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Montrose Voice, No. 326-B, January 23, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 326-B, January 23, 1987 - File 001. 1987-01-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6313/show/6288.

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(1987-01-23). Montrose Voice, No. 326-B, January 23, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6313/show/6288

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 326-B, January 23, 1987 - File 001, 1987-01-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6313/show/6288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 326-B, January 23, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 23, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript montrose Montrose Properties Face VOICE Foreclosure Sheri Cohen Darbonne, inside HOUSTON WEATHER Friday night A little warmer low of only 38 Saturday Cloudy and cool. high 60. Where Are All the Funds Really Going AIDS Money Sheri Cohen Darbonne, inside Also on the AIDS Front: o TV Station Accepts Condom Ads o Private Doctors Take a Hard View news, inside Hill Almost Unseats Parker over Demo Flap Your NewGPC Officers news, inside NOW IN THE MONTROSE VOICE: CAPTAIN VIDEO'S TV SCHEDULES President Resigns Business Guild Post By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Mo11tro.'iP Voicl' Less than two weeks before scheduled officer and board elections of the Greater Montrose Business Guild, Phyl­lis Frye, who would have been running unopposed for a third term as president, resigned Jan. 16. In a letter of resignation, copies of which were sent to guild members, the outspoken president cited disappoint­ment in the member participation level as the principal reason for her action. Frye also claims in the letter that the GMBG board has "restricted her dutit,s" whenever the subject matter of a board debate involved gay! lesbian community issues. _____ r_ Phyllis /?rye cites lack of participation as thr reason for her resignation as presidl'nt of the Greater Montrose Busim•sto; Guild Fryr $aid Wednesday it was a dis­agr('(' ment over the gay question that led to her initial resignation, but the suhj<•<·t has since taken on a lesser importance than the matter of partici· pation. "I see the role of this business guild as being proJ.,'l'eHsive, even though we are not a gay organization," Frye said. "That was my reason for taking off the harness. However, once it was down on the ground, r realized the weight of the harness was my main reason for hesi­tating lo pick it back up." Frye claims a core group of about IO people has been doing 90 percent of the work of keeping the guild going, and that only 20-:lO people usually show up at monthly meetings despite a dramatic incn.>aHe in membership. She said that to her knowJNige, no one was seeking the officef.I of secretary and treasurer of the organization. But Bill Yon, guild vice president who has "reluctantly" as~rnmed Frye's admi­nistrative duties, said there are m<'mh<'rs interrst<>d in filling each of the four OJ><'n offic<'r positions and eight of the nin<' hoard seats. He said he has called an "expanded nominating meet­ing" to formally nominate the candi· dates and that nominations will also be accepted from the membership at the <•lection mreting Wednesday, Jan. 28. "Several people are picking up the pie· ces and moving foward, now that there is a need for new leadership," Yon said. "We certainly acknowledge <Frye's) contributions to the guild, but we don't like what she's done or the way she did it." Clark Moore, a board member who also resigned his position last week, said there was "a delicate situation" on the board. "lt seems there is a division in the administration the leadership is split," Moore said. Frye expressed frustration ata Jack of response to a letter she sent to members Jan. 2, urging more participation in planning the guild's 1987 activities and suggesting ways for the organization to increase its visibility. "l think I got three phone calls," Frye slated . "I'm not mad. My thoughts for the guild are all positive. I just think there are so many things the guild could do, and be, and it can't be done without participation." Yon responded that participation is a problem in every civic organization "What is participation?" he asked. "Everyone who pays their dues partici­pates, lo the extent that they do pay. The way lo attract participation is to directly ask people lo take on specific jobs." Elroy Forbes, who chairs the guild's media visibility committee, acknowl­edged there had been a disagreement during the December general meeting involving Frye's proposal to publish the organization's newsletter, The Bill· board, in the Montrose Voice. However, he said, objections did not centf'T on the paper being for the gay community, but on private committee reports that appear in the newsletter, as well as pro­posed changes in the size and price of a "business card" ad. Ex-Lawyer Linked with Foster Winans Indicted Nf~W YORK-A former New York law­yer has been indicted with embezzling more than $:3.7 million from clients using the money for stock trades based on information leaked by a former Wall Street Journal reporter David Clark, :l7, was charged with 55 separate felony counts in an indictment handed up by a federal grand jury. Thirty-eight <'ounts of the indictment focus on Clark's alleged use in 1983 and 1984 of information that was to appear in the Journal's "Heard on the Street" column, written by R. Foster Winans, federal prosecutoi:_s said. ~n 3al{emoriam MIKE HOLLOWAY Mike Holloway. 42, died Sunday. Jan 18 Mike was treasurer of the Kreweof Hydra Funeral services were held Thursday. Jan 22. at Heights Christian Church fol­lowed by direct cremation JOHN S. CROCKER July 18. 1955-January 11 1987 John died at the Institute for Immunological Disorders m Houston. He attended the Uni .. vers1ty of Houston and was one of the founders of Gay Resources Services there He was also active m vanous student and political affairs He 1s survived by his mother. Vern: a sis­ter. Marsha. and two hrothers. Jay and Steven Services were held at St Stephens Epis­copal Church in Houston on Jan. 15 Those who knew, loved and gave him their support will miss him JANUARY 23, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 3 Another DVitji £JfsA Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm s1so Well & s1 Beer Friday & Saturday: NO COVER AFTER HOURS FRI. & SAT. till 4am Country Express Band 8-12pm Friday-Jan. 30-10:30pm FANTASY IN MOTION NO COVER CHARGE 11830 AIRLINE - 445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine-Bender) Adver­tising Some­where Else? You can pay LESS or MORE for Gay Advertising ... but you still get less unless you pick the Voice. There are ;J Houston gay community publications. Us, them and them. You can buy advertising in that other newspaper. They're the cheapest of the three. In fact, they're about 10% cheaper than the Montrose Voice. BUT, you get less too. Their circulation is more than 30% less than the Montrose Voice. Or .YOU could buy advertising in that magazine. They're the most expensive of the three. (Whoa! Let's italicize expensive.) A typical small magazine half· page costs about 40% more than a typical (and about twice as big) tabloid quarter-page in the Voice. And what do you get? Still less Houston circulation than the Voice. The Voice is the choice with the highest Houston circulation. The Montrose Voice circulates each week in Houston about as many copies as that other newspaper and that little magazine combined. After the air clears, after comparing our news, their convenience, our cartoons, their pretty boys, our classifieds, their classifieds, and everything else, there emerges one final difference for Houston gay advertising-and it's an eleven letter word: CI RC ULA TION. Real, solid Houston circulation for getting your message to the public. The Voice has thousands more readers than them or them-and the Voice has, by far, the most cost-effective advertising rates. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE Don·t miss out on Houston's largest gay audience, the readers of the Montrose Voice montrose VOICE HOUSTON TEXAS ISSUE 326-8 FRIDAY. JANUARY 23. 1967 Published bi-weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours~ 8am-6pm Henry McClurg pubfis"-'·flditO' Linda Wyche. maMg'*'IJ •d•rr:tr David Roumfort produCl•Ofl Elroy Forbes.so-1a1 t;Jrrecior Sheri Cohen Darbonne. .,e.u SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529~8490 ADVERT SING SALES DEPARTMENT 1713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland atJvlH1 smg drrector Ken Boge eceocmf e11ec Jtiv• - ---~----- POST,..A$T£R Send •dd•ess corr~ IQ 408 AVOfl'o d•le Houston TX 77()()6..3028 Su1Jtu.r•1Jf10t1 tar• in US 1br VOICe c•mer Of US MMIJ SI 25p.,.w~(ICJI021huet) S65~rye1r(S2weeksJ ".>f SJ2 50 ~r 1.1• mooll'ls 126 ""ffkl) N.t/>Dfla/ •<h•rr111ng rep1es&nrer1ve A1ve11deli Marketing 666 61n Av~. N,.w York 10011. 12121 242-686'1 F111111 at:tverl•sm9 dMdlm• All display .as 5pm 2 days proor to pyblicatoon date AU ClllU•l•ed ads2pm 1 day pri >r to pubhcat•on d•!• Nol<efl 10 adver11s.,s Ad\lerl•llflQ 1ate sche"dule Eoghl-A w..sellechvf>April 11. 19811 RaponS1bibtr we do not auume 1tnanc,a1 respo1111b1hty lot Clll•ms by ac:1vert1Mrs but rNdefl are asked to 8<1v•te l trt• ""w,.,.1)91' o! •J1y 1U1p+e10n of fraclul8"1 or ctecep11ve ac:Jve.il•Smg and SUlp•cJOns "''II be •nveatlgaled -~~~r tl'llern~ ! _ Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice Seek a dote, on adventure, an encounter Send a message for all lo see to someone you love Advertise your secret fantasy TO PLACE A 'PERSONAL' IN THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, JUST CALL 529-8490 Lawyer Calls 'Bell Jar' Film 'Hollywood at its Worst' BOSTON (UPl)-A lawyer for a Har­vard psychiatrist who claims she was falsely depicted as a lesbian in a televi­sion adaptation of the novel The Bell Jar told a federal jury Tuesday, Jan. 20, that the film represented "Hollywood at its worst." Dr. Jane V. Anderson has filed a $6 million suit against 14 defendants ineludini: AVCO Embassy Pictures Corp., CBS Inc. and Time-Life Films alleging defamation of character, inva· sion of privacy and intentional inflic­tion of emotional distress. Anderson, 5.5, an associate professor of clinical psychiatry at Harvard Medi· cal School, was a close friend of author Sylvia Plath, who wrote the largely autobiographical novel about a wom­an's struggle with mental illness. She says her relationship with Plath was accurately portrayed in the 1961 book but not in the movie, broadcast in 1979 on CBS and Home Box Office. Legal experts say the trial could be an important test of the right of privacy versus artistic freedom. "The evidence will show Hollywood at its worst," Anderson's lawyer, Harry L. Manion III, said in his opening argu~ men ts to the U.S. District Court jury. Anderson sayi; she was the basis for a character named Joan Gilling, a lover of the movie's central character, Esther Greenwood. Anderson's lawyers E-mid their client was identified by name as the model for Gilling in two biographies of Plath pub­lished in the 1970s. And(•rson particularly objected to th(• scenes in which the Gilling character mak(•H sexual advance8 to the Green· wood character Manion arrused the defendants of being "outrageous, unethical and inde rent" in allowing the film to be aired after the similariti(•S hetw(•en Anderson and the Gillin!