Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991
File 014
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991 - File 014. 1991-02-22/1991-02-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6265/show/6245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1991-02-22/1991-02-28). The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991 - File 014. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6265/show/6245

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991 - File 014, 1991-02-22/1991-02-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6265/show/6245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 22, 1991-February 28, 1991
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript EmsisHBanaEaDasaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii FtBRUARY22-28.199l/TNV/THr:NEWVOIC[ 13 Activists wary of report that AZT may harm minority AIDS patients UV I JKIJOKAH Mfc.SC'fcr. mraHir-al it'c rar, tathir»al it'c a er-i^irttifi/* nnhlich/iH tin" /-iMhic cri iHw ^nll riHH unt iriAthor r By DEBORAH MESCE FOR THE NEW VOICE WASHINGTON (AP)—AIDS activists are cautioning blacks and Hispanics not to read too much into a new study that suggests minorities may be harmed by early treatment with the anti-AIDS drug AZT. The study findings, though inconclusive, also illustrate the need to get more minorities into clinical trials where drugs are tested and to study how intravenous drug use, access to routine health care and other factors affect treatment, the activists said Feb. 15. "You have to test the drugs in the population that is going to be taking them," said Mark Harrington of the New York- based AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, known as ACT UP. which has pushed for expanding clinical trials and including more women and minorities. "People used to stigmatize our desire for inclusion of all affected populations as somehow a political imperative:' he fold a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee. "But it's not. ... It's a medical, it's an ethical, it's a scientific and a political imperative!' The Veterans Affairs Department study, released Feb. 15, indicated that early treatment with AZT may not benefit, and may even harm, blacks and Hispanics infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. For whites, the study supported earlier studies that found early treatment slowed progression of the disease. Based on those earlier studies, the FDA last year said AZT could be recommended for adults infected with the virus that causes AIDS when they have mild or no symptoms of the disease. Members of the FDA advisory committee said the findings of the new VA study were disturbing but not strong enough to warrant changing the government's treatment recommendation. Some on the panel, however, said they would inform their minority patients of the findings and that the information should be made available to other physicians immediately, rather than wait si; to eight months for the findings to be published. "The findings may be a fluke, but I'm concerned they might not be,' said Dr. Richard O'Brien, a researcher at the federal Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Wayne Greaves, head of the infectious disease division at Howard University and a consultant to the panel, said that while he agreed the evidence was not strong enough to re-label AZT, he would tell his minority patients about the study. "I will tell them the data contradicts earlier studies, that early AZT therapy may not be useful and may even be harmful to minority patients," he said. The study "is preliminary and will need to be replicated." Leaders of the National Minority AIDS Council and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force cautioned that it would be premature to draw any definitive conclusions from.the study and said they were concerned it could send the wrong message to blacks and Hispanics carrying the virus. 'We are concerned that misinterpreta tion of this study will add yet another potential for discrimination against people of color with HIV and AIDS, not to mention discouragethem from seeking AIDS drugs!' said Belinda Rochelle, a lobbyist for the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. Paul Kawata, executive director of the National AIDS Minority Council said his concern was that "we must not send people of color with HIV infection underground. This study has the potential to take away hope for infected minorities." The VA study was small, with 338 participants, and the results were inconsistent with other, larger studies, the activists and committee members noted. It also was not designed to measure racial differences, and therefore might not be an accurate reflection, they said. It did not distinguish between blacks and Hispanics, but rather lumped them into a single group. In addition, the VA study was not able to measure the importance of other factors, such as socioeconomic status, lifestyle and access to routine medical care. visory committee. "But it's not. ... It's a to eight months for the findings to be "We are concerned that misinterpreta- style and access to routine medical can Couples flock to S.F. City Hall to register as domestic partners SAN FRANCISCO (AP)—More than 275 after 8:00 a.m. by the Board of Supervisors. The issue flyers about the law in the city's