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Montrose Voice, No. 149, September 2, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 149, September 2, 1983 - File 001. 1983-09-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/615/show/590.

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(1983-09-02). Montrose Voice, No. 149, September 2, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/615/show/590

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 149, September 2, 1983 - File 001, 1983-09-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/615/show/590.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 149, September 2, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 2, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Lower Montrose: Houston's New Red- Light District? By Hollio Hood" After members of the Greater Houston Montrose Business Guild voted to support the City of Houston's proposed convention center in concept, it leveled some serious questions regarding the deterioration of the firot 10 blocks ofWestheimer because of the proJiferation of sexually oriented modeling studios. Discussion of the Westheimer area arose when John Green, Westheimer property owner and member of the Westheimer Col­ony Civic Association, informed the meet· ing of a letter he sent to Mayor Kathy Whitmire inquiring about issuance of a sewer permit to one of the studios. The letter read in part: "events seem to bear out th~ allegation. Over a period of time, beginning with Mayor McConn's admin· istration and accelerating under your administration, the number of modeJing studios has grown at (an) alarming rate. There are presently six of these studios on the 100 block, two on the 200 block, one on the 300 block. (and) within a month there will be one on the 400 block, and, we have reason to suspect, one on the 500 block." The letter also mentioned that a water uoage permit had been granted to Oku Hama Modeling Studio for expansion pur· poses, and that this grant "flies in the face of the so-called moratorium on additional sewage use in effect throughout the Mont· rose area," since permits have not been granted to business and property owners wishing to build high·rise buildings on Westheimer. This letter further stated that the "City of Houston is operating . . . pur· posefully to convert lower Westheimer into a red-light district." Mayor Whitmire has not replied to this letter, which contains over 80 signatures. One guild member stated, "What I want to know is how m bell did they (the studio) get that plumbing permit, and why the hookers are allowed to continue busi· ness?" The member went on to ask, "Why can't they have a sting operation in Montrose like they have had on South Main and in other areas of town?" "The police don't do a thing about it," said another member. Landlords cannot compete with the ris­ing tide of modeling studios, which has doubled in the past calendar year. u1 don't care if somebody at City Hall is getting paid off to protect these places or not," one attendee said. "I want to find out what's going on and stop it before it's too late for the neighborhood." "We need to take a stand on this," one man said. "We need to start asking ques­tions and drawing attention to this prob­lem." It was 1uggeoted that questions could be directed to Police Chief Lee Brown when he vioita the guild the first Tuesday in Sep­t em her at ita meeting in the Liberty Bank Community Room, or to Mayor Whitmire, who is ocbeduled to address the group'• October meeting. The group voted to send correspondence to Councilman George Greanias support· ing the queetions raised in the group's let· ter Also, the group voted to create a "report card" for Montrrn>e's elected representa· tives on past performances regarding the area's need.s, so that voters will be aided in the November election. The group aloo decided to look into implementing a redevelopment plan for the Weetheimer area should something be done about the modeling studios and their detrimental effect on the neighborhood. MONTROSE AIDS Hearing in D.C. Blasts Reagan v a I c E Administration The Newspaper of Montrose Sept. 2, 1983 Issue .. 149 Published Every Friday page 6 Mayor Says Convention Center Would Help Montrose Economy By Hollia Hood Mayor Kathy Whitmire unveiled a scale model of the proposed George R. Brown Houston Convention Center in a cerem­ony at Jones Hall on August 31. She com­mented that oupport is needed for the pending ballot resolution regarding the cent.Pr's financing The proposed center, recently endorsed in concept by the Greater MontroRe Busi· neea Guild, was close to the original mas· tPr plan and design approved by the City Council last December. Members of the City Council, the advisory committee of archite<'t-8 and engineers for the project and memlwrs of the organization to pro­mot(' it on the ballot, Fl'iends of the Down· town Convention Center, were all present at the unveiling. The new facility will provide 500,000 square feet of exhibit space, as stipulated in the rity's original design criteria. Sub· sequent construction phases could provide an ultimate convention center with l, 183,800 oquare feet. Robert F. Lucas, a88istant executive director of the National School Boards' Association, told attendees that "We are here in 1984 because we made the commit­ment to Houston, and we will keep it. We are holding tentative dates for a conven· tion in I 990, aBSuming something happens between now and then to make it po88ible for us to return. H~wever, if the new facility does not receive approval, then we honestly cannot come back. And f doubt we are the only people in that dilt>mma." Lucas as a full time meeting planner, said thai Houston's proposed building will represent sta~of.the·art. meeti_ng apace, and because cities in th11 section of the country which are suitable for large con• ventione are limited to Dallas, Houston or New Orlean1, that Houston's need for marketable apace ia paramount. Principala in Houaton 's tourism ind us .. The proposed d.owntou·n convention center should be healthy for Montrose busmest, aay the supporters. by bringing more tourist• for the area's restaurants try voiced concern at a recent dinner for gay leaders and businessmen (sponsored by Texas Eastern Corporation, a firm donating murh of the proposed site) that Houston is losing millions of dollars each year in missed convention trade, depriv­ing the economy of the accompanying rip~ pie effect on related industries. According to convention center offi. cials, the propoRed building would bring in $431 million in &pending by delegate& vis­iting the city, $14 million in new tax revenue• and $121 million in payrolla, according to official&. Alao, the new center will create approximately 1.200 construc­tion jobs immediately and 10,000 new and permanent jobe in hotels, restaurants and stores in support services to conventio­neera. Despite a petition circulated by the Houston Sports ABBociation and quet;· tions regarding whether or not the donated land from Texas Eastern is the best site for the facility, plans are moving ahead, as evidenced by Tuesday's presen­tation . Funding to pay for the mammoth SI 15,600,000 facility would come from the hotelJmotel tax. the philooophy being, "We build it: the people who come to use it pay for it." Mayor Whitmire and a unanimous City Council will put the fund­ing question to the voters on November 8, in which a ''yee" vote will guarantee that no general fund monies will ever be used to fund the project; it v.ill be paid for exclu­oively by the tax. "It becomes not so much a question of how will we pay for it," one spokesperson said, •·but how can we afford not to build it?" The Greater Montrose BusineMs Guild voted to support the convention center in a recent meeting, but questioned why a Montro8f" representative was so suppor­tive of a 1ite other than Montrose for its location. "We could put it where Allen Parkway Village is," aald George Grea­nia"• DiMtrict C councilman, "but I don't believe there is enough spaCf' there for the green spaces planned around the site, and accesa and egress from the building (eitra roado) would completely destroy the Fourth Ward." The proposed construction site. part of which has already been donated by Texas Eastern, is approximately 25 acres on the east side in a deteriorating area of the city. Much of the land would be u•ed for the convention center proper and the remainder for expansion and parking. A business guild representative said that Texas Eastern has given right-of-way on four blocks near the center for a monorail or aome form of mass transit between the site and Montrose. The project is seen by proponents as beneficial to HoU8ton'a economy as a whole, but particularly to revitalizing part of downtown and i.ts adjacent areas. Texaa Eastern representatives assured Montroae busineMsmen that Montrose would gain more fine restaurants and become a pivotal point for entertaining conventioneen:. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 2, 1983 SEPT 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 GPC Municipal Endorsements Announced By Robert Hyde Houston's Gay Political Caucus, which refers to itself as "one of the most powerful political machines in Houston ," announced its endorsements for the November 8 municipal election Wednes­day evening, based primarily on candi­dates' responses to written questionnaires and lengthy screenings concerning impor­tant issues in Houston's gay community, such as the AIDS crisis and police protec­tion . Mayor Kathy Whitmire received an endorsement for reelection over her major mayoral opponent BiJl Wright, since the caucus believed Wright was not suffi· cient1y educated to handl~ problems within the city's gay community. Mayor Whitmire received a standing ovation when she spoke before the caucus early in the evening. Candidate Wright was unable to address the assembly due to prior obligations that kept him away from the meeting until after the approval of Mayor Whitmire had already been given. No endorsement was issued for the con· troller's race; however, the caucus leaned heavily toward endorsing Controller Lance Lalor at a later date. "He has been with us too long," said one caucus member. Some caucus members felt that Lalor was not interested in the endorse­ment, since he did not reply to the written Gay Switchboard Needs Volunteers Volunteers will be needed when the Gay Switchboard expands its hours in October from the current 6:00 p.m. to midnight on weekday• and 3:00 p.m. to midnight on weekends. Volunteers will work three hours per week after a two-weekend train· ing program which will provide skills in crisis intervention and counseling tech· niques. Women and bilinguals are always needed. The next training program will be held on the weekends of September 16 and 24. For more information, call the Switch· board at 529-3211. questionnaire or submit to GPC's screen· ing. GPC's most difficult decision for endor· sement concerned whether to approve Dis· trict D Councilman Anthony Hall or feminist Niki Van Hightower for the posi­tion 4 council-at-large seat, both of whom were deemed 0 friends of the community" by the GPC. Hall was initially recom· mended by the screening committee, but after a heated debate, the endorsement went to Hightower. District B Councilman Ernest McGowen was given a contingent endor· sement based on his long record of service. He was unable to complete GPC's screen· ing because of the recent death of his son. Councilman George Greanias was endorsed for reelection in District C since the caucus felt that he was able to "see fairly all sides" of gay issues. Greanias was the only candidate in District C race who subjected himself to the GPC screen­ing. District D candidate Rodney Ellis received the GPC's endorsement in that race. Dale Gorczynski received an endorse­ment for reelection as District H council­man based on his being "very strong and informed on health issues." Gorczynski was the only respondent in that race to GPC's ecreening. Councilman Ben Reyes