Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
File 001
File size: 13.28 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 001. 1982-05-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6026.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-05-21). Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6026

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982 - File 001, 1982-05-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6055/show/6026.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 82, May 21, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 21, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript v Those codes: keys and handkerchiefs. Peter Harrison longs for the 'good ol' days' Tongue in Cheek, page 25 0 I c E The Newspaper of !'.lontrose Issue #82, Published Weeklv Friday May21 1982 Good El'ening Montrost.• we:athM" toni~hl: P :1.ly cloudy and warm v.1th a chance Jf showers and a lo\\ of 70 Saturday: Sunrise 6.2GAM Partly cloudv and warm with a chance or showfrs and a high of 't'.7 . .sunset fl:IOPM. Left: Scenes from last weekend's Mining Co. vs. the Voice softball game The Mining Co. won. See Montrose Sports, page8 lnternationa I mime group performs 'Mummen­schanz' at the Tower Montrose Live, page 15 Joan Miro, international artist, on display in Montrose Montrose Art, page 19 Thousands raised for Kaposi's sarcoma research Montrose News, page3 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 1022 Westheimer, naturally Sund1y: 4pm Beer Bust Sunday: MSA Softball at Levy Field, with beer bust at the field. Mary's vs. Dirty Sally's, Spm Monday: Pool Tournament and Leather Night Tuesday: lOpm movie, "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes 1 'I [ s ti d • a I Montrose News MAY 21, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 'Sodom and Gomorrah' party raised $4600 Montrose Mouth The Different Drum and The Loading Dock clubo joined forces Saturday and Sunday, May 15 and 16, to present "Sod.om and Gomorrah," the reincarna­tion of the fabled sin cities of Biblical days. The purpose: a fundraieer for the Kapo­si's Sarcoma Committee, a group of local activists, including a victim of the disease. Bill Bailey, owner of the Drum, reported that the function raised a net amount of $4600 from the $2.00 door donation. Thie Does America need a 15-MPH speed limit Pacific New• Service The 55-mile·an-hour speed limit is a step in the right direction, but a California man says it doesn't go far enough. John Loudermilk has begun a cam­paign to lower the limit to 15 miles an hour, with the motto, "insects have rights, too." Loudermilk heads a 600-member organi· zation called "Not-Safe" which, among other things, favors knife, slngshot and pencil control, as well a a ban on all child· ren 's games-because "they lead to gambling." He says the suggestions are to make the point that the government is paBBing too many laws and regulations. "Good intentions," he says, "don't necessarily make good laws." Supreme Court to rule on sexual assault case International Gay New• Aaency WASHINGTON-The U.S. Supreme Court was turned over to the committee. Costumes were encouraged at both bars, located across the street from one another in the 1700 block ofWeetheimer, and the resulting panoply of Roman centurions, slaves, Christians, gladiators and various and a880rted characters reminiscent of Old Testament days presented an astounding visual array. Kaposi's sarcoma, recently isolated as an identifiable syndrome that attacks pri­marily gay males in America, is being fought on several levels. On the level of has agreed to settle a key question involv­ing federal civil rights suite. The justices said they will consider whether a state or local official must actually intend to harm someone before there can be an award of "punitive" monetary damages. The case concerns Daniel R. Wade, who was sexualJy assaulted while serving time in a Missouri state prison. A federal grand jury held the prison guard who placed the second inmate in the cell with Wade liable for the incident. Wade wae awarded $25,000 for the inju­ries he suffered in the sexual assault and $5000 in punitive damages to deter future wrongdoing by the guard. Traditionally, the Supreme Court has avoided cases involving homosexual iseues. Westmoreland says military should take over media Pacific News Service Retired army general William Westmore­land says the only way the U.S. can win wars in the future is to control the news media. The former U.S. commander in Vietnam says the media-especially television-education and public awareness, groups like the Kaposi Sarcoma Committee, just now in the process of being formed, hopes to obtain funds from state and federal governments for increased research into the causes and prevention of the disease. Bailey reported that the committee being formed includes people like Michael McAdory, who is chairman of the commit­tee and himself a victim of the disease, and activist Andy Mills, state representative Debra Danburg and several local physi­cians. The Nation was to blame for creating an atmosphere of public discontent which crippled the military's ability to win. "Vietnam was the first war fought with­out censorship," he says, "and without censorship things can get terribly con· fused in the public mind." Pirates gobbling up Pac-Man profits The makers of Pac-Man are paying a price for their video game's popularity. Midway Manufacturing Company, which holds the copyright on Pac-Man, says its video maze has become "the most infringed upon game in the U.S." Midway says video game counterfeiters are gobbling up Pac-Man profits, and the company has filed about 20 federal suits nationwide, charging copyright infringe­ment, reports the Dallas Morning Neu:s. Ed Adlum, publisher of Replay maga­zine, says the imitations should come as no surprise. "When you have a hit this outrageous," he says, "the vermin come out of the woodwork." There are 95,000 legitimate Pac-Man and Ms. Pac-Man machines in the country and 350,000 worldwide. • I 'IQNIGMT Memories Remember Joey Dee and the Star­liters- and the Peppermint Lounge and the Peppermint Twist-featured on American Bandstand eons ago. Well, Stonewall Features just in­formed us that the Peppermint Lounge, New York, was a gay hustler's hangout. Dick Clark never told ue that. Last weekend's "Sodom and Gomor­rah Party" at both the Drum and the Loading Dock was a great success-and a ton of fun. It's purpose, of course, was as a fund-raiser for research into Kaposi's sarcoma and the other apparently­related diseases. Well, folks. We lo•t. The Mining Company whipped the Voice in MSA softball play last weekend, 17 to 11, which pushed the Mining Company into second place in the North Oivision and cemented the Voice to last place in the South Divi1:Jion. Mine manager Randolph Parks thus wins in his bet against Voice publisher Henry McClurg, with Henry to pick up the tab for an ad from the Mining Company. Ran­dolph says he'll take that ad in a future issue_ Complete Montrose Sports cover­age elsewhere in this issue, of course. The Venture-N now has free pool opening to closing Monday through Thursday. Richard Wiederholt of Basic Brothers Clothing is all excited about his new second loca· tion at 1220 Westheimer. And Quan Hua and his all-Chinese staff have opened the International Club Restaurant at 243 Westheimer. Tom Bennett, popular waiteratthe House of Pies, is at Ben Taub hospital and needs blood. You can donate, regardless of your blood type. Just tell 'em its in the name of Tom Bennet (donor account 100-61- 60-1). Tom was hit riding his motorcvcle on Mother's Day (he's a Te;.,.s Rider) It was a "hit and run" case. Anyone with information can call Wayne with 520-8660. • And as for the blood, go to room 119 at Ben Tuab, 8am-llpm. Mary's won the volleyball game but the real story wae the cheerleading contest, judged by the Park Police last weekend. Congrats goes to the Drum for the cheerleading honors. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21 , 1982 ~ NUMBERS 2 The Place to Be for the Best in Live Entertainment THIS SUNDAY May 23 RJ Productions presents PRODUCTION #'S '82 Coming Sunday, May 30 VIOLA WILLS Singing 'Stormy Weather' plus her other hits Advance ticket sales: Real Records, Record Rack and Numbers 2 #:t Open Wednesday-Sunday #:t 526-6551 j 1 MAY 21, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 The World OneYearAgo May 24, 1981: Former Montrose jeweler killed Tom Cohen, returning from a trade fairto his office carrying t.wo briefcases filled with gold jewelry and diamonds, was robbed and then shot. to death. Cohen was known to the gay community as o!le of the operator& of ETC., a jewelry boutique at. Number& in 1978 and 1979. He had also once operated the boutiques at Cud· dle'a and the Old Plantation d.iecoa, both gay. May 25, 1981: Roger Staubach was said to be fighting to "save children" from "smut TV" In the old Anita Bryant. style, former Dall81 pro footballer Roger Staubach was leading the fight against what he called "cablepom," reported HouatQn Chronicle columnist Ann Hodgeo. Staubach wu said to have grouped homo· aexuality and "women being brutally mol· ested" into the IBJlle category. May 26, 1981: City changed law so gay parade could follow traditional route Houston City Council amended it.a parade ordinance after pre88ure from gay commu· nity leadera who eaid that under the old ver· sion I.he Houston Gay Pride Week Parade would not be able to wind it.a way down its traditional route. May 28, 1981: TV aired series on gay Houston KPRC, the NBC affiliate on channel 2, con· eluded a fiv'°part series called, "Gay Hous· ton, How It Started and How It Is Now." The series aired within the 10:00 p.m. news· cast.I each night. and started May 24. Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright •1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm Henry McClurg 1Wbl1•Mrt«11tor Billie Duncan ent•rl••n,.,.,.,,lltPOr1•f#d11or Ed Martinez repotter Nick Fede Wilham Marberry lld'o>efl"lflPd1t9Clor Randy Brown edi.wl.,1ng Oav+d Petluck MIV'erlttmg Lyt Harril •dvW'""'" M.mbel' G•yPr.uAMoei•tt0n. Te11•G•yNewsAuoct1hon N.....-..S.M Y•CN lnlerMt•on•• G1y New• AgeN:Y. P•cthc: New• Syrwlic•ted FHture S~ic.t & W111er1 ($1.n Fr1nc:1teo) Chro­mci. Featur•. Unitlfd F .. 1ur• Syndicate. Jellrey Wilton. Randy Allrlfd. s1onew1U Fealur• Syndic•!•. Brian McNaught POSTMASTER Sena lddr ... correc11on1 10 3317 MonlrOH 11308. Houaton. TX nooe SvCrlcripfiOn rife in US $49 ~ y11r {52 1uue1). $29 per 11• lftOtllha (29 .. UM). OI' $1 25 per Mell (lei• tMn 26 •UUM). N1t1ot1M ed"'ert111ng ,.,,,.,.ru1t1"'• Joe 01S•blto. R•.,.lf'tdell M11k1tltlg. Me 8th A.,.,,ue. N .. Yort 10011. (212) 242..-, Ad ..... l<tlflg a..dl1ne E•ch Tuea<Sey e OOJ>f'I, IOI' ...... ~9'ctifncl•y..-.n1r1g IGA meeting held after French government support By Gavin YollDg International Gay New• Aaency STRASBOURG, FRANCE-The recent meeting of the International Association of Lesbians/ Gay Women and Men, known as IGA, attracted major national media attention in France over Easter because of a conflict over the Catholic hostel origi· nally hired to hold the delegates. Only a few days before Easter, the Bishop of Strasbourg, Mgr. Leon-Arthur Eichinger, cancelled the agreement made to rent a Catholic hostel to the organizers, a move the organizers saw as the bishop's attempt to force a cancellation of the meeting. The organizers turned to France's new Socialist government for help and received the cooperation of top ministers. The Minister of the Interior, Gaston Def· ferre, called upon the Civil Defense, which aent a convoy from Paris, 300 miles away, to provide emergency tents and bedding for the delegates, while the Minister of Defense ordered supplies of Army blankets. Delegates joined local gay people in a candle·light proteat outside the bishop's Easter service, handing out leaflets to the congregation. The !GA and the French organizers are now investigating other avenues of redress as well. The meeting itself covered some major issues to be considered in July at the inter­national meeting to be held in Washing­ton, D.C. These included: • Lesbian and Gay Year. A proposal is being considered to make 1983 the "Inter­national Year of Lesbians and Gay Men." Some of the suggestions include marches on the United Nations headquarters in Europe and New York. • Artificial Insemination. Members have been asked to find out the attitudes of their governments towards artificial insemination for unmarried women and lesbiana and the use of gay men as donors. • Amnesty International. A major effort is to be made to persuade national Amnesty groups to aupport a motion at their international conference later this year to include lesbians and gay men as prisoners of conscience in cases where they are imprisoned because of their homosexuality. • &otland. The Scottish Homosexual Rights group is prepared to challenge the age-of-consent laws for homosexuals in Scotland, through the European Court of Human Rights, when they get an approp· Law students could turn bad grades into money Law students in the Canadian province of Ontario may soon be able to turn their bad gradea into cash. Under the terms of a bequest left to the Law Society of Canada, $500 a year is to go to the student who graduates from the bar admissions course with the poorest marks, reports the Toronto Gk>be & Mail. In his will, lawyer Samuel Weir recom­mended that the prize winner use the money to "take his wife, husband, fianci.e or serious female friend out for a gay evening." The late Mr. Weir explained the odd bequest by saying, "Many with very low standards at examinations have become illustrious member& of the bar by keeping dark their lack of legal knowledge." The Law Society admits it's a bit per­plexed. "Why should we be rewarding 110meone at the bottom of the class?" Asked the financial secretary. "You might get a lot of competition." Northern Ireland to change laws By Gavin Young lnt.ernat.ional Gay Newa Agency BELFAST, N. Ireland-Northern Ireland Secretary James Prior announced recently that the laws prohibiting male homosexual acts are to be changed. riate case to use. • World Health Organization. IGA plans to step up it.a campaign to persuade WHO to delete homosexuality as an illneas from the International Classification of Diseases, before 1985, the last time in a decade when changes can be made. The decision was brought about because the European Court of Human Rights ruled that Northern Ireland Jaws were contravention of human rights. The proposed alteration will create an ~ge of.consento~21, bringing the laws into line with those m England, Scotland and Wales. However, Prior said that he did not expect th,e legi~lation to be introduced in this years se88Ion of Parliament. Opposition h~ already been expressed by Ian P8.1sley s Democratic Unionist Party. Ban on gay teacher lifted by Gavin Young lnternat.lonal Gay new• A1ency LONDON-The Inner London Education Authority has lifted a ban ithad placed on a gay teacher, John Warburton, first impooed in 1974 following Warburton'• refusal to abide by a direction that he not discuss homosexuality in the classroom. The situation arose when one of the teacher'• pupils aaw him at a gay rights demonstration and asked, "Sir, are you queer?" Warburton answered by explaining what it meant to be gay. He insisted that he should be able to reply when called a "queer" and hence refused to comply with the directive to keep silent on the subject. With the election of the pro-gay leftwing Greater London Council last year and a subsequent policy change, the ban was lifted. Warburton has agreed not to discuss homosexuality unle1u; it is raised by a student. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 Buying records by mail? 1982, Stonewall Features Syndicate So you want a bunch of records. So the paper offers you 12 !or a penny and a little bother. Is it a good deal? Maybe so, maybe not. It depends on you. It also depends on where you live and what record bargains are available to you. The normal list price for a record album these days comes to about $8.98, so the offer makes something like $108.00 worth of recorded music available for almost nothing. H you are a good shopper, your next question should be "Why?" Read the fine print, and you discover that you are now obligated (if you take the offer) to buy eight more records over the next year or so. This means you are going to shell out about $72.00 for those eight records; all the recordings you buy from the club will be list price. But that is still a good deal. Wait a minute. Each record will have postage and handling charges added: about $1.75 per disc. How does it look now? Still a good deal. You will pay about$86.00 for the eight records you have to buy, and the twelve free ones you have gotten brings your price to about$4.30perrecord. You are ahead of the game. If you play the game right. The theme of this column is that there is no free lunch. Nobody gives you something for nothing, and it is up to you to find out what the gimmick is. The problem here is that, in the first place, you will probably have some trouble picking out those twelve free records. Unle88 you are a real fan of disco, main­stream pop or C&W, there will most likely be only six or eight records you will really want, and the rest will be fillers you must take merely to fill the requirement. But isn't this all right? Not if you take into consideration the fact that you are paying for them at the rate of $4.30 each. Do you really want them? Would you go into a store and pay for them? The record market is in flux right now, its prices higher than they once were because of the higher cost of oil (the basic component of vinyl). and because of vary­ing public pre88ures. Many of the price breaks that record companies were once able to give large discount houses have disappeared. Yet the base price for whole· sale remains at approximately $5.13 per disc. U you live in a metropolitan area, you can find record sales approaching or even beating that figure. Still, $4.30 looks a lot better, doesn't it? Only if you hew closely to two criteria. First, order only records you really want. For modem jazz, classical, and some rock fans, this is impossible. No major com­pany offers enough records of these types to aatisy the hard-core aficionado. (The .. classical selections for the ad we have used as an example here number only seven.) Second, be prepared to answer your mail. Once you join a club, you will be bombarded with offerings that present each month's choices. They will be sent to you automatically unless you return a card saying you do not want them. There are a few more questionable deals, too. Records will be offered at a "dis­count," often less favorable than one you could receive at a local store. You may be tempted to buy these in the hope thay you will satisfy your membership require­ment. Not so. Every record you buy to fulfill your agreement will be a full list price. Come hell or high water, you will pay $8.98, plus postage, times the number of records you have agreed to buy. Unless you are very careful, you will find mysterious packages in the mail containing records you never ordered. You must tell the companies not to send unwanted discs. Classical music fans who want to join a record club should investigate the Musical Heritage Society, 14 Park Road, Linton Falls, NJ 07724. You get only one record as a freebie, but there are no future purchase requirments, and the Society publishes some unusual recordings and out-of-the-way composers. Recording quality is high, and the price is only $4.95 per disc, plus shipping. For the majority of us, record clubs offer little more than what serious shopping at local record stores might do. Moreover, carelessness with the membership requirements can put our credit ratings in a bad place; Columbia and RCA have been cheated by so many people that they are notoriously fast in calling credit bureaus. Before you join, in short, make sure you are getting what you want !rol'n the club and that you cannot beat the club prices locally. A dictionary of body language Pacinc New• Service Don't get all bent out of shape over this: A British researcher says he's come up with a way to identify personal "body signatures." 0 Body signatures," he says, are the tel­ltale mannerisms and body movements that give clues to our personalities. Walter Lamb is selling his technique to business firms so they can evaluate job applicants. With the right training, he says, recruiters will be able to predict an applicant's ability to make decisions and get along with people, purely by body movements. Europe's smallest republic confronts feminism San Marino, Europe's oldest-and smallest-republic is grappling with the 20th century issue of women's rights reporta the Times of London. In February, the judiciary gave women born in San Marino the right to keep their nationality if they marry someone from outside the 38-square-mile republic. Until then, that privilege had been extended only to men. San Marino citizenship, however, will still pass only to the offspring of male citizens. Record firm plays three sides of fence A British record company is covering all the bases in its attempt to score big on the coming world cltp soccer championship, reports The People magazine of London. It's released three singles, with the same tune and the same words-with one excep­tion. The records are titled "Viva Eng­land!" "Viva Scotland!" and "Viva Ireland!"-each sung with a different accent. Classified ads in the Montrose Voice bring results. Get yours to us by 6pm Tuesday to be in Friday's Voice ... and you'll reach thousands in Montrose. ' * OPEN!* GRAND OPENING ~ CELEBRATION Fresh Flower Specials Calif. Glads $5.95 (bunch of 10) Iris $4.95 (bunch of 10) Carnations $3.95/dz. Long Stem Roses $9.95/dz. & other specials Offer good thru May 25, or while supply lasts Tropical Plant Specials Large Hanging Baskets $12.95 Plus other plant specials all over the store. Houston's Newest & Best Discount Plant & Flower Shop 812 Westheimer 1-&pm, Sunday, May 23 MDA Carnival at the House of Coleman 901 W. Alabama Beer, food, booths Sponsored by The Barn, the Briar Patch, the Drum & Kindred Spirits All proceeds to benefit MDA Muscular Dystrophy Association Western Benet it 8pm-mldnlght, Tuesday, May 25 Brazos River Bottom 2400 Brazos $1 donation at the door Burgers & nachos on the patio Door prizes Mustang Band Dance contest with Trophy for best • Two Step • Waltz • Cotton-Eyed Joe • Schoddise Happy Hour 7am- 7pm Open Everyday at ?am Grant at Jackson 528- 8234 The Deep MAY 21 , 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Celebrity bartenders from Briar Patch, enar~;ch.llEf2!nK~in1d;re1dmsp1ir~itsm.B~R;~ml!l-·ilil1l~·!l1111 .. ~;;;;;;;;;:;;;:;;;:;;;;;;;;;~;::;;;;~~~~ IS YOUR TIME FOR LUNCH LIMITED?'?? PLEASE COME TO INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY . f /'AMERICAN CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ' Ii' J 11 Ji • ALL YOU CAN EAT .•• Only $3.75 111 l 1 l 1.PepperBeef 8. ChickenAlmondine • 2. Moo Goo Gai Pan 9. Sweet & Sour Chicken 3. Sweet & Sour Pork 10. Vegetable Dish 4. B.B.Q. Chicken 11. Won Ton Soup 5. Egg Roll 12. Egg Drop Soup 6. Kung Pao Chicken 13. Cream Com Soup 7. B.B.Q. Pork Fried Rice 14. Hot or Iced Tea LUNCHEON BUFFET SERVED FROM 11:00 AM TO 2:30 PM Monday thru Friday A DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY e DIFFERENT SELECTED DISHES SERVED EACH DAY* Delicious Food-Reasonable Prices Relaxing Atmosphere-Fast & Courteous Services FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA ORDERS TO GO, Tel: 523-2795 8 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 Sports MSA Tennis competitors waiting for the Texas Cup MSA So~ball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday, May 16 Montrose Mine 17 Montrose Voice Galleon 12 Brazos RB Jim'1 Gym 8 Mary's A&K Jewelry 20 Bam STANDINGS WO" '"" Pct South Division Galleon 5 2 .714 Jim's Gym 3 3 .500 A&K Jewelry 2 3 .400 Briar Patch 2 4 .333 Montrose Voice 1 4 .200 North Division Dirty Sally's 6 0 1.000 Montrose Mining 4 2 .667 Mary's 3 2 .600 Brazos River Btm 2 3 .400 Bam 1 6 .143 THIS WEEK'S GAMES {All """* It Levy Fl.td. From MonlroM, go out Ric:hmond, PHI Kirby, Jen on Eutlide.) Sunday, May 23 Jim's Gym vs. Montrose Voice, 6pm Montrose Mine vs. Brazos Riv Btm, 7pm Mary's vs. Dirty Sally's, 8pm A&K Jewelry vs. Briar Patch, 9pm LEADING HITTERS 11 1 6 14 GB 1* 2 2* 3 2* 3* 5* (Based on 15 or more at-bats through Mlly 18) PllY'lr (Team) AB R H AVG 1. D. Davidson (Sally's) 17 11 11 .647 2. J. Summerall (BAB) 15 3 9 .600 3. M. Marchena (Sally's) 22 12 13 .591 4. B. Schmidt (Bam) 16 8 9 .562 By Billie Duncan The Challenge Ladder of MSA Tennis ia becoming a battleplan with the knowledge that the top seven places on the ladder by June26, will be the people playing in the Texas Cup. Fred Lopez and Lester Vela have maintained their first and second place positions, but Bobby Hopkins, one oft~e very top players in MSA Tennis, has dropped out of the compitition for a while. Bobby has an ankle injury that is not really serious, but it is probably just as well that he resta up and re-challenges on the ladder at a little later date. Even if Bobby does not get back into the sing lea competition, he is expected to play doubles with Fred Lopez in the tournament. They are heavily favored to win that event at this point. Meanwhile, some other shaking up ia takinig place on the ladder. Newcomer Michael Green challenged Rich Corder and soundly stomped him &-0 and 6-1. . Michael ia the treasurer ofMSA Volleyball and though he proved his raquet skill against Rich, Rich insisted, "But I might could beat him at volleyball." Earlier, Rich had been challenged by 8th place Rick DuPont, who swatted his way to victory 6-1and6-2, and nabbed a 5th place on the ladder. Look for Michael Green to challenge Rick DuPont soon. Another hot match coming up should be Mario Marchena of Dirty Sally' a softball fame who ia expected to challenge on the ladder. And guess who he will play? You got it. Rich Corder. Mario is batting .591 at present in softball, and if he can swing a raquet with as much accurancy as he swings a bat, Rich Corder may seriously be thinkin;g of taking up volleyball by next week. Anyone who would like to try for ladder spot can either go to regular play on Sundays or arrange a challenge during the week. David Robicheaux ia in charge of the challenge ladder and can be reached at 666-0696. • Sunday softball The third gameolthe day last Sunday between Jim's Gym and Mary's had enough drama for a miniseries. Thegame notonlywent for 8 innings, but had a terrific last inning rush of excitement. Going into the 8th, the game was all tied up at5-5, in nobody's favor. With basea loaded and 2 out, Jim's Gym catcher David Brown whammed a double that saw 3 pairs of feet over the home plate. But Mary's ia a tenacious team. They were not about to go down without a fighL So in the bottom of the 8th, they managed to get 2 batters on base and to score 1 run. Obviously, that was 2 runs short of tying the game again and 3 runs short of winning it. Final score, Jim's Gym 8, Mary's 6, in the aecond game of the season that Jim's Gym has won in extra innings. The lead-off game of the day between The Montroee Voice and the Montrose Mining Company had a little side-bet going that added some interest for the onlookers and spurred the players to give an extra oomph. Montrose Voice publisher Henry McClurg, in a rush of team spirit and po88ibly spirits of the liquid kind, bet Mining Company manager Randolph