( character were brought to their attention. Defenl-ie lawvrr Alexander Pratt, who was scheduh·d· to deliver opening argu­ments Wednesday, insi8ted the compar­ison was invalid because the film was based on a novel. " It's a fiction bast>CI on a fittion," he told reporters. The $6 million suit also names Ted Hughes, the poet laureate of England and th<• widower of Plath. who killed herself in 196;!. Hui:hes, executor of Plath's rstate, sold motion picture rights to thf' book to srveral parties. Thr suit also asks for an end to the broadcasting and distribution of the movie. In a distant time and a far·off world. Eleven top science fiction writers give their visions of who! it could someday mean to be gay or lesbion. in this widely-acclaimed new onthology. Contributors include Somuel R. Deloriey, Joanna Russ ond Edgor Pangborn. lM:>RLDS APART edited by Comillo Decornin. Enc Gorber and Lyn Paleo S795 1n bOOkstorns. Of clip this od to Ofder 8 Enclos-;d 1s $8 SO (postpoid) for Worlds Apart. rome City Nyson Publications, address _state___ zip μt F < 11 F yrv-ptcr• <t l:losl ~ MJ' FEIFFER® Tuesday: New Special 8pm-2am 25<!: Draft $1 .50 Well $1 .25 Beer No Cover Wednesday: The Night to be at Crystal's Everyone Else Will!! Strictly Disco Night 75<!: Bottle Beer, $1 .50 Well , 25<!: Draft No Cover Look for the Surprise Coming on Wednesdays Thursday: Wet T-Shirt Contest $50 1st Place, $25 2nd Place $1 .25 Pitcher Beer Come See Your Favorite Wet Shirt It's A Must January Special Never A Cover Any Night JANUARY 23, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 5 Crystal's 911 W. Drew 522-7524 6 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 23, 1987 Minister-Author Changes Attitude; Hesitant to Perform 'Holy Unions' (/) a.. :::> UJ z :::> GENERAL REPAlrtS ~ :IJ () By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montro Voice Rev Larry Uhrig, pastor of Metropoli­tan Community Church ofWashington, D.C., and the author of two books deal­ing with the spiritual aspects of gay and lesbian relationships, says his outlook has changed somewhat in the past year. A renewed emphasis on commitment among gay people in the wake of the AIDS crisis, coupled with recurring identification of cultural influence as the reason many couples seek ceremon- March Organizers Meet in Calif. The steering committee of the second March on Washington for Gay and Les­bian Rights met this past weekend in West Hollywood, Calif. About 60 delegates, including four representatives from each of 10 geogra­phical regions and representatives of several national gay rights organiza­tiono, attended the conference, at which the march planning structure was the main topic of discu~sion . Dunng the conference. the committee decided to refine its planning mecha­niam by installing two smaller commit­tees to deal with hands-on coordination of the march effort. A coordinating com­mittee, which will meet four times before the march date Oct. 11, was created, consisting of the chairs of the national steering committee and chairs of several march-related events. Ray Hill, who attended the conference carry­ing the proxy of local representative Mary Walters, said he was elected to the coordinating committee as the chair of the National Lesbian and Gay Congress. An executive committee was also selected, consisting of steering commit­tee co-chair Steve Ault, who presided over the conference meetings; National Gay Task Force Jeff Levy; co-chair Pat Norman; and fourat-Iargesteering com­mittee delegates. The executive commit­tee will work full-time on a volunteer basis for the march effort, and will be responsible for physically implement­ing ~teering committee decisions, Hill said. Physical logistics and arrangements for the march were not approached at the weekend conference since negotia­tions are still in progress with the fed­eral government and the City of Washington, Hill said. He said that representatives from New York City and Washington. D.C., expressed a pref­erence for Lincoln Memorial as a rally­ing site. The executive committee will be responsible for future contact with the governing bodies, Hill said. The full steering committee will meet twice before the march, while the coordi nahng committee, a group of about 20, will meet four times. Steering committee members also agreed to endorse the idea of a National Lesbian and Gay Congress to work towards its establishment after the march. According to Hill, the Congress would consist of 870 delegates, two from each U.S. Congre,;sional district, who reflect the ethnic composition of the regions they represent. The Congress wouJd meet prior to party conventions in 1988 to discuss the gay right. agenda ial affirmation of a relationship, has made him somewhat hesitant to per­form holy union ceremonies, Uhrig said. Rev. Uhrig arrived in Houston late Wednesday night, Jan. 21, on his first visit here since 1981. He will be featured in Metropolitan Community Ch urch of the Resurrection's winter spiritual re­newal this weekend. Uhrig, author of The Two of Us and Sex Positive, said he no longer believes a formal blessing of a relationship is Rev. Larry Uhrig has changed his attitude on gay holy unions significant, though church unions are "appropriate" for people of faith . "I'm concerned people are so socially scripted to do what our parents did. Many make choices based on cultural values," Uhrig said And, the new fear-driven emphasis to "settle down," while it has made people more serious about the quality of rela tionships, intimacy, spiritualitv and life. has a drawback · "I have this apprehension that people are grabbing on to another person ... it isn't healthy to just jump on the firt'.tt possibility for a relationship," Uhrig explained. The minister, whose pioneer· ing effort to discuss the positive aspects ~f gay relationshps in The Two of Us earned him a reputation as an advocate of same--sex marriages, called his image an 'unavoidable trap." "I wrote on the subject because no one eh.;e had. I felt there was a need for some voices to say positive, healthy things about gay and lesbian relationships in a way, I wanted to help change how people feel about themselves," he said. There isn't a Jot of support for gay relationohips." he commented. "There's the TV voice of the religious right, of evangelical America." In his own ministry, Uhrig said he has performed only one holy union ceremony in the past year. "Most of the calls I get (for holy unions) are from people who are not member. of MCC. What I am hearing more and more from some of my col leaguet-i in the ministry is 'I don't do them,' or 'I only do them for members. ' I think this is unfair, since these people obviously have a need, or they wouldn't have called ," Uhrig said. Uhrig approaches the problem by cal­ling in each couple for individual coun· seling to determine where the relationship stands and what partners actually want. There are some who have an actual need to affirm a convenant between two partners, according to Uhrig. There is also a need, he said, for a way to acknowledge that a bond has been dis­solved. There must be a way of renego­tiating a relationship that has changed, Uhrig claims. It is from the perspective of expe­rience that Uhrig speaks on separation. His stated partner in The Two of Us a nd Uhrig separated after seven years of companionship. They remain close friends. Uhrig has been with his present lover three years. Couples who are separating benefit most by combining counseling with their application, the minister said. On the matter of fidelity within a rela­tionship, Uhrig stated he defines being faithful as keeping the commitment. What is important is that people know what they want when they make a con­venant and stick to the agreement," he said Expecting all of one's needs to be met by a single partner in a long-term rela­tionship may be unrealistic, Uhrig said, as research indicates peoples' sexual needs may change. In his second book, Sex Positive, Uhrig challenges many popular inter· pretations of scriptural passages that he says are used incorrectly to give sex a bad name Sadly, the AIDS crisis has resulted in some reinforcement of old sex·negative stereotypes, Uhrig noted. A third book, this one a novel based partially on Uhrig's experience, is in the works. Uhrig said he has written about 100 pages so far of the novel, which deals with growing up gay among fun· damentalist evangelicals in the 1950s. Uhrig reported his own communica tions with his father, a well known evangelist who once moved in the same circuits as Bill Graham and Oral Roberts, have improved. "His attitude was once very negative, but he's mellowed out now. We can talk about gay things now. He's beginning to get over the sexuality and realize that his son has a ministry." Rev. Uhrig was scheduled to open MCCR's renewal la!it night with a ~er mon on "the fullness of Christ." He will also be delivering sermons tonight at 7: 15 p.m .. and Sunday al 10:45 a.m. and 7:1!) p.m . in th(• church ~anctuary , 1919 Decatur A <·ov<•red dii.;h dinner is planned Rat­urday at 7::lO p.m. in MCCR's fellowship hall, fpaturing entertainment bv the Metropolitan Community ChurCh of Dallas' m€'n's choir .... 0 S2 z 0 z =i 0 .a..:. AUTOMOTIVE 6z .(.). z _J Winterize Your Car: Gl UJ Transmls;Jon Service 29.95 011 a Lube 2A.95 Cooling Syslem Selvlce 27.95 1411 Tait 522-2190 TRANSM!SSIONS ~--------- ..... --, : s10°0 : off I I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I any of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing •Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes •Announcements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers •Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD MEMBERS ~ 10% DISCOUNT · SPEEDY - PAINTING SERVICE OF Te-)(AS Fast Rehable Serw:e, ... -· ~ . Excellent Ouahty. Low Cost ~ 5400 BEUAJRE · BLVD. Conven1Mt Southwest Locauon · blocktMlolC~•ockM:M~ I CALL 667-7417 I PICK UP AND DELIVERY I M~~~Err~=~I~~~~~ ~~~M~Lf f :~:~~~~~~s~~~~=1= I -----------..! Tom's Pretty Fish 224 Westheimer (Only Six Blocks from Main St.) 520-6443 Announces that The Joker that's been sitting in a glass o_f c~ampagne on the wall of the Old Exile 1s now in the front part of Tom's Pretty Fish shop. It's now :eally a very pretty shop with a varied inventory of pretty fish , birds, aquariums, cages and supplies. Come See It and our many sale items. JANUARY 23, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 BEER BUST 2SA. DRAFT All DAY, All NIGHT II 5t; ~ 7 Days a Week I-SATURDAY & SUNDAY LIQUOR BUST 15::;, All the Well Liquor You Care to Drink 4pm-7pm 220 Avondale '' μELP ME μOSE I EM DOWN ~NP, DR'1 'EM OFF Wet Jockey Short Contest $200 Cash & Prizes Starring Maude Thursday Evenings 529-7525 8 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 23, 1987 AIDS Money Is It Going Where It's Needed Most? By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice President Reagan's proposed trillion­dollar fiscal year 1988 budget targets $343.5 million for AIDS research. Together with $120 million included in the budget for AIDS education. the total the federal government would spend to combat the deadly disease if the pack­age is approved is almost $500 million. Even this unprecedented amount seems. to many, inadequate in the battle against an epidemic giant that U.S. Sur­geon General C. Everett Koop has said could kill 100 million people by the year 2000 if a cure or vaccine is not found. But what role the federal government is destined to play in finding that cure or vaccine-as well as how much, if any, of the budgeted funds will filter down to local AIDS service providers and who will benefit from them-seems uncer· tain at this point. The United States Public Health Ser­vice hao budgeted a total of$416 million for AIDS in fiscal year 1987 to cover research, public education and social . ervices. The agency breakdown is as follows· $11 ,900,000, Health Resources and Servicet1 Administration, $89.229,000, Center. for Disease Con trol; $252.483,000, National Institute of Health; $47,553,000, Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Services, and $14.390,000, Food and Drug Adminis· tration "Our point of view is that we have the money available to do what can be done now," Murphy said. The research arm gets the biggest cut of the pie, but how federal intervention will figure into the development of a treatment for AIDS is a question, even at the level of the agency responsible for administering the funds. Judy Murphy, a speaker for the National Institute of Allergi•s and Infectious Disea~es, the National lnsti· tute of Health agency responsible for administering AIDS funds, said how much federal AIDS funding is needed for research "depends on who you talk to ," "Our point of view is that we have the money available to do what can be done now," Murphy said. "Money alone. that is, just throwing (funds) at the problem is not the answer. Administering the money requires peo· pie. and time." she pointed out. If Congress were to give $20 billion to the NIAIO for AIDS re>earch, the agency would not have the personnel to administer it, Murphy said. There are currently only 19 research centers in the country approved by the NIAID to receive grant assistance from the national agency to conduct drug experiments. In Texas, only the Insti· tute for Immunological Disorders is licens.d by the NIH agency. The other~ are Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases in New York City; Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore; University of Washington, Seattle; Univer~ity of Miami; Harvard Univeri;ity at Massachusetts General, Botston; Tulane University Medical School. New Orleans; University of Minnei-;ota Health Science Center~ Duke Univer~ity Medical Center, Durham, N.C.; Univeroity of Rochester, Roches­ter, NY.; t:CLA School of M.dicine, Los Angeles; University of Pittsburgh; Uni­versity of Southern California, Los Angeles; San Francisco General Hospi­tal; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, The Bronx; New York Univ.rsity Medical Center; Stan­ford University School of Medicine, Stanford. Calif.: Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York City; and the Uni­versity of California at San Diego. The centers were selected on the basis of the experience of the individual researcher making the grant applica· hon, the quality of past research at the institution and the type of facility where the experiments are conducted, Murphy said. Competition for the federal grants runs hiich. she noted. Apparently, the NIAID has its hands full coordinating the current 19 con· tracts. .. Everyone involved in these projects has to he overseen. This means the agency must provide a monitor. The proce:-;s involves a lot of paperwork, and each center also has its own protocols establshed for drug tests," Murphy explained . .. We're trying to do as much as we can as quickly as we can," Murphy said. Lynn Walters, public information director at the Institute for Immunologi· cal Oh;orders, said government money for research sometimes comes "with strings attached " "We don't really know what the budget money will mean in Houston," Walters said. But the hospitals are on the watch, and the Institute's pharmacy is being expanded to handle moreexper· imental drugs Funding for AIDS research is also available in the privatt' sector, largely through pharmaceutical companies and hiote<'hnical firms who finance their own experiments