failed to received the District I endorsement because the caucus felt he was "purpose­fully unwilling" to cooperate with the GPC. Consequently, the GPC nod went to Rey Rodriquez, the only candidate in-the District I race who responded to GPC'• screening. • Endorsements for council·at·large poei· tions 1 and 2 went to Anne Wheeler and Eleanor Tinsely, respectively, as they were the only candidates to submit to GPC's screening. Position 3 Coundlman Jim Greenwood received an endorsement for reelection to that position, despite his not scoring well on all issues during the GPC screening. However, the caucus felt that Greenwood had "asperations for higher office that could be beneficial to us," and was given the caucus' approval. Feeling that Councilman Judson Robin-son was "weak in some areas but could be educated,'' the caucus endorsed the incum­bent for Position 5. Candidates for Districts E, F and G failed to respond to GPC's questionnaire or submit to the screening. Consequently, there were no endorsements in these races. GPC Slates Next Meeting Houston Gay Political Caucus has sche­duled its next meeting for Wednesday, September 7. Topics on its agenda will include endorsements for upcoming Texas constitutional amendments and for the Houston school board election. There will also be discussion of a GPC endorsement regarding the Houston Con· vention Center project in the upcoming bond election. Possible AIDS Therapy Found The drug Isoprinosine has been shown to restore immune responses in blood taken from AIDS victims, reports United Press International. Already established "" helping to ...,.. tore the immunity of aging people to dis­ease, Iaoprinoeine showed favorable results in preliminary experiments when administered to AIDS patients, said Dr. Kwong Y. Toang of the Medical Univer­sity of South Carolina. Stop! In the Name of Lust P•cltle New• Service Police in Cleveland say a group of enter· prising hookers figured out an ingenious way to get motorists to stop in the name of love. They allegedly broke into a control box and set a traffic light permanently on red, giving themselves a better opportunity to solicit for sex, and also lending new mean· ing to the phrase "Red Light District." Montrose Mouth And the winners These two fine people are Frank and Freda Jerrell of the group Family and Friends of Gays. They drew the winners from the recent Montrose Voice Greater Tuna Sweepstakes. The grand prize winner, receiving two tickets to the Tower Theater/Pace Pro­duction of "Greater Tuna," dinner for two at Rascals and limousine service by Limousines d'Elegance, was Nancy Martin. Other winners, each getting two tickets to "Greater Tuna,." were John Barnes, John Burnett, Mike Cevera, Peggy Don­nellan, Ed McDonald and Marc Sanders -a- Well, it's Labor Day weekend folks. Got your plans all laid out? Check the ads for the clubs In this issue of the VOICE for the fastest Labor Day events. We'll sample a few here: The Mining Company has a new "atmosphere" planned for Monday night. Mary's is hav­ing bare chest and shorts specials all wee­kend, including •·water sports" at the back bar. The Same 01' Hole 1s having their long-awaited Bartenders Show this Sun­day, 4pm, while down the street. the Lazy J 1s having a show too. Friday night (yes, tonight), with (he"s still kickin') Ron Sioux and ('"what-ever-happened-to") Torchy Lane Wait. there·s more: The Officer's Club and the Upper Deck will party all wee­kend. Numbers will have it's after-hours till sometime after the sun comes up. There's '"Bare Chest Night" Monday night at the Texas Renegades (possibly the only gay bar in the country named alter a Jeep). Hungry? Ba1a's is having its annual Labor Day Buffett. 11 :30 to 3pm. The Gal­leon is having its '"Labor Day Drag Brunch." Over in Lake Charles. where they now read the Voice every weekend, they're having a "Salute to Diana• show Saturday night. And of course. there·s Dianna Ross her­self in concert Friday m Houston The .. Silver Screen• continues this wee­kend at Risky Business-Friday night. Saturday night and Sunday night. At Lolas Depot (toot toot). they"re gonna party on the patio all weekend with Labor Day drinks specials Rascals 1s going to be closed Monday. so catch the 1mpress1ve, sultry Leata Gal­loway there dunng the weekend Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose P306 Hooston. TX 77006 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 2, 1983 SELECTION A SPECIAL SERVICE FOR SPECIAL PEOPLE OPENING IN SEPTEMBER HOUSTON INFORMATION LINE (713) 961-9876 SEPT 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Anthony Hall Trying to Become an 'At-Large' Councilman By Hollis Hood "I want to become more involved with the lifeblood of the city," stated District D Councilman Anthony Hall in giving his reason for abandoning his secure seat on the local governing body and running for the highly contested At-Large Position 4 in the upcoming November election. Hall announced his decision at a recent Gay Political Caucus meeting because, "I need all the help I can get." The native Houstonian said that as councilman for District D, he represents only one-ninth of the total population of Houston, and while that portion is impor­tant, he thinks he can contribute more by representing a broader base of the citi­zenry. "I would like to be more involved and get input from the entire city_" The city needs to develop a long-range plan for capital improvements, said Hall, for street maintenance, especial1y. and needs to inventory all city holdings. Having served on council committees for aviation and the police study commit­tee, Hall is familiar with the problems of the airport and the jail. "We could have a first rate airport if we just did a few things right," Hall com­mented. The councilman also supports a central jail and the pre-trial release program for offenders in nonviolent crime "where there is no reason to believe the person will not show up." A father of two children, Hall said he MONTROSE V D I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright •1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg publiJher 9d11or Ace! Clark gr•oh1cs Jet! Bray gr1p/11ca Sonny Davis eccoummg HOiiis Hood m.~rnged11tH Chuck Mered11h •port• ed1t0t Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee COOl1lt)uf1ng """l•rl Bob Jones. Mary Cadena. Juhe Hollmgsworth. John Cooper. Larry Popham contribl.Jtmg phologrephers Lyt Harris M/~•1mg director Mark Drago .c/~•''''"''1 Jon Cheetwood ci.ud.-dedlfert•s'ng Foundlrtg Mem1»1 Gr .. 1.- Montrose But•oea GuMd. G1y Pr ... AUOC•ll•Ofl .N.e.w.s. .S etv•CN lntemll•Otlll Gay Newt AQe!'tcy. P1c•hc: N11w1 A<11ttn 8.,rNU C.J*OI Newt Serv•C9 Syndical«! FHflll'9 S1rv1c .. 4 W•il9f"s. (San Francotc0} Cl'lf'onlci. F .. tur•. UnJted FMl1J11$ynchut1. Jeffrey W•laOrt R1r.dy Allr.O. Stonf'wll F1a1ur" Syr1c:hut1. Bro1n McNaughl. Joe S.ket' POSTMASTER s.ncl 9dd• ... con.cf.ions to 3317 MonlrDM 11)()0. Houston. Tl( 71008 SubltcripllOll rare "' US "' n•~ ~111/0f» $-49 per year (52 "*ll..ln). $29-per ••it fl'IOfllhs (29 IUUfti). 0tS1 25perw"k (14111 than 26 II.uni N'1ion1I .0119fl1s1ng r1pte.1n11rrv• Joe 01S.bllto. R1vendell M•rkellng. &6e 6th A¥en~. New York 10011. {212) 2.(2-6863 AthW111mg <Hedl•rte Tuad•y. 5 :)Opm. for katue ntlnaed Frt­d• y ...,en•ng No/ice to ed....,tl,.,. Loc•I 1dvertl11ng rate .chedul• Fl..,..A wu ettec:1MI Oc:t 1. 1982 Loul •dv•thllng rel• tcf'ledule S•~-A w1H be efl.c:hv-e July 1. 1993 RNpontlb•hty MontroM Vo11:e" does not auume re1pon11 blhty for advett•"ng cl••m• Rffder9 lhould aiert "Monlrote Volte" lo eny ci.ceptrve IKIYert•••ng fqpo] [,.\Y 11 A A. )to opposes increasing taxes because so many families are already having economic dif­ficulties. "It just won't be fair to add to their financial burdens," he said. On the issue of human rights, Hall said that he, as a black, is obviously for equal rights. "I am avidly for equal rights and have been. Government should not be in the business of regulating the individual's rights, unless protected rights are being violated." An individual's human rights are something that must be protected daily, the 38-year-old Marshall Law School graduate said. However, when dealing with prejudice, Hall added, "It's a long-term solvable problem. It must be dealt with day-by-day." HaU is a U.S. Army veteran and served in Berlin and Vietnam. He represented Houston in the Texas House ofRepresen· tatives from 1973 to 1979 and has served in various capacities as a member of the state Democratic party. He is a member of the St.ate Bar of Texas, the Houston Lawy­ers' Association and the American Bar Association, as well as the National Bar. He has been listed in "Who's Who in Texas," "Outstanding Young Men in America," "Men of Achievement" and "Personalties of the South," to name a f-ew-. --- This is one of a continuing series on the candidates in November's election Gay Activist Challenges City Ordinance Houston gay activi!"1 Ray Hill testified in U.S. District Judge James DeAnda'scourt Aug. 29 that a city ordinance allowing Booze and Cigarette Ads Back on TV Liquor and cigarettes advertising is back on television thanks to the Public Broad· casting Service. Although booze and tobacco firms have been banned from advertising on commercial TV for over a decade, new PBS guidelines allow them to fund public TV programs, report.a the Phi­l< Mklphi Inquirer. The first company to take advantage of the loophole was R.J. Reynolds Industries, owner of Heublein Spirits and R.J. Rey­nolds Tobacco. A company spokesman calls it "a new era in public television," but PBS spokes· woman Mary Jane McKinven doubts it will open the door to liquor and cigarette ads on commercial TV McKinven says R.J. Reynolds is an underwriter, not a sponsor, and was allowed to underwrite the program only because it owns businff!Res other than its tobacco and alcohol concerns. Houston police to "bust anyone they want to, any time they want to" is unconstitu­tional, reported the Houston Chronicle. Muzak for the Eyes Rock video is here; now get ready for easy­Jistening video. As reported in the Wall Street Journal, an outfit called Environmental Video is producing half hour t.apes that feature babbling brooks, a barn in a meadow and other restful vistas. There's no action, just some birds flying back and forth, to the strains of Mantovani-like violins. The company sells the tapes to hospi­tals, where they're piped into rooms via closed circuit A Shocking Idea This story from the future shock depart­ment. A new Swiss anti-snoring device literally shocks people out of the habit. New Scientist magazine reports that a microphone by the bed picks up the fre­quency of the snore, and sends an ultra· sonic signal to a receiver attached to the wrist. If the snoring gets too loud, the device zaps the culprit with up to 40 volts. The invt·ntors claim the ishock will stop the ~noring. Th""y don't say, however, if it will nlso Mop the slttping. Hill, who is a co-founder and board member of the Gay Political Caucus, is suing the city following his arrest in Feb­ruary 1982 for allegedly interrupting a police officer "in the execution of his duty." After an incident in which police had halted traffic by ticketing someone, Hill noticed officers grabbing a black youth who was trying to direct a motorist on Westheimer. Hill told the officers that the youth had done nothing wrong and asked them not to harm the young man. Hill stated that he also told the officers, "If you want to pick on someone, why don't you pick on someone your own size?" Conae­q~ ently, the young man was released, and Hill was arrested and spent 18 hours in jail. Hill feels that the ordinance allows offic· ers to arrest people "purely at their own discretion," and is asking the court to overturn the city statute that makes it unlawful for anyone "in any manner oppose, molest, abuse or interrupt any policeman in execution of his duty." Following one day of te.stimony in which Hill's cJaim was supported by Steve Long, a television cameraman for a Hous­ton station who had been arrested April 28 for failure to obey a police order to move while Long was investigating a crime scene, Judge DeAnda adjourned the civil trial until September 13 so that his docket for a lengthy criminal trial could be cleared. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 2, 1983 Reagan Response Blasted in AIDS Hearing By Larry Bush Federal health officials wrangled with a congreesional oversight committee over the Reagan administration's handling of the AIDS crisis during two days of hear­ings in August. The debate which pitched House Government Operations and Health Sub­committee Chairman Ted Weiss (D· Manhattan), researchers, public health officials and gay groups against the Rea­ran administration 'a health officials and Republican congressmen on the commit­tee was the most public display to date of the growing differences of opinion over the federal government's effectiveness in responding to the epidemic. An angry Ted Weiss charged Assistant Secretary for Health Edward Brandt with hindering the congreuional committee's investigations into AIDS response by both the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Weiss said that R..agan appointees had inotructed scientists that they should have officials from the top levels of the bureaucracy sit in on any interviews about the effectiveneBH of AIDS research effort.a, and that files on research propos­als and results were being blocked as well. At one point in the hearings, Weiss tore off the front page of a memorandum by officials at the National Cancer Institute (part of NDiJ to all employees about con­gressional interviews, which told employaee that top-line officials "should be invited" to sit in on the interviews. Weiss charged that the presence of top bureaucrats would have a "chilling" effect on frank evaluations of the government's p~~;,r;:· and a team of federal health agency directors denied Weiss's conten­tion, claiming that they were seeking only to protect scientist.a and researchers from congreuional "'intimidation," and that files had been closed to protect the confi· dentiality of namN collected by federal officials in search of clues on AIDS. The angry exchanges were resolved when Brandt agreed to a new system of file review proposed by Weiss which pro­tecta the confidentiality of names; he also agreed that subcommittee investigators could meet with health ,....earchers inde­pendently of government managers. . Resolution of the dispute was consi­dered by Wei88 to be crucial to his efforts to oversee governmental AIDS effort.a. Weiss' eubcommittee is given a mandate to aclas a watchdog over all federal health activities; as a Manhattan congre&ilman. he has taken a pointed interest in the AIDS crisis, which Reagan officials have labelled the nation's "number one health priority." Weiss' hearings were also marked by partisan divisions between. Republic~& and Democrata, with R..pubhcan88eekmg to argue that making AIDS "the number one health priority" didn't make it the number one funding priority. Republican committee members. present through most of the hearings, devoted close atten· ti.on to the testimony and demonstrated familiarity with maoy of the technical points raised. . . The hearing opened with testunony from three men with AIDS: New York's Michael Callen, San Francisco'• Ron Lyons and Wuhington, D.C.'o Anthony Ferraro. Lyons told the committee, u1 have come here today in the hope that my epi­taph will not read that I died ofred tape." He appealed to the committee to treat Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome as a "human problem.'' Callen also called for a stronger govern· mental response, noting that many gay men in New York are weary of repeated AIDS reports that bring no new informa­tion 18 months after the federal govern· ment announced its efforts were underway. Fenaro epoke movingly of coming to 1erma with an AIDS diagnoois by going home where "my oignificant other held me in•h.iti arms. and I wondered, 'Why do I feel like Ali McGraw?'" Ferraro, who ia The immediate past president of the American Public Health Association, Stanley Matek, also decried the &agan response saying, "The administration's marching order to these program directors is unequivocal: 'Don't ask for any more money; make us look as good as you can with what you've got.'" Malek asked that Brandt convene a meeting of national experts within 45 days to develop an AIDS research plan, Ha realistic budget," and a priority list. That should be follo"'.ed, Matek said, by creation of a standing expert advisory panel. Bruce Voeller, a founder of NGTF and a member of two scientific advisory panels '141.'t-:.n created by the Reagan administration on l!lfff AIDS, charged that "(the Department of) Health and Human Services has not con· vened a single national meeting of research scientist.a and physiciane from the private sector and government to col­laborate in developing a comprehensive master plan." Voeller said that animal model testing could run NIH coats to $197 million for "merely a limited array oftest.a designed only to discover a susceptible species of animal so the real research can begin ," undergoing treatment with experimental drugs at NIH, said he had been told that nearly $500,000 in drug costs alone had been involved in his own treatment over approximately a nine-month period. Also t.eetifying at the hearing WBB National Gay Task Force executive direc­tor Virginia Apuzzo, who spoke forcefully of the need for a concerted governmental plan to deal with AIDS. She also noted the high cost of continued lack of progress. "We do not count in months, weeks or days; we count in lives," Apuzzo said. "A look at the federal government's response to the AIDS crisis leads to the unavoidable conclusion that, in this administration, there is a sharp contr&Bt between the rhe­toric of concern 'and the reality of response. The administration has been out of touch with the magnitude of this crisis. It has been following, not leading, the general public and the affected com· munities. . • AJJ long as a comprehensive plan is not forthcoming, the public will legitimately wonder and worry how seriously the administration is taking this iSBue. • Gay Rights National Lobby Executive Director Steve Endean told the committee that the Reagan administration's response to AIDS has been "a cruel joke," and said, "It remains more than a little ironic that lobbying initiatives are even neceaary in the face of such a serious crisis and statements that it is the number one health priority." Voeller said that the prospect of losing federal research grants had had the effect of gagging scientists who were otherwise willing to challenge &agan budget levelo. "Those in government quite reasonably fear quick termination of their govern­ment career• if they state their considered scientific beliefs in the face of explicit government gag orders. University researchers equally clearly tell me that they fear governmental reprisal if they apJ>f!'ar before these hearings or speak their minds. These women and men are dependent upon government research grants in,?rder to carry out their scientific research. Marcus Conant, co-director of San Fran­cisico's Kaposi's Sarcoma Clinic and a physician at the University of California, told of patients who will die because of the slow federal response. "I have to characterize the federal response to AIDS as bordering on the neg­ligent," Conant said. "I see in my ~ffice every day young men who should hem the prime of life but who instead are wastin1 away toward.a an early, pointless, but once-preventable death. They regularly ask me why their own government doee not seem to care if they Hve or die. The queation is not a rhetorical one. I have no answer for it. "I cannot help but conclude that federal officials who say that enough mone}_'. i1 being spent on AIDS are simply mouthmg some required political line that haa nothing to do with reality. I wish they could be with me in my office every day u I have to face yet another patient who will likely die because a major federal commit· ment to fighting AIDS was not made sooner. CanCrusher Co~ration We Pay Ca h for Your Trash*! 0 Trash by Can Crusher's definition is aluminum cans only Can Crusher Corporation is a full-service recycling company paying market pnces for aluminum cans. Our hours are Barn to 7pm Monday thru Fnday and 9am to 2pm on Saturday Help America Recycle and Make Money Too! The Can Crusher Corp. also offers a full­serv1ce pickup recycling program for b11rs restaurants & 1nd~$try. Call 864-2223 for details. 2011 S•lve·;;:,;' :E~--sp_r•no.__1 Y*sh1ngton 2011 Silver SL SEPT 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 2, 1983 From Bad to Worse Today's third grade bullies are tomorrow's hard core criminals. That's the conclusion of a 22 year study of aggressive behavior in children and adults, reports USA Today. Researchers at the University ofillinois found that by the time the grade school bullies turned 30, they had committed eight times as many crimes as their class­mates. They also found that children whose parents used physical punishment were more likely to tum into bullies, and their children were more likely to tum out the aame way. The report concludes that criminal behavior at.arts very early in life, and that may explain why rehabilitation doesn't work. Breaking Up is Hard ... When a long-term relationship ends, some people go on a sexual binge. Others go into a deep freeze for up to a year. And, accord­ing to the author of a book called Ameri· can Coupks, both reactions are perfectly normal. AB reviewed in Glamour magazine, Dr. Pepper Schwartz compares losing a_ lover to coming off a drug. and he feels a fling or two may make the withdrawal less pain· ful. For some people, however, a time out from dating provides a chance to disco:ver it's pol8ible to 1urvive without depending on someone else. AB for se:x with an ex, the doctor advises again1t it unless the couple i1 seriou1 about getting back together. Otherwise 1ays Schwartz, someone will be hurt an 1 d rejected a 1econd time. pl• GENERAL REPAIR • AUTO m () -I ::0 0 z 0 -I c z z ~ Sum Specials ~ : * Oil Change & Lube ~ ~ $1995 ~ g * Tune Up from $3995 ~ 1- 5 * Air Conditioning 0 ::! Check & Charge $2180 ~ ~ 1411 TAFT ~ ~ 522-2190 ~ • AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • <( .-------------------------------------------.. 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And now you can experience all the excitement of live theater and EASTERN America's favorite way to fly LO\.~~~~~ 2327 GRANT AT FAIRVIEW 528-8342 "Partv on the Patio" lwith recorded r ock n rolll Friday & Saturday 8pm-2am Labor Day Drink Specials ~.~A ll Da ~J '- SEPT 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Spend Labor Day weekend at Mary's FRIDAY Post Diana Ross Party 11pm SATURDAY-Shorts Dav Happy Hour prices all day + 75C schnapps to a11 in shorts SUNDAY-Bare Chest Dav c Happy Hour prices all day+ 75C schnapps to all wltn no shirt ..:- MONDAY - Shorts & Bare Chest Day + plus water Sports all afternoon on the patio + plus \Nennie Roast at 2pm Happy Hour prices all day + m schnapps to all in shorts & no shirt ruesday & wectnesday, sept 6 & 7 25C KEG BEER BUST on the patio ruesday Movie, Sept 6 "Champagne for Ceaser" starring Vincent Price & Celeste Holm Everyday Special 1/2 price drinks to all arriving at Mary's on a motorcycle! All Day wectnesday & Thursday Special Happy Hour prices to all in Mary's T-shirtz LINGEREE & PAJAMA PARTY Friday, sept. 9, 7am·noon. First drink free to all in proper attire LEATHER NIGHT Friday, sept. 9, Bpm·2am, 75C can beer to all in Leather PMK1N<i IN SIDE LOT 5PM·8AM Wffl(ffl!S, AU OAY WEEKffllS !TOW AWAY ZOfE OT/ER TIMES! AFTER-HOURS NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIMER Home of Houston Motorcycle Club & Texas Riders 528·8851 MU51C BY LAF?f? 10 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 2, 1983 Working at the Redneck Mall By David V. Meunier Nora and I are old friends. We met while working for the same retain chain, Books Unlimited, That we both were gay only added to the fact that our two personalities clicked immediately. Even after Nora was transferred to another store, we kept in touC'h. I must admit I was a bit surprised however to receive a late night caJI from her. "Yes?'' I muttered sleepily. .. David, it's Nora. It's horrible!" "What's horrible?" {Was this a dream?) "I've been transferred again • . to the &.!neck Mall!" "The what??'