Parks a full page ad in The Voice which Henry would pay for out of his own pocket against a night of merriment at the Mining Company on the outcome of the game. So now it ia the painful duty of the Montrose Voice sports page to report that fine, dedicated and generally good-looking Montrose Voice team will not be enjoying a night on the town at the Mining Company's expense. Instead the Mining Company gets to gloat over their victory in a full.page ad aomewhere between the hallowed covers of the Voice itself. Oh, well, it could have been worse. Going into the bottom of the 6th, the Voice trailed 12-2, but they managed to rally and scoop upa total of 9 runs at their last two times at baL But that was not enough to keep theMinersfrom taking the victory 17·11, led by the batting skills ofWayneRomero(4 for 5) and Carl Fries (3 for 4). · The Voice's next game will be against Jim's Gym. Perhaps Henry would like to bet a team workout against a cover picture of a barbell. The Galleon stretched their winning streak to 3 in a row with and easy win over the Brazoe River Bottom, 12·1. Arthur Castillo, who is one of the League's leading hitters with an impressive .538, was 2 for4 on the day, as was Don Kessler. The win puts the Galleon 1 112 gamea out in front of second place in the South Division, held by Jim's Gym. The BRB team bas recently reorganized and will probably gain some winning momentum as the season progresses. Well, in the final game of last Sunday, the zaney wildmen of the League, better known as the Barn team, again managed to pull off a real show of softball insanity, this time against the A & K Jewelry team. The Barn started off by proving what kind of power they really have with 6 runs in the first inning compared to zip for A & K. But the fun bad just begun and inning two saw 4 A & K runs. Then innings three and four saw a total of 16 more runs for A & K. The Barn scored 8 more runs in the game for a final tally of 20 for A & Kand 14 for the Barn. But the crazy part about it was that the 34 runs scored in the game came off of Z7 hits. Nine men got free tickets to first during the match and between the two teams, there were 15 errors. Bill Schmidt, who ia the Barn's top hitter with .562, was 3 for 4 on the night. He was joined by Tony Pietachner who had a good game with another 3 for 4. A & K was led to victory by the bats of Sandi Skelton (3 for 3) and Ken Johnson (2 for 4). 5. W. Romero (Mine) 18 8 10 .555 6. J. Young (Sally's) 20 9 11 .550 7. A. Castillo {Galleon) 26 12 14 .538 8. R. Martin (Volco) 15 3 8 .533 9. M. Morrison (Sally's) 19 12 10 .526 10. R. Gore (Galleon) 21 15 11 .524 11 . N. Borjas (Sally's) 16 4 8 .500 HOMERUN LEADERS (Through through May 16) Pllyer (T .. m) HR Pl119r (T .. m) HA J. DeSale (Sally's) 3 0. Davidson K. Johnston (A&K) 3 (Sally's) 2 M. Marchena B. Fike (Galleo") 2 (Sally's) 3 K. Gray (Sally's) 2 B. Schmidt (Bam) 3 D. Kessler K. Balley (Sally's) 2 (Galleon) 2 J. Moretta (Jim's Gym) 2 MSA Women's Sq~ball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday, May 16 Ducks 8 Armadillo Grph Chuck's Angels 7 Twins Royal A's 11 Special Blend Kindred Spirits 13 Hell Raisers STANDINGS w .. '"" Pct GB Renegades 3 - 1.000 Hell Raisers 3 .750 * Duci<s 3 .750 'h Armadillos Grph 2 .667 1 Chuck's Angels 2 .500 1* Kindred Spirits 2 .500 1* Twins 1 .250 2* Royal A's 1 .250 2* Special Blend .000 3* THIS WEEK'S GAMES (AHgame.11 Fonde Pllrti.. Tab l...SSouthtoTllfephoneexh. T1k1 f99der IOMu1"1Q91', right on Muno-. go 1 bfc>cl, turnfen.) Sunday, May 23 Chuck's Angels vs. Renegades, 2pm Armadillo Graphics vs. Hell Raisers, 3pm Ducks vs. Royal A's, 4pm Kindred Spirits vs Twins. 5pm MSA Bowling LAST WEEK GAMES Monday, May 17 HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Garald Hagan 253 Garald Hagan 661 Bob Craig 242 Don Housen 609 Barry Baas 220 Bob Alkins 606 STANDINGS Division A Division C 1. Daddy's 1. Slow Hand 2. 69ers 2. Black & Blue 3. Barnyard Hoers Balls 4. Tammany Haul 3. The Hole Division B 4. Strikers 1. Bushwackers Division D 2. Five Easy Pieces 1. Gator-Aid 3. Split Endz 2. Happy Trails 4. E/J's Protein 3. Sidekicks Suppllments 4. Galleon One THIS WEEK'S GAMES (All Qlime9 II Stadium Bowl, 8200 Bl'lll9lNl!n) Monday, May 24 Regular competition, 9pm Thursday, May 27 Regular competition, 9pm Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Monday, Mey 24 Kindred Spirits (5245 Buftafo Speedway, 665-9756) at 8:30pm, • Ingle ellmlnatlon, Uentry, wtnnertakeall Mary's (1022 W•thelmer, 528-8851) at 9pm Ranch (6620~ Main, 529-9730) at 9 pm, sing le ellm· lnatlon, $2 entry, wlnntr take 1/1 {$50 guarantee) TUN<tay, Mey 25 Limpest (2417 Tim• Btvd., 528-8921) at 8pm, sin· gle ellmlnatlon, $2 entry, winner t1ke all Wtdnadty, May 26 Briar Pitch (2294 W. Holcombe, 665-9678) at 9pm, single eUminatfon, $2 entry, $50 prize G.B.I. (1419 Richmond, 5~) at 8pm, alngte .t.fl.m. lnatlon, $2 entry, winner tak• all plus new P<><>' Thuraday, M•y 27 Bern {710 Pacific, 5~27) at 9pm, double eliml­n1tlon, $2 entry, $25 first round prize, $15 second round prize Just Marlon and Lynn's (817 Fairview, 528-9110) at 8pm. E/J's {1213 Rk:hmond, 527·9071) at 9:30pm, dou­ble ellmlnatlon, $2 entry, winner take all. MSA Tennis STANDINGS 1. Fred Lopez 8. David Garza 2. Lester Vela 9. David Robicheaux 3. John Ryan 10. Terry Rich 4. Jon Colbert 11. Eddie Chavez 12. Randy Jlerscheck 13. Daniel Casillas 5. Rick DuPont 6. Michael Green 7. Rich Corder THIS WEEK'S GAMES (Courtl locai.ct on the north lide of Memorial Oft¥tl In Memorial Pan..) Sunday, May 23 Regular competition, 4:30pm Last Monday saw some shake-ups in three of the four divisions. In Division A, fourth ranked Barnyard Hoers slid up to number three spot, while Tammany Haul hit the charts at position four. Daddy's and 69er's remained in the one and two positions. In Division C, only Slow Hand remained in place holding on to the number one spot. Black& Blue Balls moved from fourth to second aided by Bob Craig who hd a 242 game. The Hole moved all the way from seventh to take over the number three slot. TheStikerssank from number two to number four. Division D saw the wildest rearragement of the standings with the top two teams, Galleon One and the Untouchables taking the elevator down to the number four and five levels. Top dog in Division D now is Gator-Aid which had been in third. Happy Trails went from four to two, led by the battering balls of Don Housen who bowled a 609 series and Bob Akins who popper 606 pins for the night. Division D also has another battle going on the other end of the standings, with five teams tied for last place. • Tennis leaders Tennis has about as many leaders as players with new officers being elected and the Texas Cup organization going full swing. The MSA Tennis board unanimously elected the ever-active Eddie Chavez to the office of secretary. He is also in charge of publicity and is one of the official tennis representatives for the Board of Trustees of the Montrose Sports Association. Jon Colbert is the new treasurer, while Terry Rich has taken on the job of the telephone committee (know affectionately as "the grapevine"). · As far as the Texas Challenge Cup is concerned, Rich DuPont i& in charge of rules, top player Fred Lopez is team captain, and Rich Corder is the tournament director. • Women's support The MSA Women's Softball League is supporting the fundraising efforts of the Montrose Sports Association in conjuction with Black and White Men Together on June 19. Leslie Mullins, a Ms. Gay Pride Week contest representative, is sponseringthree booths: graphict-shirts; ballons, faces, lips, etc.; and information. The Women's Softball League's own fundraising are going well with tickets still available for their "basket of cheer" either at the games or from individual members. The " basket" is an assortment of bottles and cans of alcoholic beverages donated by Kindred Spirits with a wholesale value of $80. Saturday, May 22 901 West Alabama (The House of Coleman) Ci tv Wide Carnival for the M'uscular Dystrophy Association 1 :00-6:00 PM Sponsored by The Barn, the Drum, Brazos River Bottom & Kindred Spirits TBI BARN ~· - 'v- - ·-,,'y \.. - .... ~., ~ Houston's Friendliest Country & estern Bar SATtrRDAY, Kay 22: Pancake Breakfast 8-11am and sidewalk sale & bake sale 10am-?, both benef­iting the MDA •. SUliDAY: Buffet for the MDA. KOli­SAT: Open 7am. KOl!DAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. Also Special MDA pool tour­ney, $10 entry fee. Grand Prize: a weekend in New Orleans. TUESDAY: Steak & Mi.rguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Wednesday, May 26: MDA Show sponsored by Ron Sioux at the Lazy J Good luck to the Barn Yard Hoers and the Biddies at l.G.B.O. "Muscular Dystrophy Association 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 For better gardening, learn Latin 1982 Stonewall FeaturH Syndicate Into gardening? If you are, you'd better forget your French and Greek and get into Latin; that can save you money, a lot of disappointment, and wasted time. One of the things that happens with gar· deners ia that after the first excitement of success. they tend to get ambitious too fast. If a few plants flourish, then a dozen more will do even better. Maybe so, maybe not. Let's take an example. One of our friends lives nearby in a low valley with no direct sunlight and heavy humidity. He's had good luck in raising African violet.a and lipstick plants. He spots some­thing called "Purple Passion Vine" that loou u if it would be a fine addition to his collection. He buys it, and six weeks later Purple Paaeion goes into a blue funk and dieo. Why? Becaaae despite sharing hairy leaves with the violets and a vining habit like the lipetick'e 0 Gynura aurantica" comes from an entirely different plant family. African VJoJeta and lipstick!' are gesneriads, nearly all of which share a love for indirect light and humidity. "Gynura" is a cousin of daisies and chrysanthemums, members of the "compoeitae," and lovers of sun. One of our constant messages is "know what you're ordering:• Mailorder plants present special problems because common names for plants vary widely. "Gynura is also known as 'velvet plant: 'hairy creeper,' 'Purple p8.88ion,' and just about anything else an enterprising florist wanta to call it. But it has only one Latin name, and that name is agreed on all over the world. We're not suggesting that you go back to school for a full cou~ in Botany. We are SU&'gesting that if you really want to garden and to make your garden thrive, you ohold buy a good book with pictures of the plants you like, and familiarize your· self with their botanical names. Simon and Schuster's .. Plants and Flowers" is a good beginning. It's a $6.95 paperback with over 500 pages of photographs, as well as deBCriptions of growth habits and bloom timee. That's a good start. It could save you from the fate of one staff member here who ordered a "magic tomato vine" that was ouppoeedly froatproof. and bore hundreds of tiny delicious fruits. What she gotwaa a relative of the flower called Chinese Lant· em (Phsalio alkekengi) which gave lots of fruit. all right, but of a lute nowhere near that of a good tomato. Another recalls ordering the spectacu· lar "Empreea Tree" only to find on deliv· ery that it wu the same weedy plant he had been trying to rid his garden of for years. If he had known the proper name for the plant he ordered, he could have avoided the lose of time and money. Hard-and-fast rules about whom to order from juat can't be made on any wide­ranging ba8is. Generally, it's better to order roaea from a grower who sells only rosea, dahliu from a dahlia grower, and so on. You'll find good sources for such plant.I in the advertising sections of such magazinee aa Horticulture and Flower and Gartkn. Many nurseries do elrist that 8ell a wider range of plants, and there are many reputable ones. Still, the best course for you and your flowers is to buy them near home if you can. They will be more acclimated to your local weather, and not dazed from the shock of shipping. First. choose the flowerB or plants that you'd like to have. Then make sure you can grow them. Do they survive in your cli­matic conditions? Aze specific varieities more suited to your area? Then go to local nurseries. Even if what you want is not in otock. they may be able to order it for you. If the planta you want aren't at hand, then consider mail order, observing two cautions: Never buy plant.a by their common names. Reputable nurseries always give Latin names to avoid confusion. A com­mon name in one part of the country may refer to an entirely different 1peciea in another location. Avoid suspiciously cheap plant offers. Many of the ada you see in Sunday supple­ments offer plants collected in the wild, which will be weaker and less likely to survive the shock of transplanting. A good garden requires too much work to have it spoiled with spindly and unhealthy plants. Start with sure things and go on to the exotica later, as you gain experience. With time, you'H discover ways to pare your expenses by learning how to propagate stem cuttings and trad· ing seedlings with fellow enthusiasts. "Dishing the dirt" will take on an entirely new meaning. Spanish bachelors plea for women They can themselves "The Bachelors' Party"-they're residents of a small, mountainous region in northwestern Spain and they've got a problem: no women. The area's two small towns. they say, have more than five men to every woman, and the situation they claim is promoting alcoholism. drug abuse and homm~ex ­uality, reports the Guardian of Landon newspaper. A spokesman said that picking up a woman in their region "isn't a sin-it's a miracle;· and appealed to the women of Spain to help them out. Getting rough on rapists In an effort to "scare the living daylights" out of rapiHts, a former