and, sometimes, university research . Private founds tions like the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation give grants directly for AIDS projects, Murphy noted. The government's involvement in the AIDS busine•s hinges on a sense of pub· lie responsibility, according to Murphy. "We're really all working on similar tracks-the NIH, the drug compani•s and theunivt>r:sities. We have a common goal. finding a trC'atmentand setting up a mechanism to administer it," Murphy said. "We at the NIH feel that we have to put money into it. The government can't sit back and do nothing." It may w•ll be this "moral" applies · tion that makes federal involvement viable. Howard Bragman of ICN Phar· maceutical~ I Viratek, the company that developed ribovirin. ~aid the antiv· 1ral drug manufacturer prohably wouldn't have gotten into th• AIDS market at this time without coaxing from the ('enters for Disease Control. The CDC, in its own experiments. di!o<· covered an in-vitro effe(·t of the drug agaimit the HIV virus and contacted the company, Bragman explained "Although AIDS research isn't a primary purpose of this company, we saw the need to conduct research , so W(' sought outside funding," Bragman said The company had previously been testing ribovirin in a variety of applica· tions which it believed have a larger total market potential than the AIDS use, Hragman said. The drug is cur­rently approv.d in the U.S. only for treatment of respiratory syncytial viru~. an respiratory disease found in infants. Had th• f.deral ag•ncy not alort.O the The company had previously been testing ribovirin in a variety of applications which it believed have a larger total market potential than the AIDS use, Bragman said. The drug is currently approved in the U.S. only for treatment of respiratory syncytial virus, an respiratory disease found in infants. company of its experiments, lCN may not have immediately tested ribovirin as an AIDS drug, Bragman said . Outsidt• funding for the study, how­ever, cam<' from Eastman-Kodak Inc. not the gov(•rnment. "Traditionally, pharmaceutical com­paniei-; fund their own research," Brag­man said. "The company subsidizes r<'S<'arch(•rs, and independent investi ­gators conduct the research ." "AIDS research is different, because the government feels a need to be involved," Bragman said. He add•d that the company did not seek gov•rn· mcnt funding for the ribovirn study. The budget of AIDS Foundation Houston includes a provision of2-3 per­cent for n•search, usually used to sup­port national organizations working to obtain re~<'arch funding. Curtis Dick son. AFH executive director, said he has h•ard that the foundation has, in the past, given money to local researchers and physicians, but he knew of no such projects during his nine-month admin­istration. The local foundation is working actively to attract some federal AIDS funds to Houston. Federal assistance which probably will come from th• money earmarked for education, consti tutes AFH's "available funds for the for· seeahle future," Dickson said. But federal funds usually go to state and city health departments, not com· munity organizations. Last year. the Texas Health Department received $29.5,000 in funds for AIDS .ducation· risk rt'Cluction. Community resources­including AFH, Oak Lawn Counseling Center (!}alias) and the Austin AIDS Proj(·<·t-are just now receiving a por­tion of unust·d funds. AFH will icet about $5,246, Dickson said. While the government (and also the international medical profes$ion) is tshowing a zC'alous determination to stem the •pread of the disease, the esti· mated :JO-S0,000 Americans already affected by AIDS seem to hav• been tagged with a decidely low priority. The apparent attitude regarding ris­ing incidence of the disease in the so­call<' d "at.large" community is neatly summed up in the opening paragrah of an article in thr .Jan. 12 issue of U.S. Ne1t·s and World Report: The disease of them Auddt·nly is the disease of 'us.' " The implication is that "they"-the gay m(•n and drug users originally identl fied ns tho high-risk groups for AIDS­ar(' going to di(•. but maybe it's not too latf' for u!!I. ' JANUARY 23, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Some McConnell Montrose Properties Face Foreclosure Place a 'Personal Ad in Next Week's Montrose Voice Montrose Gardens condominiums at Montrose and Fairview and the Glen­dower Court townhouse project at West­heimer and G:-eenbrier could be auctioned at the Feb. 3 foreclosure sale if a lienholder is successful in obtaining permission for the sale. Charles Parrish, an attorney for Com· monwealth Savings and trustee in charge of auctioning the two Montrose European Concern Over AIDS Helps Spark Anti­Drug Drive By Al Webb Unitt•d Press lnternatwnal LONDON-Ministers from 16 Euro­pean countriC's Wednesday endorsed a British initiative aimed at hitting drug traffickers where it hurts-in the pock­etbook. The pledge was contained in a list of "priority areas of action" indentified by the ministers at the end of their two-day eighth Council of Europe Ministerial ConferenC'P on drugs. David Mellor, minister of state at the Britain's Home Office, said the other nations either have similar legislation or are formulating such laws. Mellor said the conference was partic­ularly concerned that illicit drug users with non-8terile hypodermic needles were contributing to the growing toll of victims in Europe suffering from deadly acquired immune deficiency syndrome. In Edinburgh, Scotland, alone, he said, about 80 percent of drug addicts are infected by the AIDS virus-"a very worrying figure." "The AIDS problem ... is something we have to build into all our responses" to the spread of drug abuse, Mellor said. AIDS Among Issues Discussed by Mayors By David E. Ande r son Unit"d Press lnternatwnal WAS HI NGTON (UPI)-Facing another round of deep budget cuts in domestic programs, more than 170 may­ors arl' gathering for the annual mid­winter meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors with a call for a new national urban centu. Conference officials say the mood ranges from concern to anger as the mayors convene in the wake of Presi­dent R<•agan's fiscal 1988 budget prop­mml, which recommends new cutbacks in fPd(•ral funding for state and local governmrnt. A first sign of such concern was ex1wdrd from thf' conference's drug control tm;k force, which arranged to meet to disrusfi Reagan's proposal to cut money for thrC'e programs providing assistnnre to i..tah• and local govern~ mt>nt'H und<•r the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of !9XG. A hoHt of administration offic-inls and mt•mlwrs of Congr<·ss nr<• expt"<:ted to mt>t•t with tht' mayors during tht> thn·<•­dav met>ting, diseussing issueti ranging frc;m hunger and homell'ssness toAJl)S and tN:nngt' pregnancy to police and arb1 policit•A. properties, part of J.R. McConnell's con­fusing estate, said it was unlikely per­mission would be granted before Feb. 3, but not impossible. He said attorneys for Commonwealth are confident they will eventually get permission to sell the properties, but that it may take "a couple of months" because of McConnell's complicated bankruptcy case. Parrish said Commonwealth believes the amount of the loan is greater than the value of the property. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Letitia Taitte on Wednesday, Jan. 21, denied a request by bankruptcy trustee Peter Johnson for a six·month freeze on creditor litiga­tion to sort out McConnell's $275 mil­lion case. Johnson said Thursday that although the stay was denied, the court issued scheduling orders requiring the creditors to make their moves on spe­cific dates. Johnson said that although the court had given Commonwealth permission to "go through the formalities" of filing foreclosure papers, the lender did not have permission to sell the properties. As many as 80 stay relief requests were received by the court from separate creditors. Johnson said. Seek a dote, on adventure, on encounter Send o message for all to see to someone you love Advertise your secret fantasy TO P'\,AC( A ?Ell'SONAl' IN THE NEWSPNU Of MONT!l'OSE. JJSt CAll 529-8490 Happy Ours 0 Morning: ?am-Noon Monday-Saturday Afternoon: 6pm- 8pm Monday-Friday Evening: 11 :30pm-12:30am Every Night Can Beer $1 .25 Draft Beer 50¢ Well Drinks $1 .75 Shots $1 .25 Bartenders Specials Every Weekend Nobody gets Happy like 1022 Westheimer • 528-8851 Home of Eagle Leathers 10 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 23. 1987 Breaking Them Down The Stereotypes of Hispanic America Commentary by Richard Rodriguez Pacifw News .";nv1ce Spt>c1al to the M1Jntrose Voice America's uncertain border with Mex· ico was big news last year. Hispanic­Amencan s were consequently prominent in the public imagination. no longer 0 America's forgotten minority." To !"Orne Americans now we douhtlesr;ly seem a threat. a monolith-the young­est, "most fertile" group in America. And growing. The question mark on the political horizon. Yet what America will increasingly find out about Hispanics is that we are real hearts. individuals, not of one mind, one soul. In recent years. Hispanics have gained prominence, but it has been a prominence based on stereotypes amounting to little more than a carica· tu re. Ask most Americans to describe an Hispanic. and most Americans will probably come up with something like this: Hispanic:-: are Spanish speaking. And most Hispanics are immigrants. And , yes, of course, Hispanics are brown. IH1spanics are a racial minor­ity.) These 5'imple-minded generalities result tn part from the way Hispanics have politically represented them· selves The political ascendancy of His panics in the last two decades has followed the lead of the black civil rights movement. Hispanics got defined by analogy to blacks In the 1960s. race had replaced pov erty as America's primary social oppression The social reform move-­ment." t that consequently caug-ht the public's 1maginat1on did so by use of the analogy to the situation of blacks. Hispanirs in the late sixties charged America w1th racism . The solutions pro­posPd were based on a racial critique. In the era of affirmative action. Hispanics Joined blacks as America's "other minority ," the partner race. There was one problem, however. And that is simply that there is no such thing ai; an Hispanic race. Hispanics consti tute an ethnic group, not a racial group. There are "'pure'' white Hispanics, just as there are Asian Hispanics and sizable numben; of black Hispanics And of course. Indian Hispanics. Most Hispanics in the Cnited States. which is to say most Mexican American£.;, are of mixed race. mestizo. We carry the blood of the Spaniard and the Indian both. It .-. • •r;, 1H4o2u0s tWone.s Ttheexa•ms "' 77006 522-4485 ~ DELIVER VIDEOS Heads and Tai/1 Above the Rest -La ge Selection cl All-Mole VHS lopes -Tues Thurs and Sun Rentals $2 for Our Members -Now OP,en Sunday 2 to 8 OPEN 7 DAYS • Amex. Visa . MC is for this reason that in single Mexican American families among several child­ren one often sees a variety of skin color and facial features. And why "racial discrimination" has never fallen evenly on all Hispanics. The reforms of the sixties as thev apply to Hispanics were fatally flawt-d , com1cally flawed at times A friend of The next time you see charts comparing Hispanics to whites or blacks or Asians, remember the simple fact that there are Hispanics in all those racial groups. mine, he of Spanish father and Swiss mothE•r, he of hlut' eyes and blond hair, recently applit'd to an Ivy League grad ­uatP s<·hool. He was quickly accepted , gret·ted as a "minority" student becausp he had the requisite surname. Demographics, the secular prophets of our hureaucratic age, persist in treat­ing Hispanics as a racial group. They describe a fanciful future. It is said, for example: Hispanics are going to become the nation's largest minority group, out­numh< ·ring blacks by early in the next century. Or; Hispanics are going to become the dominant population in this or that southwestern state by the 21st century. It is nonsense. Hispanici; as an ethnic group cannot logically be compared to racial groups. The next time you S(•e charts c·omparing Hispanics to whites or blacks or Asiani-;. remember the sim· pie fact that there are Hispanics in all those racial groups The n•al future of Hispanics in Amer­ica is of no sin~le hue. The future evades easy graphing. Hispanics are a diverse society. And Wt' may be among the most divers<• of immigrant groups that Amer· ica has yt·t sPen. Th(• irony is that certain Hispanic activists of thP 1970s advanced hilingu · nlism and hiculturalism as national goals in thr namt.· of American "diver· sity : ·Hut those same ac'tivists admitled ~Pl~y ~Safe! Attention Members: J.O.E. J .O.E.'s Admiss ion Times Tues. & Thurs. 8 -9pm F r i. & Sat. llpm-2am Sunday 6-9pm J.0.E. is a private organization for mPmbers on_ly (adultgaymen).J.O.E. is not a public cl uh. There are membership restrictions. New member inquirirs may he made during the above listed hours. J.0.E. current/)' meets at the Collafle Pla)·hou"'· behind the lot at 611 Pac1f1c. Entrance is at rear of house. f,{)(Jk for the Play Safe flag much lesfi about Hispanic diversity. The fart is, for example, we don't all speak Spanish. Yet, again and again, we are trivial­ized by the institutions that deal with us. Take, for instance, the Roman Catholic Church. In most America dio~ cest.