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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 022. 1982-05-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6047.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-21). Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6047

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 022, 1982-05-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6047.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 21, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript May 21,1982 / Montrose Voice 21 Heritage lie figure of her stature found the courage Emma Goldman was in early fight for sexual freedoms tovSVthS^Stl By Patrick Franklin ©1982 Stonewall Feature* Syndicate Maureen Stapleton won her Oscar this year for playing role of Emma Goldman in Reds. But the woman she portrayed was a far more complex, compassionate and dedicated person that the script allowed that character to be. Emma Goldman was a fighter, all right, and one of the first and strongest voices for gay liberation in this century. Her birthday is an easy one remember; it falls on June 27, one day before Gay Pride Day, and it might be fair for us to commemorate her work in some of the speeches that go on during the parades and festivities. She had barely reached her teens before launching herself into a career of protest and demonstrations. In 1893, she spent a year in prison for making speeches "inciting to riot" Now that the mainstream public has cleaned up her image, recognizing that much of her "communistic" message was very genuine social protest, she is presented as a radical social and political thinker. We hear about her views on labor, on representation, on suffrage. What we don't hear are her equally far-sighted views on sexual freedom. For Emma knew that the most important freedoms were those that went beyond the boundaries of the polling place and the press. She fought for the freedom of the body, for the rights of women to determine their own fates, for abortion on request, for birth-control information. She believed that if there was a right for people to assemble peaceably to discuss and protest, there should be an equally inviolable right for them to assemble and meet one another. The "love that dare not speak its name" created a man whose name no one dared to mention. Yet as early as 1900, Goldman was not only mentioning Oscar Wilde, but decrying the laws that put him into prison. In this endeavor, she not only met the antipathy ofthe public at large, but that of her associates. Radicals are often not sympathetic to sexual rights; think of the rampant homophobia of Paul Krassner during the free-wheeling '60s. Emma, though, ignored criticism from that quarter as totally as she did from any other. Her approach was humanistic and sensible. She chided Magnus Hirschfield for trying to make homosexuals into a specially gifted "race." The emphasis, she declared, was that homosexuals were people like any other people, neither meriting particular approval or opprobium. Emma's constant message was that every person has a right to live as free and unfettered a life as possible. No one can say with surety if she was gay or not. There exists a series of letters to her from a younger woman who was explicit in her declarations of love- Emma's few replies are touching, non- judgemental, and unrevealing. But both she and her associate on the journal Mother Earth spent a great deal of time in prison, and both wrote of the gay love affairs that went on there. Both spoke positively of the real affection between members of the same sex. Emma lived on until 1940, shuffling back and forth between countries as she wan repeatedly deported and repatriated. Russia's iron fiat of repression soured her on the revolution there, and for all her socialist leanings, she never stinted on her criticism of that regime, either. But that was merely a gloss on the eter nal theme: human freedom. For nearly 50 years, she preached gay liberation as a necessary part of social reform; she died a quarter of a century before any other pub- Whether or not she was a sister doesn't really matter. She waa a friend, a mentor, a guide. Emma Goldman is the model for all of us who fight for the freedom of the individual. COMPANY "B" Army/Navy surplus from around th* world Lost Our Lease Sale 5366 WESTHEIMER 10AM-6:iOPM MON.-SAT. (TUX 7PM THURS.} HOUSTON 7705S 9**-97» smmOTrtE i The response is overwhelming in support of Our 2nd Love-In Sunday. May 23, 4-8pm Hundreds of Dollars in prizes Contests Twist Jitterbug Limbo Hula Hoop WEEKLY CALENDAR 1950s drink prices $1 Cover, $1 Well Free Beer, Free Buffet TUESDAY—Free C&W dance lessons 8-1 Opm, followed by live DJ playing your requests WEDNESDAY—Steak Night, 7-9pm. 5 Buck Inflation Fighter, 16 ox. steak, bake tater, salad, baked beans, bread + 2 Free Well Drinks or All the free beer you can drink + Dancing to the Flying Blind Band at 9pm THURSDAY.FR1DAY-SATURDAY- Dancin' to the Flying Blind Band, 9:30-1:30, with after-hours Friday & Saturday with live DJ 911 W. Drew, SUNDAY. 4-8—Live DJ, Free Beer, Free 528-8840 Buffet, followed by the Flying Blind Band 8-12pm }^^^mmmmmmmm^Siwsj^^^msmsm
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