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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
File 019
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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 019. 1982-05-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6044.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-21). Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6044

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 019, 1982-05-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6044.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 21, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 Montrose Voice/May 21,1982 MontroseArt 'Miro in America' at the Museum of Fine Arts By Ed Martinez Miro in America, the first major exhibition fully documenting Spanish artist Joan Miro's extensive impact on American art, is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts until June 27. Sponsored by Texas Commerce Banc- shares, Inc., United Energy Resources, Inc. and Gerald D. Hines Interests, the exhibition coincides with the dedication of Personage and Birds, a 55-foot public sculpture by Miro to be installed in the new United Energy Plaza in downtown Houston. The sculpture, already downtown, has created much controversy, and interest among the viewing public. This exhibition, funded by Houston corporados in celebration of their monumental public sculpture, is one of the largest corporate gifts to the arts in the history of Houston. The exhibit was organized by consulting curator Barbara Rose, assisted by associate curator Judith McCandless, and features not only the works of Miro, but also the works .of major American artists whose work was profoundly influenced By Miro—artists such as Alexander Calder, Arshile Gorky and Jackson Pollock. This exhibit is the first major exhibition to fully document Miro's extensive impact on modern American art It contains approximately 100 paintings with additional sculpture, ceramics and works on paper which span Miro's career. The thrust of the present exhibit is that influence that Miro's career. The thrust of the present exhibit is that ofthe influence that Miro has exerted on American artists. Considered one ofthe most influential of the Surrealists during the '20s and '30s, Miro has influenced nearly all post-World War II American abstract artists and has been a special source of inspiration for the New York School of Abstract Expressionism. Miro was not especially popular in Paris, where he spent so much time and worked so long. It was primarily in America that he found particular favor, and it is in America that he continues to be such a creative force. Now, of course, his reputation is firmly established internationally, but he continues to feel a particular fondness for this country that first recognized his genius. Miro has expressed himself strongly in interviews as displeased with seeing his work being used as "international bank notes." "My art is for the people—it is for everybody," states Miro. Which is why, obviously, he has been so interested in the monumental sculptures he has done, such as the one recently unveiled here in Houston. • * Miro's style is as difficult to describe as his genius is to be contained in mere words. Only the work itself can do justice to his vision of reality, the vivid colors, the whimsy and humor inherent in all his work combine with that distinctive style that cries out Miro! His work is seldom confused with other artists, and that in itself is a mark of genius, a clearly recognizable and highly individual style signature. A number of lectures on Miro's work will be available to the public during the exhibition, which will be seen only in Houston. Houston is indeed fortunate to have this once in a lifetime opportunity, one that should not be missed. Houston's turning to the VOICE! Cf it $tl E'uiM. "Personage and Birds," see in the United Energy Plaza in downtown Houston.
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