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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 007. 1982-05-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6032.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-21). Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6032

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 007, 1982-05-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6032.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 21, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 Montrose Voice/May 21,1982 Buying records by mail? 1982, Stonewall Features Syndicate So you want a bunch of records. So the paper offers you 12 for a penny and a little bother. Is it a good deal? Maybe so, maybe not. It depends on you. It also depends on where you live and what record bargains are available to you. The normal list price for a record album these days comes to about $8.98, so the offer makeB something like $108.00 worth of recorded music available for almost nothing. If you are a good shopper, your next question should be "Why?" Read the fine print, and you discover that you are now obligated (if you take the offer) to buy eight more records over the next year or so. This means you are going to shell out about $72.00 for thoBe eight records; all the recordings you buy from the club will be list price. But that is still a good deal. Wait a minute. Each record will have postage and handling charges added: about $1.75 per disc. How does it look now? Still a good deal. You will pay about $86.00 for the eight records you have to buy, and the twelve free ones you have gotten brings your price to about $4.30 per record. You are ahead of the game. // you play the game right. The theme of this column is that there is no free lunch. Nobody gives you something for nothing, and it is up to you to find out what the gimmick is. The problem here is that, in the first place, you will probably have some trouble picking out those twelve free records. Unless you are a real fan of disco, mainstream pop or C&W, there will most likely be only six or eight records you will really want, and the rest will be fillers you must take merely to fill the requirement. But isn't this all right? Not if you take into consideration the fact that you are paying for them at the rate of $4.30 each. Do you really want them? Would you go into a store and pay for them? The record market is in flux right now, its prices higher than they once were because of the higher cost of oil (the basic component of vinyl), and because of varying public pressures. Many of the price breaks that record companies were once able to give large discount houses have disappeared. Yet the base price for wholesale remains at approximately $5.13 per disc. If you live in a metropolitan area, you can find record sales approaching or even beating that figure. Still, $4.30 looks a lot better, doesn't it? Only if you hew closely to two criteria. First, order only records you really want. For modern jazz, classical, and some rock fans, thiB is impossible. No major company offers enough records of these types to satisy the hard-core aficionado. (The'' classical selections for the ad we have used as an example here number only seven.) Second, be prepared to answer your mail. Once you join a club, you will be bombarded with offerings that present each month's choices. They will be sent to you automatically unless you return a card saying you do not want them. There are a few more questionable deals, too. Records will be offered at a "discount," often less favorable than one you could receive at a local store. You may be tempted to buy these in the hope thay you will satisfy your membership requirement. Not so. Every record you buy to fulfill your agreement will be a full list price. Come hell or high water, you will pay $8.98, plus postage, times the number of records you have agreed to buy. Unless you are very careful, you will find mysterious packages in the mail containing records you never ordered. You must tell the companies not to send unwanted discs. Classical music fans who want to join a record club should investigate the Musical Heritage Society, 14 Park Road, Linton Falls, NJ 07724. You get only one record as a freebie, but there are no future purchase requirments, and the Society publishes some unusual recordings and out-of-the- way composers. Recording quality is high, and the price is only $4.95 per disc, plus shipping. For the majority of us, record clubs offer little more than what serious shopping at local record storeB might do. Moreover, carelessness with the membership requirements can put our credit ratings in a bad place; Columbia and RCA have been cheated by so many people that they are notoriously fast in calling credit bureaus. Before you join, in short, make sure you are getting what you want from the club and that you cannot beat the club prices locally. A dictionary of body language Pacific News Service Don't get all bent out of shape over this: A British researcher says he's come up with a way to identify personal "body signatures." "Body signatures," he says, are the telltale mannerisms and body movements that give clues to our personalities. Walter Lamb is selling his technique to business firms bo they can evaluate job applicants. With the right training, he says, recruiters will be able to predict an applicant's ability to make decisions and get along with people, purely by body movements. Europe's smallest republic confronts feminism San Marino, Europe's oldest—and smallest—republic is grappling with the 20th century issue of women's rights reports the Times of London. In February, the judiciary gave women born in San Marino the right to keep their nationality if they marry someone from outside the 38-square-mile republic. Until then, that privilege had been extended only to men. San Marino citizenship, however, will still pass only to the offspring of male citizens. Record firm plays three sides of fence A British record company is covering all the bases in its attempt to score big on the coming world cup soccer championship, reports The People magazine of London. It's released three singles, with the same tune and the same words—with one exception. The records are titled "Viva England!" "Viva Scotland!" and "Viva Ireland!"—each sung with a different accent. Classified ads in the Montrose Voice bring results. Get yours to us by 6pm Tuesday to be in Friday's Voice ... and you'll reach thousands in Montrose. sA ^oucfv ot &xt>uutaaance/. ^usl avtiued, w collection/ al slatted, nand-painted silk/ noliows/. IflecAaeat cYHc&autatvs/ uiozA/ ieMect&< his/ iiewis/ at siudu/ in s4lananistan/, ^)aua/, c$%alL, and mosiw lecentlw ^anis/. c?{is/ uMviks/ now/ faeina/ shown/ exclusiitelu/ al... _*«»*b,_kt *>-6 OPEN! PLANT HOUSE GRAND OPENING it CELEBRATION Fresh Flower Specials Calif. Glads $5.95 (bunch of 10) Iris $4.95 (bunch of 10) Carnations $3.95/dz. Long Stem Roses $9.95/dz. & other specials Offer good thru May 25, or while supply lasts Tropical Plant Specials Large Hanging Baskets $12.95 Plus other plant specials all over the store. Houston's Newest & Best Discount Plant & Flower Shop v* 812 Westheimer
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