEEKS FREE (MISC.) FOR SALE Movong - F•tness Exchange Club Mem­bersh• p for Sale Good thru March 1987 $375 Regularly $525 776-232~~- LIQUIDATION SALE Misc household items. office supplies, books, church supplies. furnishings. new hot water heater, electric heaters. ceiling fans. etc 8am-5pm Sat & Sun Oct 5, 6. 12, 13 1840 Weslhe1mer 5~8005 - ----- FOR YARD SALES See ads under .. Yard Sales· at the end ol ttie Montrose Classified MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS RELIEF WITHOUT DRUGS Deep muscle massage Dy Bill o·Rourke 869-2298 COWBOY LEATHER INSTRUCTOR Will train noV1ce or intermediate Repfy Blind Box 256-B clo Voice MUSCULAR MASSEUR EUROPEAN FULL- BODIED TREATMENT Penetrating profes.s1onal deep muscle massage In or out. day and evening appointments available CHASE 88(}- 4500 Cad•llac of Massage Autumn Spec<al, call ET (713) 622·4530 GOLDEN TOUCH MASSAGE Performed by a Greek trained, hot. ha•ry, handsome, welH!ndowed massuer offer­ing 25 years ol expertise Services to the discreet tnd1v1dual If size and pleasure 1s •mportant, Call Peter, $40 In, $50-$7:;. $100 out 524·6337 BODY MASSAGE Full body massage Hot 01l-1n or out Bruce 622-0370 PERSONALS Hatry Merv Ha1rfans Adhst tnlo $2 00 Hatr 59 West 10th. NYC 100t 1 We hsten The Gay and lesbian Sw•tch­board 5~3211 MOVING TO MONTROSE G W·M. 20, 5'10", 130 lb blond, blue Looking for s1m1tar friends. roommate. etc Shy but radical Call Chris alter 9 PM ONl Y 996-8693 RUSTON You made me lose my usual self-control: but loving you made me the happiest man for four too-short month! I wanted you and still do Selling you tree was the hard· esl thing IOfmetoface. but. I hadtobefatr to you. the hnest young manrvemetin 12 years We'll always have our moonlit nights I want the worfd to know you· re a •pec1al person Ma-ior Randy- II you re lucky enough to meet and know tho tall Texan RUSTON lrom Lufk•n. beware He·u steal you re heart easily. and rlf kick your bull ti you hurt h<m Ma10'._ Gay Wrestling' Uncensored intop1xpax $300 NYWC. 59Wesl tOth, NYC 10011 M•ke S -20 yr old college sophomore who called me twice on Sat, Oct 5 You did not leave your phone no on my ans­wering machine Please again call me col· lect weekdays 11-9 30pm NY time Mr Stuart 914-4211-3991 Attractive GWM 30. 1ntelhgcnt. sensitive, masculine. preppy Seeks same 9~ 7288 Adam GWF 30. new 1n area seeking friends. maybe relationship Please respond with Interests. address, phOne no to Blind Box 258-H CIO Voice JUST COMING OUT_ __ GWM. 23. inexperienced Needs lnend or lover willing to help me explore different aspects of gay lrfe I'm quiet. sensitive. honest. and serious about fmd1ng a mate Only those sincere •n becoming good friends or starting a relattonsh1p should respond No drugs, SIM please Reply Blind box 25~G ci o Voice - - - I AM attract<Ye. masculine. 6' tall, 1651bs relat1onsh1p--onented romantic, affec· t•onate. hung, versal<le YOU ARE attrac­tive. masculine, hairy, either muscular or slender extremely well· endowed, very ~1~1~1g2~;~9. eif':.11~~Y Peoer~o'::0i~. Houston 77006. lor photo exchange. IMPORTANT NOTICE. Anyone witness· mg accident 10!5185 at 1 30 am Westhe1· mer al Yupon Call 52~2165 -- --- BLACK AND WHITE ~~~!~ Gh~~th{:io.'°l~~. •;~el~ t~°.:e":s GBM 26-38 w•th same qualities Interests include sports outd00r5 movies quiet times at home and lun Reply Blind Box 259-C Clo Voice MATURE PROFESSIONAL GWM. 44. 5'10'h" 168. blond/blue, emo· t1onally stable, t1nanc1ally secure expe· nenced 1n long term relat1onsh1ps, seek•ng GWM. 3>45. educated. hard· workrng. non·smoker interested in build· mg a faithful. loving relationship and secure hOme Reply Blind Box 259-S c/o Voice HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 11 here then stand back for the crowd Call 529-8490 OrvlS•l the Voice al 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement PERCHANCE TO DREAM The love we shall share. rooted in quah· ties of hfe affording peace of mind and heart. shall be an enduring resource of strength and commitment from which meaning. growth. vitality define the ceie .. bration of our lives shared together This. our .. labor of love ... can be perceived of as harmonious, vibrant. beautiful I. an attractive. professional sincere ind1v1dual seek that special young man. 23-33. (slender, smooth) with whom mutual love cultivates, with ever enrichen1ng matur· 1ty. our permanent relationship I am GWM (5'7". 147. 38. balding. brn/hzl, masculine, hairy) Should, perchance. your dream be similar to mine please reply Glenn P 0 Box 3182 Galveston, Texas 77551 PrOteSS:On8i.Stable. GWM 35, 160. browrvbrown. happy but looking lor someone special Like music. theater, long walks, sex. cuddling and lotsofTLC P 0 Box 920957 #118. Houston 77292· 0957 GIW M. 33. 5·5i·. 