>" "The Redneck Mall in Redneck, Texas." "What the hell are you talking about?" CNow l was sure I was dreaming.) '"Redneck. It's a suburb of Pasadena. I can't stand it. You have to come imme­diately'" .. At 3:00 a.mJ I don't even how how to get there." "No, no. Meet me tommorrow morning at 9:00 a.m. in front of the store." "Give me directions." (At least I was waking up enough to ask for them.) "Well, you go down Highway 22 through Pasadena, and it takes you right to the Mall. It will be on the left, okay?" "Sure." "You can't mies the mall. It's right acr088 from the KKK shopping center'" 'The KKK what?" 'Oh, you'll recognize it. It has all the .croases burning in fhe front." (This was more serious than I first suspected.) The next morning as I drove along, I braced myself for the ordeal ahead. I slowed down as I noticed the sign: WEL COME TO REDNECK. TEXAS, THE ALL­AN! ERJCAfi T0\1<'1"' Populationc 4557 'i\'hite, 0 Black, 0 Perverts. ''Some people look for the sign of the Golden Arches-I looked for the burning crosses. They were easy to spot. "As I hurried mto the Mall, I was imme­diately struck by a large flashing green ne<>n sign-"The Christ Died For You Bookstore." Ah, the competition. As I was rounding the comer, I realized I was the only one dressed in Dolphin running shorts and Montrose T-shirt. Everyone else looked like they had just finished plowing the lower north forty. !\ora was out fronL She seemed quite nervous. She was smoking four cigarettes at once. •·charming atmoephere," I said. We quickly entered the store. It seemed very low on stock. Nora noticed my puzzle­ment. "The local council of churches made me remove a lot of 'filth' . as they called it". "Who's thal? Rebecca of Sunnybroolt Farm?" I motioned to a young woman in a high-necked, long sleeved, ruffled number which came down to her white ankle socks. ''Oh. that's Sally Ann. my assistant manager. She'~ really quite sweet. She's a lot more help than Bertha May." Bertha May was fortyish, v.;th a bee-hive hairdo, wearing a flowered blouse, a lime green polyester pantsuit, gold hoop earrings, and a large cross around her neck. She was throwing huge piles of books onto a cart. "What is she doing?" .. The Reverend Sidewinder has insisted he'll boycott the store unless we get rid of ~!~i:~}ldren's books containing demo- "l'm afraid to ask. but ... like what?" i'Cinderella. Snow White, Star Wars." "Snow White? .. "Yes, she was living in sin with seven dwarfs!'• "Sound• kinky to me," Sally Ann piped in, smiJing aweetly. "Don't forget Peter Pan. Bertha," I shouted. "He hung around with fairies." Bertha May glared at me. and said something about "the mark of the beast" under her breath. ''Last week the Reverend Brimstone made us pull all the copies of Peoplemaga· zine", Nora continued. "All because Brooke Shields was on the over wearing a bikini.'" "J .. us Christ. Nora!" (Bertha May fainted, while Sally Ann said something about using the Lord's name in vain.) "Why not just ask for another transfer?" HJ refm1ed Georgia and West Virginia, I'm afraid this calls for drastic measures. Let's get going." "What do you have in mind?" "Just wait and see!" 'Stepping over Bertha May's body, we proceeded to get to work. Despite a few interruptions from blue-haired little old ladies asking for the Jatest Harlequin rom­ances, and three Bible salesmen, we were finished by closing time. We stood back and proudly admired the window displa>" "'Books Unlimited pre•­ent. s a celebration of gay literature." Commentary "I think The Joy of Lesbian Sex in the middle was a nice touch," Nora com· mented. "I still wish you had let me do a 'Summer in Sodom' theme." ''Now what?" "We pick a vantage point and wait." It didn't take long. I thought the fire· bombs was a bit of an overkill. As we walked out into the parking Jot, the flames leaped into the night sky We toasted our­selves with champaign . "Here's to a return to civilization," I said. "I wish we had marshmaJlows," Nora sighed. "Better yt>t, acid!" I replied. "But what do we tell the home office?" Nora questioned. "Oh, how about .. they devil made us do it!" ,N1Eonmn11N I If' I WWI I GRr:?RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 ANTHON'l''"~'"O"'o"vo'" 11 CITY WIDE POS.4 Councilmember ANTHONY HALL has been a human rights advocate throughout his twelve year political career. He is committed to the causes and issues which are important to the Gay Community and he has the knowledge, the contacts, and the political skills to help us achieve our rights. EDUCATION Howard University in Washington, D.C. (B.A. in economics). MILITARY POLITICAL NATIONAL STATE LOCAL Texas Southern University, Houston (Juris Doctorate, Cum Laude). Captain in U.S. Army (Purple Heart and three Bronze Stars). Councilmember, District D, City of Houston Member, Texas House of Representaives, 1973 to 1979. Assistant to Harris County Commissioner Jamie H. Bray, 1971 to 1972 POLITICAL ACTION FOR GAY SENSITIVE ISSUES Worked for inclusion of the Gay Rights Plank to the National Democratic Party Platform in 1980. Lobbied for repeal of section 21 .06 of the Texas Penal Code (sodomy statute) as Chair of the Convention Resolution Committee in 1980. Texas Equal Legal Rights Amendment (state version of ERA)-defended repeal. Chaired the Affirmative Action Commitee that promoted the position that the State Democratic Party will not discriminate because of race or sex. (Received the Susan B, Anthony Award from the Harris County Women's Political Caucus in 1974 for his legislative action on behalf of women's rights.) Helped to repeal Houston's Crossdress Ordinance. Will sponsor an amendment to Houston's Affirmative Action Resolution to include sexual orientation as a protected category. Consistant support of Mayor Whitmire's efforts to eliminate discrimina­tion and to include minorities on City of Houston boards and commis­sions. ANTHONY HALL has successfully worked for HUMAN RIGHTS. When the areas he representated had few gays, he fought for the rights of all gay people. Keep this courageous person in city government. VOTE FOR ANTHONY HALL COUNCILMEMBER AT LARGE POSITION 4 "The job's not done until we're all free'.' Paid for by the Anthony Hall for City Council Committee, 2713 Main. Houston, Texas 77002, JE. Middleton, Sr.. Treasurer. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 2, 1983 Buy, Buy Love By Sharon Mcoonald Ever since Vance Packard wrote The Hid· den Persuaders, there's been talk about aubconscious manipulation in the market· place. We all know that many manufactur· era use seductive advertising ploys. But when it cornea to sneaky psychology, let's give credit where credit is due. For pitting buyer against seller, the large department etore is the Grand Prix of mind control. Many people find it virtually impossible lo walk into a store, find the item they came for, pay for it, and walk out. Take Louise. Last week Louise went out for a tube of toothpaste and came back two hours later with aspirin, three Almond Joys, a email hand mirror, two typewriter ribbons, dog food, a crescent wrench, a dehumidifier, a healthy looking Creeping Charley, a dictionary for poor spellers, and no toothpaste . .. That's it!'' she shrieked when she remembered the toothpaste. "From now on you've got to do the shopping. I can't take the pressure!" "Louise, Louise, Louise," I clamly explained. "All you have to do is exert a little will power. You don't have lo buy everything. Just go in and .. " "I can't! Everything says 'Buy me!' I can't take it anymore." Well, it seemed that once again, I'd just have to show her how it's done. The next Saturday I went to a large department store to buy Louise a shirt. I have to admit, those store managers really know how to weave a spell. One minute I was in a grimy parking lot and the next minute I was in a color· coordinated. fantasyland where trash cans looked like planters and planters looked like trash cans, where soothing music muffled the gasps of shoppers deci· phering price tags, where zom hie salespeo-­ple slided noiseleS1ly acorss plush carpets to disappear behind mysterious corners. Maneuvering through racks of crisp new clothing, I suddenly noticed how out of date my own clothe• looked. The man· neq wna wore better dressers than me, and from the superior looks on their lifelike facea. they knew it. I decided to get my bearinga, find that shirt for Louise. and get the hell out of there. I studied the map of the store's depart­ment&. If I'd been shopping for a man I'd only have to chose between Mens' and Boye', Formal or Sports. But for a woman I had Girls'. Ladies', Misses'. Juniors', Women'e, Working Gals', After Five, Young Collegiate, Teen Time, Activewear, Nightlife and my favorite, Budget. There were separate departments for belts and buckle•. for shoes and laces, for comhll and brushea. There was no place to sit down, ever. Bathrooms were unmarked. disguiaed behind false walls, and hidden two stories away from any given point. Price tags were printed in code, and worst of all. sizea changed from department to department. A Junior size8 1a a Ladies" Petite, a Women's small, a Teen's 9, an Activewear medium, a Work· ing Gala' 10, or a Budget one-size-fits·aU. Well. with all these- choices. buying one meaaly shirt should be a snap. Guess again. Louise may be a Jot of things, b~t feminine she'• not. On top of that, she s adamant about staying that way. To meet her rather rigid fashion sense, I needed lo find a ahirt with no firlls, ribbons, lace, ruffiee. print.I, flowers. tucks. fringes, beadwork, aequine, bows, pleats. gathe~. trim or glitter. I could akip the Lingene Department altogehter, elinky dresses were out, and 80 were jeans with hearts. daiaiea, or a pair of red lipe applied on the ass. Trying lo find my way from Young Col· legiate to Budget, I asked three manne· quins for directions, then nearly got flattened when I reached out and felt the skirt of a live woman. I wandered in a daze past itnitation living rooms more inviting than my own, through mounds of stuffed animals the size of smaU horses, and around an artificial forest where an artifi. cial family of four was vacationing amid $5000 worth of fashionable camping equipment. When I passed the Lingerie Department, a mannequin wearing a puce negligee was flashing a nipple at me from a torso that put mine to shame. Thia trip wae getting demoralizing. Grabbing at a railing lo steady myself, I was shocked into next Tuesday by the charge built up from the rug, and by the sudden realization of how very ill equipped my own household really was. Why, I'd been calling myself a middle class woman and I didn't even own an ice<rusher, window shades in earth tones, or muffin tins! While I was there I might as well open a charge account and pick up a few things we needed ... When I got home, Louise helped me unload the trash compactor, bulletin board, dusting powder, telephone stand, bookends, picture frame, tape measure, temperature gauge, gloves, planter, throw pillows, boots, acatter rug, sandals, cock· tail glasses and croquet game. Louise's expectant look turned slowly to a smirk when she got down to the bottom of the last bag. "Where's my shirt?" Well, she had me there, and she wasn't about lo be bought off by the attractive Commentary new desk lamp I'd brought her. "Alright. I forgot it. One little slip in an otherwise exemplary life . .. " "Never mind," she said, the smirk already becoming a smile. "I'm sure we'll find someplace for all these-uh­necessities. You just saved me the cost of a shirt. Which is good because not we can't afford to go anywhere." Relationships, as I have often said, are doomed if they're not flexible. I forgave her the dehumidifier. She forgave me the trash compactor. Besides, we needed it­for all those receipts. McDonald, who lives in Los Angeles, is co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay Mwspapers. ~Ff~J;" ~~' ... J.