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Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004
File 016
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Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004 - File 016. 2004-02-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6119/show/6105.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-02-20). Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6119/show/6105

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004 - File 016, 2004-02-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6119/show/6105.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date February 20, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript eclipse fifl HOUSTON VOICE GAY HOUSTON NIGHTLIFE, ARTS & CULTURE FEBRUARY 20,2004 PACE 15 Fab Five "Queer Eye' CD delights with club-oriented, catchy dance-rock. Page 16 Finding strength Gay filmmaker Arthur Dong releases documentary trilogy "Stories from the War on Homosexuality' on DVD By MATTHEW FORKE LISTENING TO THE HEARTBREAKING STRUGGLES of gay generations past and present has a funny way of putting our daily inconveniences into proper perspective, which is one of the many meaningful "take-aways" viewers should appreciate in documentary filmmaker Arthur Dong's new DVD box set, "Stories from the War on Homosexuality" An Oscar nominee for his 1983 documentary short-subject film "Sewing Women," Dong's substantive three-part trilogy explores the unyielding culture of discrimination against gay men and lesbians by conservative religious groups, hate-crime perpetrators and the U.S. military. The first film in the trilogy, "Coming Out Under Fire," (based on Allen Berube's book) was filmed in 1994, not long after the infamous "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" debate of the early '90s. Through a montage of rare photographs and documents, government newsreel footage and contemporary interviews with gay veterans, the film traces the history of gays in the military as far back as World War II, complete with government screens for "sex perverts," gay newsletters written in "code" and homosexual "witch hunts" conducted by superiors. Far more harrowing, though, is Dong's second entry. 1997's "Licensed to Kill," which comprises a series of interviews with incarcerated killers, many of whom are on death row or serving life sentences. Dong, himself a victim of a gay bashing in the late '70s, turns his lens and microphone to some seriously sick (and vastly uneducated) individuals and asks the question. "Why?" In return, everything from religious upbringing to AIDS to self-hatred — one convict. Jay Johnson, is gay himself — is used to justify their horrific crimes. Riveting stuff, though the postmortem photographs of the victims are not for the faint-of-heart. in pain Dong completes the trilogy with 2002's "Family Fundamentals." a remarkably balanced and sensitive look at three conservative Christian families who happen to have gay children. Brett Mathews is the son of a Mormon bishop. Brian Bennett is the former campaign manager and chief of staff for U.S. Rep. Robert Dornan, a conservative Republican from California who lost his seat to a Democrat several years ago. And finally, Susan and David Jester are the estranged gay daughter and grandson of Kathleen Bremner, a Pentecostal church leader in San Diego. The DVD box includes some well-selected bonus features, including introductory interviews by Dong himself; featurettes; deleted and extended scenes; unreleased interviews (brace yourself for those in "Licensed to Kill"); liner notes, essays and illustrated booklets; music selections and trailers, among others. Dong recently discussed the DVD release of the trilogy with Houston Voice. Houston Voice: What filmmakers inspire you and your work? Arthur Dong: You would think someone had asked me that. Hmm. I've been asked what filmmakers I admire. Stanley Kubrick is one of my all-time favorites. HoVo: What are some of the goals you've set for yourself as a filmmaker? Dong: At this point, I'd say it's not to be making the kinds of films I've been making. I'd rather be making "Terminator 4." Did 1 really think 15 years ago that I'd be making this trilogy? No, I'd rather not have to do this. But I have to. Eventually, I'd like to be making more "fun" films. HoVo: In "Family Fundamentals" you said you were interested in documenting conservative Christian families with gay children that fell Into three categories: a family headed by a political leader, a family that had dealt with reparative therapy and a family headed by a Filmmaker Arthur Dong is unafraid to speak in glowing and critical terms about the gay civil rights movement. In a recent interview, he says: I'm not just happy with 'Will & Grace' and 'Queer Eye for the Straight Guy.' That's fine, but its not good enough.' church leader in a rural community. How did you decide on these three criteria? Dong: I came up with those criteria after researching about 30 stories where various aspects or structures were apparent. I wanted them to be diverse. HoVo: How did you find the interview subjects who participated? Dong: I found Brett after a screening of "Coming Out Under Fire." You know, he's a vet. And I knew of Brian's story. Rich Tafel, the former executive director of Log Cabin Republicans, introduced me to him. And Kathleen's story, I was referred to her from another ex- gay ministry up North. I was thinking about doing a different family's story and it didn't quite work, but they said they [knew] of another family [I] might want to think about. HoVo: You said in "Family Fundamentals" that each of the three families' stories served as "microcosms" of the larger social and political struggles being fought in the public sphere. What direction do you feel the country is currently headed, both politically and socially? Please see FILMMAKER on Page 19 GAY SURVIVOR: All-stars' Richard Hatch is an uncompromising and now wealthy gay survivor. Page 17 MARDI GRAS MAYHEM: Miss Keys West 2004, Aurora Briar, brings Mardi Gras to Houston! Page 21
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