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The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991
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The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991 - File 011. 1991-02-22/1991-02-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6265/show/6242.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1991-02-22/1991-02-28). The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6265/show/6242

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991 - File 011, 1991-02-22/1991-02-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6265/show/6242.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The New Voice, No. 539, February 22 - 28, 1991
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 22, 1991-February 28, 1991
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 TNV/THENEWVOICE/riBRUARY22-28.19vl niEEHssaanasaaaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Health groups fault President's AIDS budget, wants millions more A broad coalition of national health organizations has severely criticized the President's budget, saying it falls far short of the effort needed to fight the nation's AIDS epidemic. Speaking for the National Organizations Responding to AIDS (NORA), Daniel Bross, executive director of AIDS Action Council and chair of NORA, said, "Over 100,000 Americans have died of AIDS. Surely our nation's leaders should pursue the war against AIDS and drug abuse with the same determination they have mustered for armed conflicts in the international arena." A total of 161,000 cases of AIDS have been reported in the United States to date.. The Centers for Disease Control estimates that a million Americans are infected with HIV, and at least 165,000 of them will die in the next two years. A statement released by the 150 member coalition Feb. 4 cited three areas where greater resources are needed in the fight against AIDS: programs to prevent the transmission of HIV; funding of the Ryan White CARE Act; drug abuse and AIDS. For prevention programs, NORA requested an additional $500 million over current spending. NORA also requested full funding of the Ryan White Act at $881.5 million ($531 million over current spending), and suggested a major increase in the Alcohol, Drugs and Mental Services Block Grant. "These increased commitments to AIDS must be part of a larger commitment to improved health for all Americans confronting all diseases," said Bross. "During this Congress, we will work to ensure that commitment is safe." i::-i-::-s i ii ii urn ill ill 'Sleeping with the Enemy' is a riveting, well-made thriller By STEVE WARREN TNV Film Critic At first glance Julia Roberts is living the perfect life as the perfect wife in Sleeping with the Enemy. Her husband. Patrick Bergin, is a fabulously successful investment counselor who works out on a machine that makes him look like he's making a Sisyphusian run up the corporate ladder. Sure, he does Borne business when they're supposed to be vacationing at their summer home on Cape Cod, but he also finds time not only to take his wife to parties but to tell her what to wear to them. We soon realize Hubby Dearest is a control freak, and that he beats his wife brutally when she disappoints him (shades of director Joseph Ruben's earlier film, The Stepfather !), then becomes especially loving in the usual pattern of the abuser. All Roberts can do is look wistfully from their window like a bird in a gilded cage. "We will always be together^' Bergin tells her. "Nothing can keep us apart." From someone else this might be reassuring, but from him it sounds like a threat or at least a life sentence. After "three years, seven months, six days," a boating accident gives Roberts a chance to escape and start a new life in a small town in Iowa. She takes the name "Waters" in honor of the waters that saved her. Roberts lucks out by renting a house next door to the most sensitive heterosexual man in America (Kevin Anderson). When he starts growing attached and presses her for some information about herself she j asks, "What is it with men?" a variation on "It's a dick thing." But she eventually warms to him and lets down some of her defenses. Meanwhile Bergin figures out his wife didn't really die and the hunt is on! There's never any question of what will happen in this formula suspense drama, only when and how. Fortunately it contains several witty and suspenseful sequences. Although a few cliches are inevitable, things aren't dragged out unbearably long; if anything, the climax seems a bit rushed. Bergin doesn't have the natural menace of Jack Palance, who did this kind of thing so well in the '50s, but he's a good actor and Ruben known how to photograph him to make him frightening. Besides, we see enough of him in action to believe he's capable of anything. A gay man figures cleverly in one scene with no stereotyping or PHOTO BY MYLES ARINWITZ, 20TH CENTURY FOX Julia Roberts plays a young woman who takes desperate measures to escape a destructive relationship, and Patrick Bergin playB her husband, who's obsession is to keep her at any cost, in the thriller "Sleeping with the Enemy" homophobia a bit part but a good exam- capable of carrying a film, if there was pie to other film makers of how smoothly any doubt. I'm not sure what message it gay characters can be woven into the will send to battered women, who may fabric of everyday life. find it disturbing; but for anyone else it Sleeping with the Enemy is a well should prove as easily forgettable aB it is made thriller that proves Julia Roberts is thoroughly enjoyable. 