135 lb Looking lor fun In all the right places Looking for you PO Box 263341, Houston, Texas 77207 3341 Want to lose we1gh1 t()()qi, money back guarantee 52&-5443 OUR POLICY on Sexually-E;;j;lic•tAdver· t1S1ng The Montrose Voice does not believe that human beings engaging I sexual acts with one another 1s immoral It rs abnormat, 1n fact, for a person not to engage in sexual activity Therefore. our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relationships. encounters. adven· lures, etc. All advertising should. how· ever not contain language that would offend an unsuspecting reader Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. IN SEARCH OF GWM. 33. 6., 165. br hair/eyes. sfabte. secure. relatively gdlk1ng. well humored straight appearing-acting. medical scientist enjoys outdoors. camping. h1k· 1ng. SCUBA. travel, movies In SHrch ol: down to earth man 2~35 with mutual mterests. stable. straight acting. non· smoker, who also thinks "'Life's a banquet but most poor sons-a*b1tches are starv­ing'" Write me_ All letters answered Blind Box 258-L Clo Voice A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederickjlrandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their new book. "Classified Affairs." they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those runny little abbreviations mean Send $8 to · c1ass1f1ed Affatrs," Aly· son Pub . Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St , Boston, MA02118 (Alsomcludedw1ll bea coupon for $5 off on your next Personals m your choice of 25 gay publications, 1nclud1ng the Montrose Voice ) - --PLAYSAFE ____ _ Sate sex rs fun, erotic Play safe. for your sake, for your partner's sake YARD & GARAGE SALES KREWE OF HYDRA Garage Sale Sat & Sun Oct 12 & 13. 9-4 2612 Stanford MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6.95 in bookstores or use th is coupon to order by mail. Here is $7.50 for M urder is Murder is M urder, by Sa,;uel Stew;;:d . name __ ~~~~--------- address ~~~~~~-~--~~-- city state ip Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 Come have sunshine on your shOulders with us 800 Heights Apts. 1 and 2 bed· room Start $2~$410 Adults bills paid Family units and bills 862·2885 Heights garage apt-WOOd "'iiOors Appliances $285 95&-8671 leave mes· "!ge ~ i ~~.,':A A·1 ROOMMATE SERVICE For your Ideal roommate call 932· 1363 Established 1n 1979 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartmenl lhrough a Montrose Voice Classified Call 5~8490 ~~'!,~~cr:b'.' C~J:t:r:"~~.c~~~~~C~r~ or VtSa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Clean ng company needs bondable help Good position tor dependable 1ndus· tnous person 52&-1369 9am·7pm JaMor1af bar latentghl. part·llme Bruce 5211-9427 7am-11 am Professional bartender '"' your next party l.,ge or small 9'1ther•ngs John 523-9244 VOO Kl'OJ. SAll'<, EV£R i;!NC.f l1W TClD M£. ABOOT ''MPL.£ ANSWER S'<NDROMt,' M: SUN IT All AROJllO Mt. WHtRl DID TH£ TI.RM COME FRct'l? .---- ---------... IHACJI~ - A f"lfiI HA\l'iNCi WE ASTUTENESS TO DETECT A TIWf LIKE THAT IN lilS Cl.JN !<IND! H<X.J 00£S H£ 00 IT? On the Town ACCOMMODATIONS (for Visitors to Houston) ~ Jtor Gl I House-108 Avond•le- -523· 2218 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GAY BARS 81cchui='523LOvett 523--3396 lesbian Barn-710 P1c1hc-s2&-S42T country Bayou Landing-53-4 Westheimer-526-7519 Brazos A•;;,. BOttom-..2400 Brazos-52&-9192 country SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Briar Patch 2294 W Holcombe-865-9678 Chteke;-eoOP=iJ:; W81the•me~2--.0- Cho.c•.-111 Magic Oaks. Spnng-350-0471~ Club~t27ie North~S:--~ Copa· 2031 Aichmond-528-2259 d11co. 1mperson1tor1 Dirty S1Hy·1-220 Avond111-529-7525 E/J·a-1213 Rtehmond-527-9071 Edd1ng1on·1-e121H111croft.:..981--6-,-21~-­Ex1~ 1011 Bell-659-0453-countrv Gaileon-2303 Richmond-522-7616 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Heaven PKif1c at Grant-521-9123 disco SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Hole 109 Tu1m 52&-9128 H001e,.72'212 Converse-:-:'--52~1--23-1~0- -­IR1=- ao& Pacihc-521-2$19 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Just Marlon & Lyn.n·s-817 Fa1rv19'11-52&-911o lesblon Kindred $ptrits 4902 Rte~623-6135 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Lazy J 312 Tuam '52&-0343~---­lola'I Depo~ Grent-$2&-8342 ~":.