Massachusetts ~tate legislator has proposed castrating any man convicted twice of aggravated rape, reports the &ston Globe. Paula Lewellen says the bill she's offer· inl( would increase the penalty for aggra· vated rape to 15 years minimum for a first offense and at least 25 years plus castra· tion for a ~ond conviction. ''It's time for the fun and games to quit," Lewellen says. But the current chairwo· man of the legislatu~·s Criminal Justice Committee predicts the bill will receive a negative recommendation, saying it's "not the way to deal with a problem in a civilized society," The gentle sex gets tough in Lichtenstein Europe's last bastion of male supremacy may be about to fall, reports The Guardian newspaper of London. Lichtenstein, that tiny Alpine principal· ity wedged between Austria and Switzer. land. is debating whether to give women the vote True, there's not much to vote about: the parliament has just 15 seats, and the entire government consists of 270 employees and 40 policemen. But, while Lichtenstein may lack such modern amen­ities as unemployment, trade unions or poverty, it does have a spirited feminist movement. And now the Council of Europe sayo Lichten8tein's membership may be in jeo­pardy if it doesn't allow women to vote. There may yet be trouble, though. Male electors have twice vetoed the idea, partly out of national pride, since half the male population is married to foreign wives they met while working abroad. MONTROSE TRAVEL WHER E A LL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS 4TH OF JULY IN NEW ORLEANS 2 nights at the French Quarter Hotel $149, all inclusive MAZATLAN, JULY 3 4 wonderful days at the Plaza Del Raye $239 RENO RODEO All Inclusive Tour, $399 (Hurry, only a few seats left!) 2506 RALPH-522-8747 Back by Popular Demand The Fabulous DIXIE KINGS This Sunday, 6pm Friday and Saturday Nights Bob Williams & the Trail Riders 715 FAIRVIEW OPEN' N'oon-2am 7 days a week 521-2792 The Kampy Kapers of Keokl Kona, Wednesday­Sunday, 6pm-1am This Sunday: "Swing Into Summer'' Patio Party, featu ring Houston's hottest new group, Bob Wiiiiams and the Trail Riders plus a super buffet $1 donate at the door goes to Gay Pride Week 528-9066 109 Tuam . . L A M Presenting MATA HARi featuring MARYANNE MAHONEY every Friday and Saturday, ~h~ft'!1d Engagement Sundays-Screwdrivers, Bloody Marys, $1, 2-6pm Mondays-Free Buffet, Bpm Tuesdays-All-Women Pool Tournament, Bpm 2417 Times Blvd. 52B-B921 '--------~-..----............. ____ _ POST 2417 Times Blvd. 52B·B921 Harrars Ethiopian Cuisinr A touch of Elegance, Intimacy and Fine Ethiopian Food 428 Westheimer 526-2895 Featuring Harrar's Club Dancing 10 to 2, Mixed Music There 's never a dull moment Friday & Saturday evenings, enjoy live Ethiopian music OPEN for lunch and dinner MAY 21, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 New in Town? Open a N.0.W. ACCOUNT The checking account that pays 5114% Interest. No Service Charge on SSOO balance A Insured to 5100.000 by the FSLIC ~ cau or come bytOday ~ - MainlanJ SavitzgJ SET SAIL FOii SAFETY WE'LL SHOW YOU THE WllY HOVSTON l«l1 Al~ Partway 527 l&a6 flflENOSWOOO 102 N FOMOSwOOd Dr .. 2 J'iSJ HfTCHCOCIC 8300 H19hwav 6 - sso BAYTOWN 15<» w lallf'f n ~rm 420 S69S Open a tax deductible IRA speclalizlng In 18 month certificates Please call fer current rates. A C~lraHkl"'!KtlO~~ ~ SUllll .... l~•~rotfOl"tJl"lyW•tl'>O•,.,,I, ~ insurirouot11S(l()OOOO'f'rto•·l'klo MainlanJ SavitzgJ SET SlllL FOR SAFETY WE'LL SHOW YOU THE WAY HOUSTOf'.t Ja0'1 Al~ Pa~av 527 ""' fli!IENDSWOOO 102N F~ndswooa Or Q2 7S'U HITCHCOCK UOOH1ghwJV6 916·5St7 BAYTOWN 1309 W Bak~ Jt G.artfl •20 5695 12 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21 , 1982 -----------------------~ MAY SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85-with this ad GYRO GYROS SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 Open 11am-10pm everyday (till midnight Friday Iii Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines ~-----------------------· ------------------------• OUR SPECIAL SALE FOR YOU OFFERS • 15% DISCOUNT off our everyday, low competitive prices. • THE QUALITY WORK that earned us the reputation as the community's quality printer and s tationer. • FREE PICKUP AND DELIVERY Sale discount good for all our services, including stationery, .envelopes, business cards, general printing, typesetting, carbonless business forms, color printing. Xerox 9400 processing. When you are getting price quotes, give us a ceB 667-7417 For 15% discount, present or mention this ad Quality is the difference at SPEEDY PRINTING SERVICE BELLAIRE STORE "The Community's Quality Printer & Stationer" ------------------------------------------------,~ SAVE YOUR MONEY BY USING THIS $10.00 COUPON* AT THE SHOE WAREHOUSE 523-6606 • 2024 WESTHEIMER (at Shepherd) I "'DmRO. Levi, Convene, Pu.m~. Pony. Texas Boot. This offer expires I Minimum purchase $50. June 30. 1982 I ------------------------ "Come visit our new video game room upstairs" $1.50 OFF ANY LARGE PIZZA WITH THIS AD Montrose Voice Clip UUse COUPONS Each week in the Voice, Montrose merchants provide valuable savings through coupons. Look for this page each week. Note: some coupons are valid this week only. Others can be saved for futu re use. One of the largest gay newspapers in the country. Yes, YOUR local gay newspaper-the Montrose Voice-is now one of the largest gay newspapers in the country, with an estimated 18,800 readers each week. That's 18,800 readers all here in Houston. We invite you to come on over to the Voice-and to our 18,800 readers. We're Houston's new Number One gay publica?on-and now one of the largest gay news­papers m the country. *F'igur~ are ~· ea~ated by MONTROSE VOICE Research, following an extensive six month analy11a, _endmg with the week of Feb. 26, 1982. THE VOICE GUARANTEES ITS CIRCULATION. If _advertising aalea people from any pubhcation state different figurea ask for a "awom pnntera affidavit." The VOICE will gladly provide one. ' Call 523-0800 pick up & delivery after 5pm 2111 Norfolk S. Shepherd at S.W. Freeway FREE DELIVERY within 1 mil• radius MAY21,1982/MONTROSEVOICE 13 Conan: 'Barbarian Beef' By Richard R<>gera 1982 Stonewall Feature. Syndicate If Conan the Bo.rbarian had been made in the '508, it would have been a low-budget adventure flick with Steve Reeves and an ad campaign that screamed, "See Conan Tempted by the Seductive Sorceress! See the Man of Steel Wrestle a 34-Foot Snake! See Him Knock Down a Camel With One Blow!" I_n the inflated. 180& however, Hollywood reliee on blockbusters for survival. So this naive little tale of a Hyborian-Age hunk has been bullied into a $19 million epic, with nudity, gore, and overblown special effects. Last year, Steven Spielberg turned a serial adventure into a stunning hit with Raiders of the Lost Ark. Despite its big budget and elaborate special effects, Raid­ers never lost the dopey charm of its sour­ces. Spielberg's friend, John Milius, has not been so fortunate with Conan. He has borrowed from Samurai movies, Biblical epics, and Italian quickie flicks, then attempted to superimpose a comic view on the collection. But the gore and humor tend to fight one another. The writer/ director has peppered his tale with visual jokes, but he never achieves a style that i1 consistent. Thia is a shame, because the middle por· tion of Conan has a sense of high adven· ture and comaraderie reminiscent of Sinbad the Sailor. Arnold Schwartze­negger almost comes to life in these sequences, and Sandahl Bergman and Perry Lopez make lively characters of the barbarian's lady love and sidekick. If you're in an indulgent mood, there may be enough derring-do and visual humor to keep you amused through most of Conan. But if you're in the mood for a more cohesive work of the imagination, you may want to wait for Spielberg'• upcoming E.T. or Ridley Scott's Blade­runner. The media attention lavished on several new films haa made it easy to overlook the alow but increasing influence that the gay community ha1 exerted over the film world in the past few decades. Yet anyone who haa grown up with movies cannot forget the impact of Julie Christie's gay friend in Darling, or the daring on·acreen ki88 between Peter Finch and Murray Head in Sunday, Bloody Sunday. Ao we approach Gay Pride Week, it seems fitting to recall a sample of the films that showa a progression in the handling of gay themes, changing our awareness of ourael ves as well 88 the oonsciousnesa of the general public. Vito Russo'• important book, The Celluloid Closet, used here as a reference, is recommended to readers for a complete analysie of the subject. In the '20e and early '308,filmalikePan­dora'• Box, The Gay Divorcee, and It's Loue I'm After featured character actore like Edward Everett Horton and Eric Blore, who specialized in playing "1wiehy" valets and male secretaries. By the mid-'308, the production code of the Haya Office forbade the treatment of gay subject.matter or characters. Gay ref· erences were deleted from scripts such as The Lost Weekend and Crossfire. Kenneth Anger made the independent gay short film entitled Fireworks in 1947. Tea and Sympathy (1956) dealt with that "unspeakable topic,'' but it turned out the protagonist was just shy, not gay. Some Like It Hot (1959) played around with role reversal and transvestitism . Billy Wilder left the ending curiously ambiguous. Otto Preminger's Advise and Consent gave mainstream America it& first look at a gay bar, and a gay protagonist who, of course, oommitted suicide. Also in 1962, The Children's Hour sug. gested and then denied that heroines Aud­rey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine were lesbians. MacLaine hanged herself, just in case it might be true. Kenneth Anger's Scorpio Rising burst on the scene in 1963 to become an under­ground classic. John Schlesiger's Darling (1965) showed audiences that straight women sometimes have gay friends. An independent feature, Frank Simon's The Queen (1968) caused a stir in larger cities. The Boyt in the Band (1970) became the first Hollywood film in which all the major characters were gay. William Friedkin (of Cruuing infamy) directed. Tragic gays, including lesbians, became the rage in a wave of films that included Tiu Fox, The Killing of Suter George, Staircase, The Damned, Midnight Cow­boy, Death in Venice, and Fortune and Men'•Eye•. Entertaining Mr. Sloane, Something for Everyone, and Cabaret introduced bisex­ual chic in the early '70s. Sunday, Bloody Sunday (1971) provided the most mature view of gay love of any movie of the decade. John Waters' Pink Flamingos, Multiple Manics, and Female Trouble brought us Divine and his/her heady irreverence for traditional roleo. Truffaut's Day for Night included a rec­ognizable gay character in 1973, foreshad­owing the director's positive gay images in TM L<ut Metro and The Woman Next Door. Chriotopher Larkin'• A Vuy Natural Thing (1974) wu the first non-porno com­mercial release that dealt with the gay life­style exclusively. Of questionable artistic merit, it nonethelesa represented a break­through for gay visibility. Sidney Lu met'• Dog Day Afternoon pre­sented a real-life gay love story with a min­imum of sensationalism in 1975. Al Pacino's lover waa a tragic mess, though, and Pacino died in a hail of bullets. In 1977, two independent gay features (Outrageoua; Word ls Out) won critical and popular support. La Cage Aux Foiles (1978) stunned Hol­lywood with its box-office clout, and started producers thinking about gay­themed films. Face to Face, To Forget Venice, and The Best Way were late-'708 pictures that pre­sent. ed. responsible, non-neurotic gay male and lesbian characters. 1981 brought us meaty, humorous parts for gay charaacters in Neil Simon's Only When I Laugh and Blake Edward's S.0 .B. Movies So far, 1982 has given us maj,1r gay characters and themes in Making Love, Personal Beat, Deathtrap, Victor' Victo· ria , and Ta.xi zum Klo!I. Partners is upcom· ing. It's anyone'aguessastowhat (orwho) will jump out of the closed next! The new religious wars By John W. Rowberry International Gay Newa A1ency "With Beirut, an old dream disappears, that of the Orient. The Orient no longer exists. Actually, it never did exist. It was only a dream of the West." The seeming contradiction in these Jines, spoken by one foreign journalist to another during the 1980 war in Lebanon, ia echoed throughout VolkerSchlondorff's Circle of Deceit, where war and betrayal are wedded to rites of manhood and love. Schlondorff's first film since The Tin Drum is firmly set in the genre of the New German Cinema with it& daring composi· tion and narrative-but is unlike any film about foreign journalist& or foreigners Liv· ing in a war·torn landscape yet to emerge from the modern electronic age. The story, simply, is almost a cliche: A West German reporter and his photo­grapher companion are sent to Beirut to cover the Palesteniam uprising. The repor· ter, played by Bruno Ganz, leaves behind a shattered relationship with his wife in which nothing is what it seems· in which deceit and betrayal are aa ordmary aa morrung orange juice. When they are caught mid-argument by one of their chil· dren, they begin a quick ritual of seduction in front of the child as if the violence of the eex act would mask the violence of their paronia. Rather than have Georg, the reproter, go through the usually predictable metamorphi1i1-where he enters the war with objectivity and emerges on one side or the other-Schlondorff follows the path established by Coppola; the act of redemp­tion for Georg in which he cornea to under· stand the fighting, is so horrible aa to be unspeakable. Circle of Deceit was filmed in Beirut while the war raged on across town. Schlondorff didn't use any actual film footage or enlist any of the rebels in the making of the film-yet everywhere