7r7n^T7i^2]:::i:iiiiiiiiiiiiiin Taking the AIDS test: A personal journey YOURS TRULY IN A SWAMP by LEONARD EARL JOHNSON TNV New Orleans When I was in my salad days (my twenties), I lived in California and lay atop a park bench most afternoons in a manicured park high above the Pacific Ocean, listening to the ships and smelling the air moving up from San Francisco Bay. It was the 1960's, a terrific time to be in one's salad days. I went on to become a sailor and ship out on vast oceans to far flung lands. Then I grew older, lived again on land and left the ships in memories' wake. On a recent voyage, sailing aboard an airplane, returning from the ancient sea bed of Nevada: flying back to swampy New Orleans from desert dry Las Vegas, I decided to take the AIDS test. On the plane with me were two men in declining early years. They were frail, one more so than the other. Both had thin, wispy, post-chemotherapy hair. I spoke, asking if they were from New Orleans. "Yes," the sprier one said. Had they won in Vegas? "No," they both said. 1 guessed two things about them; they were dying, one sooner than the other. Movies are the great American Art Form. They portend, herald and bracket our lives. -The Graduate," "The Big Chill." "longtime Companion" are all bittersweet milestones of our age. In cold Illinois, I have a friend from my college days who is HIV positive. He was slow in telling me but I had guessed. He has gone back to graduate school at out alma mater. I went to see him. He told me his plans. They are: to finish graduate school with the time he has left and then bow out or recover, if a cure is found. These are times that try our soul and faith and patience. I decided again, this time for sure—when I get home I will take the AIDS tfst. In Illinois, we talked about life in the 60"b. Once, he and I sat on a hillside looking at a munitions train moving slow and snakelike along the Mississippi River. There was war then. too. the 60's had their drawbacks. I saw "Longtime Companion" for a third time after returning from Illinois. The ending is powerful. A tear jerker, ending like movies made during World War II. Two men and a woman on a beach dreaming of a better day and of those fallen. I phoned to make an appointment for the AIDS test. I am 50 pounds overweight and I worked for the United States Navy for all those years. I was given blood tests regularly. Had they been positive, surely they would have fired me. But then, maybe they did. Also, I have had heavy bouts with depression. And I have dandruff when I don't wash my hair! And I had a little skin cancer on my nose! The lady who greeted and tested and talked with me was nice, friendly and understanding. I was worried, she knew. "Probably you don't need to worry," she said. "You look healthy. Most people when they come for the test look ill." I thought about my neighbor. One morning he died. He had looked healthy, a big Frenchman from Cajun country who sold insurance in New Orleans. His long time companion told me he had been in the hospital for two weeks with an uncontrollable sinus infection that turned out to be a rare spinal infection. Then they tested him for AIDS. He was positive. "After that, he gave up and went." Louisiana is poor and slow. Results from an AIDS test take "... two to three weeks," the nice lady said. I will tell you what it says. (To be continued next issue) TNV/The New Voice ISSUE 539 FEBRUARY 22-28. 1991 Published Fridays Established 1973 as the Houston Montrose Star, established i960 as tie Houston Montrose Vol mcorporaling 1991 the New Orleans Crescent City S Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston. TX 77006 (713) 529-8490 365 Canal, suite 2300 New Orleans, LA 70130 Phone (504) 524-1408 Contents copyright 1991 Office hours: 9am-5:30pm Henry McClurgpubMfle» William Folrtner allien manager Sheri Cohen Darbonnaefluor SUBSCRIPTiONS/DISTRIBUTION Austin (512} 478-4245 Houston (713) 529-8490 New Orleans (504) 524-3279 San Antonio (512) 226-1833 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Tony Allwright/director Robert DeCola/representative Austin (512) 478-4245 Houston (713) 529-8490 New Orleans (604) 524-3279 San Antonio (512) 226-1833 N.O. photographer-journalist honored by Japanese The author of the nationally syndicated column "Yours Truly In A Swamp." Leonard Earl Johnson of New Orleans, has been honored by the government of Japan. The Diet of Japan expressed its "appreciation to photographer/journalist Leonard Earl Johnson for sharing the art of American photography and the noble art of American seamanship with the people of Japan," so translates a document forwarded to Johnson from the U.S. State Department. Johnson exhibited 36 black and white photographs in Tokyo in a program sponsored by the United States and the Japan Seamen's Service during 1989 and 1990. The images were of U.S. Merchant seamen working aboard ships around the world. "I assume it (the parchment document) is complimentary, but I can't read it!' Johnson said. "I got a phone call from Washington saying it was a good thing, and it is very pretty" POSTMASTER TX 77006-3Q2B uclions Io 408 Avon- are m US {by earner *r 6 months or 165 per year) ruing 'epresenralive RIvantMl MMttttng y U Bo* 1268. Plainfield. NJ 07061. (201) 754-43*8 ng deadline 5pm Tuesday lor Friday rusers Advertising effective Feb 15. 1991 Responsibility We do not assume 1 lOvtviisers bur readers arr askim io ■■!-,■ ■.-■ nvesligated N,*s se<W. Associated Preii
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