\V--.~ MfN1NG COMPANY SEPT. 2, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE ~3 14 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 2, 1983 Spies in the Closet Gay Community By Dan Siminoski, Ph.D. There are spies in the closets of Gay Amer­icans! For at least 30 years, a variety of federal agents have been compiling dossi­ers on our activities, our organizatins, our leaders and our communities. It is esti­mated that the FBI alone is holding tens of thousands of files on the gay rights move­ment since 1950. Why they started the surveillance, and what they've done with the data they've gathered is a complex story whose full details are only beginning to be known. This is the first of several columns in which I'll share the story with you. Many gay activists have as~umed for years that their groups were under federal 1turvei11ance. if only because of the exam· pie of other civil rights movements. Founders of early gay groups, like the Mattachine Society and the Daughters of Bilitis, know their groups were watched because of per~onal experience with sur­veillance and interrogation by FBI agents. We know that an obscure law called the "Hoey Act," passed by Congress in the early 50s. required local police depart· ments to forward copies of all arrest records relating to 04sex and perversion" to the FBI. Most of those are assumed to be gay-related. It was revealed in a 1977 Federal Court trial (American Friends Society vs. Webs· terl that at least 99 cubic feet(!) of Hoey Act documents were accumulated before the proce!oitiing was terminated sometime in the 60s. What was done with those records , and whether or not they have been destroyed, are important question& that need to be answered. We know that President Eisenhower issued an Executive Order (E0-10450) in 1953, which required the FBI to investi­gate federal employees and job applica· lions to protect against their "subversion .'' ''mental disorders," 'immorality" and "susceptibility to coer­cion ," among other categories. Tho1:1e knowledgeable of the FBI and federal per· sonnel policy believe these four warrants for inveatigation were probably used heavily againRt gay people, and that the resulting file!; could be enormous in number. E0-10450 is still very much in use at the preRent time~ We can determme the general nature of the FBI surveillance of us through public records and from reserching the experien­ces of our own groups and communities. But we cannot know the depth of federal interest in us unless we examine the FBI files themRelves. Some attempts have been made to get at those records, but the results have been fragmentary at best. Facing this problem, I initiated a suit in October 1982 under the Freedom of Infor­mation Act IFO!A), requesting all records of FBI surveillance of our movement since 1950. I asked by name for records in head· quarters and in eight regional offices. I specified that I wanted the research to include, but not be limited to, 13 hiotori· cally important organizations in the decades since 1950. The FBI has admitted having thousands of pages of records on the groups in question, but it seems likely that we will have to file suit in federal courts to gai'l access to them. According to gay and FOIA legal experts, the case is one of the most com­plex of its kind ever filed, and io likely to raise substantive legal questions regard­ing gay rights, privacy a nd Justice Dept. guidelines regarding domestic surveil­lance. I am being represented by the Southern California American Civil Lib· erties Union, with the partnership of Lambda Legal Defense and the support of other national and local gay organiza­tions. My FOIA requ.,,I was filed last fall. In January, the FBI denied it in two ways , First. they denied my application for a waiver of search and copying costs, a request ueua1ly granted to work that is in the "public interest." The FBI claimed that gay rights is not a matter of current public interest, that it affects too few peo· pie to meet the "public interest standard" and, that despite book contracts and media access, I did not have the ability to get the released records out to the inter­ested public. Since these rulings are inconsistent with the facto, I have appealed the FBI decisions to the Justice Department. Jus­tice has made no announcement after over six months of delay. We were prepared to file suit if a favorable ruling was not handed down by Labor Day. Litigation seems inevitable. While the fee waiver issue is important, the central issue of the case when it comes to trial will be the adequacy of the search made by the FBI for the documents rele­vant to my request. Eight months after my FOIA application was filed, many of the regional offices have refused even to acknowledge surveillance activities. At this moment, the total number of pages acknowledged by all FBI units amounts to less than 6000. Of this number, sources at Justice have informed me that a great majority consists of publications of the surveilled groups themselves. Throughout my negotiations with the FBI and Justice Dept., no mention has ever been made of the Hoey Act or E0- 10450, and no destruction of pertinent doc· umenta ha" been admitted. Therefore, it 11eem1 quite likely that those 6000 pages represent only a fraction of the record against us. As a gay activist and a politi­cal scientist who has specialized in FOIA questions, I am confident that we will win any lawsuit. The law is on our side, both gay and straight press have shown great interest, and I am confident of support from the gay community. In my next column, I will discuss our legal strategy and the potential impact of the case on gay rights and the 1984 elec· tions. I encourage your comments and questions on this matter and any contribu­tions of financial aid or information on any aspects of this case. Dr. Siminoski u.•as for-;erly- a political science lecturer at Texas Tech University, Lubbock. He may be written at 131 S. Occi­dential Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90039. 1983 Stoneu·all Features Syndicate. NOW LEASING .. · Apartment Living in the Galleria Area Comfort, Convenience, Absolute Elegance The St. Lauren is in the heart of City Post Oak, allowing easy access to the city's finest dining, corporate and fashion addresses. Located one minute fron the Gal· leria Mall. After the work day is done, sam· pie the cuisine at . intemationally-accla1med res­~ urants or shoN a.t s uchJ.resti-f: k~!~:egaaks FTfihaA~e:~~s; Abercrombie & Fitch, all located within a two-block radius of The St. Lauren. Relax in the lavishly landscaped courtyard under the shade of magnolia trees or take a late night dip in the oval-shaped pool. 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Kessler is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California-San Francisco, as wel1 as past president and founder of both Bay Area Physicians for Human Rights and the Caucus of Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Members of the American Psychiatric Association. Kessler also told the symposium, which sponsored BAPHR: "We need to steer a level-headed course between panic and denial, and I say that for both the non-gay and gay communities. I think this involves a focus on AIDS as a health issue, not a moral issue." NO MONKEY BUSINESS: Bruce Voeller, president of the Mariposa Foundation and paet co-executive director of the National Gay Task Force, illuminated the sympo­sium on just how expensive finding the cause of and a cure for AIDS will be. "Even for a few of the major kinds of research projects that would be necessary," Voeller said, "we're talking literally hundreds of millions of dollars, not the paltry $26 mil­lion" in next year's federal budget. For instance, VoeJler continued., merely finding a model of the disease in monkeys, chimps or other primate species closely related to humans will be costly. At least six species must be tested, with at least 25 animals each. That's 150 animals, at a boarding·and·research cost of $100 a day. Multiply that by a tw°'year incubation period, and you reach $10,950,000. If you test six suspected infectious agents, and you introduce each three ways (in the blood, in the muscles and in the abdomen), multiply again by 18, and you reach $197 million-almost 20 times the 1983 AIDS budget-just to identify an animal model. Not only that, Voeller added, but the federal government has " no master plan for dealing with AIDS research .... How then can the administration have any budget, not having a plan? ... A plan is essential in order to realistica lly calculate a budget." COST-EFFECTIVENESS: If research costs run to $500 million in three years, Voeller noted, it would still save money as well as lives. Even if only half the 100,000 cases some experts fear in that period actually develop, at the current average of $100,000 in medical and hospital costs for each AIOS patient, the total would be $5 billion. That's 10 times the fundable, high· quality rest•an·h available and 100 times what the fednal govf'rnment is talking about now, Voeller concluded Bill Krau•, an aide to U.S. Rep. Sala Burton (1).-S.F.J, added, "The Reagan administration, while asking for about $14 million (not all for reoearch) for AIDS, is asking $120 million for the redevelop· ment of nerve gas in this calendar year and telling us they don't have enough money to spend more on AIDS and that it isn't nece88ary." CLOSE THE BATHS? Concerned aboui the •prend of AIDS in bathhouses, Cha­rles Krauthammer. senior edit.or of The Nt·u· Republi<". wrote in that publication's AuguAt 1 issue; .. If the bathhouse issue were freed from the political uses to which it has ht.·cn put by homophobes, and from the politiral symbolism with which it has bel'n t•ndowed by radical gay activists, it might ht· NtMi€·r for the gay community to C'loHe the bathhouses to save livas. One would hopt' that the issue. could be de­idt> ologizt-d and left to the Judgement of the affoeU.·d community. But that is not likely to happen." . Agreed. As is, we are_not even d~bat1_ng this openly in our me-cha. As we did with blood transfuAions, we are allowing our po1itical leaders to respond simpl.iatically and defensively to a complex issue. A fringe of our own commu~i~y and an eco· nomi<'ally powerful advertising sect.or has kept discussion from being opened. Krauthammer believes that action taken by the gay community, rather than imposed on it, would save political energy as well as lives, saving us from a struggle that would be cost1y in victory or defeat. Just because the baths are there, must we defend them absolutely? I believe we should debate, not: "Should the baths be clo•ed?"; but: "What should we do about the baths issue?" Personally, I don'tthink we should close them. The high·risk sexual activity that goes on there could and does go on else-­where as well. However, we should take some action. Jn our highly regulated society, the very • N SEPT 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 fact that the baths remain open confers some legitimacy on them. After all, the health department closes restaurants that are unsanitary, people might reason, so if they haven't closed the baths, they must be safe, right? To remove this implied approval, every bathhouse patron must be informed of the possible AIDS risk of various sexual behaviors. Brochures often go untaken or unread, and posters do not remain posted for long. Perhaps, each patron should be required to sign a statement acknowledg· ing his right to engage in consenting sex, the medical risks involved and the neutrality-not approval-of the health Dateline S.F. department. This merely assures that con· sent is informed consent Consider, for contrast, this proposal from L. Davis Almand, "a gay employee of SFPD," in the July issue of San Francisco Policeman: close the bathhouses and