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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
File 011
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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 011. 1982-05-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6036.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-21). Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6036

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 011, 1982-05-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6036.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 21, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 MONTROSE VOICE/MAY 21, 1982 For better gardening, learn Latin I 1982 Stonewall Features Syndicate Into gardening? If you are, you'd better forget your French and Greek and get into Latin; that can save you money, a lot of disappointment, and wasted time. One ofthe things that happens with gardeners is that after the first excitement of success, they tend to get ambitious too fast. If a few plants flourish, then a dozen more will do even better. Maybe so, maybe not. Let's take an example. One of our friends lives nearby in a low valley with no direct sunlight and heavy humidity. He's had good luck in raising African violets and lipstick plants. He spots something called "Purple Passion Vine" that looks as if it would be a fine addition to his collection. He buys it, and six weeks later Purple Passion goes into a blue funk and dies. Why? Because despite sharing hairy leaves with the violets and a vining habit like the lipstick's "Gynura aurantica" comes from an entirely different plant family. African violets and lipsticks are gesneriads, nearly all of which share a love for indirect light and humidity. "Gynura" is a cousin of daisies and chrysanthemums, members of the "compositae," and lovers of sun. One of our constant messages is "know what you're ordering." Mailorder plants present special problems because common names for plants vary widely. "Gynura is also known as 'velvet plant,' 'hairy creeper,' 'Purple passion,' and just about anything else an enterprising florist wants to call it. But it has only one Latin name, and that name is agreed on all over the world. We're not suggesting that you go back to school for a full course in Botany. We are suggesting that if you really want to garden and to make your garden thrive, you shold buy a good book with pictures of the plants you like, and familiarize yourself with their botanical names. Simon and Schuster's "Plants and Flowers" is a good beginning. It's a $6.95 paperback with over 500 pages of photographs, as well as descriptions of growth habits and bloom times. That's a good start. It could save you from the fate of one staff member here who ordered a "magic tomato vine" that was supposedly frostproof, and bore hundreds of tiny delicious fruits. What she got was a relative of the flower called Chinese Lantern (Phsalis alkekengi) which gave lots of fruit, all right, but of a taste nowhere near that of a good tomato. Another recalls ordering the spectacular "Empress Tree" only to find on delivery that it was the same weedy plant he had been trying to rid his garden of for years. If he had known the proper name for the plant he ordered, he could have avoided the loss of time and money. Hard-and-fast rules about whom to order from just can't be made on any wide- ranging basis. Generally, it's better to order roses from a grower who sells only roses, dahlias from a dahlia grower, and so on. You'll find good sources for such plants in the advertising sections of such magazines as Horticulture and Flower and Garden. Many nurseries do exist that sell a wider range of plants, and there are many reputable ones. Still, the best course for you and your flowers is to buy them near home if you can. They will be more acclimated to your local weather, and not dazed from the shock of shipping. First, choose the flowers or plants that you'd like to have. Then make sure you can grow them. Do they survive in your climatic conditions? Are specific varieities more suited to your area? Then go to local nurseries. Even if what you want is not in stock, they may be able to order it for you. If the plants you want aren't at hand, then consider mail order, observing two cautions: Never buy plants by their common names. Reputable nurseries always give Latin names to avoid confusion. A common name in one part of the country may refer to an entirely different species in another location. Avoid suspiciously cheap plant offers. Many of the ads you see in Sunday supplements offer plants collected in the wild, which will be weaker and less likely to survive the shock of transplanting. A good garden requires too much work to have it spoiled with spindly and unhealthy plants. Start with sure things and go on to the exotica later, as you gain experience. With time, you'll discover ways to pare your expenses by learning how to propagate stem cuttings and trading seedlings with fellow enthusiasts. "Dishing the dirt" will take on an entirely new meaning. Spanish bachelors plea for women They call themselves "The Bachelors' Party"—they're residents of a small, mountainous region in northwestern Spain and they've got a problem: no women. The area's two small towns, they say, have more than five men to every woman, and the situation they claim is promoting alcoholism, drug abuse and homosexuality, reports the Guardian of London newspaper. A spokesman said that picking up a woman in their region "isn't a sin—it's a miracle," and appealed to the women of Spain to help them out. Getting rough on rapists In an effort to "scare the living daylights" out of rapists, a former Massachusetts state legislator has proposed castrating any man convicted twice of aggravated rape, reports the Boston Globe. Paula Lewellen says the bill she's offering would increase the penalty for aggravated rape to 15 years minimum for a first offense and at least 25 years plus castration for a second conviction. "It's time for the fun and games to quit," Lewellen says. But the current chairwoman of the legislature's Criminal Justice Committee predicts the bill will receive a negative recommendation, saying it's "not the way to deal with a problem in a civilized society." The gentle sex gets tough in Lichtenstein Europe's last bastion of male supremacy may be about to fall, reports The Guardian newspaper of London. Lichtenstein, that tiny Alpine principality wedged between Austria and Switzerland, is debating whether to give women the vote. True, there's not much to vote about: the parliament has just 15 seats, and the entire government consists of 270 employees and 40 policemen. But, while Lichtenstein may lack such modern amenities as unemployment, trade unions or poverty, it does have a spirited feminist movement. And now the Council of Europe says Lich ten stein's membership may be in jeopardy if it doesn't allow women to vote. There may yet be trouble, though. Male electors have twice vetoed the idea, partly out of national pride, since half the male population is married to foreign wives they met while working abroad. MONTROSE TRAVEL WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS 4TH OF JULY IN NEW ORLEANS 2 nights at the French Quarter Hotel $149, all inclusive MAZATLAN, JULY 3 4 wonderful days at the Plaza Del Raye $239 RENO RODEO All Inclusive Tour, $399 (Hurry, only a few seats left!) 2506 RALPH—522-8747 NOW OPEN Happy Trails _b mm -toMBERSHIP CLUB Back by Popular Demand The Fabulous DIXIE KINGS This Sunday, 6pm Friday and Saturday Nights Bob Williams & the Trail Riders 715 FAIRVIEW OPEN Noon-2am 7 days a week 521-2792 hde The Kampy Kapers of Keoki Kona, Wednesday- Sunday, 6pm-1am This Sunday: "Swing into Summer" Patio Party, featuring Houston's hottest new group, Bob Williams and the Trail Riders plus a super buffet $1 donate at the door goes to Gay Pride Week 528-9066 109 Tuam
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