•s, if you phone the chancellery office in charge of Hispanic affairs, the voice answering will invariably answer in Spanish. I know Hispanics who stay away from Emch officC>s. who feel pushed away becausC> thC>y cannot speak Spanish. Tht>rC> are many Hispanics, several gen erations into this country and often among the most disadvantaged, who long ago in their familil's lost Spanifih. They Blay away from the Spanish masses on Sunday, just as they avoid Spanish language television programs and the billboards for Coke and Toyota emblazoned in Spanish . Spanish has been at the center of the Hispanic political agenda for the last 20 yearH. No issup hs b(>("n more passion· ately efipouscd than bilingual educa­tion. ls that because without Spanish, Hispanic politicians Sl'nse that there is littll' otherwise that would glue us tog<'ther a!-1 a political force? The Congrt'SHional vote for the immi· gration bill last November-the first att(•mpt at immigration reform in :JS years-signa)(•d a new public candor ahout Hispanic divl'rsity: five out of 11 Hispanic· rongn•ssmrn votl'd with tht• majority. Th(•y acknowledg(•d what polls for years have suggested, that Bis­panici-; gt.•nerally arr at least amhival· (•nt ahout th<• prospect of illC>gal immigration. This candor is welcome if long ovl'rduP. Hispanic politics will incrC>as­ingly havt· to take account of Hispanic divt·n1ity. For thl' fart is that th£>re an• vastlv diffen•nt lives crowdC'd under tht• Hisp3nic label. My own suspicion is that there is too much diversity to permit a national His­panic agenda. And the possibility of then• being a national Hispanic politi· cal movement is C>ven morl' doubtful. Ntt'ds rrmain. Urgt•nt needs. And thus tht·rr will have lo be alliancl's. But allinnc<'s hnsc_,d on commonality of intN(•sts rathC>r than simple ethnicity. I can envision an alliance•, for example, of Hispanic immigrant rights groups with s1milnr Asian groups. The Hispani<·s l know best. middle clm;s like myfielf, are ml'anwhilr drift· mg into America. Among Hispanks of th<• middle dass th(•rl' has long l><'(>n a high int{'rmarriag(> rate ouL~ide the group. Today, some of the most promi nt•nt Hispanic lt.•adPrs are married to non -Hispanics. Their children will carry (•on fused genealogies. We will call thC>m. :-;imply, Am(•riran The longPst Hispanic influence of Amt•rica may not turn out to be political so murh as soda I and rultural. His pan· ics an• a Horiety of mix and diversity Italians bl'camc Spanish-speaking in Argc>ntina, Chinese married Indian in Pt•ru, hrown married white in Mexico. Blnrk and brown marri(•d in the Carib­bean Th<• Hispanic hlood ml'mory is a mint•. This is our nchnes!-l as w<'ll as the politician's dilt·mma . PNS associate e<Mor Richard Rodnguez. ltie lulhor of ·Hunger in M·~mory wutes for a wide range ol publications l I Murphy. again referring to tht- con stant cries for "more funding," sug· gested that many groups and individuals mistakenly think a bulk of federal AIDS money goes to patient care and social service programs for people with AIDS. "This is an area that really doesn't even involve the NIH," she commented. Instead, the crucial area of human services falls largely under the umbrella of federal health care agencies like Medicare-already crippled financially and slated for more cuts in the new Rea gan budget. At just under $12 million, the Department of Human Resources gets the lowest allotment in the Public Health Service's AIDS breakdown. The area of rounsehng and mental health gets a slightly better response, from lJoth the government and the pri­val<' sector, than services in general. AIDS Foundation Houston was able in December to hire a fill-time mental hl'alth dire<:tor with funding from a pri· vale foundation grant. ... Federal funds usually go to state and city health departments, not community organizations. But the foundation still depends on volunteers to coordinate its advocate and "buddy" programs, and to provide supt>rvision and assistance at its eight­lx• d PWA residence. Provision of tram;­portation and in-home care suffers h<•c·ause of voluntft•r scheduleR, which usually cannot nccomodate workday hours. ThE' Vi~ting Nurses Association, funded by United Way, Medican• and privatp insuranCE', helps to fill the gap. AIDS puti<•nts. a VNA spokesman said, ofl(•n fall into the Medicare group RE's<•archers, despite consd(•ntiouN funding from all sectors, have so far pro· duct·d only two drugs that appear to aff<•d the t;wift, painful progression of thP diseas<•. Only one has h('en approved by the FDA for general UCC('t"S. At the va8t majority of private hospi tals and th<• public health facilitie" that car<' for th<' nation's indigent, only AZT, a toxie drug whos(• known side eff(•cls includ(• sev<·re anemia, is availabl<'. Jn the word• of Dr Robert Awe, director of Harris County Hospital District's AIDS program, AZT iR still "the only show in town" for thousandR of patients and outpatients at these facilities. Tl'sting of ribovirin and a th ird drug, ampligen, continues at the government· approv(•d centers. Several varcines are being tested by fit'ienti1:>ts throughout the world. Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 1J :;;;--;I)< .. . JANUARY 23, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Parker Narrowly Escapes Last­Minute Challenge in GPC Elections In an unexpected last-minute contest for the presidency of Houston Gay Polit­ical Caucus, members re-elected incum­bent Annise Parker over outspoken activist Ray Hill by a single vote Wednesday night, Jan. 21. The debate centered on the Demo­cratic National Convention controv· ersy. Hill, a member of the "Committee for Democratic Awareness," blamed "thr absence of strong GPC leadership" for turning the affair inro "an unfortu­nate romedy of errors.'' "I felt the community deserved better treatment by the convention host com· mittee, the city administration and the media. I felt I could provide that leader· ship. hut I had no portfolio to do so, .. Hill said. The first vote in the only contested caucus race resulted in a tie, but Parker pulled in front 24 to 2:J in second round voting In comments following the first vote, Parker stood firm in her position on the convention matter. GPC of firers and board mrmhers elected Wednesday night are (sitting, l. to r.) Mary Walters and Annise Parker, (standing) Paul Simons, George Coe. Brian Keet•er, Pat Gandy, Phil Batdorf and Dat'id Kelley 111 believe T had opμosi ti on over the issue I stand by my position. I believe they were wrong in the tenor of what they tried to do," she stated. Under Parker's leadership, the cau­cus had from the beginning distanced itself from the controversy. Parker had earlier written a letter to Mayor Kathy Whitmire, stating that HGPC had not endonwcl the group and wa.s supportivt• of Houi:;ton 's hid to host the convention. The )(•Uer pointed out, howevn, that an adv(•rsarial rt•lationship did exi~t betwt'f'n the hm~inehi:> community and thC' gay ('Ommunit:v. that Houston ha.s a history of homophobia, and that the problems must be addressed one way or another Other officers and board members elected Wednesday were Paul Simmons, vice president; Phil Batdorf, secretary; David Kelley, treasurer; Brian Keever. board seat four; Mary Walters. board seat five; George Coe. board seat six: and Pat Gandy. board seat nine. First call was h(•ld for nominations to board s(•at 8, lwing va<·ated by Dennis Hatch In other business, Parker presented a plaque to SuC' Lov('ll, a former presidrnt, honoring her for accomplishments dur· Where Your Friends Live 3 pools, free cable, utilities paid and new exercise facilities Only 20 Units Left (713) 621-7880 Anorher Fine fing"r Propc.:ny ing her tenure. A planned appearance by Michael Shuff. director, and Eleanor Munger, founder of Omega House, was cancelled because no volunteer was available to take Shufrs place in patient care. Ironi· cally, the scheduled appearance was to appeal for voluntffrs for the AIDS hos­pice Counseling Center Director Named to National Board William (Billi Scott, founder and clini­cal dirt>ctor of the Montrose Counseling Center, wa.s rPccnUy elected to the board of director>< of the Washington. D.C.­based National Lesbian and Gay Health Foundation Bill &ott. e/rnical director of },fontrose Coun. eling Center NLGHF began m 1978 with the goal of being a forum for lesbian and gay health providers and consumers. Scott fee ls Houston, if not all of Texas' gay and lesbian population, has benefitted extensively from the foundation's effort.•. The Montrose Counseling Cen­ter, sinre its inception in 1978. has con· suited with NGLHF for guidance and a~sistance , St·ott. who also helped start the Oak Lawn Counseling Center in Dallas and the Waterloo Counseling Center in Aus· tin, feels :"LGHF ran be considered a grandparent to a Tex' lesbian and gay menl.lll he-Ith faC'JJlti s, as well a. most of the nation . 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 23, 1987 Unbeknownst to most hlstorlons, Einstein started down the road of professional basketball before an ankle Injury diverted him Into science. Goal> l'o.tl\1.1'1~ ~/IM., WE Wf:P.¥.. 'RfK ,,,_ \t:l? samc:mc~~\\\E.N.'.~Of~ \£. ~ ~o~~wurnl\\.. WAI l Vf\R£ H!ll' ll.£N1\0N \\£, ~'t . l ~ !<0\ E~N fl.\ L\&ffi'i II) it\.L 'IOU OOR ~'iS tlR WI\.~ wt~ I-IE.RE. 11'1 l'llC.\, \.'IE ~'!IL'{ SA\0'1)0 1-'U~ fto.\..REl»O'!. t 1',\11'1¥.. \\ \'J()U\.'IJ &. 6.ST II' INE I.El'\ NOVJ. G.t:00- t>il.-'l . -- 'fMI Nm \N'E il.f°1'61\,t-lEW,l-\Ot-1e.'S.\ "'1'f'R~ AAt> ~IT 11.\E "tlEE.l'.1..'1 ~\Rt> CME l\NC.R? Voice Comics '1wo questions, Milch: How much do you -igh, and what's the most senslllw part of any elephanrs anatomy?" 2'f- C1t11COIOIM~.llc. Brian is totally unaware that his pancreas 1s telling his liver to pour massive amounts of stored sugar into his right arm. "Somethln's up, Jed . ... That's Ben Potter's horse, all right, but aln1 that Henry Morgan's chicken rldin' him?" ,1\..1 ;A .._.JM..._ __ . _4"-(,J~~ .. # ..... ~-­PIRlfltO · ee-"'""',.';""!'l., ·,1~ Private Doctors Take Hard View of AIDS NEW YORK (UPI)--Private doctors surveyed about AIDS were very skepti­cal of public health policies, with nearly half advising against taking donated blood and 28 percent calling for the qua­rantine of AIDS victims. The survey released Tuesday, Jan. 20, by MD magazine showed a widespread skepticism among doctors, many of whom called for new tough measures to slow the spread of the fatal disease. "ThesC' resulLq indicate a skepticism among physicians about the conclu· sions reached by researchers and other public health authorities," MD editor A.J. Vogl said. "There ar<> discrepancies between doctors in practice and the ivory tower t;orts, but his is extreme," he said in a telephone interivew. In all, 45 percent of those surveyed said they would advise family members about to undergo elective surgery to shun donated blood. Another 9 percent said they were not sure what they would do if faced with such a dilemma. They said they would urge family members to have their own blood stored in the weeks before the operation and then given back to them if needed. And 28 percent said AIDS patienta should be quarantined. A California doctor, age 35, wrote, "I feel the public health agencies arenegli· gent for not quarantining infectious persons already.'' "AIDS can be eliminated by quaran· tining all AIDS patients on a desert island," a 70-year-old general practi­tioner from CaJifornia wrote. Concerns by doctors over the safety of the nation's blood supply were expressed despite assurances from the Red Cross that the public blood supply is free of the AIDS virus. All donated blood is routinely tested for antibodies that indicate the presence of acquired immune deficiency syn drome, the Red Cross said. AIDS is known to be passed through blood, sPmt•n or the birth canal. The steps the doctors favored was a proposal that the government test high­risk individuals and then track down the sex partners of those who test posi­tive for the disease. The measure, rejected by the surgeon general and AMA as ineffective, was favored by 78 percent of those polled. Just over half of those surveyed said an A IDS blood test should be a prerequi­site for a marriage license. Many of the doctors wrote in their own comments along with thei r answers to the survey questions. "[ think everybody over the age of IO should be tested," wrote one family doc­tor from Colorado. "My sympathy for the AIDS problem is lowerM by the awareness of the life­style that initiated the vast majority of c·oNes," wrot<• an obst€'trician. ag£> 52, from lllinois. Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice PARKWAY ATHLETIC CLUB $20,000 OF NEW EQUIPMENT INCREDIBLE FACILITY INCREDIBLE EQUIPMENT INCREDIBLE PRICES INTRODUCTORY OFFER Bring us your present gym con­tract from any other gym and we will honor the balance of the pre­paid time with the purchase of equal time from Parkway Athletic Club. JANUARY 23, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 TV Station Accepts Condom Ads to Fight AIDS By John M. Leighty Umted Press International SAN FRANCISCO-A San Francisco television station has agreed to accept condom commercials for the purpose of combating AIDS, and civic and health leaders Monday, Jan. 19, urged other stations nationv.