~r5•g•ro• 1501 s H,.Y 2~88~Ang-.,..10-to-n-- Mary·1.:.1022 Weattletmer-52'8-18S1 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrose Mining Co 805 Pac1hc ·529--7488 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mother Lode Cafe & Saioori-804 Pac1l1c-S23- 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Rendezvous-1100 Westheimer-523-2422 S"'"E"E" OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE R11ky Bu11ne11-2700 Albany-528·3611 ceNret SIUdlO 13 1318 W11theimer=s21-=9041, 521: ll030 The811-811 HydePark-528-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Twtnt 20S3W1rt Rd -827·1113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE '(OU KNOW, l'VE ALIJl..'1'5 fELT rD UNOCRSTAND WORLD l\ffl\IRS SITTER If I HAD AN OVERVIEW (f CIVILIIED HIST~ .. ~~ Ma•n· -522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Club Ho~Body Centre· -2205 F~ 4998 French Quarter Theater-3201 LOl1111ana-527- 0782 VACATIONS VISITING SAN FRANClS~ DOLORES ST BED & BREAKFAST 41S-861·5887 OR WAITE MARC 381 OOLOAES ST, SF FOR INFO For Houston travc1 agcnts:&ee 'Travel Agents" in the Greater Montrose Busi­ness Directory, next page - NEW ORLEANS GUEsTHOUSE-- 1118 Ursullnes. (5041 566-1177 See our display ad monthly In the Monlrose Voice SAN FRANCISCOTfLANDH~ 1315 Polk, 1-SOC>-253-5263 or (415) 441- 5141 See our display ad monthly 1n the Montrose Voice ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classi­fied rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by the inch." When buying by the inch, you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles. REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $«! 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 DINING OUT IN MONTROSE RESTAURANTS ALL RESTAURANTS LISTEO HERE SERVE AS OISTRIBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Baba Yag11 :le07Grant~..()(M2_ __ Oout9Vard Cale 808 Loven -621·1015 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE M1nout1 Street care-1117 JiAlaouri-5~1264 Mr Sak•a-Tet•-2406 S S!Wpherd-524-3451 OCTOBER 11, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 )~ \1 :xit') Hurl Ci COORSf., P51/CIO..OG4 IS J\J5T A l"'W-4\fESTATI~ Of VNDERL'<ING BIOMEDICAL f'RINC.IPLES, WHICH BRINGS IN CHG'\l.5ffit{ ANO PROOAB!!< P't\l/S~S ... fORTUNA"Tal{, I RE.f\Lrz.ED THE ULTIMATE FVTILIN OF IT BE~E li.l\STINb TOO t'\lXH Tll'lE. .. 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat OCT OCT 11 12 OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 13 14 15 16 17 Cniena for 1n• on •n 7-0ay Calendat and Montrose Resources 1 Event or group must apecihcaUy pertain to neeghbothood 01 Montrose or Houston's gay community o™ets m&JOr c1ty. stateor natlON.l hOltdey or mator oationar gay event 2 Str~Jy commercial events not 1nctuoed 3 Business. ctvtc and soc1a1 groups ano their ..,ent1 are generally qualihed 4 Pohbca1 ~ts whet9 only one vtew of a subftct candidate or party Is dominant not QUalihed For 1dc1'ltonal tntonnatton or phone numbers. k>oll: tor the .sponsonng organ1zatt0n under "'Reeources • Typestyles indicate events' location Eventa in Houston. Events of Local Interest Elsewhere, Events of Area Interest SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS •FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFT, FM-90, 8:15·llam •FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur •FRIDAY: Baytown Lambda meets 730pm Oct.11 llSA1UROAY-SUNDAY: Texas-OU Football Weekend, Dallas llSA1UROAY·SUNDAY: 11th Annual Texas Renaissance festlvol, Plantersville, Oct. 12-13, 19-20, ~27, NOY. 2-3, 9-10 llSATURDAY: KS/AIDS Foundation meeta 3400 Montrose, no_ 501, llam llSATURDAY-SUNDAY: Annual Lesbian a Gay Pride Conference, Ft. Lauderdale, Flo, Columbus Day Weekend • SATURDAY: Houston North Professionals meets 7:30pm, Oct.12 • SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGregor Park • SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center • SUNDAY: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl DDDDDDDD ~ode Cafe & Sa~Pkihe !t23- 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE O·enen s Oyster Bar i<>e W"themwtr 52•· 0105 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Per1-;y 1-A1chmonc:t at Kirby-524-0075 Ratph·s-51S"'YtA~ 526-690_0 ___ SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WiRie'1 880- Weett\elmer at Montroee--52&- 5411 •SUNDAY: Gay Asians & Friends meet 3pm Oct. 13 llSUNDAY: W,W_B. Bowling League. 7:30pm, Po.;t Oak Lanes •SUNDAY: Overeat.ere Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett mMONDAY: Columbus Dav. Oct. 1'4 llMONDAY-1UESDAY: Alllnnallon/ Gay and Lesbian Mormons national conference. Son Diego, Oct. 14-15 •MONDAY: Frontrunners run from Golf Center, Hermann Park •MONDAY: Integrity meeta 7:30pm Oct_ 14, Autry Hou11e, 6265 Main • MONDAY: Montrose Art Alliance meets Oct. 14 • MONDAY: KS/AIDS Foundation & Montrose Counseling Center AIDS Risk Reduction (Safe Sex) Workshops, 8pm Oct.14 • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Wl'UESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center WI'UESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm WI'UESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band met>ta Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY. Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center •WEDNESDAY: Gav Political Caucus meet.; 3217 1-<annin, 7-30pm Nov.6 •WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool I..engue competition •WEDNESDAY: Overeat.ere Anonymous meet 8pm Benng Church, 1440 Harold WI'HURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park TennlB Center WI'HURSDA Y: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 WI'HURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 9pm, Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeoimain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN 1 WEEK: Fall Weath<!'imer Colony Art F .. tival Oct.. 19-20. 1001 Weoth<!'imer • IN I WEEK: Choi.- - !pm Oct 20, Mut.enon YWCA. 3615 Wilha • IN I WEEK: Parenta FLAG meeta 2pm, Oct.211, Pre.byt.erian Center, •I Oakdale • IN I WEEK: Houston Area Gay &: Leebian Eng;neen &: Sc:ientista meet 7pm Oct22 •IN I WEEK: Montroae Civic Club (Nee.rt.own) meeta 7pm Oct. 22, 1413 w .. theimer • l.S 1 WEEK Gtftlter Montroae BUlim- Guild meeta 7pm Ocl 23. Brennan'• Restaurant. 3300 S=th •11' 2 WEEKS Parente &: Friends of 1 ..... biana le Gaye national convention Oct. 25-ZS, AUanta • IN 2 WEEKS Houaton Tnathlon I\' Oct..26 -.i 2 WEEKS Full Moon. ·'Hunlar's Moon." Oc:I 28 - 2 WEBCS HalloW.-\. Oct 31 •IN 3 WEEKS. Hous!On Gay Health Advocata meet 730pm Sov.2 - 3 WEEKS Election Day, Nov 5 - 4 WE9CS Houston Tennis Assn "Hou-T• V' Nov. 9-11 •N 4 WEBCS V.....an's Day. Nov 11 •IN '-5 WEBCS: T•os Gay Rodeo. Houston. Nov. 1S-17, with Judging Mr I Ms. Rodeo Nov.14 • •IN 4 WEEKS Lutheran• Concerned meeta Nov . 12. Grace Lutheran Church. 2515 Waugh •IN 4 WEEKS Citizens for Human Equality meeta 7:30pm Oct.8, HoWJU>n Ho._, 1617 Fannm. 9th floor •IN 4 WEEKS: Houaton Data ProfNaionaJ. meeta 7;30pm Ocl8 • IN 4 WEEKS. Neartown Buam ... Alliance meeta 7pm Oct..9, Liberty Banlr., 1001 w .. thel.!Der • IN 4 WEEKS. Avondale Aaociation mttta 7;30pm Oct.. to. ChnJ1uan Women'• Center, 310 Pacific miN 6 WEEKS Thanbglvlng. Nov. 28 • IN 6 WEEKS: Turkey Trot Fun Run, Nov. 28 • IN 9 WEEKS: Jingle Bell Fun Run. Dec. 15 - 10 WEEICS Chrtslmas, O.C. 25 - 11 WEEICS N-Year's Eve, Dee. 31 • IN ABOUT 26 WEEKS 11th annual Southeast.em Confereooe for Lesbuma 11Dd Gay Men. apnng 19tl6, 1'ew Orleana - 37 WEBCS 17th anntv9rsay ol :sion.oc1 RIOls. N.., Yortc. June 28 • 11' 43 WEEKS Gay Gameo II, -rriump 10 'i"6. • Aug 9-17, 1986 San l'ranciJlco EN 4' WEEKS 4111 CllWvwsay ol *-al ruling ClgOll>ll T•os· "tlomoMKuol conduct low," Aug 17. 1982 • 11' 18 WEEKS Houston Livestock ~now & Rodeo, Astrodom• a•mplex, Feb. 15-Mar. 2 •IS 46 WEEKS 150th birthday of City of Houston. Aug. 30 - 91 WEEKS Unlversol Fellowship ol Mlllropollan Community Churcn. I Otgntly lnlematlonal simultaneous lrnmahonat conlarenceo July 19-26, 1987, MICll'lll/ R. lauderdole In MontEose, Neady EveEyone Reads the Voi'e 22 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11, 1985 Greater Montrose Service Ir Shopping Directory TO ,A,()\,/ffiTJSE ON THIS PAGE OR lN THE MAIN ffiONT PAGES OF THE MONTROSE VOICE. CALL 529-8490 WEEl<DAYS 1Q4M.5 3C1'M 11mva1 T RA-VEL COMPANION-S -~­Want to go to Hong Kong, Rio or even San ADULT VIDEO WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay videoserv1ce 1420Westhe1mer 522-4485 ADVERTISING -PAOviiiiNGisERVICE? Keep 1t losted here 1n the Montrose V0tce w~ere lnerally thousands turn each week - VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Voice Classlf1ed Call 5~8490. Pay by check or charge it on your Amer1- ean Express. 01ner's Club MasterCard. Visa or Carte Blanche. AUTO SAL~S. LEASING MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 97~1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE - ASCOT LEASING, LTD.--- 1303 Upland. 97a-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAHJACiNTo MOTOR LEASING 10700 Rochmond #100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see Cars & Bikes• Ori "Montrose Class1!1ect• page AUTO RE!'Alfl --A-LLPAiNT&BODYSHOP-~ 15t0 Leeland. 65~3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Tait 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ---- PISTONS UP t901 Tait. 52&.1901 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REP.iiR I BODY SHOP 2001 Harold. 522-5255. 526-t940 Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or1Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel Eloctrrcal Repalf 526-3723 2110 Fairview Gay Owned & Operated CLEANING JANITORlr1L SERVICE PlUS 528-6245 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Becks Cleaning Specializing in Bars Professional Service We Care How You Look 528-9427 (a.m-11•m) CLOTHING SENSUAL ---SENSUOUSUNGER~- 5920 Hwy 6 N 85~ 2023 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE CLOTHING. ME~ S UNION JACK 1212 Westhe1mer 528-9600 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE COMPUTER-RELATED COLUMBIA RIBBONS & SUPPLIES 8939 Bun.""