predon couples, most of them gay and lesbian, About a dozen same-sex couples were was put on the ballot after a petition cam- nantly gay Castro district, and his ait SAN FRANCISCO (AP)-More than 275 couples, most of them gay and lesbian, walked into City Hall as single people on Valentine's Day and left as officially registered "domestic partners" under a new city law. San Francisco voters approved a domestic partners proposal in last November's election. Other cities with similar laws include Santa Cruz and West Hollywood in California, Seattle and Madison, Wis. "It's a real milestone, not only in our relationship, but for the gay community," Chris Minor said Feb. 15 after he and Richard Mulholland became San Francisco's first official domestic partners. Minor was on the steps of City Hall at 5:30 a.m. The couple, in matching leather jackets and boots, paid their $35 fee and became legal domestic partners shortly after 8:00 About a dozen same-sex couples were waiting when City Hall opened. They included Christmas Leubrie, a 41-year-old nurse, and her lover of six years, Alice Heimsoth, 39, a city health worker. They wore pastel silk outfits and flowers in their hair. "We worked hard on this," said Leubrie, who was active in the campaign to get the law approved by voters. "It's about love and recognition of relationships." The Rev. Charles Mcllhenny, pastor of the FirBt Orthodox Presbyterian Church, said earlier, "City Hall is playing fast and loose with God's creation ordinance." He was among religiouB leaders who led a referendum campaign in 1989 to overturn a similar ordinance approved by the Board of Supervisors. The issue put on the ballot after a petition campaign and narrowly failed. Voters passed the law in November after narrowly rejecting a similar ballot initiative in 1989. The city's Board of Supervisors had adopted a domestic partners ordinance in 1982, but former Mayor Dianne Feinstein vetoed it as too costly. Under the new law, couples file their declaration with the county clerk. There is no ceremony.. But late Thursday afternoon. Feb. 15, about 100 couples took part in a special multi-denominational ceremony recognizing their new status, with their names announced as they descended City Hall's rotunda stairway. San Francisco Supervisor Harry Britt's staff had handed out thousands of flyers about the law in the city's predominantly gay Castro district, and his aide, Jean Harris, said the supervisor's office was flooded with calls from people planning to register. Britt was the prime backer of the legislation. The new law is narrower in scope than the earlier proposals. It does not provide any benefits for domestic partners, only letting them declare that they have an intimate relationship, that they have lived together at least six months and that they will be jointly responsible for living Denmark is the only country to permit same-sex marriages by law; Sweden is considering a similar law that would give gay couples the same rights as married people in areas such as taxation, inheritance and divorce. The San Francisco ordinance applies to gay as well as heterosexual couples. Mississippi House approves AIDS testing for rapists By GINA HOLLAND FOB THE NEW VOICE JACKSON, Miss. (AP)—The Mississippi House voted on Feb. 12 to require AIDS testing for convicted rapists with the results being sent to the victim. The bill which would include testing for anyone sentenced to a Mississippi prison passed 122-0 with little debate. It now goes to the Senate. Rep. Ed Buelow of Vicksburg questioned whether the bill should be expanded to include all sex-related offenders, not just rapists. Rep. Ed Jackson of Cleveland, chairperson of the House Penitentiary Committee, said rapists posed the biggest harm. The tests would be conducted by the state Department of Health. Any positive AIDS or AIDS virus test results would also be reported to the victim's spouse and to the spouse of the person who is convicted of the sex offense, Jackson said. The state Department of Health now performs random testing of state inmates for AIDS and the AIDS virus NewsLine: Louisiana Louisiana receives $13 million for AIDS programs BATON ROUGE, La.(AP)-Louisianawill receive $1.3 million in federal money to expand and improve programs for people with AIDS, Gov. Buddy Roemer said Feb. 14. The money, which will be in hand in April, will be used for home health care, to buy the life-prolonging drug AZT for AIDS patients who cannot afford it, and for support services for people who teBt positive for the HIV virus and live outside of the New Orleans area, Roemer said. The grant is named in memory of Ryan White, an Indiana youth who died from AIDS last year after receiving international attention for his battle with the fatal dis ease, which he contracted from a blood transfusion. "The Ryan White ... grant will benefit HIV-infected citizens and their families throughout the state by providing more readily available health care and support services," Roemer said. Roemer said some of the money, which will be administered by the Department of Health and Hospitals, will also be used for case management and primary care for AIDS patients. At last count, there were 2298 Al DS cases in the state, with more than half of them concentrated in the New Orleans area. The New Voice
File Name uhlib_24648896_n539_013.jpg