there is the look of euthenticity. A printed pre­face on the screen warns that every single image in the film is a work of fiction . It is, while no doubt the truth, impo88ible to believe. I can not imagine fiction created to so mirror truth with such detachment. American audiences may not under· stand the underlying factors in the war in Beirut, and Circle of Deceit does not attempt, at any point, to separate the "good" guys from the "bad." While this film ie set amid a war, and uses the metaphor of war, it is instead a film about the humam condition that becomes interchangeable under certain circwn1tances. Geori is betrayed by his wife, his peera, the Lebanese, the woman he meets and falls in love with in Beirut (Hanna Schygulla); ultimately by his pro­fession and hie own weaknesses. He doesn't return from Beirut a better man for the experience, but a changed man; perhapa a man who fits better into the landscape around him. The killer in ua all-a cliche except for Schlondorff's selec­tive handling of the sums that add up to this whole. Something muat be said about the look of Circle of Deceit; the cinematigraphy by Igor Luther is itaelf a deceptive metaphor, often filled with fictionalized "newafilm." Part of the ability of the film to distinguish itaelf from othera in the same genre is how amazingly well Luther mixes theatraight­on style of the film'• narrative with touchee that ano either copied from sheer docwnentarianiam or border on pure via· ual metaphor. The composition of key shots Oilte a recurring letter that threads the relation­ship of Gt!org with his wife back in Ger­many) are nothing short of brillant. And Luther makes even the most unbelievable film symbols-crashing waves turned blood red-workable semiology. Circle of Deceit is an intellectual exer· cise, to be sure; but one that moves with the swiftneu of a mis:ale. The gentle and biting aatire of The Tin Drum has been replaced with a focused , sharp, unsettling sense ~~ reality-as·illusion. It question& our ability to see not just the truth, but to see at all. 14 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 The mystery of 'Mummenschanz' By Billie Duncan In Mummenschanz. different is beautiful It is also humorous, touching, surprisinf and creatively done. The internationally known mime pro duction will be opening May 25 at th• Tower Theater, 1201 Westheimer, for a twc week run For anyone who has seen excerpts frorr the show, an expJanation is beside tht point. For those who have never seen tht: work, an explanation is nearly impossible. In Mumm~nschanz. a love story can be told using seven rolls of toilet paper and the talents of two people. In Mummenschanz. a long dark shape can move, twist and turn until a story emerges and tears of laughter roll down your Cace. And all the wonderful thing• that appear before your eyes are performed by only three people Peter Schelling 1~ from Switzerland, Lydia Biondi is from Italy, and John Murphy is from the good old I; S. of A.-n small but truly international cast. This will be the second time that Mummenschanz has been performed in Houston . The first time they were here was over a year ago at the Alley during the Swiss International Festival. Producer Arthur Shafman was sur~ prised to see all the green everywhere as he came in to land. Said Shafman from New York in a telephone conversation with the VOICE. "'I thought Texas was all sand."' Shafman travels a great deal and it was during one of his journeys that he dis­covered .Yummenschanz. A friend of his caught the show in Zurich in 1973 and insisted that Shafman see it. He did, and he was hooked. The original troup consisted of two Swiss mem hers and one I tali an mem her: Andre Bossard. Bernie Schurch and Flor­iana Fraaetto. They still keep a sharp eye on the ahow. coming to see it every six weeks and working up new material. The material with which they come up is generally linked to the creative use of costumes and masks. which brings up the origin of the name .. Mummenschanz." In medieval times when people would play poker. sometimes the looks on their faces would give them away, so they invented masks to wear while playing cards. In Switzerland, these masks were ca11ed "mummenschanz," or "masks of chance" The masks are still used in some European festivals to ward off evil spirits. According to producer Shafman, the most unusual thing about Mummen· schanz is the mtermission. During the breaks between ac16, the cast comes out and does improviRations with the audi­ence. The ahow is recommended for all age groups. Said Shafman, .. Adults will come to see the show and discover it on their own. Then they come back with their children and grandchildren." Perhaps Mummenschanz appeals to the child in each of us who still remembers when even the most ordinary object could take on extraordinary dimensions when a little imagination was applied. Mummenschanz will enjoy 16 perform· ances through June 6 at the Tower. Nightclub Entertainment Thie Week In Montrose (Friday ~•y21 . thtough Tl'lu...O.y. ~8)'27) •PIANO StepheNe Parti;er9pm Friday and Saturday: Aldi EHte 9pm Monday: and LM Ywonne9pm Tuesd•ythrough Thursday at Rascal•. 2702 Kirby. 524-6272 Tom Wlllam.1 5pm Friday and 8:30pm Sundliy and Tunday-Thuf"9day: Bii Hudeon 8:30pm Friday and Saturday. Mk:tley Rankin 8:30pm Monday: Jim Ce .. r Som Saturday and Sunday; and Te,... Meuney 5pm Monday-Thursday at Keyboard. 3012 Milam. 528- 8988 Salty Maps and Blty Strltch 9pm Fnday and Satur­day. Laon.hare 9pm Sunday and Monday ~ and Ruth HaaUnge tpm Tuesday-Thursday at Ba1a·s. 402 LO¥­ett. 527-9866 LH Laforge 1nd cabuet singers 8:30pm n1ghtty (except SundayJ at Arno's. -4002 Montrose. 528·2993 Bubbe I 8fft 8:30pm Frlday and Saturday: talent ahowcase 8:30pm Monday and Tuesday: and Titrn1 Mauney 8:30pm Wednesday and Thursday at Bac­chus. 523 Lovett. 523-3396 • CAGAN K.okl Kone 5pm Friday and Saturday. 3pm Sunday end 5pm Wednesday and Thursday at the Hole. 109 Tu1m. 528-9066 • COUNTRY I COUNTRY/ROCK Band-to--b&--1nnounced Wednesday evening at E/J·a. 1213 Richmond. 527-9071 Bob Wiiiams and the Traff Aklerl 9pm Friday. Satur­day and Thurad1y 1t Happy Trails. 715 Fairview. 521- 2792 Ab I the Rebel Outll'wt 9:30pm Friday and Saturdrt 1nd 8.JOpm Thursday at the Exlie, 1011 Betl. 659-- 0453. and 8.30pm Sunday 1t Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Flying Blind hnd n1ghUy (except Monday and Tuee­dly) at Mu Chutone·s. 911 Drew. 528-8840 Mu.tang a.nd 9:30pm Fridrf. Saturd1y. Wednad1y and Thur.day •I Brazos River Bottom. 2<400 Brazot. 528--9192 • GUrTAA "'L • 9pm Fnday and lrt.h Fotk 9pm Wednesday at the Pllrtour. 2402 Mandefl. 529-8069 1111 .. Dunc.n 5pm FrKiay: Lyrw'Kal Gratuwn I Und9 Aum Rhyme 5pm Monday, Tuesday and Thursday; and Raw.tyn Aunln 5pm Wednesday at Kindred Spir­its. 52-45 Buffalo Speedway, 665-9756. • SHOW GROUPS Dbl .. K'"914pm Saturday and 2pm Sund1y at Happy Trada. 715 Fairview. 521-2792 Mata Harl 9pm Frtdrf and Saturday at Lampost. 2417 Times Bl'Vd , 528-8921 John Day • Co. 8pm Sunday II EIJ"•. 1213 Rich­mond. 527-9071 • JIJ2 Robert CebeUOI Group 9pm Sund1y 1nd 'Ntlh Jimmy Ford 9pm Fnday, Saturd1y. Wednesday and Thurs­day •I Laa Brl88S. 814 W Gray. 528-9959 Paul Engkh Group 5pm daily (except ..... kendll •I Arno's. 4002 Montrose, 528-2993 Kltil Whalum nightly (except Sunday) 11 Cody's. 3400 Montroae. 522-9747 Rumors 9:30pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon­day). and Mickey Moeley 81nd 930pm Sunday 1nd Monday at Birdwatchers. 907 Westheimer. 527--0595 • IMPRESSIONISTS •TtHef any Jonn. Donna Dey. Naomi Sima & Hot Choco-­Sunday evening at the Copa, 2631 Richmond, 528-2259 UHJe Bobby. hrry Harper. TFKey and guest Sunday evening 11 Exile. 1011 Bell, 659-0453 ·p1ayg1rl Folhes .. with Laur11 Lff Lowe. Lan11 Kane. Eydie MN and guest 10:30pm Saturday at Pink Ele­phant. 1218 Leeland. 659-0040 • MISCELLANEOUS "Extrav911enu 12" 11 pm Sunday al Numb«s 2, 300 w ... ....,,,.,, 529-e551. T1tent shows Tuesday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528-2259: Wednesd1y evening at M1dmte Sun, S:W Westhelmer. 526-7519: and Thursday eve­n 19 at Twins. 535 Westheimer. 520-0244 • Duncan's Quick Notes It's Only Symphonic Music, But I Like It: Saturday night the Montrm1e Symphonic Band will be in concert at the Tower Theatre. The way advance tickeL~ are going, it jw.:it might sell out. It should sen out. The MSB is one of the finest examples of what our community can do with just talent, direction and suppoet. The program iM varied and includes clas.-ical pieces as well as marches, movie themes and standards. One particularly exciting selection is titled "Ramparts." Andy Mills beleives it typifies our com· munity because it has passion, beauty, poignancy, granduer, moments of simplic­ity and a great deal of variety. By the way, if anyone should run across someone who is selling an alto and I or tenor sax on the street, with "Montrose Symphonic Band" boldly marked on the cases, call Andy Mills at Mary's. Someone had the bad grace to steal the two instruments from the back of his car. Houston/Off Broadway Rides Again: For the third year in a row Houston, Off Broadway is doing a Gay Pride Week show Montrose Live baJ>led on the theme of the year. This year, the group will be performing the show at various fundraisers around Montrose. Last year's show was cancelled at the rally, when the entire raHy got mudded down. The year before, however, the group got a solid standing ovation from the approximately 8000 people at the Proud To Be rally. A Chocolate Season: Chcx:olate Bayou Theater, the theater with the confusing but colorful name, has announced a new season! Talk about variety. First, they will present Feydeau's A Flea in Her Ear. Then they plan to do Andrew Johns hysterical new comedy, Pipt•on.'I on the Walk. fol­lowed by John Steinbeck's contemporary claissic, Of Mice and Men. Next they wiJI present an Agatha Christie mystery,Mur· der in tht· Vicarage. Tht· i-;ea~wn will close out with Albert Innaurato's Gemini and a Houston pre. mier as yet unnannounced. The TOP~ plays are even more exciting. Of particular interest to Montrosians is that Ted Tiller·s Count Dracula will lead off the Meason, with its final performance on Halloween Other projects include Tom Topr's Nuts, Dario Fo's We Can't Pay? We Won't Pay, and William Mastrosimone's The Wool· gatherer Attention Songwriters: If you ever wanted to write the title song for an original comedy melodrama. this is your chance. Montrose-based playwright Eddie Cope has a new creataion titled Don •t Print That! that wiH open in midsummer at Theater Southwest, directed by Bonnie Mcferren. Mcferren needs to hear the song on a cassette tape by July I. All right$ to the song will be retained by Tunsmith, as the song wiH be used only during the run of the show. Don't Print That is set in 1890 and Mc Ferren pointed out, "It's America's first comedy melodrama about a newspaper." For more information, call 747":1816. 'Daughters of Heaven' soars By Billie Duncan 2n When a theatrical idea becomes impor· tant without becoming pompous and deres to take chances. sometimes the end result is very. very exciting. That is exactly what has happened at Stages with the production of a new work by Shelley Vitze titled Daul/hler• of llPavf'n. It is a theatrical docu-<lrama about the early days of women in the air. The first act chronicles the first all­women's air race in 1929, known as "The Powderpuff Derby." The Recond act fol· lows the women through 1937 and the dissappearance of Amelia Earhart The play was written from a great deal of re earch and with a realsenseoflove for the subje-ct. It has been directed with e ear, at the ded oup the dTo ~OU mg new win hen ·cal fol· ry will Ur· be rt pre- ·ng. S iR lead nee na the the fthe and first r." e air. t all· "The t fol· I the IAY 21, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Tide open and vast: That's west Texas Bob Damron , old saying goes, "The sun is riz, the sun set, and we ain't out of Texas yet." tis is especially true of west Texas, 11.ich stretches from the panhandle in the >rth, to the storied Rio Grande in the +uth. To hear Texans tell it, this is one of merica's last frontiers and "bigger than fe." Besides Amarillo, El Paso, Lubbock and >dessa, many tourists visit Big Bend and iuadalupe Mountains National Parks. El Paso is the largest and most interest· ng city in west Texas. It used to be one of ~he ''Tip.roaringest" towns in the Old West •. and had it's share of Cowboys, gamblers, gunfighters, prostitutes, Catholic padres, Spanish conquistadors El Pm10 skyline (left} and "The Frontler FamU and fuil~r~i~,,~~~~hr~~·.~~r~r::i~~~ ....... in two weeks. 