-;de to do the same. "We're in the midst of a deadly epi· demic," said Dr. David Werdeger, direc­tor of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. "The condom is the sin· gle best weapon we have against AIDS. The message has to get out." John Molinari and Harry Britt, members of the city's Board of Supervi­sors. held a news conference Monday and announced they would introduce a resolution to the law-making board Tuesday urging local media to accept advertising from condom manufactur­ers. "This may be a controversial issue for some, however what's at stake are human lives," said Molinari. "We have only begun to see the devastation of AIDS in this country. San Francisco must continue its role as a leader in edu­cation and prevention of this disease." Javier Valencia. public affairs coordi­nator of the NBC affiliate KRON-TV, owned by Chronicle Broadcasting Co., said the major-market station was con­tacted by a local representative of Tro· jan. a Carter-Wallace product. A contract must still be agreed to con­cerning fees and air times, said Valen· cia, a process that ·will take about a month before the ads appear. Revenues from any condom commer­cials on KRON-TV will be donated to AIDS research and advertisers will be required to make an equal donation, said Valencia. The spots are to be aired during a six·month trial period and will not be .shown around children's pro­grammmg. "The reason we've accepted the con­dom ads is because of the AIDS health crisis, and at this point no other issue is being addressed," said Valencia. "Our focus is trying to combat the threat of AIDS." Paul Boneberg, spokesman for the Mobilization Against AIDS, said his organization would work at the grass­roots level in numerous cities this year to get local media outleta to accept con· dom advertising. "This is the single, most effective thing we can do to fight the spread of AmS," said Boneberg Valencia said KRON-TV has already aired condom ads in connection with news stories about AIDS and in that format there were no negative \.;ewer reactions. "We're now making a slow progre~sion into paid condom commer­cial,.." The world's leading condom manu· facturer. Ansell-Americas. staned an ad campaign Dec. 1 that focused on pre­venting AIDS. The ads, with the eye­catching stat.t>ment, "I enjoy sex, but I'm not ready to die for it,"' appeared in USA Today, Neu· York Magazine and Vogue as weB as being aired on some local television and cable stations. Supervisor Britt said other nations such as Hong Kong and England have launched massive educational cam­paigns to fight AIDS. but the federal government has dragged ita feet on the issue, making it even more important that private sectors get involved. "Public education has been and will continue to be the most effective mean8 in preventing the spread of this tra,Pc disease," Rritt t'aid. 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 23. 1987 The Wild West Returns to Main Street The "al S1tlinR Bull and Buffalo Bill Cod). Bruce Ellis plays Buffalo Bill and Ambrosio Guerra is Sittin.R Bull in ~\fain ~treet'a "Indians" Review by Bill O'Rourke .V. ontro&I! \to1u Indians at Main Street Theater is easily one of the 10 best shows this season,and will be cited ai; such on practically eve­rybody's list. Do not wait and watch the movie. They did try to film it, calling it "Buffalo Bill and the Indians." It stinks. This is one of those supremely theatrical shows which just will not translate to any "ther medium. Film is just too literal for uua imaginative piece. Watching it. we are several places at once. We are watching Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild We•t Show, as he himself might have remembered it. We also see Cody carving a name for himself out of the American wilderness. Most of all, we are present at a conclave between Indian leaders and a committee from Washington in which both sides accuse the other of treaty violations. It is a pe"onal tragedy. Cody might have been a great man. Ironically, his fatal flaw was an overriding ambition to be remembered. In his attempts to reap fame. he rapes the truth and the land. He sells out friends who look at him for aid. He even prostitutes his name by the way he sells what is at best a parody of himself. It is also an international tragedy. The white man shows no interest in try· ing to understand the Indian nations­neither their philosophy or even thetr organization. The Indians barely avoid losing themselves by adopting the ~~ite man's wea..P,ons-h9rse • gWJ treaties-«> try to fend off his encroach ment. This Arthur Kopit play was directed by Jeff Galligan (who also directed Marat Sade). He has a fine feeling for spectacle and never once lets loose of the meaning, worrying it until he gets every morsel of meat off that bone. Superb! The depth of the talent in this cast i• phenomenal. This is a large cast, but you can tell that no corners were cut in rounding it out. This has got to be Bruce Ellis' year. The mun is on a role from one fine per­formancr to another seemingly better one. His characterizations are so varied! He plays Buffalo Bill with true verve, wit and pathos The description sounds like many things I've said about James Black in the past and he's deserved them all. He's here, as Wild Bill Hickock. In many ways, Hickock's almost the man Cody might have been, had he been true to himself Ned Bunthne was only a promoter from Brooklyn. Maybe he didn't realize he was a snake in the grass. Here he'~ realized to perfection by Curt Alfrey Ambrosio Guerra is Sitting Bull. His ~ft for oratory is a match for this noble chieftan. Ditto John Guerra as John Grass. They ore magnificent. You might t'xpect somecne with a body like Carlos Compean·s to be a rather wooden actor. Remember Peter Lupus? He's not. He's fluid and touch· mg. There are way too many good perfor­mances to mention everyone who deserves to be mentioned. Technically, especially with John Early's lighting, this is a very daring show. All those risks really pay off. For one thing, this cast reaHy knows how to play that beautiful lighting. Skip this show? Don't be silly! o Notes Blasted pnnter's gremlins' Last Friday, this column announced that all remain­ing Houston Symphony Orchestra tickets are on sale for half price. We should have said, "all remaining Mon· day evening H.S.O. tickets." Our apolo­gies for the confusion. The Univen1ity of Nebraska at Omaha gave Houston Grand Opera music director and conductor John Demain an honorary doctorate in art.~ and letters last month. o Openings Jnformance (UT Med School, room 3.001, 2.1, noon)-part lecture, part con­cert; pianist Marcantonio Barone; Freebies-ONO! Talley's Folley (Country Playhouse, 2:l}-two people foll in love in a deserted boathouse Thoroughly Wild Rice (Hermann Hall, Rice, 23 & 24)-Rice Dance Theater Children's Story Hour (U. of St. Tho­mas Bookstore, 4100Montrose,24, ll:OO a.m.)-a member of the Houston Story­teller's Guild; every Saturday; freebies Houston Choreographers x 6 {Jewish Community Center, 24)-original works by Sara Draper, Joan Karff, Cyn­thia Powers, Kristine Richmond, Rode­lio Rodriguez and Roberta Stokes; ONO! The Dishes (Hard Rock Cafe, 26, 9:00 p.m.)-Hot Oiggety Dog! ONO! C_vnthia Pou''''·"· choreographer-dancer u·ith Houston Chon·ographers x 6 The Mi~souri City chapter of Links Inc. is spearheading a national cam­paign to sell 500 season tickets to The Ensemble. They encourage subscribers to donate the tickets to the theater which will give them to high school slu· dents. Thr Normal Heart \.,:ill have a normal run at The Alley, but the performances to attend ar<· the two previews that benefit the AIDS Foundation! Get those tickets now o Celebrate Jan. 21, 1931 Lubbock, Texas: The whole town went on a one-day fast. The money they saved on food was used to help the poor and unemployed. B'days: 23-Humphrey Bogart, Franklin Pangborn, Chita Rivera. 24- John R<'luRhi, Ernest Borgnine, and poet Kenneth Pitchford. 2.5-Aaron Fricke, Dean Jonet;, Virginia Woolf. 26-Earthu Kitt, Paul Newman. Gene Siske!. At the end of the pres1' conference after last year's Super Bowl, winning qunrt.-rhnrk Jim McMahon carried his 2 ye.ar-old daughter into th<• larker room, saying, "Let's go sN> some naked boys," "'--•hlc>lo """·- c v St•lt' /rp Please make check or money order paydble to CHRISTMAS CRITTERS 1318 Nance Street Houston, Texas 77002 Coll 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Community Groups ttFrontrunners-Houston Competed in Tenneco Marathon Sunday, Jan. 18. dawned cloudy and cold for the 15th annual Houston Tenneco-Marathon. Over 4500 runners braved the 32-degree temeprature and 20-mile-per hour winds combin­ing to produce a wind chill factor of 18 degrees. Among the competition were two members of Frontrunners-Houston. Both were rewarded for their efforts with personal best times Rtck Potter. who ran 1n the event for the fifth time. finished the course in 2:53:35. easily quahfymg him for the Boston Marathon. In his third appearance in Houston's marathon. Steve Rheinecker completed the 26.2-mile run in 3:21 :20 The top fintsher in the event was Derrick May with a t1meof 2: 11 :50 Bente Moe led female competitors. finishing in 2:32:36 ttMary's II Leads Billiards League After several weeks of play. Roger Pruett. secretary of the MSA Billiards League, reports the top three teams are Mary's II. The Rancheros and The Barn. respectively Position round play began Wednesday, Jan.21 so standings are expected to cha"rJe considerably ttWoman Advances on Tennis Club Ladder Dimples. a female member of the Houston Tennis Club. got off to a good start in 1987 with a B ladder win over Jeff Barkman, 6-2. 6-4 The victory advanced her from No 6 to No. 2 on the ladder before suffering a later defeat which dropped her to No 4 Another female player. Thalia Thompson. 1s preparing for her first ladder challenge. She is expected to move into the top ten very soon In other action. David Helland. No. 5 on the Top Twenty, defended against No. 8 Arm1 Alabanza. 7-5. 5-7, 7-5_ No_ 9 Rich Corder defended 6-3. 6--3 against Rene Ruiz Dimples' newly-won No. 2 ranking got a quick test when newcomer Gary Schwartz ' 6-3. 6-0 victory gained him a place on the ladders for the first time New member Gilbert Pee. in his first ladder challenge. defeated Barkman 7-6 (7~5 ttebreak). 6-3 New players of all levels of ab1hty and experience are 1nv1ted to join the club for play Sundays 10:30 am -1 ·oo p.m. and Wednesday nights 7 30-9:00 at Memorial Park Tennis Center HTC president Mark McMahon has called an officers' meeting Saturday.Jan 24. to formulate plans and committees for 1987 He can be reached at 721-8933 JANUARY 23. 1967 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Coffee Shop 1102 Westheimer - 522-3332 To Go Orders Always Welcome Break{ ast Specials $2.49-$2. 75 Lunch Specials $3.95 Dinner and Midnight Specials $erving Beer and W1·n_e __ _ Thanks for Your Continued Support of Aid for AIDS Meeting place of Wednesday morning Montrose Business Guild Breakfast Club-6:30am MAKE KROGER YOUR SUPER SOWL PARTY HEADQUARTERS * 4 EXPRESS LANES DAILY * MONTROSE KROGER STORE 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 23, 1ga7 1\\IS - IT, .lUSOCf! WE'll:E ~ RIMI( 1\115 AME, SEE - ~1W~ ~ -m' ~ GfN@L, ~-ra· ~-u~~WE.'VE ~~E~rlllOSE~ ~- ~ti.IT,~ Mm. 'EM INID ~Q.UIS!~~!r ~b ... ~ -,"'·~ ~~;. The Born Loser The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe Adverisity can breed nobility. Take my friend Fred Frisbee. "I am going to make the supreme sacrifice," Fred told me the other day, "in order to wipe out the dread scourges that so plague the lot of mankind." Heaven knows ad­versity has hound­ed Fred. It goes back to the innocent days when he was court­ing Felicia. They danced cheek-to­cheek on their se­cond date, kissed good night on their fourth and petted on their ninth . Fred, of course. never thought of scor­mg, In fact, the night he rounded first base, he felt obligated to propose. And so, on June 4, 1969, Fred and Felicia (she in virginal white) solemnly exchanged vows to renounce all others until death did them part. That was eight days before the sexual revolution struck. At first, Fred and Felicia looked upon it as some strange aberration. A wide­eyed Felicia read in Cosmo (formerly 428 Westheimer-529-2506 Cosmopolitan) about group gropes, menages a quatre auec chien and such fascinating new positions as the Inverted Muffin . "Do you think a Maz­ola Oil Party is some sort of cookout, Fred?" she would ask. But Fred was busy perusing examples of full frontal nudity in Playboy ("They all look alike to me," he was fond of saying). along with articles examining the need for mayonnaise in sexual sand­wiches. One result of the Sexual Revolution was that Felicia became liberated and had to go to work. At Felicia's office, the women (formerly girls) talked about uThe Sensuous Woman." At Fred's job, the men (formerly studs) talked about "The Joy of Sex" So Fred and Felicia bought a copy of "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex," which, as Felicia put it, "had a lot more in it than that." As the years dragged by, they gamely introduced Reddi-Whip, flamingo feath­ers and nude arm wrestling into their bedroom, but both agreed something was missing. 