clubs, quarantine all AIDS patients, establish national and international com· put.er banks to monitor the whereabouts of all AIDS patients and tightly restrict immigration. Hello, 1984. Alfred's column originates at the uSen· tinel," a San Francisco gay news~oaper. ~ 1983 Randy Alfred, all rights reserved. • N ·U • A • L LABOR DAY BUFFET Happy Hour Drinks! All You Can Eat! 11:30-3:00 $5.95 402 Lovett 527-9866 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPT 2, 1983 Sports Bowlers Splash-Not Crash By Chuck Meredith The 1983 MSA Monday Night Bowling Season ended with a splash Friday with an awards ceremony and pool party at the Officer's Club. After league members and guests dined on hamburgers and swam to their hearts' content, numerous league awards were presented. The overall league championship was won in dramatic fashion on the final night of play, ao Five Easy Pieces vaulted from a three.way tie for second place to take the title from previously top-ranked Dirty Sal­ly's Strokers. Team members Tommy Davis, Doug Campbell, Mike Schedler, Jerry Petrizzo and Ed McKelvey won all their games that evening to accomplish this feat. A team oponeored by the Barn, the Barnyard Hores. won the league's han­dicap tourney with team members Jessie Rhyneo, Louie Schneider, John Davey, Mike Linder and Mark Hall. Individual awards were presented for outstanding performances during the sea­son, with Sally's Bob Craig winning the High Indi\;dual Average award with a 193 average. One of the league's most important awards is that of the Moat Improved Bowler. Roy Cisneros was the overall winner, improving his average by 23 pins. In Division A, Leslie Micallef won, improving 17 pins, while Paul Bern­stein captured the Division C title, increas­ing hio average by 16 pins. Now the league turns its attention towards the atart of the fall aeaoon begin­ning September 19. There are many open­ing• on existing teams, or entire teams may still join. Call Steve McConaugby at 499-9036 or Sam Immordino at 52S-4576 for information. Join now and don't mi88 the hot action on the lanes. o Women's Softball League Hol.ds Scavenger Hunt; Plans Fall Season The MCCR team hao yet to prove that they play the beet softball in the league, but this pa1t weekend they proved that they could outhustletheotherteamswhen they won a scavenger hunt 1pon1ored by the MSA Women '1 Softball League. Two teams hot on their trail were the Cyanide and Briar Patch team1, who finished second and third, reopectively. After a feetive barbeque in Memorial Park following the hunt, the women began worlr. on their fall aea.oon beginning Sep­tember ll at Memorial Field No. I. Nomi­nation• are now being taken for a new board of officers; the only requirement ia that candidate. be current good-1tanding membero of the W .S.L. Thoee wishin11 to be elected ohould contact Katie at862-8587 or Martha Ritchie at 728-9371. A list of all nomineeo will be pooted at the firot league same. The fall aeaeon will conaiat of two .U.­team diviaiono, which ahowa the growth of the lea1111e. In order lo maintain unity within the league, each team will have a 0 1i.tter" team in the other division for which to pull. New memben may atill join and ohould alao contact Ritchie for infor­mation. Racial Mixture a Winner on Baseball Diamond The right ethnic mixture of the team may have juat u much to do with winning a baoeball game ao hitting and pitchine, reporta TM Sporting Newa. Temple Univenity Professor Robert Bunnell aaya a aurvey of nearly 200 col- 1.,e teams found those with at leaot one bliwk, one.white and one HiaP@icetamr had more victori .. than all-white or all· black teamo. The winning percentage for all-black teams was .467, he says. Forwhites, it was .547 and for "melting pot" teams, it was .605. Probably No Pretzels, Either It may be hot here, butit'o hotter in China, and what'a worse, there'a no beer. The St. Louis Post·D18palch reports the roasting weather has caused a run on Chi· nese suds, and demand is double the out­put of Peking's two breweries. As a result, people have been lining up out.aide restaurants with jars, plastic con· tainer1 and thermoo bottl•, hoping to buy 1ome of the precious commodity. -- L.I t~AVi:L : . . , . r1 · · ... n1 TRAVEL TECH HAS TRAVELED Around the corner to 2519 Sunset Blvd. Our phone remains 522-8227. IM:1 need your business more than ever. Come vist at our new office Serving the Gay Community -"... SEPT. 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 SPEctAt.T - '??'rlj I I 1-f YOU ARE NOT ALONE WE HAVE CUSTOMERS ALL OVER TEXAS WHO ARE LOOKING FOR YOU TOO 3317 Montrose Blvd .. Suite 308 Houston, TX 77006 phone 520-3006 OFFICE HOURS 9am-7pm daily and by appointment Happy Hour Prices 10am-7pm Mon.-Sat. 75C Well Drinks, $1 Beer CIA.ILV SPEC::::IA.LS SUNDAY Happy Hour PricH Noon..-pm, S1 •••r, 75~ W.11 Drinks •1.~·;:u •:_•"t !i~Cm, MONDAY B•r• ChHt Night 9pm-2•m In aur Luther Loft with Happ~~:~; :~~c::,." wall TUESDAY Leather Night. 9pm- 2am-l.8d.herman drink for Mppy hour pricH on .. u d rinks C beer WEDNESDAY C&W Nighi., 10pm-2em, Happy Hour Prices an W.11 Drinks G •-r THU AS DAY 11 ... ,. Bun, all you can drtnlt. lpm-11pm FRIDAY Club Colors •ight: Club Members in Colors Drink for Happy Hour Prices 7-1Dpm DJ Lary Thompson 20 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPT 2, 1983 LAZYJ LOUNGE presents ~SHOWTIME! Friday, Sept. 2 starring * Dianna Wright *Champagne \ * Robbie Roberts ) vets~~~~rest Miss Torchy Lane and what's left of Ron Sioux Good Booze, Good Music, Good Men and ( Good Times! Open 10am-midnight Monday-Thursday 10am-2am Fri. & Sat. Noon-Midnight & then some on Sundays Happy Hour Daily 10am-noon & 5-lpm 312 Tuam, 28-9343 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat SEPT. SEPT. 2 3 SEPT. SEPT. SEPT. SEPT. SEPT. 4 5 6 7 8 For •dd1llon•I 1nform•llon Of phone numbers tor e¥ent1 u119d below, 1oo1i: tor ttMI aponaorlng OfQlflt­uuon undftf "Organizations·· fn the Montrose CIH11!ted Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: Gay World Series Softball Tournament concludes in Chicago •FRIDAY-MONDAY: Dallas Gay Alliance's Texas Freedom Festival celebrating anniver· sary of repeal of section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code •FRIDAY-MONDAY: Sixth Biennial International Conven­tion of Dignity, Seattle •SA TU RDA Y-MONDA Y: Tulsa gay softball league invi­tational tournament •SATURDAY: Lambda Bicy· cle Club meets, then tours, from 3pm, unless raining, at 210 Fairview, apt. 1 -SATURDAY: Choice's Les· bian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm, 210 Fairview, apt. I -SATURDAY: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm • SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGre­gor Park mMONDA Y: Labor Day mMONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont· ro8(> Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 mMONDA Y: MSA Summer Season Bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Montrose Sym· phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm • TUESDAY: Greater Mont· rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm, Liberty Bank commun­ity room , 1001 Westheimer • WEDNESDAY: Rosh Hashannah, Jewish New Year, begins • WEDNESDAY: Montrose Chorale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-!0pm • WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm • THURSDAY: National Les­bians of Color conference opens Los Angeles, through Sept. 11 • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stem gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: "Come Out and Sing Together," lot North American Gay Choral Festival, opens, lasting to Sept. 11, Lin· coin Center, New York • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 1 WEEK: Texas NOW Conference, "We Can Do It NOW!," Corpus Christi, Sept. 9-11, Emerald Beach Holiday Inn • IN 1 WEEK: Family & Friends of Gays garage & bake sale Sept. 10, !-6pm, Numbers, 300 Westheimer U N 1 WEEK: Lambda Bicycle Club meets. then tours, from !2::10pm Sept. II, unless rain­ing, at 2212 Dunlavy, apt. 20 U N 1 WEEK: Lutherans Con· cerned meets Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh, Sept. 13 IN 1 WEEK: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets Sept. 13 • IN 1 WEEK: Houston Data ProfeSBionals meet 7:30pm Sept. 13, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main UN 2 WEEKS: Yorn Kippur, Jewish day of Atonement, Sept. 16 •IN 2 WEEKS: Montro•• Ten­nis Club"s 1983 Singles Cham· pionships begin, MacGregor Park, 9am, Sept. 18 UN 2 WEEKS: Choices meets 12:30pm, Sept. 18, YWCA, 3615 Willia UN 2 WEEKS: Unitarian I Universahst Gay Caucus meets Sept. 18, !st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin • IN 2 WEEKS: Families & Friends of Gays meets 2pm Sept. 18, Presbyterian Center behind 1st Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main U N 3 WEEKS: Full moon, 1 :27am Sept. 23 • IN 3 WEEKS: Autumn beg­ins al 9:43am Sept. 23 UN 3 WEEKS: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets 7pm Sept, 27, Bering Church, 1440 Harold U N 3 WEEKS: Human Rights Campaign Fund annual dinner, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, Sept. 27 U N 3 WEEKS: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet 7pm Sept. 28 U N 4 WEEKS: Texas Renais· sance Festival opens near Plan· tersville Oct. 1 and 2, also running Oct. 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30 & Nov. 5 & 6 U N 4 WEEKS: "World's Toughest Rodeo," Gay Men's Health Crisis benefit, Oct. I, Madison Square Garden, New York •IN /J WEEK S: Family & Friends international conven­tion, Oct. 7-10, New York •IN /J WEEK S: National AIDS vigil, Oct. 8, Washington, D.C. •IN /J WEEKS: Oct. 8 deadline to register to vote in November elections U N /J WEEKS: Columbus Day, Oct. JO • IN 6 WEEKS: Westheimer Colony Art Festival, JOO to 1100 blocks Westheimer, Oct. 15-16 • IN 8 WEEKS: Halloween, Oct. 31 •IN 8 WEEKS: National Asso­ciation of Business Councils 3rd annual national conven­tion, "Future Links," opens Los Angeles Nov. 3, to Nov. 6 NOTICE Bu 1NESS OWNER~ Tf\e Mootro111 V01ce 1a11 Ir" NCh ~k 1n 1"'9 MoMrOH Classtfted buP ,.... nt•bhltlmen1a ""''"9 •• d1strlbueion pc>tnt~ Im ,,. \lc)ke •l'ld community Ol"QWl•H· '""' •htdlcel .. lht. Hettng I• e Monoo .. Vote. d~trt-bulkNI point SEPT. 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Montrose Classified MONTROSE APARTMENT Huge sunny 1 bedroom (900 sq ft.) with study (possible bedroom). 1126 West Grey, hardwood floors, new appliances, off-street parking. $365 526-0804. 1 week free rent ONE BEDROOM 1 bedroom apt. in small quiet Mont­rose complex. Pool. No pets, no children. $200 deposit, $290 mo. + utilities. 529-8178 GALLERIA/MEMORIAL BARGAIN 1/1 condo, convlently locetud, land1caped courtyard•, pool•, cover9d parking, 1ecurlty, decorator touchH, nble, HBO, all utllltln paid. $425/month. Call Lucille 781-5509 or Bonnie 840-7207. The Voice has more news, more Houston readers NICE 1 BEDROOM Apartments $275 to $295 Rich­mond. Shepherd. Kirby area 526- 4877. UNIQUE MONTROSE APARTMENTS Newly remodeled. 1409 Indiana, 1212 West Drew, 2323 Park $390- 600 529-0090 MEMORIAL OFF 5400 Modern 2 bedroom, new AC. ref rig $325 + electric & deposit. Guest house. 3 rooms. all electric kitchen. $275 +bills & deposit. Morada. 861- 3030. DUPLEX FOR SALE Large 3-1 & 1-1. 4315 Roseland Purser Realty, 526-9954. 434-2553 SUPER NICE BRICK In Eastwood Large 2-1-2 with big den & very nice garage apartment Mid 90s Purser Realty. 526-9954, 434-2553 HOUSE FOR SALE Near SW Fwy. & St. Thomas Univer· sity. 2 story. Mid 90s. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553 GOOD SURBURBAN LOCATION WiUobend area Convenient to Medi­cal Center & downtown. 3--2-2. den, has Mexican tile. Large updated kit­chen. CA/H WBFP. Purser Reatty. 526-9954, 434-2553. APARTMENT FOR RENT 3 large rooms. living room. bedroom & bath. Unfurnished (has stove & refrig), air conditioned. water paid 1/2 block off Richmond (500 block) New paint. quiet and secure amid friendly neighbors Call 524-9092 No kids please GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE (A gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make this year. 523-3223 SMALL QUIET COMPLEX One bedroom. pool, courtyard No pets All adults $310 +electric. 