}' Run 99!Hl94 7 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Houston, TX n006 Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appointment (713) 524-0538 1nnm•1•u•- - - A·1 DOMESTiC SERVICE~-­Daoly maids. party helpers and all domes­tic servtees provlOed In business since t981, 932-1363. FUNERAL DIRECTORS - SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DiREcToRS 12t8 Welch 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS FITNESS EXCHANGE~-- 2900 R•cttmond. 524-9932 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAI fl LOSS SERVICES MP8 CLINIC 5401 Dashwood •tD 661·2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR SAL!JNS. BARBER SHOPS GREAT LOOKING HAIR_ _ Get onto &ttape wtlh a great perm and style at Breen"s In The Village 2518 Rice 528- 555t Mentton ad for 15'!io Discount Ask !or Doug UNION JACK 1212 Westhe1mer. 528-9eo<l SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE RON"S HAIR STUDIO 1310 H-thome 521-3000 Your Barber/ Stylist In NW Houston Is Hank Wierzba 680-3166 682-9495 Barchus Barber Shop 727 N.W. Mall HOME AIR CONUI I IUNING TIME FOR AIC REPAIR? $25 plua­-~-.:.. P_81_11.1 CALL '43-0318. Mid Town Air Buy I NII window AIC Senlce ell b<enda AIC1 521 -~Tdeys Mllllllf411f!ml - STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. 2801 Ella Blvd . au•te G, 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~ l'l.P.N t,'()\) IJIOt.j(j WE HAVE DIDITT nu. lNTl llf. !1llM< TlW f'fflOON f~ mt ~? Will, EXPlR"TION Cl" IT'S iOO Lllll 12 \JTKD1WS NCX.J • AFTER THE'< f\llD LEGAL SERVICES J)AVI]) SOSEHEK ATTORNEY AT LAW .. a lawyer who cares abOut Montrose H21-HHHf) NO CHARGE for 1mt1al consultation AFFORDABLE FEES-quoted upfront Evenings and weeJrend eppomtments o DWI r Po"ess'°n ot Drugs o Prostitution o Lewd Conduct o Debt Rehef o Bankruptcy o ln1ury Claoms C' Job & Acc1den1 and other areas - ) l\\'l-l'H(~f~:.?00 3816 W Alabama. Suite 212 Member Hllttb County Cr1m1na1 Lawyers AssocaatJOn Dom-ISOZ1!E) IS...,,..., by the To.a:s Supteme Court and conducts • G~al Practice Nt C9'tt byTXBd Ollg ~ MOVING MOVEMASTERS Boxes. too• Visa. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 630-6555 PEST CONTROL PEST CONTROL 993-0663 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL TPCL •o:;640 VISA MASTERCARD PIANO LESSONS - Openings availabte f1 r sh1dent;-c;t";i'i ages and levels Member Music Educa­tors National Conference. Music Teachers National A$$0Cllll0n Natlona! Guild of Piano Teachera For more lnfor­matt0n and registration call Carey Jones at 74~7530 or 527-0660 PICTURE FRA~ING Custom Framing with metal moldings at wholesale prices 527-0111 PRINTING ---SPEEDY PAINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 687-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE INTERNATIONAL PRINTING SPECIALISTS 2103 Yale. 861-0026 SEE OUR DtSPLA Y AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SORRY, BUT 'lWl?E MISTAKEN. f~ Tli1S f}'.ROCW\R f'HfTKJN, IT'S TliE. ~ fOLlO\Jll'(, T\\E EXPIRl\TION ~ 12 Of\'6 WW<£NDS COON\. SHOE SHINES - - - - THE SPIT SHINE SHOP ~n~;·°N~o~~ ~~~~"!;t~~ g~11b~0:o}~~ ~re Information and brochures 932- 1363 Found exclusively at The 611 Offering m11ttary spit shines tor shoes and boots Repairs available Private calls accepted Please call Peter, 524-6337 Help wanted also TRAVEL CONSULTANT_S _ Complete travel arrangments All semces FREE Open Monday through Fnday 9am-5.30pm. 2029 Southwest Fwy , Houston. TX 77098 (713) 529-8464 -- VACATION IDEAS?- See · Vacations·• following ·on the Town" on the previous paae. TIRES .... 529-1414 ~~TMl111l* P._ACE ALL BRANDS VENDING --- - PORT CITY VENDING 1307 Fairview Juke boxes, paol. pinball. cigarette machines, coffee service_ Bdl French, 3 Blks West of MontrMe 741·1705 nly $8.95 208 pages 8~11 I I The Far Side GALLERY At ost The Far Side Goll&r/ is here Ah the material from Gory Larson's previous three books. The For Side. Beyond The For Side. and his newest bestselling collection. In Search of rhe For Side - n<:NJ together 1n one omni bus collection Contooning over 600 comic ponels plus 8 lulkolor mini-posters. The For Side Goltery bnngs us the beastly wood where on>­mo ls often moke monkeys out of people. Order a copy for your favorite f<:ir Side fan! -------------- Please send me: __ cop1es of The Far Side Gallery al S895 per copy plus $1 postage and handling Totol omount ---- (tt check. make payable lo Andrews. McMeel & Porker ) Ploose allow 4-6 weeks for deliver{ 0 Check 0 Money Order 0 VISA O MostEl!Cord I Address - - - - - ----- 1 City __ __ Stote __Mo st_e<C~~·---- 1 Credit cord * - - ----- lntefbOnk "---- 1 : Signature as on credit cord Expir Dote I Send to: The Far Side Gallerf. c/o Montrose Voice I I 4400 Johnson Drive. Fairway. KS 66205 I m;;.;;;-;;;;.-;;;;;;......,jl.