1'•••••••••••••1111 During that time, she called the 99s (the original women's flying organization) in Oklahoma City to see if they had nny information on Louise Thnden, who was one of the foremost flyers of her day. They told her they would look in their archives. They looked and told her, "You're in luck. We haven'tgone through the Thaden stuff, but there's boxes of it." "When I got there," said Shelley, "it was as 1f Louise Thaden knew I was coming. Everything on the Powderpuff Derby was clipped out." One of the strangest things was that Shelley had already written a scene in which one of the characters has a news­paper and says, "Look, here's a map of the U.S. with the race route, and a picture of Louise." In Louise Thaden's memorabilia, there was a paper that had been published during that portion 'of the race, and it had the map and the picture of Louise. Several women in the cast look remark­ably like the women that they play. Vicki Bell could very welt make a career out of playing Amelia Earhart, and there is a great deal of similarity between Claire Hart-Palumbo and Ruth Nirhols. When Ellen Swenson was cast as Gladys O'Donnell, no pirture was avail­able. But Shelley finally came up with one and the resemblance was so ~triking that ''th('re was a moment of silence." accord­ing to Shelley. The cast hn8 gotten invloved in re!'Ntrch for thtir roles, even to the point of going up for flying lessons in a small propellt'r plune. Nanette Raiger who play8 Blanche Noves was on the controh.; for the first ti~e. trying to keep n eye on everything, when Nancy Lee Rogers (Louise Thaden) enthusiastically asked her, "Do you want to run lines?" Needless to say, although the suggestion had a certain charm, Nanette declined. As far as the personal reading, each actress has become somewhat of an authority on her character Vicki Bell expa1ined that Amelia Ear· hart was not brought up with stereotypical parental expectations, so she never con· sidered that just because she was a woman that she was unable to do anything that was within her capabilities. "Women's lib was not a fight to her." said Vicki, "It was a natural thing." Nancy Lee Rogers took a picture of Louise Thaden home with her and kept looking at it, trying to get a feeling about how Louise felt about things. Because of her research and her closeness to the project, Nancy said, "I know I can't meet her, but I kinda feel like I haue." Claire Hart-PaluJJlbo developed a real admiration for Ruth Nichols. "She was n survivor. She just kept on." Nichols had several crashes that almost killed her, but she never gave up. After one of her cr~shes "she was flr,ing in a body cast, settmg a new record. Perhaps thE' care and love that has prevaded the procetiS of this very wonder­ful play in process is what gives it its life and honesty. Daughters of Heal'en is playing during the Texas Playwrights FeHtival at Stages. Coll the theatre for datei;i and times. TUWU~ Tti~4TI:>~ AATHUA SHAFMAN INT"l LTO The sm•sh Broadw•y hit! ~~NfiSCHANZ IT REALLY IS FUN," CllWB• •"'"'N.Y'°0t1 ... ftlCOMHUfD IT,.. W• •i.r K•r. N. V.Tlm• MAY25· JUNE 6 . • All TICKETS AESEA\iED: Jlh !"1rt"lifi T..ws. Wrd. Thurs • 8PM - sn. S11. & S9 Fn BPM. Solt - 'iPM & lOPM SlS, sn. Sll ::\i1l=~~~A~~~·:'~~\~-~~l ~ TKKETS AV.IJLA&lE AT 1-1_. 1-.iilrt Bo" Offl("f" ~ .iill Tt<"btm.iistn- outlt•h I nlffl••nmf'nl IU IOUfMH"I" ,,./odd.I~ 94 'lhowonh Subtc'c1 lo•u•l•b.l.lt Saturday, May 15 hosted by Laura Lee Love, with Lana Kane & Eydie Mae Special Guest this week Sharie Amour Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-Bpm Open lOam Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink ! ' . ) Elephant~ "Oldest Ii< 1 f1 1 Friendliest in Texas" , . 1218 Leeland ~<-= 659·0040 MAY 21, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Announcing ou< ~nual ~ HI NEIGHBOR PARTY WateringHole Sunday, May 23 All Day- Come One-Come All Free Food, Free Beer Afternoon Band Tuesday: Steak night Wednesday: Country & Western Night, & John Day & Co. with Bob WillilllD8 & the Happy Trails Band 8·10pm Thunday: Pool Tournament 9:30pm Morning Happy Hour 7am-noon Evening Happy Hour 4-7:30pm 1213 RICHMOND • 527-9071 Extra parking on the corner Mt. Vernon &: Richmond MAY 23 1-6 p.m. 901 West Alabama COME HELP US FIGHT MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY DON'T MISS THE DUNKING BOOTH r .. ,urini< Andy \1iUs f\tary'sl Larry Bagneris tG.P.C.I Bill Bailey ITh<' Druml Ric Marino !Kindred Spiritsl Jerry Kauffman IThe Briar Patch l Terry Clark IThe Baml Marion Coleman !Kindred Spiritsl KOOL POOL, CAN-CAN, GAMES GALORE, FOOD, BEER, SOFI' DRINKS & FUN A ALL PR9CEED\BENEFIT THE MUSCL'LAR DYSTROPH\ ASSOCIATIO'I Spon.ort'd b) Tht>Bam The Briar Patch The Drum and Kindred Spirits LAS VEGAS CASf.'10 NIGHT AT KINDRED SPIRITS Spon.M)rt<f by thf' Drum ~ Kindttd Spirib for the-ir candidatts for \Ir. ic M .... C..a., Rod<'O T"uc; Thursday, ~lay 27 8-ll:30pm 5245 Buffalo Speedwa~ \II donariom to bt:ntfit tht ~tu" ular D\ .. lroph, .\. .. ~ocUtJon 16 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21 , 1982 Invitation to tbe 1982 World's Fair From $175 per person, twin occupancy, May 1-0ct. 31 lZ' 2 Nights/3 Days 3 Nights/4 Days FEATURES INCLUDE: • 2 or 3 nights accommodations including tax at The Palisades Condomini­ums. All units are fully furnished and include use of the complex's swimming pool, tennis courts, sauna and exercise room. • Economy size car rental for three 24-hour periods, unlimited mileage. (Tax and insurance are not included and are payable at the rental counter.) • Two days admission to the World's Fair For more information on this tour, and for airline tickets worldwide, call Bob Houston Travel Consultants Associated with Creenspoint Travel ~nter Pho~ a~c~~!~Z J31 c~:ursJ We offer these Creek dishes Mousaka, Pastipsio, 302 Tuam (near Bagby) 522-7040, Greek Plate Lunch. Mixed Drinks. Open Mon-Sat, HonorinR Dolmades American Express. Visa Wr 111:lso hne Fresh Baby Whole Flounder, BJiby Snappe r, Seafood and Steak PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis & Counseling Service Personal •Confidential James D. Kristian, Ph.D. REGISTERED HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep. con f idence. self-worth . shyness. memory. concen tra­tion. self-esteem. relaxation. habits love emotion OVERCOME: Fear. anxiety guilt. depres· s1on. nervousness. drug abuse. alcohol abuse. anger. lonel1 · ness. weight STUDENT AND SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977-2485 DISCOUNT FIRST VISIT DISCOUNT WITH AD Arno's. 4002 Montrose. 528-2993 Kirk Whalum nightly (except Sunday) at Cody's. 3400 Montrose, 522·9747 Rumors 9 JOpm nightly (except Sunday and Mon· day) ~ and Mlck.y Motley Band 9:30pm Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers. 907 Westhe1mer 527--0595 • IMPRESSIONISTS THfany JonH. Donna Day. Naomi Sima & Hot Choco. •te Sunday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 526-2259 UH,. Bobby. Jerry Harper. Tracey and guest Sunday evening at Exile. 1011 Bell. 659-0453 ''Playgirl Folhes" With UUl'll LH Love. Lana KllM. Eydie .... and guest 10:30pm Saturday at Pink Ele-­phant. 1218 Leeland. 659--0040 • MISCELLANEOUS .. Exll'llYaganza 12" 11pm Sunday al Numbers 2, 300 WHthelrner, 521-4551. Talent shows Tuesday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528-2259: Wednesday evening at M1dmte Sun. 534 Westhetmer, 526--7519: and Thursday e~ _.,.. T_.,,. ~'\5 W•theimer. 520-0244 MontroseLi1 based on the theme of the year. This • the group will be performing the sho various fundraisers around Montros£ Last year's show was cancelled at rally, when the entire rally got mua down. The year before, however, the gr got a solid standing ovation from approximately 8000 people at the Proue Be rally. A Chocolate Season: Chocolate Bai Theater, the theater with the confusi but colorful name, has announced a n season! Talk about variety. First, they w present Feydeau'sA Flea in Her Ear. Th( they plan to do Andrew Johns hy6terici new comedy, Pigeons on the Walk, fo lowed by John Steinbeck's contemporar cla1JSic, Of Mi<:l' and .\fen. Next they wi ~re~n~ 1an -~gatha Christie mvf<tPni \111 1 * *GRANT STREET* * * STATION * ** ** ** Everything in construction from glamourizing a room to renovating the entire manor Cabinets • French Doors • Bathrooms Kitchens • Windows • Plumbing C.H. Construction 529-3869 The exciting talents of Teresa Mauney playing for Happy Hour 5-8, Monday -Thursday MAY 21, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Doing America Wide open and vast: That's west Texas By Bob Damron An old saying goes, "The sun is riz, the sun is set, and we ain't out of Texas yet." This is especially true of west Texas, which stretches from the panhandle in the north, to the storied Rio Grande in the south. To hear Texans teJl it, this is one of America's last frontiers and 0 bigger than life." Besides Amarillo, El Paoo, Lubbock and Odessa, many tourists visit Big Bend and Guadalupe Mountains National Parks. El Paso is the largest and most interest· ing city in west Texas. It used to be one of the "rip-roaringest" towns in the Old West . . and had it's share of Cowboys, gamblers, gunfighters , prostitutes , Catholic padres, Spanish conquistadors and marauding Apaches. The first Euro­poeans arrived in 1581, and for several centuries it remainded under Spanish or Mexican rule. Today, the "Sun City" has a population of 450,000, of which more than half are Mexican-Americans. Just across the river is Ciudad Juarez, Mexico's fourth largest city with a population of 800,000. The "O.P." at 219 S. Ochoa is the super gay disco with a multiracial, unisex, younger crowd. Diamond Lil's is a fun Salsa disco at 308 S. Florence. The San Antonio Mining Co. at Ochoa and San Antonio is the best cruise bar with har­monious 50/50 split of macho Mex-Tex honchoo. Le Milord features a Spanish language drag show, while Piga11e and others offer Chicano drags and hustlers. U.S. citizens can go to Juarez without a visa, but I strongly suggest if you want to chance the gay bare and baths there, take along a well-built, knowledgable, Spanish-speaking amigo. I stay at the Holiday Inn-Downtown, but since Ardovino's closed, haven'tfound El Paso skyline (left) and "The Frontier Family" statue in Lubbock. a decent restaurant. Gillespie's is a disae· ter, and Bella Napoli, Billy Crew's, Cabal­lero or Hein's aren't much better. You may want to view the Aerial Tram· way, Fort Bliss, Old Spanish missions, Sunland Park Race Track, UTEP, or the Bull Ring in Juarez. A major annual event is the Sun Festival and Sun Bowl game in December. Amarillo is a typical prairie town with a population of 150,000. It looks better at night when all you see is theirone25-story skyscraper, brillianUy illuminated like a great white phallus. Maggie's at 1005 N. Fillmore is the moot popular gay disco, while Take Five at 323 W. 10th is a fun bar with cruisy days. I like the Hilton Inn, and for good dining try the Country Barn or Hugo's. If you get the late night munchies, hit the Union 76 Truck Stop Restaurant at I-40 and Eastern . , . which can be cruisier than Elwood Park. South of Amarillo is Palo Duro Canyon State Park, where the outdoor musical Texas is performed each summer. Nearby is Cal Farley's Boy's Ranch, "a home for boys of unfortunate circumstances." Sometimes I think I have known them all! Flat, squeaky-dean Lubbock, 175,000 population, is the home of Texas Tech. You'd think with 23,000 students, the bars would be hot ... but they're not. The Hil­ltop Club at 810 N. University is popular with women, and the owner plans a new men's cruise bar called the Texas Man Stop at 508 Amarillo Road. The other cur· rent disco is run by a non-gay foreigner, who knowa lees about operating a West Texas disco than I would a West German whore house. I stayed at the Hilton, which resembles a centra1 American Hyatt. If you stick to steaks, The Depot ill adequate, but you're better off with hambergers or chili at Gardoki'o. If the word plains, as in Great Plains, stem& from plain, as in ordinary, Ode88a must have been the model! The one mini· oasis in this drab, dusty, wasteland is the Capri, a good gay disco at 8401 Andrews the GALLEON 2303 RICHMOND 522-7616 OPEN 2PM-2AM HAPPY HOUR DAILY 2·8 Highway. The Uteso Saloon is supposed to open soon at 2425 W. Murphy. I otal'.ed at the Holiday Inn, and did enJOY a ruce steak at The Barn Door. This plain(•) town has a population of 90,000 (obviou.oly loyal) residents. Eicept f~r n«:Ighbon~g Midland, OdeoBB is really nght m therrud­dle of nowhere. The windy plains and wide-open spaces of west Texas may stir the cowboy or cow· girl in you. Personally, after a week or two with me, they bring out the urgent need to split to Dallas, Ft. Worth, Houston, San Antonio ..• or any other big cosmopolitan city. At least there, when "The Eyes of Texas are upon you," they know what they want, and so do you. CARGO HOUSE A Few- Clodt.e~ A Few-jtrt.tique~ Lots of jtccessorie~ And Clt.art.delier~ OTHER STUFF, TOOi 1802 Park St 529-0334 18 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 'Miro in America' at the Museum of Fine Arts By Ed Martinez Miro in America, the first major exhibi­tion fully documenting Spanish artist Joan Miro'& extensive impact on Ameri­can art. is on view at the Museum of Fine Arla until June 'ZI. Sponsored by Texas Commerce Banc· shares, Inc., United Energy Resources, Inc. and Gerald D. Hines Interests, the exhibition coincides with the dedication of Peraonase and Birds, a 55-foot public oculpture by Miro to be installed in the new United Energy Plaza in downtown Houston. The 11CUlpture, already downtown, has created much controversy. a.pd interest among the viewing public. This exhibi­tion. funded by Houston corporados in celebration of their monumental public sculpture, ia one of the largest corporate gifta to the arts in the history of Houston. The exhibit wu organized by consult­ing curator Barbara Rose, assisted by ll880ciate curator Judith McCandless, and features not only the works of Miro, but alRO the works .of ~ajor Am~rican artis~ whoee work was profoundly mfluenced by Miro-artiata such as Alexander Calder, Arahile Gorky and Jackson Pollock. Thie exhibit i1 the firat major exhibition to fully document Miro'& extensive impact on modem American art. It contains approximately 100 paintings with addi· tional aculpture, ceramics and works on paper which span Miro's career. The thrust of the present exhibit is that influ­ence that Miro's career. The thrust of the present exhibit is that of the influence that Miro has exerted on American artists. Considered one of the moat influential of the Surrealiots during the '20. and '30a, Miro has influenced nearly all post-World War II American abstract artists and bas been a special aource of inspiration for the New York School of Abstract Expression· ism. Miro was not especially popular in Paris, where he spent ao much time and worked eo long. It was primarily in Amer­ica that he found particular favor, and it i1 in America that he conti.nuet1 to be such a creative force. Now, of course, his reputa* tion ill firmly eotablished internationally, but be continues to feel a particular fond· neea for this country that first recognized hia genius. Miro has expressed himself strongly in interview• as displeased with seeing hill work being used as ''international bank notes." .. My art ia for the people-it is for everybody," states Miro. Which is why, obviouoly, he has been so interested in the monumental sculptures he has done, such aa the one recently unveiled here in Hous-ton. • • Mira's otyle is as difficult to describe as hia genius is to be contained in mere word.a. Only the work itself can do justice to his vision ofreality, the vivid colors, the whimay and humor inherent in all his work combine with that distinctive style that criee out Miro! His work is seldom confued with other artists, and that in itaelf ii a mark of genius, a clearly recog­nizable and highly individual style sign&· ture. A number oflectureeon Miro's work will be available to the public during the exhi· bition, which will be eeen only in Houston. Houaton ii indeed fortunate to have this once in a lifetime opportunity, one that ohould not be miased. Montrose Art Houston's turning to the VOICE! 