521- 0972 or 52Hl212 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED PAINTERS 6 HELPERS Immediate openings. Experience preferred. 529-9985 ACTORS/STUDENTS Alley Theatre seeks telephone per­sonal to promote "83-"84 season Excellent pay. A great sense of humor a mustt Call James Fowler 228-9341 eYt. 87, 10am-9pm FOR SALE Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 Love means never having to exp/1r1tly say "I m sorry " HOUSEHOLD ITEMS SALE GE stove (2 ovens, conventional & microwave). cedar wardrobe, stain­ktss steel sink, desk chair, picture frames, almost new lampshades, small appliances. other household ttems Cottage Thrift Shop, 301 Hyde Park. GAY BARS HV ISTON-e& iccr;;. 623Lovett-523-3396-11¥9 en. lett11m'"*1t ::::·•-402 Lovetl -527·986fi d1n1ng. l•ve e Bam-710 Peclfic -528-9'27 COCJ"''Y • &°alo. R-;ver BOriOm-·2.WOBr&zOI. 52&: 91~-~ e Bt.., Petctl-22SM W Hok:ombe--165-96711 • C"atett-, Dtsco--4965 M.n,n-iuthet Kinv- 6'11 2521 e Ch~k~n Co®--535 WesUleUTlet-52&-2240 ,•.,C."_oP I w1-Rictimono--S2s-2259 d11COw11h • O.riy S.1~s· 220 Awondat&--529-7525 e 00ubl. R_ Saloon--.6731 ~trby-=-_~21-,.ui e E,.J"e- 21l Rocflmond· 527.9071 • EK• • :011 8.11 .659-0453 country • GeHeon·-2303 R1ehmQt'IO- 522-7616 •~ •O-·T...-m-:52&-9128 e J R I· «NI Pee.tic- °521-2519 • Jutt Merion & Lynn--:S." -ti7 Fain.- 5~8- • O: lnb,.n e 1<1ndred Spirits- -62•5 Butteto $pee(l•ay· 8f T"-ft pr9domtNntly ._boan 9LUY _ -3-12T1.11,.,:;..:.52&.~- e~ -~":2327Gra-;;:~2 •Jr.l••Y' -1022 W~r ~1 • Mo'"' -ial-Pli,.., M0t9i-S.r.-50 WelJilh Dr 1-131 ,.i,u n-~4- Westtie•mer- 526-7519 • ~ Ct\ar1otfu-9'r1- W Dffl'*-5~ e M~- Ml M•n1ng Co -805f>Krfie-529-74ss . ,.,,,-nt..r12-ooOw•tt...INir ~551 . (_ •Club--270CIA1Mny· :s2J..4ciii • ~eon9,,..101!._W~~!~=-s~ _ en,. eun. ..... ,,,, R1ctimot>d-528-a903 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 2, 1983 " Well here comes Mr. Hunter and Gatherer with ' a nother useless trea sure." The Far Side by Gary Larson Confucius at the office " I've heard all kinds of sounds from these things, but 'yabba dabba doo' was a new one to me." e Pliik Eiep;,;,;1-121-8 LM11nd--=659-0).w with "9'R""a' ~h~~ M11n-52&-ei30- • R~1il-.2102 K•fbY-=52.i&272 d1mng. hYI mut1r e R1Ch·1-=240~n Jacinto e R1pcOrd-_:-i15fl•N•ew--5i1--2792 • R;iky eUsmeu-~2700 Albu1y-S2&-3611 er •• a. Reneg1ctes::-:i31-a-·wnlh.---;-me..:::..52,_ 3475 • Tropu:an1 Sw•m Ctub-·2114 Peckhllm eT;._..;n,_535- wn1he1tner--s20-o2.iti lmb••n d•OCO e \i9n1ur•N-:_-2923 Mam-.:522-0000- • West P11y11nc1--3012 M118m--5-2&-6~ BEAUMONT- • Co~-304 Oflnns- -832-<t206 tlSun®wner -497 Crockett- 833-39f!! e81ve RO?m· :t-14 :c.Jrcl- 76:.l-9031 e Fly 2101 0 1iJ-98441 • M1ry .. 1 II· 2sc °'"" 763-9'35 e Aobert1l1!11e- -213 K9m~!!.._-!~96 e Trammpt--627 Winn. 763-1247 LAFAYETTE 9FantffyT 408 M-..nce 4W1ndwood shopP.ng C!rl--232~ e P1rag0<1- 1501 Broad--03-9389 ORGANIZATIONS SelECno NATION-Al ORGANtZATIONS· O•y Prn1 A110C1a\1Qfl-POB 33605. Washington, DC 20033--(2021 387-2430 Gay Roghtt N11>on1llobby-POB 1892. W11hongton OC2001l--(202154&-1'101 Hyme,n R.gt111 C1mpa11~n Fund-POB 1396. Waah­lngton DC 20013-~2021548-2025 l.,.,.bd1 Leg1I 0.lenN--.132 W 43«1. N-YoOt. NY 10039-(2121 t44-tMa8 Me<hl Fund lor Hum1n R•ghll (G1y Pres1 AUOC•lloon)-P08 33805. WHhmglon. DC 20033-(202) 317-2QO NlhONI "9loc11loon of &.lt•neM Councoll-Boa 15145. 5#1FrtnCleCO.CA94115-(415) 185-4393 ~IOONI AMocMhOn ol Gay a L-.b•-1 Oemocra•oc: Ctubt-1742 M- A .... SE. Waehlt'IQtotl. DC 20003-(2071547..,,104 ~"°'* Gay A~ Ad'tfoc.lt•-SilO C•tro. S.n ff'9nQICO, CAM114-!41S)183-3Cl2• ~loon.IGtyTMll Forw-«151hA.,.. NewYotl!.. NY 10011-(212) 741"5800 NQTF'1 Ct•o.Une-{IOO) 221·7044 (outs!Oe Hew YorllStN) T- OaylletOt&n Tuk Forw-POB Al<. o.nton 7'5201-(117)317-G'tl A C-iel11 -Cho-rul- (MontroM) Church ot Chr111-777-928& A P1.~· ,;; tM &in~Gr.Cnynn eook1. 104 F1•rv19W --522-7695 tubgroup of ttH Inc con~ C.U 7pm Tuet AcLu...:-1238 w·a r.v-.:s2•-ss2s A1DS H011tne-c10GiY Sw1tChboard- ~529=3211 ;.;;;ca,, ·o.y Ath .. 111-_:•57~ -- Am9riC1'1 Le1th«me,, 1sOc-;-11 club)-'""" at 01ffere'1t Orum. 1732 W•tl'leimer-528-8528 club night W9d A1trO Rl,,,-t)O.,.. At11anu-520-IM51 (voiCe~520- 0552 (TTY} Bayou e·1u- ... liAOfllrOM "Chora•e ~'t.:~~~1.~.ci~~~~~~c,::~~- e .... k &-Wh1t9Men-fog91he;-(ewMi) e10G1y 5w•tchboltd. "9-1211 C"'Ok:es- <: 0 GaY Sw<IChboard ()(Carol II sn: 4975 meeta YWCA. 3615 W•lha. 12 30pm ~d Sun a110 '" Lesbian Mother• Chr1tl•lrt Church ot the -Good Shepherd- 1707 MonlroM" MfY•Cft lpm Sun, Bible atudy 7 30pm Thurs (Mo'1trosel Ctw.irch ot Chns1-1ioo MOfltroM· 777-9286 aerv1cea 111m Su,, Church ol Chr11.11a,, F-a•th--i1i Fa1rv1e-w~529. 9006 Mf"w•ota 10 4Slm Su,, & 7 lSpm W9d B•ble ttudy 7 1 Spm Tu" & Sun , choir p<1ct1ce Wed 1tter MfVIGel Ct!Urch -()l"P.,,teCo1111 UMy-850-7286. s-20- 5699 Sert•cff 7 30pm Fn, 11am Sun C111z1fl1 for Hum1n fqu1hly 1CHE)-609 Fannin 11301-238-8666 board meeting 2nd Tuesd1y1 Con •5"1 (aoc111 C1ub)-mff11 -at Brazol-R1Wlr Bottom. 2'400 Brazos~S2&-9192 Community Goapct1-C9nter~l10() MonlrOM- 523-flOlll Con'g Aytz Chay1m..:me811 at Cc""f 217 F1•fV•ew-M&--1!1997 MtVlce a IOCtll 8pm 2nd & 4th Fr1d1ya Con~ot ArN Lam'bd. Soc•ety-Jan at-7~ or Rayll 756-4097 cm.a Hotline- -i2a.-1505 O.a1-1-Gay·Ath.,.I •S,-:-66e0 Amencal\ G1y A.tl'le•lls O.ana Founoat1on--2100 Maaon· 62•-5791 01Qt1•ty- meets 11 cithohi Sfu<Mril Clfllef" 1703 Boleover· li20-9281. ~8-7&4• meetings 7pm ~af'Jfdlyt flmil,.. a frlefldl of G1y1 ·"8<1-6663 '""'' Zpm 3rd Svnd1ys It Pr"bytenen Cftflter. "1 01kd1le blthlndfir11Prnbyter1111Cf'lurch. S300 M111n 1sl n111r1•n Church !1210 Fanni,, -626-1571 ..,...,ce 111!-arn Su,, Frontru,,ners 529-12811 G1't' a Ahve Shenng E.-p«•ltllCll (GA.SE)· ·528- 1311. S28--0e91 G1y & Lnb•en Arch1vn of T 11.-11 1U11111e ot llH '"' G1y A.11a11 c1W-::ii1s Waugh •12• 77006 G.'t'H•1PanlcCsuct.11-2722NPW"1an112 521· 0037 meet• 3rd Thuradaya OayttalianGroup -52&-9&4" Gay Nurws All•anc.- ~9"86 Gay Poht1ca1 Caucus (GPCI· .Poe- ee66" 772M---52MOOO meeta"600M11ro1211130pm lt1&lrdW~1ys G•y Pride W•k "9J Cornm111ee- ~o Manon Colema,,. House ol Cotema11. 901 W AlaMm1 523-25.21 Gii s*7tchboard Pee 362• -529-3211 • 1nlM­m. 1ooro. counseling relerrels. TTY, AIOSHolhne Grti819r MOrlirOM Bus1neN- Gu11ii="cO;;"t.Ct through Montrose Voice mHts 7 30pm. 1st Tuetd•)'I. community room. Liberty Bank. 1001 W•the•mer G;MnsPo1ro11FMl&e0-Aree Fli;:A*ay Fnerocts 821-9681 HOmoP.,-11e -interla•th AU.a;-~729 Menor ~2Ui69 Houston Aree Gay ·a_ l..01en EnginW. & Sc1ent1st1-526-73815 meets 7pm 4th Wednes- ~!_I HoustonCOmmun1ty Ciowns-862-8314 HOuston -0-ate PfoiHs1onels-meets in El.st Room, Holiday Inn Central. 4640 S Ma1n-523- eg22 meeting 1-30pm 2roc1 Tuesdays Hou-lien MotOrcyCie "CtUb(ioCi'al c1ubi-cto Mary's. 1022 WesUieimef-528-8851 HoustOn NOf1h Proleu~;.i.:.:PQe 38-40. Hum­ble 77338-8111 et 821-7126 1/H -inc ~Poe tro.1~-i7222-694-1fai 529= 7014 effll11ted groups ere Interact Grec1elynn Gellery"s A Piece In the Sun. Montr<>M Art All•1nc.. Gay & Lnb1an Arct11vet of Texas. Gey Switchboard. MorotrOH Symphoro•c Barocl. Mont­rose CIOQQftfS. boerd meehng 7 30pm 11tThurs­d1ys (verled IOcahons). Klucetional fOf"um 7 30pm 3rd Thuradl)'I f,i;t~~=~o; ~:~~12~=.i at Autry HOUie, 8265 Mein. & 4th T~•YI 11 'Hr1ed local<OM in1.,act.educ~t~al1ubgroupof l1Hll'\C -POB ll0-41. 77222-52t-7014. e&.4-1732 iKPFf R&d;o".'°-FM-90_.19-LO;i,n it;d-526- ~~= ·n Stein .. g•y rad•oshow Thursdays Ks/AIDS Foundation- -1001 w9lthe1mer#193--:: 524-AIOS LimbdlB1cycle -Club- ~Oilv1d -682.0.56:-c;,ol 5~975 limbdi Center Gay Ak:oholics & Alanon-1214 J0Ann1e· 521-11772 ~:ib~~0n~_G:looA~1~~~~en. s:~·~:u7~~~~~ .. ~~ 1253 L .. b••ns & Gay People 1n Med1cme- -88CHM86 meet.no 7 30pm 111 Seturdeys .. esb•an Mother-s tubgroup of Cho-ic•; meets Ill 1nd 3rd Set 6 30pm 210 Fa1rv1ew apt 1 i:uthera,,. Concerned- -meets st Grae. Lutne­ren Church. 2Sf!5 Wa<JQti- 52Hl863. •53-1143 meeting 2nd & 4tn Tvn evenings • Mefro'Potiten Community Cnureh of !he Rnur rection cMCCR)-191i O.C.tur-881-91•9 pol• luCll d<nroer 7 30pm lit S•I mon1n1y services 1045am & 715pm &in & 715pm W9d m&m· betshlp 1nqu1Nrl claSI 7 30pm Tues educahon CinM9 TUlll & Wed ews Morotroae Art All1enc. 621·2•~1 ell! 1e1e 11H Inc meets 2nd Thursdeys Montrose~ Chorale and- Bayou -e·iu--ROOert ~oon. dir. 521-2006 reheerul 7 30--10pm Wed et Bering Churcn_ 1440 Harold Mon1roNC1oOliers 11l~11e1e of l 1H 1nC. meets Frldliy evea Ber•Flg Church Act1v1t1es Bldg 3405 Mtllberry MontroH Crv1~ Club 14"9 Neertown A1&oe1•l1on • Montrose ClinM;;.--1().t W•thltlmer· 52&-55Jl <>pen wHkdays 10.m-5pm ie-cept Wed) end WHkdsy eves 6 30·9 30pm women's emph•s•s p1ogram 1·5pm Sun Montrose Counseling Center-900 Loven •20J-~0037 AIDS v1ct1m support ciroup meets 6 30pm Mondays Montrol(I Singers ·Carl Lewraroce n•-3591 efter 6pTl rehHrul Mt.m eves, Bermg CN.ircn 1«0Herold MonlrOM Tenri1sClub--RICl'11t 524-2151 pl•ys $unday1. &am, MecGregor P1rk_ li83 Singles Cnemp-onsh•PI begin hm Sept 18 "'4SA. Mondey Night Bowhng- plays II Siad.um Bowl. 8200 Braesme1n- 52&--4~711 Of" •99-9036 ~!;;'~~:::,:~~~·~~~~~~;_r,gx;: 1523 MSAJGreeter Houston (Men's ) Soltb-;I -523 8802deys, 523-0413 ...... MSA-Women·s So!triil!CMQU9> -i211-t371 MSAIVolleybaiil=--880-.:2130- gamff-i30pm Tuea Grepory-L1rocoln school, 1101 Tett Montr0.. srm-Pt\Otl.c -e•nd-meets --.-,- Bering f=\u!:~11.~:,~:~;1~~1-SM9 meet1n9 MOnt;o;;-watch aubg"'7o7rp NNnown Assoc Mustangs (soc1il ciUb)..:m..11 Stine B.iitn.710 Psciltc-5211-9427 club mght Thurs NeartOwn' Assoc1e11on {Montrose c;v~ Club)­meets at Benng Church. 1440 Harold· -522· 1000: meeting 7pm •th Tuescl11ys New Freedom Ct;';111<an c"ilUrct\..::.-gtiW-11ttt- 591-1~2 services 10.m Sun. 7 30pm Wed ~~:~:c:_pT!~~f.--NHrtOwn --Commun1!y Paz "Yilberac~f.1- -P<>e &oooe3, _77260=523- 90111 ~~::~~:: LMlei FUr1d"Co;-m1iiff- Mustang ~;~: unlV -Gay1Leab1an suPP<>rlGroup- -524- TeXas Bey ArN G.Y.--332-3737 meet;ng Thurs. evening Te11u Bay Ar9eGiy YOuih-332-3737 me.tings bt-weellty Texas a.y!l .. b.en Task FOrce:..:.-1231."86&= 8901 ~~!on=:hn~~~~4 Found1i;on=;-915 r;;_e:J1 1dh--ciOMliYl.-1o22 w~.;;;,. LJn.t.;;8NIJn.veru111l Giy Caucus--=clOlst Unitanan Church. 5210 F1nn1n-5»9787. 5211- 5&42 meeting 3rd Sun 1tternoon1 W•leyen Fellowlh1p_:.864_8899 - - - Wi9the•m.rco1ony -Artl-Asloc1a1iot.-:"1001 W•theimer 11187 Fnt1vel 100-1100 blocks W•the1mer. Oct 15-16 ~9n-:S Lo-bby .A.thence-• Chelsea--521~3~ .AKE CHAALES- )tgnrty- -Rt 1. Box 216C. Longv1Ue. LA 70652 PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS INFORMATION SOUGHT To anyone having knowledge of habits or death of Santos Aravjo. please contact Gene Graham. 277- 0236 CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN Wrestling & more. 500 members nationwide. lntopak $3. NYWC, 59 W 10th. New York, NY 10011 HAPPINESS IS ... Being with a handsome. healthy, warm, tun-loving escort, model or masseur from TexEscort, noted for discretion & integrity. 524-9511 Ma1or credit cards AMWAY PRODUCTS MEAN quality & personal service. Try us & see. Kent Naasz 520-6541 Gene 859-0418 Hank 529-7525 or 864- 7229. Trish & Phyllis 723-8368 GAY WOMEN Write/meet with dignity through 'The Wishing Well" Magazine Pro­gram. Integrity since 1974 Confi­dential. supportive, prompt Tender, loving, alternative. Introductory copy $5, postpaid (mailed discreetly 1st class). Information Box 117, Navato, CA 94948 MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: a $2 for up to three .bold capital words and a 30¢ for each remaining regular type word. T_otal m1nim~m charge per ad $3. There are no other rates. Advertisers who wish something different should consider run­ning a display advertisement. a Deadline for all advertising is 5:30pm Tues­day for newspaper released m1d_-day Friday. a Blind box numbers can be assigned tor $3 each week the ad 1s run and all respon~es will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office. a ~educt 15% 1f you run the same ad 4 weeks or more and pay tor the full run m advance. a Bnng or mail your Montrose Voice Classified to: 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Use this form or blank sheet of paper Addi•• NUflll»t of ,.. .. ., .a 10 run - - Arno.i"I ..