- - - - - - - - - - ---- - --- - - -· \IS B\C.KE.RING, ALL RIGHT, BUT rrs Al'\AllNGL'i \.JELL R£5G\RCH£D B\CKt.RING. Montrose Voice Classified Advertising ;:,~ ~::::,:f"lff,;.r ~"dv~;/:,,~"!:~hC::~':'.:,~ i;::::;t~' For r90u11r di•P'•r •dV•rt'''nfl THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type, centered, are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can also appear within the text or at the end of the ad, and are also $1 per word, with a minimum of $3 per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type Is 404. (Additional regular words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Word• not in all caps are 55¢ each. Additional BOLD WORDS in all caps are 704 each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add11tonal word hke this 40C. THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1onal word like th!S 40C THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each additional word hke this 11 40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55C EACH. Addttlon•I bold wordl Ilk• thlt In text •re SSC Heh. ADDITIONAL BOLD, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes dunng the run, pay for the full run in advance. and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number. We'll confidentially forward all responses to your ad to you by mail or you can pick them up at our office. Rate 1s $3 for each week the ad runs. (Responses will be forwarded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad in or phone it in You can pay by check, money order. Mastercard, Visa, American Express, Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you. DEADLINE: Class1f1ed ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper Ads received later will be placed in the following week·s newspaper. ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number. clo Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006-3028. It will be for­warded. unopened, to the advertiser Enclose no money. ADDITIONAL NOTES: A "word" 1s considered anything separated by '"spa­ces," except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word 1f 1t stood on its own. A complete phone number, Including area code. 1s 1 word. City, state and zip is 3 words. bold line ----- ----- --~------ bold line------- --- text words.----- bold line--------------- Use add1t1onal paper 1f necessary CATEGORIES OAnnouncements O Accomodations (lodging for Houston visitors) O Cars & Bikes O Commercial Space O Dwellings & Roommates 0 Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale O Models. Escorts. Masseurs O Personals O Pets O Rides O Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY," OPPOSITE PAGE ___ bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line) ----regular words in text at 40e each ---All CAPS regular words in text at 55e each ----Bold word• In text at 55e each BOLD ALL CAPS tn text at roe each Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 1t mailed to me, $1 25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Tim• week1: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD{S) o Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week. 1 have enclosed (or will be bllled or charged. as indicated below) an additional O $29 for Ii months or 0 $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged; METHOD OF PAYMENT; 0 Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed o Cash 0 VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge 0 Diners Club charge o Carte Blanche charge 0 Amerc1an Express charge 0 Bill me If charging, card expiration date -------- - -- ---­Credit card number -- Signature --- Name Address --- Phone(s) for venflcallon of ad, if necessary ----------­MAIL OR BRING TO; Montrose Vo ice. 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10em-5·30pm OCTOBER 11, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 23 MONTROSE RESOURCES SELECTED STATE. NAT ORGANIZATIONS SW Owiiers Aun of Tx (BOA n - 120 8'azo1 lll02, Aul:hn-tS12) 472·3333 AIDS Acbon Counctllf9d9ra.on of AIOS Atl.eted Oro-niuhona, 1115"" Independence Aw SE. WWungton. OC 20003. (212) 547·3101 Gay & l-.._ Aoon- POBA. OldC-Slt N .. Yotti., NY 10011-(212) 811--8822 Gay Rights Nat lobOV-POB 1892. W ..... ngton. 0C 2'Xl13--(202) 546-1801 Human Rights eampwgn Fund-P08 1388. w..,.._ .,g1 ... oc 20013--(202) !M&-202~ lMnbdll legal Oete,.._132 W 4.lfd. New York. NY t<llXl9-i212) ........ LelbW'l/Gey R¢t1 Act.ooeat81-P08 822, A~tin 78787 Media Fund torHumanRight1 - POBA. Otd CheiltN Sta. New Yorti.. NY 10011-(212) 9ftt..M22 Niil Man of 8u11MM Counc1lll- Bo11 15145. Sen Frtinet9CO. CA 9'11S-t41S) ~ Nat A.Mn of Gey & L-..,, OemoCtub9-t742 Mut AY SE. Washington. DC 20003-(202) $47·3104 Net Gey He9tth Educ Foundatt0n-P08 714. New YOik. NY 10036-(212) 56:H313 Of Or Greenberg 17131 523-5204 Nat Gay Rights AdYocel•--640 Castro. Sal\ Fren­OIOO. CA 9411•-(41S) lel-3824 Net Gay Tut Foree ~NGTF)-80 5ch Av. New Yorti:. NY 10011-{212) 741-5«)0 NGTF's Cns•lbne-- 1.::Mll 221·7044 (out..0. New York Stat•J Rural Coet.tion tlo Wailer-ZangN. Boa 611. Blum, TX7M27 Tx Geyf\..O..n Tutt Forc..