11 SUPERB OFFICE At 3317 MONTROSE at Hawthorne Small offices & large suites available, short term and long term leases, remodeled to suit tenant Call Tim Crockett 626-8880 • • • • 11 SPACE MAY 21 , 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 T-S·O New in the Heights Merchant's Park Shopping Center 1011 N. Shepherd at W. 11th 862-3149 Optical Mgr .. C. Evans Beasley lEXAsSTATE OPTIC.AI: bZl Since 1935. LOIS YVONNE opening Mey 25 2702 Kirby 524-6272 (Stephanie Parker & Doug Mowery tbru May 22) 1ervin1 Lunch Monday·Friday 11:30·2:00 Dinner Monday·Thunday 6:30-11:00, Friday• Saturday 6:30-12:00 20 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21 , 1982 -- L.I NEW YORK $149 HAWAII $499 FORT LAUDERDALE $149 522-8227 Round Trip Air Call Rick for Details The Blue Iris a complete flower shop Singapore Orchids Lilies Plants & Gifts Total City Delivery We wire flowers worldwide 523-1827 3618 S. Shepherd Dr. Houaton, Texas 77098 ~"tbJ/ Serv~trose The ROUGH CUT * Custom jewelry design for your lifestyle * Jewelers & appraisers to the Montrose for 8 years • We also BUY GOLD, class rings, watches, old mountings, coins, dental gold • Anything made of SILVER .. . jewelry, tea sets, silverware, pre-1964 coins • Diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds Immediate cash now * FREE APPRAISAL * Tue thru Sat 10am-5pm 520 Westheimer suite K 520-7050 MALE DANCER specializes in private parties ' I ~~ for information, call 947-9478 '-----------· (mention this coupon. for average I I res1dent1af extenor for $500 before I I June 15. 82) II Commencal Residential : PAINTING I WALL PAPERING I I MINOR REPAIRS I I : : /~~# : :DON'S ~~ : 1 GENERAL PAINTING I 1522-4566 I I 791-9112 I L lntenor-Extenor __________ ... Welcomes to our staff JAN BRAHAM and LILLIE 906 Westheimer et Montrose 527-0188 ATCO PEST CONTROL • Roaches • Beetles •Anh •Moths •Fleas •Rah • Ticks • Mice SAFE, EFFECTIVE, INEXPENSIVE We feature the lowest prices In Houston, plus the best service CALL 988-1331 Award winning national political cartoonist Ben Sargent, each week in Houston in the Montrose Voice Classified ads in the Montrose Voice bring results. Get yours to us by 6pm Tuesday to be in Friday's Voice ... and you'll reach thousands in Montrose. c:Happy c:,t/nni1J<Ua•y. J\'l • \. i£f ..J:ovL, !i(Lith MAY 21, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Heritage Emma Goldman was in early fight for sexual freedoms lie fi&ure of her otature found the courap to pick up that llandard.. By Patrick Franklin 1>1982 Stonewllll Featuree Syndicaie Maureen Stapleton won her Oscar this year for playing role of Emma Goldman in Reth. But the woman ahe portrayed waa a far more complex, compassionate and ded­icated peraon that the script allowed that character to be. Emma Goldman wu a fighter, all right, and one of the fint and 1tron1eet voices for gay liberation in this century. Whether or not •he wu a sister dOND1t really matter. She wu a friend, a mentor, a pide. Emma Goldman is the model for all of uo who fight for the freedom of the in<lividual. mention. Yet 81 early ao 1900, Goldman nal theme: human freedom. For nearly 50 wu not only mentioning Oscar Wilde, but yean, ahe preached gay liberation u a decryine the lawo that put him into prioon. neceeoary part of social reform; lhe <lied a In this endeavor, she not only met the anti- quarter of a century before any other pub-apaaatohcyia ol&f tIh.e R pau<blilciacl ao ta lraer goef,t ebnu nttohta •tYoJfDhpear- -------------------------­Her birthday ii an easy one remember; it fall1 on June 27, one day before Gay Pride Day, and it mi11ht be fair for ua to com­memorate her work in eome of the 1peech&1 that go on during the paradeo and feotivitieo. She had barely reached her teen1 before launching herself into a career of protest and demonatration1. In 1893, she spent a year in priaon for malting 1peecbes "inciting to riot." Now that the mainstream public hao cleaned up her image, recoanizing that much of her "communiatic" menage waa very genuine social protest, she ii pre­oented as a ra<lical social and political thinker. We hear about her views on labor, on representation, on suffrage. What we don't hear are her equally far-1i11hted views on eezual freedom. thetic to oexual righto; think of the ram-pant homophobia of Paul Kraaoner during the free-wheeling '60o. Emma, thou11h, ignored criticism from that quarter u totally ao oho <lid from any other. Her approach wu humanilticandsen&­ible. She chided MagnUI Hinchfield for trying to make homooexualo into a ope­cially gifted "race." The emphaai1, 1he declared, wu that homo.exuala were peo­ple like any other people, neither meriting particular approval or opprobium. Emma'• constant mN88.ge waa that every peraon bu a right to live u fne and unfet­tered a life ao poeoible. COMPANY "B" Ann)J/Na~ ..,...,.,. from GJ'OUlld t1N worlll ~ Lost Our Lease Sale 5366 WE8TllEJKER ~ 10AM·6sJOPM MON.-SAT. For Emma knaw that the moot impor­tant freedom1 were thooe that went beyond the boundaries of the polling place and the preso. She fought for the freedom of the body, for the right.a of women to determine their own fatee, for abortion on request for birth-control information. She believed that if therewao a right for people to aaoemble peaceably to <liacu11 and pro­teet, there 1hould be an equally inviolable right for them to &110mble and meet one another. No one can say with eurety if she waa l'•Y or not. There exiet.s a series ofletten to her from a younger woman who waa explicit in her declaration1 of love. Emma's few repliea are touching, non­judgemental, and unrevealing. But both oho and her a.uociate on the journal Mot"Mr Earth spent a great deal of time in prioon, and both wrote of the gay love attain that went on there. Both opolte poo­itively of the real affection between membera of the same sex. ~j (TILL 7PM THURS.) \ HOUSTON '7'70S8 965-9753 The "love that dare not 1peak its name" created a man whose name no one dared to Emma lived on until 1940, 1huf!lin11 back and forth between countriee u ohe wu repeatedly deported aod repatriated. Ruaa:ia'1 iron fiat of repreuion aoured her on the revolution there, aod for all her aocialiat leaning1, ahe never stinted on her criticiam of that regime, either. But that wu merely a elooa on the eter- The response is overwhelming in support of Our 2nd Love-In Sunday, May 23, 4-8pm Hundreds of Dollars in prizes ~·< .. ,v.•< <'o,, e<f'e <f' c-"<'• """:o" ct. ~ ~'O~.a< ('\~0 '~l'i 0 1(1') ' "LT o,«0» 1)C '9 I. ~ '-""\) 90 1'.,.~ ,,.,,$,'$/ o,. ~o\~ ~·o • _.""'° -._'f\• flo9 o<I> ~ C'J, ~\ '-'''rl le~ fl~\• Contests •,, ' "'". Twist Jitterbug Limbo Hula Hoop 1950s drink prices $1 Cover, $1 Well Free Beer, Free Buffet 911 W. Drew, 528-8840 WEEKLY CALENDAR JUESDAX-FrH C&W dance lessons 8-10pm, followed by five DJ playing your requests WEDNISDAX-Steak Night, 7-9pm. 5 Buck Inflation Fighter, 16 oz. steak, bake tater, salad, baked beans, bread + 2 Free Well Drinks or All the free beer you can drink + Dancing to the Flying Blind Band at 9pm ru9SDAY-FRIDAJ-SAJURQAY­ant n' to the Flying Blind Band, 9:30-1:30, with after-hours Friday & Saturday with live DJ SYffD"f 4-8-Live DJ, Free Beer, Free Bu et, ollowed by the Flying Blind Band 8-12pm 22 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 Van Ooteghem answers critics 1982 by Gary J. Van Ooteghem Will Ray Hill and George Barnhart please atep forward onto the carpet. Up to the line, pleaae. Since your public statement& have generated a circus of false, malicious g088ip regarding my character, I ask you to step forward and be held accountable for your actions and remarks. Fint, I find it incomprehensible that you uttered any public accusations about testimony I made in a court of law, in a room distant from your own hearing, with­out fint calling me to uk for my version. You reacted when you should have rea­aoned. Something not uncommon for the two of you, I might add~ Because of not extending that simple courtesy, you have cauaed much to do about nothing. And of all that I am going to say on the matter, it is only this that I would expect an apology on. The re.t of t.hia matter concerns a dif. ference of opinion between us, which you will have to accept, like it or not. I respect the riahta of others to have differing view• from me on a whole host of matters. Not agreeing on everything is just as impor­tant agreeing on everything. We need both. Conoequently, you are entitled to your opinions and so am I. Second, and before I address the real iuue at hand, let me try to dispel many of the untruths generated by your gang of two-plus: I am not anti-gay; never have been. I am not out to interfere with the right of the French Quarter to exist; frankly, r don't have an opinion one way or the other. I have made no disparaging or spiteful remark.I concerning the lack of gay 1upport regarding my candidacy for public office. I did say, however, that no organized gay support came forward, which ia the truth. George Barnhart made the foregoing aCCU8ations and, as usual, wu way off base again. Ray Hill, on the other hand, called me a prootitute because I stepped forward and gave testimony aaainat what he calls "gay male porno flicks." Tell me Ray, how you define the word "prostitute." la it because you started a FALSE rumor (or unwittingly repeated to others) that I wu auppooedly guilty of some campaign viola­tion (there are eeveral veraions of this) and wu about to be indicted by some grand Jury? Further, that I testified for the prose-cution in exchange for them droopping an indictment against me? It would appear the only way to vindicate myself would be to be indicted for something. What non· sense, Ray. You should know better than that. I have a hard time understanding why Ray Hill or George Barnhart decided to retaliate against my testimony with a PERSONAL attack on me except that it appears baaed either out of ignorance or stupidity. In Ray Hill's cue, I suspect ignorance. Third, the issue: A. always, there are two sidee to an issue. To listen to both Hill and Barnhart, it was an anti·gay act to speak out against a film described by Hill u a "gay male porno flick." Further, they embrace the acts in this film as fitting the gay community'1standards. It is here that I draw the line and disagree with theGang of Two-plus. These may be their stand­ards, but they are not the univeraally accepted etandarda of the remainder of the gay community. For example, the film in question por­trays ... (fisting) u one ofour gay "stand­ards." I say it ia not. Hill and Barnhart would have had me te1tify that it was. If I had perjured myself, presumably they would have been happy and content. Fist­ing is not the norm or standard of this community; whether they like it or not is not my concern. The i88ue before the court was whether or not this film represented gay lifestyles. I contend that fisting is not representative of gay lifestyles. Fisting, I believe, need.I to be viewed under some other standard, but not gay. This wu the only issue I addressed in court. Personally, I believe that fisting belongs under sexual aberration rather than under any gay classifications. Too often we raise the anti-gay defense on mat­ters which are not. Wearenotexemptfrom all the rules of conduct which govern our society, even though we may like to think otherwise. I respect the righta of all persons to do as they wish with themselves and/or with other consenting adults. But I oppose, object and reject a few people placing their personal preferences up for all to view, eapecially under oath in a court of law, 88 a atandard lifestyle of our gay community. Letters & Comments It just isn't so. In the court case before us, fisting was that example. I felt it was time someone spoke out on the iasue and I did so. I was, frankly, unconcerned whether or not it was a popular thing to do. It was a statement I felt important to make. I do not present my preferences as the standard for all of us, either, and I will not permit others to intimidate me in to silence when I disagree with what they suggest our stantards are. I reserve my right to differ on the standards of our community. Hill and Barnhart do not set my stand­ards; I do! I am no one's puppet. There are those in our community who have standards at a different level than those proposed by Hill and Barnhart. I am only one, but I believe there are many others, too. Fourth, an observation: I find it strange that not a single person came forward to seek out my position on the matter before A clarification From Ed Coleman GPW Committee member from MCCR 2.Just a quick note to correct a flagrant error in the May 7, issue of The Voice concerning the May 2 meeting of Gay Pride Week Committee. In the article it was stated that Mr Larry Bagneris proposed that the man and woman Grand Marshal for this year's parade be elected by the Chairs of the committees. Not ~o! In fact a motion was made by Mr. Scott Miller that the four Chairs of the Parade Committee f'i'lect the Grand Marshals. This motion was sec­onded by me and a number of others. Right. It failed overwhelmingly, but don't give Larry the blame (or credit) for the proposal. By the way, thanks for an outstanding paper-never miss an issue. Political sayings and doings in Montrose By William Marberry When Governor Bill Clements was in Montrose to speak at Lanier Jr. High School, 2600 Woodhead, May 15 at the 13th Senatorial District Republican Con· vention he said "(Mark White) is a career politician who has had his snoot in the trough long enough." He shoulda stayed around In the same speech, Governor Clements said "the Democratic Party is in sham· bles," bogged down in all its "fussing, fighting and feuding." This remark was to praise Republican unity-and only hours before the same group became locked in a bitter, name-calling battle where the con­vention chairman was accused of trying to boost his ex-wife's slim chance of being elected to the State Executive Committee by depriving the Heights, Montrose and some minority diatricta of their delegates to the state convention. Know what the Governor's concluding remarks to the 13th District were about? "Credibility; that is what we Republicans want to stand for •. " Judge Price-is· Right? Judicial candidate Charley Price gives a clever speech in those candidate forums where two minutes is it. "My name is easy to remember: if you are into country and western, then my name reminds you of Charley Pride; otherwise, think of the TV show The Price Is Right, and remember me." Yield not unto ..