Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004
File 008
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004 - File 008. 2004-02-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6119/show/6097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-02-20). Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6119/show/6097

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004 - File 008, 2004-02-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6119/show/6097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1217, February 20, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date February 20, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com FEBRUARY 20, 2004 | .cal news Lobo Bookshop and Cafe closes after 30 years Owner blames closure on internet sales and 'Wal-Marting of America.' By BINNIE FISHER For more than ISO years. Larry Lingle has devoted his life to selling books and videos to the gay community in several cities, including Dallas, New York and Houston. Last week, the last remnant of his one- tiim' gay literary empire fell when the Lobo Bookshop & Cafe closed. Lingle blames the demise of the store on booming Internet sales, competition with his vendors and what he calls "the Wal-Marting of America." Lingle said he started in the book business more than 30 years ago. He was married then and was primarily interested in hard-to-find books. "Originally, I was doing business as an out-of-print book dealer," he said. In 1973, Lingle got a divorce from his wife and came out of the closet. His interest in books changed to the then limited genre of gay and lesbian literature. "I ended up in Oak Lawn in Dallas, and there was absolutely nothing there back then." he said. "In 1973,1 opened a book store there. There wasn't much available then." Lingle was able to fulfill a need that very few book dealers could fill. Eventually, he said, he purchased the Oscar Wilde Bookshop in New York City. In 1986, he opened Lobo in Houston's Montrose neighborhood. Lingle and his partner, Bill White, operated the bookstore empire together. White died in 1995, and Lingle said, he found it difficult to continue alone. He sold the Dallas store in 1990 and had planned to close the New York store after the attacks on the World Trade Center. "September 11, 2001 was really the death knell for the New York store." he said. "Greenwich Village was closed for two weeks, and it never recovered." The New York Times ran a story indicating that Lingle planned to close the store, and suddenly he found himself being interviewed by reporters from all over the world. A buyer came forward after the publicity, and Lingle said he sold the store at a loss. "I was down to this one store, basically," he said. Although he maintains, "The community didn't support it as much as they used to," Lingle said he doesn't blame his customers. If he blames anything at all, it is the way business is conducted today The biggest problem, Lingle said, is the fact that the vendors who supplied his books and videos also sold over the Internet at cut-rate prices. And, he said, it was difficult to compete with the big guys like Barnes and Noble and Borders. "We had to sell at full price," he said. "Anything we sold you could find online at buygay.com." To remain competitive. Lingle said, he added a cafe that served a high quality lunch. Although the cafe business was good, he said, the bookstore business continued to dwindle. "When Crossroads Market closed two years ago, the only bump we felt was an increase in our cafe business." he said. He realized that customers were coming to the store, spending a few dollars in the cafe and finding the books they would later order on line. "They could look at it, touch it, feel it and go to the computer and order it online," he said. There came a point at which he had to make a tough decision. His rent continued to increase, and sales were not coming close to covering the overhead. "The payroll was $5,000 a week," he said. "I was working to keep the store open for my customers and my employees, but I was losing money." His one consolation is that when he closed the last of his stores, the political climate for gays and lesbians has changed significantly for the better. "Thirty years ago, people were still worried about getting busted in a raid on a gay bar," he said. "Five years ago, nobody Lobo Bookshop & (Photo by Dalton : Cafe at 3939 Montrose Blvd. closed last week. DeHart) believed that gay marriage would be such a prominent issue. Ten years ago, we didn't dream of gay and lesbian couples having children." Lingle can name the gay and lesbian bookstores nationwide that are hanging on by a thread. He regrets that many of those will eventually go the way of Lobo. "I can't complain," he said. "I had some loyal customers. There just weren't enough of them." O MORE INFO Crime Stopper 713-222-TIPS Sister: 'Convinced' Allyn murder was a professional hit ALLYN, continued from Page 1 Houston gay community, police have called on gays and lesbians in the city to help solve the crime. The Feb. 5 press conference was followed by the passing out of flyers in the Montrose area that evening announcing that a reward of up to $10,000 was being offered to the person whose tip leads to the arrest and indictment of a suspect in the case. After the press conference failed to generate any phone calls, Miller said, "I'm one hundred percent convinced it was professionally done." During the three months since her brother's death. Miller said she has passed along t ips that she felt pointed in the direction of a politically motivated, professional hit. Among the pieces of information Miller has given to police is a tape of a telephone message left by Allyn around 9:30 p.m. on the evening before he died. The message was to a friend and business acquaintance, and it seemed to center on a business deal that involved the two of them and other persons. In the tape. Allyn said more than once, "We're going to do this by the book." He also mentioned that he hoped everyone concerned could still be friends once the deal was completed. Allyn said in the message that he felt he was being watched and that it was not unusual to come home and find that someone had been going through his paperwork. Before hanging up, he warned his friend, "Watch your back, buddy." Miller said she acquired the tape from a friend of her brother, and she passed it along to police investigators. Also, Miller said, neighbors on Allyn's street mentioned hearing noises around 4 a.m. on the morning of Nov. 21. She said the neighbors went outside to investigate and reported seeing a green pick up truck in the street a short distance away. Miller said the neighbors watched as Allyn's home suddenly burst into flames. Mary Lynn Miller, sister of slain lobbyist Ross Allyn, and Police Detective C.P. Abbondandolo (left) make an appeal for information during a recentpress conference staged by Crime Stoppers. and the truck drove away She said it was as though the driver of the truck was waiting to make certain the house erupted in flames. Miller said she doesn't have all the details regarding the deals that involved her brother, but she said one specific case would have meant close to a million dollars in fees for Allyn. "It had something to do with low- income loans, refinancing low-income pro jects." she said. But, he was involved in several projects. Miller said. In a recent deal. Allyn lobbied for and won a 10-year, $178-million retail contract for Paradies IAH-LLC at Bush Intercontinental Airport. In 1997, Allyn, a former aide to City Council member Ben Reyes, was snared in an FBI bribery sting that later sent Reyes and Houston Port Commissioner Betti Maldonado to prison. A judge later threw out charges against Allyn. M iller said she feels there is bound to be something in her brother's history or in his recent business dealings that could have provided motivation for someone to want to bring about his death. "How about starting with a short list of people who would profit from Ross Allyn's death." she said. Investigators working on the case could not be reached for comment. O MORE INFO Crime Stoppers 713-222-TIPS ■
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1217_007.jpg