-POB AK. Oer!ton 16201-1817) 317-e218 US Trantvett1t•Trantexuet Contact S'IC-1017-B E Pike SNttte. 11122- 12061 s:>•--8298 ATTENTIONoRGANiZATIONS Check your hst1ng We hst here each week name of organization. address, phone. regular meeting dates and times and ?n~~r~~t~~e:;J~o':'::tt~nf~r~a~~d~s!~~~= Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY ~-:fi0866952-257 77006 52H077 An A Cllpell1 Chorut. Church ot Ch~ 61173' 77~ A Pfec. 1n the Sun-522-7695 ACLU-1236 W Groy-524-5925 AIDS Hot1tne-529-:l211 (Gay i'Lftb1a~ board) Amencan Gay Athe11ts--POB 66711, 77268- 527-9255 Altro R11nbow AH1a~20.o734 (TTY) Aatro Rainbow Society tor the Oeat-924-5074 (TTY or ~I. 64$-0074 (TTY) Avonda~ Asan-POB ~. n296 meets 7 30pm 2nd Thura. Womerfa Chn1t11n Ctr, 310 Poetic Ai.u1iOWom;n7"Megaz1,,.-fS130 SW Fwy 1335-26&-5237 ~~:~~-Robert Moon. d1r, 209 Bering M..-nonaj United MethOd•st Church- 1«0 Harold- 526-1017 ave 10 50arn Sun Choices Unhm1ted-POB 70996. 77270-529- 3211 (G•y &. L•b••n Sw1tc.hb0erd) meets 1pm 3rd Sun. Masterson YWCA, 3&15 W1llla '"'$0c11t M••w" 7 30pm alternate Fridays. Sund•y brunch 12·30pm 3rd Sun Christian Ctlurch of the Good Shepnerd- 1707 Montrose ave 1pm Sun. Bible 1tudy 7 30pm Thuro Cnurcn of Ctir6at1an Fa1tt1-1MO Westtle•"*'- 521HD05 1vc:a 10 4Sam Sun, Bibte study 7 30pm Wed. Rev Chns A Riee, pastor Cit"°"' la< Human Equeki, (CHE:j:...P083045. 1~3346. 937-~18 meet 2nd Tu ... Hou House 1617 Fannin_ Ith floor ect1vlty room C1t1zena for Um1.d Hou (CUHJ-3317 Montf'ON 1832-esHl148 Oell. leabtan Mcilheta Gfoup- Sarr• 47"708 meets 2nd & 4th Thurs OIQMy Ctr Ci~i>Pers 3.t2.e,sQ2 Colt 45·1-meet1 at Brazos River BOttom. 2.00 Brazos-528-1192 Comtn1ttee f0tt Pubhc Health Awar.,;;;::poB 3045. 77253-528-6333. 522· 5084 ·sherong Group tor the Wom.d Welt" meet Fn. 7-Spm, MontrOM CounMC1ng Cir Community Polt!1e.I Action Comm1t1ee (C. PAC)-POll 2005. 77252-23e.8868 Community Goac>et Ctr-3207 MontroM- 521- 0511: Svcs 11•m Sun. 7:30pm Thurs ~ahof\-Aytz CNyim- 1840 Westheimer-681h9997. 728-5181 ave & 10C111 8pm 2nd & 4th Fri ~1j=f.117Fannin-$28-011t 523-7&« ESoPS PriYato ProfNSlonal Sociel Club- 1161· 9878 federit.On of CNnt1es Untied lor ~ ~~~~~~d~~&Ti&1 ·r~d~ Montrose CllNC: MontroH Counseling Ctr 1st UrMtanan Cl\urch-5Z10 Fennin-526-1571 l\'C 1115am Sun --------- ~-Randy681-5679or.Joe5.2()..8()19 ru~ Sun. TUM a. Thura Memorial Park Tennt1 Ctr. runt Mon. Gott Ctr Hermann P1'11: Gay & Ah;-shi'OnQ E•pet"1enca (GASE) 528- G13l1"Y1. 5211-089=1 ---~----- & Leab.an Archives Of Tx att1hate of ltH Inc Gay &. L .. bian Motmoni- 1713 W•theuner •!!040. 77098-58&-14:..;1=.3 _____ _ GIY' As-;n;&Fr'18"dl-2615 Weugh Or t289- 52U768. 7M-3833 .-to 3pm 2nd & IHI Sun GaYFai'h.rS-3217 Fannin-&2&-0111 -- Gey H_.,oe c.ucua- M&-5252 __ ~f'Mt Al1ance- ee<rt4ll - - - -- ~7~~c\cioC.= ~~1~0,,,err.d Wed ~ -~- -~~c-i:.~~:-m.~;·~1n~~-=~ ---- Gay a. L•btlrt Student Man et UofH- Box 314 4800 C•lhOun- 529-3211 (Gay I. L.,blan Swrtchboerd) GrMtef' MontrOM BuSlnMI Gu11d-M1ke Nee90n 630-0308 or Bruce wooney S2t-&4&4 mM11 7pm. 4th Wed. BrennaM R•t. 3300 Smilti. The Group theater workshop-Joe WMb 522- 2204 meets 7pm Thurs. Dignity Ctr. 3217FannLt\ Huefw•tch Producbonl-2615 Waugh Or •286. noos tesblan conc.rtl. tree ma1h09 hat HomophMe lnterlaJth AU&a'lee-721 Maoor 5~ Hou Area Gay & Lub11n EngtnMra & Sctent11t1-POB 66631. 77006-771-6481. 7~ 10pm. meets 7pm 4th Tues Hou Bar Owners Assn (HOBO}--c/o Ventur&-N 2923 Ml•n-522..()()()() Hou Community Ck>wns-862-3314 Hou Council of Clubl-52&-3054 Hou Data ProfeuionalS-523-6822. 964-6459 mNtl 7 30pm 2nd Tues Hou Goy Hoallh A.,_.leo-711().9«3 Meell 7 30pm 111 S.t Hou Gay Students Allrt-747~3()g8 Hou Inter-Faith Alhance cont.ct through 1n1 .. grity!Hou Hou Motorcycle Cl1.1b--c/o Mary's t022 W•t­hetmer-~ 1 Hou North PrOfe1$10tla-'1-POB 3640. Humble 773'7-BoU et 821-7126 ..- 7 30pm 2nd Set Hou Outdoor Group-Jam 680-3144 ~H lnc-POB 1!!041. 77222-694-1732.529-7014 aff1hlted groups are Interact. e·uarno 1 A Plare 1n the Sun. Montrose Art AIUl"Q, Gay & Lesbian Arch•v• ol Tx. Gay & LnNn Switchboard Montrose Symphonic Band. board meet 7 30pm 1st Thurs (vined 1ocat1on1); edue11t1on11 forum 7 30pm 3rd Thurs lngersoU Speakers' Bureau-POB 391, BeU1111 77401- 1ntegnty1Hou (Ep1scopal11nJ-POB 66008. 77265--524-1489 meets 7 30pm 2nd & 4th Mon. Autry House. 6265 Main lnt•1ct-P08 16041. 77222-529--7014 KPFT Red>o. Fl.4-90-419 Lovett B>vd-52&- 4000 ·er•.kthrough" ~art-fem11uat PQm Fri 8 1S-11am.. 'Wikte ·n St11n• gay pgrn Thurs 7 » 900pm KS.IA.IDS Foundat.on-3317 Monlroee Box 115.5, 77006-524-2437 AIOS R ... Reduebon (S.fe Sex) Wor•ohol>S 8pm 2nd & 4tn Moo ••cepl Dec. ,1.n, c onfl>nc:ttOn with MOtlt,.... CounMhng c.n. . In Montrose, Neady Everyone Reads the Voi'e ~uttmen Cencer Fund-77~106 Krewe ot Hydta-311 Grace&and- Blii'"Mercier 72&-1032 Llmbda Ctr Gay A~ & Alanot'I:--- 121• Jo Ann .. ~1-9772 L•bla'l/Gay Reeource Svc--~tY of Hou 4900C..h0un. bol<309. 