-icloud 0 -<:hHll D Money 0,., D c .. tt '"°' br mall} a VISA Ch••r1• c MHtelC•rd cti.rge tnd•tnrd ti DEEP THROAT SPECIALIST Seeks healthy males with large problem in need of good regular ser­vice. Satisfaction guaranteed Serious only contact Speciallst, PCB 3645. Houston 77001 TENSION EASING MASSAGE Relax tension & stress. relax & en JOY full body massage. Call for appoint­ment. In or out Tom, 524-7163 RELATIONSHIP, FRIENDSHIP GWM, 51, 5'7", 150. masculine & straight appearing. Looking for last­ing relationship. Write ad 146-A, c/o Montrose Voice BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce, 521-2009 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e etub Houstofi e•thi- -2205 Fann1n~"998 • Freroch ouener TnRter-=3'20tl.:ou1t1•n.1- 527--0782 iM.dlOW"ne-SP.-3100 F1nn1n-522-ri19- • 230& Club-- -2J011G9niiuee--s2M23s- RESTAURANTS • Baia·s---402 Lovett--527-9868 eChepuiiapec-813R1ChfnOOd ~522~365 eF·r-.;,-i(;;·~MontroH.l.1 -W8Sthe1mer- :-529. 7896 e(fyro -G-yros Sandwich Shop-1536 Westheimer-5211-465.5 eHOuse ol Piea-3112 Kirtly-- 5211-3816- .•,H,.o use of 5h1 h K1bot>-~2M°srsh'ii 521· ttin~-,-303 westtleomer-5211-8823 9 0td HoU.10'1 -O,ner· :Vu w A1~ -5-24· 2310 e Pertifs-A.ctunond II K1rby-62HiJ75 e RUCiis-2102 K•rt1Y-S2•~12 9 $Pud=u~l.ike-4-16 wes1hti•!Tlef--5~ estar P.ua--2111 Norlolk-sii-Oeoo - e ~i--~~ Eg~-~·231 Mon~oae.:__528-8135 e T1m'1 Catlee Shop- 1525 Westheimer-529- 2260 e-T(Op,cane ;.,..;m-Ci~t>--21-1• P9cit1am SERVICES, ETC. HYPNOTIST Habit modification, sexual dysfunc­tion. end fears. personal. Jay Carlsy Ph.D, 440-4667 RUBDOWN, YOUR HOME $20. Van. 493-4850. A/Ca REFRIGERATION Repairs on all models. Certified & guaranteed Call before 10am. after 6pm. 529-8104 RELAX a ENJOY the Bodyworks massge. Evenings and weekends Call Bill, 526-2470. Gift certificates available MOVE MASTERS Hauling, packing. supplies. too 1925 Westheiner, 521-3155. CHEAP AIR FARES A free service for gay travelers. We guarantee to locate the cheapest fare between any 2 cities. Travel planned for holidays needs to be booked ASAP. Gay tours. cruises and hotel packages available. Grand Central Pipeline. 523-3223 MALE MODELS, ESCORTS Handsome, cordial & discreet. Call GE.MS. (713) 520-6337 LICENSED MASSAGE THERAPIST TherapeutiC/relaxat1on masssage Randolph Alan, 528-3147 PIANO/ SINGING INSTRUCTION Private instruction by professional teacher. 723-3254 PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law, 526-7911 TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangements AU services are tree_ 2029 Southwest Fwy 529-8464 524-9511-TEX-ESCORT New telephone number Same great service1 Have fun with the nght guy for you• Ma1or crecht cards honored Monthly medical certificate LICENSED MASTER MASSEUR Full body massage. In or out Chase 527-0876 SEPT 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 .e,L .e.9 inds Ha,;-o..;g,,_90ll_Wesih.,,,,.,--527· iL10r\e1 He•r Oesign-3220 Yoekum--5~9' 9 MonlrOH Hell' 0.1gn· · 10CM cel11orn-;::522. 2822 9Montrose vo-.--ce l'leWlpap;r-=3317 MOn1rose 1'306· ·529-8490 e NeartOWn Gs~.-Qe-~11=523-279' i-Pr1v1te POS1a1 Systems mail boxff-1713 W•t~mer-sa.3020 :2~T['' Berber ShOP-2154 Port'smouth- ~ ~evel Consuttants-2029 SW Fwy-~ • Tra~el lnnovstions 150e W Alab.lme Montrose Travltj Ctub 523-3051 eccounts 523-6835 SHOPS & STORES e At.,.Ster Adutt Newt 1407 Rich.~5211- ~ -- --- - ------ - --~ e Anhque Corner-1921 W91the•lfl!'-S22-«>el7 . ~U1t80oks10..-1201 A;chm()Nt e S.HPar11 Adult ~~aJOWA1ab.me e co·b;eb L.~ClrS-20~ wilslhe•mer..:526- ~-- -~- - - --- •Cot FloWers--5015 Montrose--522-1775 e01ner'i" AduttN9ws_:24o-wei+he1"*· s2e- 8950 eDOubravlt-Jones. lne Mantt0'1e cloth1rig-19&3 W Grey--522-1089 e60wnbeat -RKordS-~2111 RicnmO'nct-ii"3- 8348 By Tycbo 9 0farnM,1i;e g hs-322iYoakum-=528-5"57 eaoog ... ,.=-,oo. Cli1itornia~~ iGrK~ynn 80oki:-7Clol Fe1rv1- 522-7695 iGreet;;.-J>tu.---:..14.11Wntheimer--630-01se e K1rt;y-,..;_..larid-3115-Kirby-520-0246- iQh-80r l.•1'*- Goods-912 w.Stt...mer. 524-7858 e 0td fngtbh Fur~iu..-1138 WGrav-521 91'5 e Record RKk muw:-310i5$hepherd-524· 'e'"s"lu dz Adult N-s-1132W-A.iaib.1m"'i i~ W Aitiba~--52'-5860 e T-att Automot1..,._W:.1Ta1t-~ e Thif1,; Piao.=1307 Fairvoew-529-1414 • Un;On Jack ctolt11~-1212westne1mer 528- 0600 eUp Ona -Wffier;,1Le-.1her:_Bf:tB 2--.-00 Braz.os-52'-5737 e weatnt1mer-FIUM1~!t;;-mef i'Whtne--;-,n;;-w;nors-1727 Westneimer- 520-1357 • W•lde & Stein boOa- slo-;;:::t02 Westhe;,,;;.,- 529-701' TRAVEL IN SAN FRANCISCO Autum is beautiful. Bed-breakfast in one of our 50 private gay homes Friendship Comfort. Bed-By-The-­Bay, 1155 Bosworth. 94131, (415) 334-7262 TRAVEL KEY WEST Free brochure and map included Accomodations. restaurants. shops, bars Write Key West Business Guild, POB 1208-M, Key West. FL 33040. (305) 296-7535. Fortunes For Friday evening. September 2. 1983. through Fr1d1y evenmg. S11ptember 9. 1983 ARIES-You are working for and with others. having made up your mind about something you were unsure of. you move forward with a great deal of tenderness, compassion and strength of purpose. Some­one with even more idealism than you will be attracted TAURUS-If it weren't for your love lite, things would be fine. This battle that you and a loved one are having will come to a head. You're in the position of making big decisions, and once you do. you'll be able to get on beautifully with your life GEMINI-Be open for that sudden msp1rat1on. Don't go around clos­ing any doors on anything or anyone. Since you've got such charm and sexy ways, you'll have plenty of openings to consider-so get ready to venture out for an unbelievable adventure. CANCER-The Moon. 1n Cancer as the weekend opens. leaves Satur­day mght. With more energy than you·ve had in a long time. you're thinking and workmg to definite goals No more of the wishy-washy1 No more of the .. what'll I do?" syndrome. You know what you're headed for and with some careful attention to detail. you'll do it LEO-In your sign all week: Venus and Mars. Just passmg through the Moon. from Saturday night to Monday mght. You· re getting closer and closer to what you want. You can almost feel 1t. If you don't let your 1uncred1ble ego get out of hand. 1t will soon be yours. Keep in touch with your soft and gentle side_ "'Firm. but yielding'' are the key words VIRGO-The Moon passes through Virgo from Monday night to Wed­nesday. The Sun is in Virgo all week. And Mercury, movmg retrograde, re-enters Virgo Monday morn mg. Changes that you've considered mak­ing in the past may now present themselves as absolutely necessary A decision that requires no looking back may take you into strange and unfamiliar territory. Be the brave explorere. The time has come. LIBRA-Mercury 1s in Libra as the weekend opens. will leave Monday morning. Pluto remams all week. The Moon will enter Wednesday mght, the 7th. You've got secrets to conceal; or one part of you that was once concealed 1s now out front and obv1ous1 For anyone who thinks the closet is no more. this could be a very surpnsing time. The process always continues Move right along. please SCORPIO-In your sign this week: Saturn. Scorpios love their pn· vacy, but you may have to forego some of that for now You'll be with otehrs, like 1t or not. Taking care of their needs. Joining 1n on their activities. you could make some new contacts that will prove very impor­tant. Seek, don't hide SAGITTARIUS-In your s1g(I this week: Jupiter. Uranus and Neptune Others may marvel at and even envy the adventure that your life is becoming_ Remember that not everyone shares this sense of romance and excitement; don't show off! At the same time, there's not a thing to be ashamed of, either. Enjoy this run of fun you're having CAPRICORN-Someone who looks up to you as a big brother or a father is going to need some special attention. Your judgement and experience will be demanded. You'll be asked to consider how deep you love is. Sex? Well. that may be confusing, but delicious, all the same AQUARIUS-Time to do a bit of explatnmg and clearing up. Your home life 1s important to you. bu the problem is that there's someone or something else in your Ifie that's also very important. Straddling the fence can be painful. Which way now? PISCES-Ifs difficult to make predictions or plans when things are changing so rapidly. Hold on to your sense of relatrve importance. because the winds of change-will blow you this way and that. Learn how to fly with both feet on the ground It ain't easy. but you can do 111 e1(183 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNOICAT[ 24 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 2, 1963 HE TOOK THE CHANCE OF GETTING HEPATITIS B­AND LOST. NOW THE CONSEQUENCES ARE JUST BEGINNING. CHRONIC ACTIVE HEPATITIS, CIRRHOSIS ... OR DEATH. You undoubtedly know someone who's had it. The 'bad hepatitis" that can keep you in bed for weeks and out of a job for months­that can cause lifelong disability and even death from cirrhosis or cancer of the liver. Where do you get it? From people who have become carriers of the virus. Tuday, it is estimated that at least 100,000 gay men are carriers of the hepatitis B virus and spread the infection through intimate contact. That's the main reason why l!!O!tlhan half of all g;iy_l!len .'N!IJ. soon~r or later become infected. How can you tell who's a carrier? You probably can't. Most carriers seem to be perfectly healthy, and many are themselves unaware that they harbor the virus. Q_n~.f!.Yilll gfil_hepatitis B. there's ng §~tl~atment for it. But !)ow there.'§J;Omfill:ii!:ig you can d~ IQ heli;tp[Q_tect xoul"§elf. DON'T TAKE A CHANCE-CONTACT YOUR DOCTOR OR CLINIC AND ASK ABOUT THE HEPATITIS B VACCINE. It 1s lughly effective m those who receive all three shots. Do it today because you never know where or when you'll make contact with a carrier. If you'd like more information about hepatitis B and the vaccine, call The American Liver Foundation at (201) 857-2626. This message is brought to you as a public service by The American Liver Foundation. Studies showed that the vaccine protected agamst infection caused by hepatitis B virus in 85% to 9fn of those who received the required three shots Hepatitis B virus is an important cawse of viral hepatitis, a dISease mainly of the liver. Even mild forms of this disease may lead to senous complications and aftereffects, including liver cancer. There 1s no . pec1fic treatment for viral hepatitis Vaccination 1s recommended for persons who have a higher ri~ of becommg infected with hepatitis B virus because al frequent, close contact Wlth infected people or exposure to body fluids from such people. It will not protect against hepatitis caused by viruses o:..her than hepatitis B virus. Because of the long mcubahon penod for hepatitis 8, 1t 1s possible for unrecog:ruzed infection to be present at the time the vaCCJne ts given. The vaccine may not prevent hepatitis B m such patients. 0 1113T"9~U....FOl.l'ICMl!on In three studies involving 3,350 persons, the overall rate of adverse reactions did not differ s1gmficantly m th06e given vaccine and those given placebo (an mact1ve substance). As Wlth any vaccine, broad use ot\en reveals rare adverse reactions not ob~rved during clm1cal t rials. Over 200,000 people are estimated to have received the vaccine since its relea..;e,and the vaccmecontinuesto be generally well tolerated HepatitisB has a long incubation pen~. and unrecognized mfection may already be present at the time the vaccine is given . Thus, reported cases of hepatitis are to be expected and do not appear to be caused by the vaccine. Reactions such as fever, nausea, vom1tmg, headache, and local pain have occurred Jomt pam has been reported; rash has been reported rarely Senous 1llnes..~s affecting the nervous system­mcludmgGuillam- Barresyndrome-have been reported rarely, but no cause and effect relat1onsh1p has been establuJied
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