41Maybe weweren'tcutout for monotony," said Felicia one day. "You mean monogamy," said Fred "Same thing," said Felicia. So they were amicably divorced on Jan. 29, 1975. The very next morning, the herpes epidemic struck. When Fred eagerly purchased his first copy of The Single Swingers' Weekly, he was confronted with a four­color cover shot of an undraped herpes simplex 2 virus under the black head­line: "Look Out!" And when he nevert1'eless bravely made his way down to The Asparagus Fern Swingles Bar, he found it had been replaced by The All-American Body Shoppe, featuring Nautilus equipment, segregated showers and fungicide foot baths. So his new adventurous lifestyle con­sisted of bench presses, treadmills and aerobic sit-ups. In hardly any time, Fred lost 18 pounds and all hope. There was a dazed but determined look in his eye when he dropped by the other day. "Only by giving my all for my fellow man can I rid the world of these new diseases and restore the joy­ous life to my swinging single col­leagues," said Fred. " But, Fred," I protested, "you're a born loser. Surely you don't think you can find the cures in some laboratory?" "No," he said glumly. "I'm going to get married." 1987 (S F ) Chronicle Pubhshtng Co BETTER LAWns & 4ARDEns Total lawn maintenance Commercial-Residential • b.dndscape • Trdsh Remoudl • Ch1mneq Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Comple te Sp rinkler Sq ste ms FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN Fortunes By Mark Orlon Your Horoscope from /he Voice For Friday evenmg. Jan. 23. through Tuesday morning. Jan. 27. 1987 ARIES- If you're going to be self­centered and self-Indulgent, you may as well go the whole route. Take a bubble bath. Take that book down you've been meaning to read. Take yourself in hand - - - - - TAURUS Hump time. There's this hump you've got to get over, you see, and someone or something's in the way. You've got to get past it or stay confused Dump 1t, pump it. jump it- just do some­thing with 111 GEMINI Your eye for beauty could get you into trouble. You'll be seeing attraction in places you never saw 1t before, in faces that until now held no appeal It's a visual high . Be discreet ' (But keep those eyes open•) CANCER Have a good time. Be play­ful and fun-loving and even foolish. Your usual intensity just doesn't work now Seek out friends to join you 1n this special time. Rock and rolll LEO Feeling moody and restless? Feel like you've got to get away by your­self? Go ahead And don't feel guilty about it. either, Everyone has these important needs . lfyou get away, don't be dragged down by thoughts of the past Remember tomorrow VIRGO Look who's looking and feel­ing sexy' And not in a quiet way. either Flaunting 1t can be so much fun; you find you're out of control. No harm. It's the season and you're hot. Nice. Very nice LIBRA Problems you've been having with brothers, sisters or best friends will come to a head and be worked out, 1f you're honest and direct in dealing with them. Just when things seemed totally screwed up. you may have found a better way of relating to each other. SCORPIO Being passive is easy and sometimes fun. but there are limits. Don't be bullied into something you know isn't right Rules may be changing , and weird winds blowing, but stand your ground You can be foolish sometimes without being the fool SAGITTARIUS This isn't the best time to take a vacation. but it's a good time to plan one. Even so, that could be half the fun Don't consider going alone, though Ask a friend or join a group Sharing 1s a big part of the picture CAPRICORN The line you're walking 1s between duty and self-grat1ficat1on Keep your arrogance under control and satisfy both Ask for a leg up instead of just stepping on people AQUARIUS -Some good, common sense could lead you to a gold mine- or a golden boy Don't scheme. or dream, or try to pull off any funny stuff. Just st ick to the facts and get your reward PISCES Fl1rtat1on into love affair into what? Deeper and deeper It's as 1f you're tingling with the energy this situation brings. seeing and feeling things you never saw or felt before. Take the plunge. I 1 MONT ROSE VOICE ~Pl~y ~safe! JANUARY 23. 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 17 The King Goes to New Orleans Around Town by Elroy Forbes Montrol'e Voice Social Director o Good News I want to sh rare my good news with you. lam going to London. King Henry Vlll is going home. And if my plans work out, you will read my experiences twice a week, as they happen, in the Montrose Voice. o New Orleans Experience Early, early Monday morning I met the staff of British Ca ledo nia Airl ines at Houston Intercontinental for a hop to New Orleans. After checking into the Bou rbon Orleans Ho te l, we scooted down the street lo the Coffee Pot for a lunch of shrimp creole on a bed of dirty ric<' with a few red beans tossed in. Talk ahout hot! I thought I was eating a dry version of a Bloody Mary. Several glasses of iced tea and cold water later, we were making our way paRt St. Louis Cathedral and down to the Mississippi River along the famous riV<"r walk. My, if only Buffalo Bayou could be lined with fountains and pla· zas. I gave up long ago on HouRton hav­ing a similar San Antonio River Walk, hut we could easily do as they have in New Orleans. There, everything is built above the river. We have the same sink­ing problem New Orleans has. While the staff went aboard the river steam<'r Creole Queen, [ was left to explore the city. Back toward St. Louis Cathedral, I enjoyed the sidewalk a rtists and the street jazz groups. IL really was loo cold and windy for the a rt demonstrations, but combos began their lunch hour concerts. Strolling a long the streets I was aware of the poor business conditions. Storefront after storefront was empty and the most promina nt signs were Lease, For Rent or For Sale. Don't get the impression that it was depressing. Ma ny of the Quarter buildings were brigh tly painted for the World's Fair. Ah~o. many of the potholt>s hnvt> heen filled. Mardi Gras beads hung from bn l· conies and there were still Christmas lights on trees and buldings. Later that evening we boarded the Creole Queen for a three-hour trip up a nd down the Mississippi as sales repre­sentatives tauted the British Is le's. Was it fun? I had a wonderful time. After the cruise, we changed and headed out to Pat O'Brien 's. Later we went our own sepa rate ways until morn ing check out and our return to Houston. Was it cold? Need you ask? o Our Changing Landscape Moving along Westheimer, you can't miss the Tower Theater. Opened in the early thirties and the pride of the neigh· lxlrhood, at night the famous neon can he spotted clearly from the hui ldingR downtown. As you might have noticed, thrTower has been dark most of the year. I do not understand why films are not screenrd there. The River Oaks Theater has a rest rictivr contract beca use of limi t(•d 1mrking spares that prevents them from having matinees or day screenings, But here is thr Tower, dark most of the time Im1ide a uthorit ies tell me that the Tower will remain as is for 1987, hut in 19AA Parr will consider alternnte pro- 1>mmls. I hope> not a parking lot, which is most li kely. Around- the next bend is the Jim's Gvm huilding. It is now empty. The new The three mosquitoes of The 611-Wayne, Steve and Ricky Parkway Athletic Club has almost doubled its membership and moved to Rosine, off Waugh Drive near Staj!rR The new facility is a big success. determined by this strip. Bacchus Reports says that some 5000 residents moved out of Montrose in Deeember. What do we need to replace them? (i<•ft to nght) Jerry Mulholland, Don Cult>er, J.D. Norton, and RC. Cuellar were among Houstonians attendinn the Arizona Gay Rodeo last weekend Many empty buildings dot lower Westheimer. This used to be home to such busine"8e• as The Happy Buddha, The Mini Ma ll l, Lilla nne's, and The Drink Stop. This area is one to watch . The value of Montrose could easily he o In The News Parkway Athle tic Club's Mike Wil· son reports the largest supply of Louise Hay materials-tapes and books- are : '· Tension, Irritability,· _,- • ~ ...,.,:.;;;._.-:Nervousness, Inability to concentrate, Self-Doubt, Increased pulse.ANXIETY has become - a part of your life. A part you don't seem able to cope with. The FABRE CLINIC offers FREE medical treatment for anxiety. Our services always remain confidential and anyone in good health may qualify. Call us for an evaluation and appoinunent. FABRE CLINIC 52~2320 here in Montrose. Guess where. Several Houston T.G.R.A. members attended the Arizona Gay Rodeo held last weekend in Phoenix. Congratula­tions to J.D. Norton who won first place for wild cow riding and third place in bareback bronc riding. The next Hous· ton TGRA meeting will be held Sunday Feb. 1, 2:00 p.m. at T he Barn . Happy Birthday to Jim Hun;t at Michaels. o Mark Your Calendar Don't forget to come to The Firehouse, 1413 Westheimer, on Monday, 7:00p.m., for the first meeting of Christmas in Montrose 19~7. If you cannot attend but want to help, call 529·1414 and leave word. On Tuesday, The Firehouse will host Twelfth Night Plus, Neartown Associa· lion's annual Christmas party as a part of the first regular meeting of 1987. Beginning at 7:00 p.m., the event is open to everyone. Ron Rodericks will be installed as president. A $2 donation is requested . The Greater Montrose Business Guild ,.,;11 hold elections to fill offices and board seat:; \Vednesday at 7:00 p.m. The firi:-;t general meeting of 1987, this will also kick off the Spring membership conh.·st They meet at Backstreet Cafe, 1103 S. Shepherd. Call 521-2239 for directions. Thursday is Chinese New Year. Friday is one week away from the spe­cial performances of The Normal Heart at the Alley Theater. For more informa­tion, call 524-AIDS. Until next week. see you around town. Something Different: Superior Service Pest Control 223-4000 Licensed & Regulated by Structural Pest Control Board of Texas 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 23. 1987 Gay and lesbian reading ======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS HOT UVJNG: Erotic stories about safe sex, edited by John Preston, $8.00. The AIDS crisis has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but n has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex­pression. Here, over a dozen of today's most popular gay wnters present new short stories that imaginatively eroticizc safe sex Conuibutors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and TR. Witomskt. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher, by Enc Rofes, $7 00. When Eric Rofes began teacbi~ sixth grade at a conser­vative private school, he soon felt the strain of a split identity. Here he describes his two years of teachmg from within the closet, his difficult decision to come out at work, and the conse­quence~ of that decision tSfCOOD C-HflflCES • pouo1 bv flonne De Ueer SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7 .00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered free} yr Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand· "ome and unpredictable Mark ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth edned by Ann Heron, $3.95. Twenty-eight young peo­ple from all over the US and Canada. mostly in high school, share their commg-out expenences. STOLEN MOMENTS, by fobn Prest0n, $5.00. Who says heroes can't be gay? In the fourth of the •·Mission of Alex Kane" series, Kane and his partner Danny Fortelli bead for Houston. There, they take on a media baron who is intent on using homophobia to build bis tabloid's circulation. Also available: Sweet Dreams, Golden Year~ and Deadly Lies; each staI­ring Alex and Danny; $5.00 each. EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00 Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced. Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start? Enter Mick, a lover from the past talking about their future; Garrick, a first-year teacher looking for conjunc­tion~, and not necessarily in the class­room; and young Dean, an oversexed Denms the Menace making all A's in some very advanced biology IRIS, by Janine Veto, $7.00. The retelling of an ancient Greek myth of love, devo­tion and vengeance - this time with a lesbian theme. REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $4.95 The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na4 tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7 .00. This unusual mystery sends Genrude Stem and Alice 8 Tokla1 sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is thetr neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stones THE LAVENDER COUCH: A con· sumers' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Mamy Hall, $8.00. Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of us really know how to go about choosing a therapist, and how to be sure we can get the most out of therapy? Mamy Hall, herself a lesbian therapist, has written the first book ever to address this sub· JeCt. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4.00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner city for Montauk, work, and the sea . She tells her story with a combination of painful innocence and acute vision, beginning with the man in the fine green CaI who does not mourn the violent death of a seagull against his windshield. The simplicity of Halegua's style is reminiscent of The Color Purple; it is a powerful story of a girl's sudden entry into a harsh maturity. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $13.00. Through •ome 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex (Oversize paperback) THE HUSTUR, by John Henry Mackay; trans. by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun­ther is fifteen when he arrives alone in the Berlin of the 1920s. There he dis­covers the boys of Friedrich Street, and the men who stroll by and speak with them. Soon he is spotted by Hermann Graff, a sensitive and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored with Gunther. But love does not fit neatly in­to Gunther's new life as a hustler. , . Gunther's story was first published in 1926. For today's reader, It combines a poignant love story with a colorful por­trayal of the gay subculture that thrived in Berlin a hall-century ago. DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CA!JFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, $6.00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls: "A wonderful, rip-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she writes a dozen more." "The book of the year," writes Feminist Bookstore News. ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. The story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple - but wasn't EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 .00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engross­ing - and funmest - you'll ever read ············TO ORDER····· ···· · ··· · Enclosed is$ _ Please send the books I've listed 6elow. (Add $1. 00 postage when ordering just one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: I. 2. 3. 4. 5. Visa and mastercard accepted; please send acct. number. exp. date, and signature. name address City state zip ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St .......... -~~~~~~: !-:~ -~~ ! ! ~- .......... . JANUARY 23, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 19 Cd[jtllin Video! !FRIDAY Janua!l 23 I • Cl m Ill ID ID ID KPRC KUHT KHOU KTRK KTXH KRIV KHTV UE WTBS CNN DISN ESPN USA WGN SHOW HBO MAX TMC 5 ,._ ,_""' - .... -- FKI of Li DlfSlrtlb ..... cOS)Nra, ""'"" -... c..... Fldofli -·- - DARYL :JI NBC News ""'"" cos .... ....... ,,~ Too Clow .., ..... -- (3S)AIHcrn ·- -- - ....... GoodT ... ... ... --- 6 .. .... - .... .... ""- """""" ......, .i..E)"I 1'051Sitllor """"''" Too .... 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Uplll'l1S11r NFL F*'ll -So -- - ,_, 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 23, 1987 I SUNDAY II Q QI Ill G ID KRIV Oil KPRC KUHT KHOU KTRK KTXH KHTV A&E WTBS CNN s: ::~ 12 ': ':.:... = 10 ': ~: "'" """ 11 ': '~'::':.. 12 AM 11s,-.. .J.l .1.4.0.1.S.o.o rts .ll 3; !MONDAY II KPRC 6 .... ,."."..' .. ... 7 .. ,..., " 8 .. ,, 9 .,.. .'.",,' '"' 10 .. - " Samo 11 .. ..... _ ll Worctuy 12 ,.. O.,Sol 0... " ,,,, 1 ,,. ._ " w ... 2 ""' """ ..... 3 "' """" . ,~ 4 ,,. ._.." . ...... I') 5 ,,._ " """- 6 .·..-.... · 7 ,,. __ " 130.,.ID 8 .. ..... • 9 .. 10 ""' ..... JI T .......... Sllow 11 "' JI LJWCc:wNc: 12 AM DMI .ll ,_ 1 .. °""' .... fl 2 ...... " ~"" 3 .. " 4 .. " 5 AM S...- """' Q KUHT '"" ""·""-"''"" " """""'' .. _ "'""""""""" ' ·.'..".."....-'. "".". .'.'."..". ·""-"""""" """"" ~-~ ... _, ",,',"..'. ......, --,. ..... ......, .-, ... ....., ~.-.n.t.-t:'I .-...... ",".""_"",' -,_ "'""' -.... ., ....... QI KHOU --_...., ........... ,,._ -".."..·". ' "" -v.....,.,. .... . ... ~lie W()f1c!Tin11 ~(::! 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""""'""" - - """' ....,......, ..,,,.., - (55)~ ""'"" IL """'""' ''""' ..... .... ,,.,., latTycuan TrwlonMJ - ._ ... ""''""" """"' .. c.1- factofLlf ""'"""' -v .. ,_ ....... ....... """' WKAP ......... ..._ """" '"""'"' ..... '""' -- '" Mw"ClnYou " "" '- ,_ ... ...... •Ku - - - "" Afiw· Wlfld "" ""' ...... - ..... ,__., """' Strwyotfrt "" ··- _, .. """" - ,, .. .... ..... '- ....... '"""' - ... _ - ..... .... ,..,... .... "" ""' "" "" """""' ...... """"'"' 1821 '"" -· "'"' --_,, The .... oW.:ivi'low ., ~:wtu:.rt• """""' ......... 145) Ab- ( of5) .WO.- -- Bllltty. C'"ltOfClne "- Pl v..., ..,,_ ........ a- VttyPacli.Jo.· fo 0 • Holt Ec!Qe NiQl't! """'" - -- ""' Sorcti Tom ·-- - (25) Mov ( 15) Mov """""' Ault Ri<'l'll;I """"'"' ( 40) Mov ( 45) ~ StrlFIQll' WI Rt-Atwnllor '"""'"' ""''" """' ....... ....... '""' ''''""'"" - .... '- Tu- ""'"""' 1101Mot- 120J A4N 1°0$) /tfov ... -. ... ...... ,......, ""~' I .. ~~ ,,_,, ,,...,.,,_ Fnnk n:l 1 , .. _ ·~ .._ ...... -- "-"'"' (50\ ... -v 1:351M:lt' I"' l'rol11n1 ~olWf .. ,,. Pw~ II ... _ - ~Clf!Ycu -.m ""~ ""'"""' .... _,. I"- ;;eong•• ,,.. ... .. _ - 1-=·"' \.-7 """"'" '""'° .... 1~ll1Jf C.-Cdy StorydFr9 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ~DVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 11 hsted here in theVoicewherel1ter­ally thousands turn each week TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochure. newsletter. promotion can help our business target your goals and reach your market Call 524-{)409 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Vo1ceCtass1!1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your Amen­can Express. Diner's Club MasterCard. Visa or Cane Blanche ~NNDUNCEMENTS I. Gary Lmgenlelter. wilt no longer be responsible lor the debts ol Dan C Kocurek. and should no longer be consi­dered in the repayment of loans made to Dan C Kocurek by other parties Jan 23. 1987 KELLY BRADLEY, M.B.S., R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lnd1v1dual. lam1ly and group practice limited to copmg·stress. role relation· ships and self-concept mtervent1on Olllce 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice. a general circulation news­paper havmg published contmuously for over 5 years. is qualified to accept legal notices HARD TIMES MESS-AGE CENTER. 9-3: 1945 SEf OUR Ol~PLA Y A 0 PAGE ME• COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS. 622-4240 SEE 0URI; SP AYAD Page Me!'" Electronic Telephone Answering C,Jmputt.1 •.. : d Answermg Service For Your PP.1sonal and Homf Use • 24 Hour 1 Day Service • Your Mess Q~ are Pr1vat1 • No L1ye Operato No M•stakes Only cq 17 montt"lfy Ask About Free Tn•I Oller ( 622- 4240 0 HMAERSDSA TGEI MES• " CENTER New Year's Special • January Only Third Month Free {Nrw 1b •hi·•· Or•ty) Cati Foward or Use Our Number Only 110' a Month (713) 568-1145 24 Hour Service ~NTIQUES YESTERDAY'S WORLD ANTIOUES 1715 Westhe1mer. 526-2646 $fF i'JuH '.llSPiAY AO Yesterday's World Antiques 1715 Weslheimer 526-2646 Smnll Shop Small Prices ATTORNEY PHYLLIS FAYE. 723-8368 General prac­hce ol 1aw ELAINE SHAW 222-7772. 645·3159 Ill OUR01$Pf.AYA0 A DON FORESTER. 1017 Bartkttt, 528· 4668 SEf OUR OtSPt.AY AD ELAINE SHAW : g~i~8fro'!:.,~~:n • Possession • Family Law • Accident 222-7772 or 645-3159 Notc'l•I hyl• 8d of~ . •l•l•to >o ~urn MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR. 2~·16 Genesee (101 Pac1!1c). 526-3723 ff OUR C'J~PIAY AD SALV1N AUTOMOTIVE, 524·8219 <fOVR"""::~AYAD TAFT AUTOMOTIVE. 1411 Tall. 522-2190 • - IUR DISPLAY AD NEARTOWN KARZ. 1901 Taft. 524-8601 Sil OUR OISPtAY AD WEST GRAV AUTO. 238 W Gray. '128·2886 "ff ~JR m LAY A{ WORRIED ABOUT YOUR CAR? Lei Bruce check •t out EJCpenenc<'d Dependable Mechanic. Reasonable Rates Salvln Automotlve- 524-8219 r Broke Special 1 $59.95 per axle Tune-Up Special 4 cylinder $49.95 6 cylinder $59.95 a cylinder $69 95 West Gray Auto I 238 W. Gray-528-2886 • flectrtcal Won: ~n• I •Convert .. can •Muffters•Tlr• Car •A/Chpoll' Specialist I •flats Rxltd I Texas state lnspec:tlOn stGHon L &om-5:30pm Mon.-Sat ------- J MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 Carburetor Specialist Electncal Repairs All Brake Work BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Dmo·s Barber Shop. 302W 111h Ha1rcu1s $6 up. 863-1520 for appo1ntmen1 Tommy's Barber Shop. haircuts$ 10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appomlments 528· 8216 HAIRCUTS BY MIKE, 522-')0()3 (' OUR 0 ~Pl'.AY AD JON BARTON 1515' Dunlavy. 522·7866 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO THE.ROMAN 2602 Whitney, 522~8576- 522-2263 SEE OUR 01 OPLAY AO "·f!. ~ SALON 1515'"> Dunlavy - 522- 7866 (/) Haircuts etc. z :::> by Mike m :;{: :;{: UJ New 1987 Prices c z (/) reg. $18 (/) now $14 z :::> Shampoo, Cut, m :;{: Blow Dry :;{: UJ by appt. 522-3003 c z (/) OPEN MONDAYS BARS BACCHUS. 523 Lovett_ 52~- 1 ~% SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 SEf OUR Ol$Pt A YAO CHA-ALIE'S CLUB. 1100 ·w-esthe1mer. 527-8619 SCF f°•lflll OISPLA YAO CHEERS. 2654 FM1960 East. 443-2986 5EEOUROISPl.AYAD CHUTES. 1732 Westhe1mer. 5-23-2213 ~r: ?JROISPIAYAO CRYSTALS OVERLOOKING MONTROSE ";Fr )llROISPIAYAn DIRTY SALL v·s. 220 AYonda1e 529-7525 Sff OUR DISPiAY An HoT ROD. 804 Pac1f1c. 524·0806 Slf OUR DISP¥. A Y AD KJ'S 11830 Airline. 445-5849 SH. OUR OJSl'i.AY AO MARY'S. 1022-Westheimer. 528-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO MICHAEi S. 428 Weslhetmer. 529-2506 !>HOUR C SP~AY AO £!-~~u~~ 5N,.,iY~~herd 863-0010 THE RANCH. 9150 S Main. 666-3464 ~EE OUR Ol~ptAY Ar> RIPCORD. 715 FatrYtew 521-2792 SCE OUR orSPLA y AD ROCK N· HORSE. 5731 Kirby. 520-9910 SEEOURl.HSl'LArAD THE 611. 611 Hyde 528-9079 SEE OUR DtSPtAr AD TAM o·sHANTER'S. 6121 H1t1croft. 771-2470 r>HAnzsptAYAO VENTU-RE·N 2923 Main. 522-0000 >'F - -ISP(AYAr 804 Pacific 524-0806 I CAN'T TELL ~OU YES. . '.JHAT ITS LIKE UNEYP£CTED HAVING 'IOU DROP 5URl'RIS£S BY ROD rn llR [ THE TOO POLITE BEST JANUARY 23, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 BEER BIG TOM·S. 2323 Milam. 529--0533 SEE OURDSSPtAY AD BONDSMAN A-QUICK BAIL BONDS F1 .t courteous. discreet .11' typi: 'f ~~~~~o~~:·v~:~~~~1r ~2~t~~da~P:~:r,r,~ bonds 678-4488. 621-8452 aaaKSHDP BOOKSTOP ALABAMA THEATRE 2922 S Shepherd. 529-2345 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BDDTS OH BOY• LEATHER GOODS. 912 Westhe1mer at Montr se 524-7r ·g ••• -:JRDl~PLAYAL SELL YOUR CAR through a Montrose Vo1r:. la, '' ltd J Call 529-8490. ~HURCHES KINGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH 614 E 19th. 880-3527. 351-4217 SfE OUR DISPLAY AO CENTER- m-AA Pos1T1VEL1FESTVLE 531·6600 SEE ("IQ DISPLAY Al Center for a Positive Lifestyle meets Downtown Hol Jay Inn e-.iery Monday 8pm For more mfo. Dall 497-PRAY Kin~dom Commumty Church Join Our Family m 1987 614 E. 19th Sundays 11am 880-3527 or 351 4217 GLEANERS MONARCH PRDFEs:..ioNAL CLEANERS. 281,"' S Shepherd. 522·5101 SEE OUR CLEANING SERVICE PLUS A Quality Cleaning Service R•ldenll•I •Commercial e BONDED e Jeff Cunningham 522-3451 ~DFFEE Coffee & Tea World Gourmet Coffee • Fine Teas Accessones 3939-R Montrose Blvd. 713-524-8536 ~DNSTRUCTIDN. ~DNTRACTING 'IOU KNOW, TlllS Pl.ACE HAS A WHOLE DlffERENI ITEL TO 11. '<O\J'Vt DONE. SOMHHING. WATEVER 11 IS, I LlkE IT JATING mw LAMBDAS JNUMITED DATING SERVICE P 0 Box 7418. Houston 77248 496-3371. 528-2236 fOUR""SPArAO lENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. DDS 427 Westhe1mer. 524--0538 - n A :>ISl>l.AYAO RONALD" A PE-TEAS. c:m·a 620 w Ala· bama 523·2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhenner 1-k•:o-.:nn, TX 77006 M, • ~~11. :•in. Saturday Ho<in ?y Arx ntmeT' (713) 524 0538 ... Htl roft 1-59"Gi~M seeks roommate pl.us (fun) ti.. liar"! 2-2 condo (large master bedroom yours) $295 mo All bdls paid tSertaus mqumes only) 772-4568 GHM looking for responsible roommate 2-2 townhOuse. SW Houston. 5177 50 ptus bills Can Jerry at 661-3873 AOOm IOr rent. privat8 home. Monirose 528-5454 Garage apt -w~lencl?d-yar<l-699--9191 Leave message_ Da111d Montrose Townhome. 2-i~ mirrored walls 1n dining room and master bed­room. w'd. quiet convenient locatt0n seamty. $650 mo. Mrs paid 521-1335 RoomrTiate ~ed to Share 3 br. apt Clase to UTMB m Galveston_ $15Q.mo pJus half ut1 1t1es No deposit Cal Lrz (409) 763-1407 VICTORIAN DUPLEX Montrose/ midtown. medical center 1700 IQ 11 cedmg fans every room. 10· ce1i.. lngs. 3 bedrooms formal t1vrng and d1n1ng room carpeting and hardwood floors. 1 • bath laundry, off 51reet parking Can serve as office and home S45W mo 526- 8634. 654--7766 306 Stratford at Taft 1 bedroom cef1fral A 5;11r~y~s 1~~~~~e~~311:a~~~:Yi I OK $315 plus $150 deposit. 523-6109 Professional execut1ve-GWM seeks same 'l 38 yrs old to sh.are nice home Wes­theimer Gessner area Must be sincerely 1terested n home sharing and discrete lnendsh1p This *5 a good opportunity for a together professional Wrote PCB 772867 Houston 77215 -te1ghts 2·1 updated central air. nic.;e treet. cfolK' m $525 monthly. $250 dep- 1t 392·5200 or 952-3202 Mr Green Montrose one bedroom apl m small qutet complex with pool. security gates. aundry fac1ht1es cable available Adutts No pets $100Cfep $26Sptus~ectnc 71J-. 529-8178 MONTROSE urge -2-1 duple:ii:. tots of v.indows and dosets Off street parking $450/mo 86 ~ 3343 MIJ:St rent at1raet1ve Olde;. one bedroom garage apartment Hardwoods. apphan­ces. a11 Needs mmor work. but t1vab6e Renv deposil flegohable. plus Mis 523- 7646 Roommate wanted Montrose nice 2 bed­room tiouse w•th priyate patio. $200, mo bills paid .S2J-.3814 1960-+45 area GwM s~ks roommate to share 2 bedroom 2 bath apartment $250 mo bdls included Must be employed and stable 583-1739 TOWNE PLAZA APARTMENTS. 4655 Wild Indigo. 621·7880 SFE c, A . ._-Pl.Ar AD GREENWAY PL.Ace~ 3333 Cummins 623-2034 SEE 04JllOISl'iA"AD 22 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 23, 1987 EMPLOYMENT. JOBS IYANTEO ArrENTION MONTROSE CABBIES Tired ol m1ss1ng pers<irials. messages scooping, an.d paymg too much tease? You re reedy for AMERICAN LIBERTY Bulld your personal business with LIB­ERTY CAB CO Call W1nnr 522·22A9 FLORIST BRANCHES FLOWERS. 1408 \.vesr hetmer, 521--0848 SE!'OURC'iP AYA{ MISC.I Sunmate 8' t ming t!"'"lp. e)[Ct lent CO"· d1t1on. cost S · 'l'1"I mak offer 14K g(.. u plated mont blanc fountain pen & pencil. excellent cond1t1on. retail $495. make otter Contact Chris 999-6700 or 221· 5•35 FOR YARD SALES See ads urider Yard Sales a1 h~ -"" if the Voice c tass1hedl SQUT -tWI:. T J-LJNERAL DIAEC'"rQRC' •218 W@'Ac"' 52&-3851 EEr R PlAll'A!> CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAi 34f:' Montr~ 529-6666 SEEC ROI LA A• :JIFTS TRIBES. 2501 S 5hel)herd--S~t7t4 SEE ?UA OISPf.Ar AO ~OME ~JR ~ONOITIONING MIDTOWN AIR. 521·9r''19. 521-9QQ9 SEE OUR OlSP1A'f AO HOROSCOPES DR p COOPER ASTRO--REFLECTIONS 2470 S Dairy Ashlord 1110. 17r77 l·IMJ0..824-7888 operator 837 ,NVESTMENTS 1n ... estor want8d 1n 1nt~mat1 ~al ,.,. J)lny Small 1nvestmet , btg r<!turns IP4 tax ahelters Cau 528-7639 ,, -F. ask for Tom ~ AWN BETTER LAWN' & iARDENS .2~ LAWN SEE< Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards. repair a nd bu il d wood fences, light hauling, lawn care, light mov­ing. house cleaning. pa i nting , gutters , small house repairs. Free Estimates LEATHER LEATHER BY BOOF 7 1 Fa1rv1 •w 526-26&' LEATHER BY BOOTS Custom Design ~oom 711 fOlfVleW 8 Adams Lid -The 611 l .ather 9y Boots-the llipcord -Houston Texos-a ·s leother-Cho1n Oflve -Austin. T•os- LIQUOR MEDICAL STEVE D MARTINEZ. MD 1: Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy •1000_ 621·7771 FABRE CLINIC. 5503 Crawford. 52&- 2320 EE OUA DISPLAY AO ROBERT CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC. 1}f~~au~~1£r Af21-2M.1 MOOELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS All : RELAX! MassagebyBdlO'FIOtJrk• M''T 86q...2298 St1mutat•ng body rubs Qui calls ._29- :1970 Houston handsome h..altr\y. non~tand mascuhne 11 3) 988-0402 THOM OF HOUSTON 523--6577 Seg.n tne nPw y 1r w111 1 e11c1t1ng lun- 11· bOdy rub Cal Peter 464-8781 THE CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by Da ... 1d D of E t (71 l 5~6232 A )Oyful rub by a m :e person Ben 270- 1828 Deep muscle. sensuous body rub e...en· 1ngs and weekends Lea ... e message Ste"'e 640-6690 STOP getting rubbed lhe wrong way Call Carl 622-3942 Stimulating body rubs by handsome GWM 529--3970 Lea ... e message on r~order 11 no answ'ft' s '1"1SUOtlS massage 1n or out 529--'3970 MASSAGE BY DAN Sale, re1a11ing. sahsfying serious Of sen- ~!:;n~ yhe:n~se1:Q;~~c~~ tasb~~: ~ 200-l 1pm weekdays. anytu'"'"'w- ends 523-9821 MOVERS Professional mt'lver.t Flat rat• 662-6674 52')-9715 MOVEMASTERS Bo)(es too" Visa. MC. Amex wr' lmf' 1925 Westhe1mer 6'ti -6555 PERSONALS Looking for Love in All the piy;~i;?' ny o Classi­Phone Texas' Newest Way to Meet Others Hear Hot Uncensored Classified at 526- 4669 Leave Your Free Classified at 526- 4423 We assign your ad a personal ID code for complete discretion A DIVISION OF TECHNOLOGIC ENTERPRISES Attract1"' E- ... , m _·9 141;. i;:ol­~ e studenl diSl•ke bats & drugs Look· 1ng for monogamous rela1tonsh1p i1erests museums movies. music and trav~hng Reply blind Bo11 :J26--K c o Voice H rry men. ha•r fans adllSI lnfop1xpak ~ 00: Hair 59 West 10th NYC 10011 Keeping Up Chronicle Feotures, 1987 You 've shown us the way to become a meaner, leaner outfit, Ted. We think it's great - and you ' re fired . There are ·Talkers· And there are ·Doers·· Talkers ha"'e beautiful smtles and dial 976 numbers Doers have 29· wa1s1 or le« and dial 529-3983. Bo!loms only DON'T DO IT ALONE Join ong1na1 24-hour sex 11nk Umnh1- biled. d1scre1e No b•II to phone except Ieng distance One-on-one. man-to-man low-cost connections 1.000's ot horny guys wa1t1ng tor calls (415J 34&-8747 PLAY ••• salely at J 0 E Meetings 5 nights a week And •I s fun Michael Lee Singles, DOB 04-05-49. SSN 363-48-6268 I am aware ol possible changes in your hie. but that does not matter Please contacl Penny Jo (Sin~ gles) Wheelock. 443-F E Edgewood Bl"'d Lansing. Ml (517) 887-2250 $500 REWARD For any 1nlormat1,)n wh·r:h would help me contact· FttNNIE. · m11'" .19~ 25 5 5 ·_ 1onq dark hair. dark eye<. ( ;,.1 ~,14) 586-9186 Jr write Tony or Coteman 52' Apt 204 SI Louts Street. Nf'W Orleans. LA 70130 GwM. 37 5·10~. 160. moustache allec t1onate cuddly !00k1ng tor similar man for sale se11 buddy. non-smoker please Describe yourself 1n reply o ad Reply B11nd Bo• 325-J Clo V<>1ce All fetish uncenSC1r8d adhst1ngs 8- 4-s­-. t1--. leather. tock wear muscles. etc tnlopak $300 TRIKX 59Wcst 101h NYC 10011 RULES FOR THE PERSONALS Person~ als {and other ad ... ert!$1ng) Would not describe or imply a description ol sf>xual organs or acts No Personals should be directed to minors Ad ... ert1s1ng must be ·pos1h"'e not ·negall"'e - (II you h;we certain preferences 1n other people. list the qualities you deslfe Please don t be nega11 ... e by hstJOg the kinds ol people or quali!les you don't desire 1 Thank you. and happy hunting ATTENTION J.0 .E. MEMBERS J O E has a nE>w home and riew hours Meetings are Toesday & Thursday ladm1ss1on 8-9pm1 Sunday (admission &-9pm) and Fnday & Sa1urday (adm1s· saon 11pm-2am). at the Collage Play· house. 611 Pacifle J 0 E helps you experience your gay male se•ua11ty 1n a sale sensible (and 9\len l~IJ tash1on ~~ikp!~~h~hea~~i~i~::~~~~~~:~ ~t Entrance 11 at the rear of tr\e nouse CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Whoa' Don t take thOH ptelures ol ywr boyfnend or g1rlfr1end 10 the drug 111ore You might get back blal'!ks and the expla­nation. ·wen. there must ha ... e been something wrong with yourc(lmera Bal­oney They just d1dn t wan1 to pnnt your ~~C::i:. B~i;a you~~~7h1~1~9;? 1b1~~~~ Michaels) tor conf1dent1.11t photo devel· oping and pnntmg We promise B•g Bnghl and Bi aut1ful Pri its as clear .11nd sharp as p4 1b SAFE SEX? Foryourmentd:h~alth ha ... eleK Foryour physical health. make 11safe1e11 Salese11 s w~re therl! itf!' no b0d1ly flwd"I exchanged The "'irus wti1ch leads to an AIDS condition is beheved usually trans­m1! 1ed from one person 10 anottiet from blood or sPmen ThOSI! wt'lo are ·recep- 11 ... e· are espec.iatly &t nsk Do conctoms protec!? They carta1nly help But con~ doms MUST be used °W'th a watl!r-based 1ubncant ti rte nE>w pr0duc1Lubrasept.c11 especrally recommended) Pettolwm or ... egetable-based lubricants will actually d1sso1 ... e the condom and eliminate the pro1ec11on Please "Play Safe A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Fredentk Brandt can show you how to ha ... e active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In the., book. Class1hed Affairs. they·11 teU you how to write an ad that really 11ands out. whal to exPf'CI when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those funny htUe abbre\11a11ons mean Send $8 10 · C1ass1!1ed Affairs ... Alyson Pub. Dept P4 5. 40 Plympton. St Boston_ MA 02118 (Also mcluded wll1 be a coupon for $5 off on your ne)(t Per.onals in your choice ol 25 pub1tca11ons. mc•udmg the Voice) RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL 2513 E1men. 524·9415. 223-4000 "EE - Results Pest Control 2513 Elmen 524-9415 M"" 1w1 P r F dP ~e ANGELS TO ZEBRAS PETS Pelw<Jrld 11725 Eastex Freeway at East -Mt H-ousmton 590·0471: !j­~: u 111 U~llll\i:l!l!B 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALL' Printing and d8"'e 1pmg enlargements 1umbo prmts lolm. KOdak paper 2615 Waugh Or 520-1010. HENRY'S 1 HOUR PHOTO_ 428' We<>t he1mer. 529-0869 SE£0'JROl""PlAYA0 PRINTING SPEEDY PAINTING 14( 81 ire Blvd 667-7417 UEOUR' Al Al PSYCHOLOGISTS DA NICHOLAS EDD. 2121 We~:~ 5:n-6680 SEE OUR RECORDS. INFINITE RECORDS. 526 Wf>slhe1mer 521·0167 SH OUR DIS' AY Al RESTAURANTS CAFE EDI W Al bama at Shepherd 520-~21 Si.EOURD$PIMA0 CHAPUL TEPEC. 813 Richmond 522-2365 llE OUROISl'tAY All CHARLIE'S 1102 Wesltle•mer 522·3332 5£E OUR~AY AO CHICAGO PIZZA. 4100 Mandell 526-9780 SEEOt1ROISPl.AYAO HUNAN VILLAGE. 1722 Ca11fornia 528-6699. 528-4651 tl OUR ~1$Pt. AY AD THE HUNT ROOM 3404 Kirby. 521-9838 SEEOURD~~AYAO MISSOURI STREET CAFE 1117 Missouri. 526-1264 ~HOUR DISPtAY AO NICKY'S PLACE. 2109 Dunlavy. 520-8039 f;EE OVRDl$PLAYA0 f>IZZA INN. 3105 S Shepherd_ 522-5676 )If UUR DfSPLAY AO POT PIE 1525 Westhe1mer. 528-4350 E OUR ( PLAY AO Pizza inn. ~ Delivery ti; (Hotline) .i 522-5676 3105 S Shepherd SEWING SPECIAL LADY DESIGN Costumes and gt'nPral ew1ng fN d• II• C 111 Jan or Wanda 9!11 1102 SPAS. SPA TO GO. 5816 SW Fwy 772-8646 ,J(()URIJfSptAI Ar SPORTSWEAR BASIC BROTHERS. 1220 Westhe1mer 522-1626 C:ff JR - >PLAY Al THE EAGLE 1544 Westhe1mer 524-738 51fOURn PAY.AO KILROY·s 1723 Waugh Or 528-2816 fQURf'!!<;PtAYAO WHOLE EARTH PROVISION CO 29.14 -~Es~g~c:~·A~2f;,3883 SUPERMARKETS KROGER 1300 Montrose UNITED CAB CO 699-0000 OURDISPl.AYAO TAXI TIRES THE TIRE PLACE. 1307 Fa1rv1 ·w 529--1414 Sl! OUADISPt.AY AD JANUARY 23, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 •!• 5291414 & THE 116\E PLACE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview Professional e11.ecut1ve GWM 33 yeara old. wants similar to share vacahon trav- ~!e~'e~~u:re::;~o':r~~~ ~af:~~ :;~~7~ Houston 77215 San Francisco 1987. Bed-Breakfast Pri­vate Homes Comfort. Friendship Details BayHosls. 1155 Boswor1h 94131 415-337-9632 VIDEO loao VIDEO. 1424-C westhe1m1 r 522-5156 SE'" OUR DISPLAY AO WE oElivER v1Deos. 1420 Westhe1mer. 522-4485 ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular class1f1ed rates of paying ··by the word ... you can purchase space here 'by the inch." Smee these are considered ''Display Ads." not ·c1ass1fied Ads." you can include special art. logos or fancy typestyles Next time you feed your face, think about your heart. Ii hlkS WMI of M• nl1• TRAVEL FRANKLIN HOUSE DENVER :m:i :rn -!JIOo 520-8108 in Houston for info A Guest House al 1620 Franklin Denver, CO 80218 Rnth SU JI~ Stnirl• 1''n.1m$'.-"IJ ll.1·1hl~ FRANKLIN GUEST HOUSE. 1620 Frankhn, Denver. Co (303) 3..,1-9106 :;t:f [)UR Dl<,;ptAY Ar TYPESETTING SAME DAY TYPESETTERS. 408 Avondale. 529-08490 Sf£0t!ROISPtArAO UPHOLSTERY. REFINISHING FURNITURE STRIPPING SHOP In the heart ol Montr~ Rrl1n1sh1ng repairs. upholstery 529-7833 ALLEN WADSWORTH CO INC 9830 Sweelwater. 445-4141 ~~E OUR OISP' Ar ,110 SEE - ~Pr.Al' Al m1~;H11Jlif.iliJillmi1m GARAGE SALE Im 1de Fri 23. Sat 24. Sun 25 4104 Gar­ron. 9-5 Yard Sale. Sat Jan 31 1420 W 15th Street at Durham. Bam-111 HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 11 ~re thr n .;iand back for thecrowd c, .>9-f\490 1rv111ltheV01ce at 408 Avona. tc pl 'ci your yard sale announcement VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Voice c1ass1f1ed Call 529-8490 And ~~=r~~u1~~~!~r:i:ne;~~~nMEa7ti~~r~1~~ Visa REGULAR RATE 1 .. $34 2" $44 3" $54 1 AD PER WEEK for 4 WEEKS RATE 1" S29 2" $39 3" $49 1 AD PER WEEK for 13 WEEKS RATE 1" S24 2" S34 3" $44 1 AD PER WEEK for 26 WEEKS RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 Above rates apply to Weekend Edition Rates for Midweek Ed1t1on are 112 above rates 1Go easy on your heart and start cut­ting back on foods that are high in saturated fat and cholesterol. The change'll do you good. A American Heart V Association W'E'RE RGHTING FOR 'lO.JR LIFE The Best Little Guest House in Town Community News from Neigh borhood & Community Groups Reasonable Nightly & Weekly Rates Private Baths Free Parking For Reservations Call (504) 566-1177 1118 Ursulines, New Orleans, LA 70116 0't JSlp.r uce Up Your Home for the Holidays 1r ,, HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor • Roofing (All Types) • Tile/ Masonry • Remodeling • CarpeVFlooring • Sheetrock/ Painting • Cabinets • Plumbing/ Electrical • Decks/ Hot Tubs • Foundations Repaired • Room Additions • Tree & Trash Removal • Concrete • Insulation • Chimney Sweeping & • Water Proofing Repairs • Pest & Rodent Control • Fully Insured • Heating/AC • References Available 1\ ~: ~'1 . ; ••Pancake Day is Feb. 28 Bering Memorial United Methodist Church will host its 37th annual Mardi Gras Pancake Day Festival on Saturday. Feb. 28. Fare includes bacon. sausage and "all you can eat'' pancakes and coffee and milk. Cost is $4 for adults and $2 for children under 12 Serving will begin at 7:00 am. and continue until 2:00 p_m in the fellowship hall of the church at 1440 Harold at Mulberry Benng·s pastor. Dr Donald Sinclair. said extra griddles will be set up to help meet the demand. Last year, more than 1000 people attended the festival Sinclair noted that Pancake Day is an ancient ritual and is still celebrated 1n both Western and Eastern Orthodox religions. The tradition came about as housewives 1n the Middle Ages attempted to use all butter fat and eggs before the start of Lent. the 40-day fast that precedes Easter Pancake or Shrove Tuesday coincides with Mardi Gras and is also known as Fat Tuesday More information on the pancake fest1Val is available by calling the church office, 526-1017 .. Switchboard Seeks Volunteers The Gay and Lesbian Switchboard of Houston 1s )pen every day to offer counseling. information and referrals to the community The next volunteer training program will be held Jal" 30. 31, and Feb. 1, 7, 8. Staff members work on the phones three hours weekly after completing 30 hours training Prospective volunteers must be at least 19 years of age To volunteer for the switchboard. call 529·3211 .. Gay Pride Planning Meeting This Sunday The first organizational meeting for the 1987 Gay Pnde Week will be held Sunday. Jan 25. 6:00 p.m. at Dignity Center. 3217 Fannin at Elgin . Agenda items include setting the calendar, publicity and theme. There is a possib1hty of a night parade this year Communny input is encouraged and needed Direct Burial or Cremation CREffiATIOTI SERVICE ITITERTIATIOTIAL® Operated by James H Murphy Funeral Homes \ I I No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 pnced $395 ram ~ 363-9999 wrn£ FIGHTING FOR Quit smoking. '.OJR c 'f !{ [II --VISA American Heart ,/a Association V 24 MONTROSE VO ICE I JANUARY 23 . 1987
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