77004 -74~1253 ._.. 2~ onemete T-. Sl>ndlelOp Room, 2nd floor. University Ctr L~i.Jl'Entert""•""•n""'-v-ou W---..-.,-p-ro-joc-t of Hou Council of Clubs-~ The lltlle Church-212 Fargo-- -622-7685 1¥ti' 230pm Sun Lone Star Nud .. Group-POB 74«J~ ~ conCemed-meets at Grece Lutn. ran Church, 2515 Waugh-521--0863. 453-1143 meet 2nd & 4th Tu• everunoa M<AdO~o cKc.;Sl=A'-1o_s F_o_und•_lk->n. 3317 Montrose Bo• 1155-52.t-2437 Men Ag11nii-Dee.Pt1on-'eo"'"-,,""eoy=-c-1u_b_ __PO -,,.-e 541871. 77254 - 529-3211 (Gey & Lnblen Switchboard): meets bi-weekly Mecropc)i.tan cam~ Church of the R..ur• rec;hon !MCCR}- 1919 Oec1tur--M1-9149 poi~ luck chnn.-' 7 30pm 1st Sit monthly, aves 11US.m & 7 15pm Sun & 7 15pm Wed. member· .atltp lnQu1rers class 7 30pm Mon ecuc:atKm CSUMI Tues & weo IY8S iHOUi" MetroPQio_en:c.:Wci-n=d-E----~ Meets St Stephen• Eptsoopal Cllut'CI\ 7 30 Wed M'OOtrose Art Alliance--fi4..1132, 868-9314 esg.. 5331 afhl&ate l!H Inc. meets 2nd Mon Montrose Business Guild let;!I Greeter Montrose Bus Quaid Montrose Church or Cnrist- 1700 MontrOM 7n-e286 ave 1 'lam Sun Monln>le Civic Club· -:;_"Nee~r1-own_AUn MontroM Cllftlc-ao3 Hawth0.,,._52&-~t apen_Mon. Tue. Thuro&-Upm ~~~SC'C~t~~ meet7~ ~ Counset1no Ctr-000 Lovett •203- 529-0037 AIOS v1ct1m supe>Ort group dlOpm Mon, Women's Support Group 7pm Tuee A10S Risk Reduct.on (Sate Sea) Work~ 8pm 2nd ~S.t'!.7o~fo!•=~ Dec. 1n con,uncuon w•th MontrOM Sinoera. 9IY men·s cnor~-M~ 3810 MOnt.OH sottb0!1L"ee9ue-P01122272.nm- 524-3144 MSA/VOlteybaO-Mo"' 522-1- go.- 7pm Tu• Gregoty-L.ncotn scN>ol. 1101 Taft ~-Meh subgroup Neattown Aun ..,.~•nos-meets at the Sam, 710 Pec1hc-52&­IM27 club niQl>I Thu" National Gar , •Mtth Education Foundation- 523-5204 ~:~~h~~~·;n~~~0m;..·- Neartown Aun (MontroH Crv1c Club)-1413 W•theuner meet 7pm 4th Tuel NMrtown Bus1neu A"iance-~7010 meets 7pm 2nd Wed. liberty Bank, 1001 W•the.mer ~ Ctv11han Church-429 YaNt­ee3- 13n "'" 10lm Sun P..ms & Friends of Leet>IW\I a. Gays tP1renm FLAG•~ - 2pm 3'd Sun. "'9sby­tenan Ctr. 41 Oakdale Part People-c/o Near1own Comrnun•ty F•rtnouse- 74 1-2524 Pu y u-.co0n-POB f!00063 n~- 1476 PrHbytet'lans tor Leab1arvGay Concerrs ­Pretbyter• at'I Ctr. 41 Oakdale-526-2584 meets 7 30pm 2nd T- --·Club 1-• _.,.,,.. GPC1-P0e -Aee·r. . 7 7291!-623-8024 uOna1 land Fund Commrttee-... ustang Cl"b P«>1oct Rice Univ Gayllesb1an Support Group- 529- 3211 (GI}' I. Lesbian Switchboard> Roth•o ChOpel- 1409 Sul Ross-52•·'1839 Shanti of Tx C01.tniehng for llte-threalening 11ln ..... -S22-5064 soc.;tyforTnd ...,Setf--f-=T-ro·°"'E,..u-.1 -...,G,..u°1"t,..-:Coa-ll Transvesbte Cttapter--POB 90335. n090 Soctety lot the PromotlOl"I of Amazon Sado-­Mnocl! ISlll (SPASM!- POB 7099tl. 77270-Gey & Lubtan Sw1tcl'lbOlrd 529-3211 ~ttte Co-locill--1C -lu_,b--c.-'o~The-S.~<-n. 710 Pecrf1C-S2&-SM27 Tx Gay Rodeo Aun-Or._., 1194 POB 18873. =-Ns:-~~- ~R:o!r~ ~1~x Ga}' ~!:im~~~~~ounda t1on 1115 fkRldenl-<10 Ripcord 714 Fainr..w-521-2792 ~~~1~ ~ T~.,~~°r.!:rt. 541· wwe Bowl<nQ· "'Yrt 123.1455 1><>o11 130pm Sun - o .. Bowkng u-wn .. yen Fell<>wehip--- We&theimer Colony Am Aan-1001 W•th•~ met 1163-521~133· IOU 1111 - Oci 1~20 'WhOt E•er ..._,,.., to Baby Jane eo..1tng Lngue ... Thursday Bowling Women'• eo .. 11ng L..gue-08bb;-.97~ 5pm SUn Stadium Lanes. 8200 Braesma•n ~<>Oby AlbaflCe--4 Chel1e11-521-0439 WOtn1n'1 SottbeU Leag~ 1 Pane:&hade. 77~91~56 BAYTOWN-Blytown L•mbda Group- 427-1378 mffta 7.30pm odd Fri COnroe Area Lesbians-Kathy at (4'09) 7*80e8 ,,,_ 8pm 2nd & 4th Fn GALVESTON - Larnbdll AICOhOlics A~-7~1401 Metropolitan Community Churctt o• Ga,.,.ton fsland- 1824 lll'-- 76S-7826 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Poat by Phone) Doctor_... adl or 529--3211 FIRE-227-2323 Goy Poftt.cal C.ucus 52=1·.c.;1000=----­Goy & Lmbl•n ~-529-3211 KSIAIOS Founda!<On-524-2'37_ _ -- 1.awye<-""'"' ~_3_2n_ ___ Llbrery- 22,__ 1 Montrose ~~1 Montrose C:OU.....ing Center-629--0037 MONTROSE YOlCE- 529-8<90 --=:::...__ TPUO1L-6I5C4-Et0-402_<2>2_<-32_31&3_-1 1_11_1 __ _ T..,. -. weathef 444-7171 ---- ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classi­fied rates of paying •by the word." you can purchase space here "by the inch." When buying by the Inch, you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" S29 r $39 3· S49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2· $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2· $29 3• $39 24 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 11, 1985 LET'S TRy h TltAT WAy PRoudly PRESENTS NATiONAl RECORdiNG ARTiST CoMiNG ••• SATURdAy, Nov. 2Nd, SylvEsTER ... f RidAy, Nov. 81lt, PAul PARkER HOUSTON'S lRAdiTiON FREE DRAh SuNdAy 4pM TO 2AM PAcific AT CRANT ~21-912J
File Name uhlib_22329406_n259.pdf