• Harris County Republican Party Chair­man Ruse Mather did not immediately yield the platform when informed that Gov. Clements had arrived at the 13th District Convention. Instead, the chair· man kept the governor waiting, apparent· ly figuring his own speech of greater importance. they started their personal attacks on me. Fortunately, our local publications are permitting me an opportunity to respond to these false accusations. My response would have been made earlier, but I was out of town for 10 days. It was during my absense that the Gang of Two-plus cranked up the rumor mill against me. Convenient. Fifth, our image: It's about time we took a look at our community and the image we wish to present to the rest of society. Both of you, Ray and George, have stated pub­licly that to object to "porno flicks" is to be "anti-gay." I disagree. Come forward and make your case, gen· tlemen. I like a good fight, so let's get on with it. But no more hitting below the belt; that'• for little people or big people with little minds. Conclusion: Opinions are like assholes. Everybody is entitled to one. Mather was urging the convention delegates to stay long enough into the afternoon to maintain a quorum so the rei;iolutions before the convention could be approved, putting the convention on re­cord against porno, homosexuality, etc. Typical of Mather'H remarks were, "The pulpits are silent on moral issues, so it is up to the political arena," and "Separation of church and state usually means separa· tion of God and country." Ultimately, the morality resolutions never even came before the convention becau!te of hanky-panky .in the Nomina· hons Committee over delegate selection. Where lo eat? On June 15th, Gov. Clement.~ will be dining with any friends willing to pay a thousand dol1ara a plate, sure to be a very elegant affair. While across the street­which was not by accident-is the Harris County Democratic Party's get-together, but at only $5 per head, with acrufty attire permitted. Or for those not especially hungry, there ii; an opportunity to skip both dinners and be just as political by joining the scheduled picket of Ronald Reagan's presence in Houston the same day. Wait 'til next time Democratic Party activist Jerry Mays said, comparing this year's sedate Dem~ cratic Conventions to the action in the Republican's oeething 13th District, "I belong to lhe party that's supposed to fight. We didn't. It was rather boring." Another round? Ray Hill says that he and Gary Van Ooteghem may meet in an open forum debate soon. Hill says it will probably be the second or third Thursday in June and most likely with the refereeing being done by Interact/Houston. Fresh rumor: It has been rumored that Richard Cross, who failed to defeat State Rep. John Whitmire in a bid for the Demo's senator­ial nomination, may be planning another political adventure before long. This time to tackle city councilman Jim Westmore­land. Fun-raising fundraising When Renee Rabb announced to the May 19 Gay Political Caucus meeting that there was a Debra Danburg fundraiser scheduled at Arno's, Sunday May 23, Marion Coleman squealed from the back of the room "That's when the carnival is!" meaning the Muscular Dystrophy Carni­val at 901 W. Alabama being given by Kindred Spirits, Briar Patch, the Barn, and the Drum. With a little discussion the women discovered that the same-Sunday func· tions had little overlap. The Carnival Against Muscular Oystropy is from 1:00 to 6:00 p.m. and the Debra Danburg fund­raiser at Arno's-which is just around the corner from the Carnival-is from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m. It's bloek·u.'alkinl( lime again in Montrose The Gay Political Caucus is organizing block.walking assignments to boost voter particiapation in certain targeted run-off elections. l'he GPC will need lots of volunteers to cover short and easily walked assign· men ts on Sunday, May 30. Come to Mary's patio, naturally, around 2:30 in the after· noon for the festivities-including the band-before going out on a short walking assignment. The most politicla football End of June is the last chance for the passage of the ERA. And there are lots of people from Houston planning to go to Oklahoma City June 5 to demonstrate their support of the ERA, hoping that Oklahoma will approve it before the deadline. Local activist Carrie Richardson has been urging absentee ba1lotingin the June 5 run-off election in order to van pool to Oklehoma City. She told Wednesday's GPC meeting: "We need to support the ERA. If we can't pass the ERA, gay rights won't make it either" Whoops TraditionaJly, the GPC in Houston has been most active in the Democratic Party. Though there have been several attempts by the GPC to foster activism within the Republican Party, only recently has there been any interest shown by gay Republi· cans in organizing. FoJlowing Wednesday's GPC meeting, there were a dozen Republicans who stayed late to talk among themselves about organizing. Besides agreeing to meet again, they were also in agreement about one other thing-they did not want to be affiliated with the GPC. Explained one, "They're Democrats, we're Republicans." That is how politics is. Hill scolds 'high society' group From Ray Hill Hou1lon Human Right• Leape 2For many years now I know by sight many members of the uptight semi· closeted set. I remember their cruising the main streetifexas Avenue circuit when I was just a kid. From time to time I would see their names in the society column in one of the newspapers as: "Society Realtor was seen . "doing this or that; or "Society Decorator .. "was seen here or there. It was much later that I learned that "Society" was not in fact an adjective synomious with "uptight, closeted homo­sexual." Many of these pety-celebs cel(>­brated their names appearing in print by getting drunk and making l~te . 12-ight personal apperances at the mfamous Milby and Auditorium Hotel basement tearooms. Over the years I've felt sorry for these economically flush flunkies to the estab­lishment. They are sufficiently guilt rid den to be viewed as "good queers" by the "good ol' boy" power brokers. I even looked the other way when one of them made large contributions to the Jack Heord's gay baiting campaign ag~inst Mayor Whitmire's successful landshde But I draw the hne when I learn that some of the same people are aiding and abetting the vice squad's campaign of harrassment in Montro~e. Innocent people are being arrested and jailed . at tl_le encouragement of these anacromsms m our community. I suppose someday soon I'll have to write the column Marge Crum baker choFie not to print. Correction Last iBBue, in a comment from Ray Hill, it waa stated that the Houston Police West­heimer foot patrol was funded by Near­town Association. This was incorrect. The hiring of off-duty Houston police­men to walk the IOOto 1000 blocks of West· heimer during weekends and at certain other times is a project of the Westheimer Colony Association. MAY 21, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 23 ~ SAT & SUN ONLY ~ Sat 10-6 Sun 11-5 Do you Simmons Beauty Rest Discount Center ~ KINGS Reg $600 drive a ~ Now! For 2 days onlyl 1982 tan $11500 Camero • QUEENS Regular $400 Texas license Nowl For 2 days onlyl ZIP-805? ~ $125°0 Other sizes available BUY NOW AND SAVE!! Please call Henry McClurg u.J 523-8278 at the Voice. 529-8490 ~ Open 10-7 Mon-Fri 2115 Norfolk AT THE TOWER THEATRE IN CONCERT FEATURING SATURDAY, MAY 22. 1982/8:00 P.M. TICKETS $6.00 & $7.50 AVAILABLE AT THE TOWER THEATRE AND TICKETMASTER ANDY MILLS. CONDUCTOR 24 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat MAY MAY 21 22 MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 23 24 25 26 27 Fur addit.onal inlorm.u.111 a boat n"mt.t bRed below. k>ok for the •PGn*'rinf Offani.ubon under 'Orsuuaatione'"' in t.h• Montrme ClaMillied Selected Events through 7 Days mFRIDA Y: InteracVHouston's Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm-midnight, 3405 Mulberry mFRIDA Y: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Churcli, 5210 Fannin -.sA TURDA Y: Montrose Symphonic Band concert at Tower Theater, 1201 Westheimer -.SUNDAY: MSA's Softball League 1ames, 6pm Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastaide rlMONDA Y: Montrose Sports Bowling League games 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Montrose Sports Volleyball League gamea 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •THURSDAY: Wil<k 'n Stein eay radio 1how !Opm-midnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks 9/N 1 WEEK: Gay Pr ... Asaociation convention in Denver, May ~l 9/N 1 WEEK: 4th National Gay Invitational Volleyball Tournament in Denver, May 29-30 9/N l WEEK: Memorial Day weekend "U.S. Openly Gay" National Tennia Tournament in San Francisco 9/N 1 WEEK: Memorial Day, May31 9/N 2 WEEKS: National gay health workers convention in Houston June 4-6 9.JN 2 WEEKS: Democratic and Republican runoff electiona, June 5 9/N 2 WEEKS: Full moon, !O:OOam, June 6 9/N 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week 82 Committee meete at Kindred Spirite, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 2:30pm, June 6 9/N S WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Opening night ceremonies at Mary'e, 1022 Westheimer, June 17 9/N 4 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Citywide llart, June 18 9/N 4 WEEKS: Father's Day, June 20 9/N 4 WEEKS: Summer begins, June 21 9/N 4 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay pride forum, June 21 9/N 4 WEEKS: 6th annual San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Feotival opena June 21, lasting through June 26 9/N 4 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Bringing Men and Women Together day, June 2'2 9/N 4 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: National Day of Remembrance, June 23 9/N 4 WEEKS: Gay Pride Wttk: Gay Youth Day, June 24 9/N 6 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Hispanic Caucu1 Day 9/N 6 WEEKS: Gay Pnde Week: Montroae Sports Association va. Houston Fire Dept. ooftall gameo, June 26 9/N 6 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Parade and rally, June 27 9/N 6 WEEKS: Texas Cup June 26 at Memorial Tennis Center 9/N 6 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week parade and rally, June 27 9/N 6 WEEKS: Independence Day, July 4 9/N 10 WEEKS: 7th Annual Reno Gay Rodeo, July 30-Aug. I 9/N U WEEKS: MSA Volleyball tournament Aug. 14 at Fonde Recreational Center 9/N 14 WEEKS: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Francisco begin Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. 5 Montrose Classified BUSINESS OWNERS· (1) we h1t lree MCh .......... In tt111 d•rectCKY (a) bu11otu •l8bh1hment.1 9r11ng u d•tribuliOn pointl '°'the MWSpml*' (b) curr.nt display aclver119eB. (C) •II Houston gay blira & PfT\llll•clubs flOt"the brlnef11 ofout-ol· towri visitors) •nd {d) l'IOn-1)f'Of1t community «ganwihons EMPLOYMENT Bald male models wanted for photo­graph. No experience necessary Paid 666-7478. GAY BARS {Al Houston Tavem Guild !MfT!bet 1ndict1t1on. pllc.d 1n tt111 d1r.ctory II ~1r r9<1ueat _ .......... ~-"°"'n:...u1 . ...--..;;01r..i.u­,.. nt.1rve•n1ertainmen1 See our ad elsewhere this issue ·~ ~ Yok:e dWrtbutlon ~ts­ONdlinH !Of next IUUM Tues ' 8pm.Ma;25 lor •UU. •83 to ti. reluNCI Fn eYentng. May 28. Tun .. !lpm. June 1. lor 111ue •84 to btl ,.IMM<t Fn. evet1•ng. June 4 PERSONAL ASSISTANT: Clerical/ Max Angst's comic satire­domestic/ man Friday. Live in or out, each week in the Voice Polygraph, 650-6068 DWELLINGS & ROOM.MATES There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice Roommates of America. Room­mates make sense-socially, eco­nomically and emotionally. Service provided by professional consul­tants. Member National Association of Roommate Referral Agencies 526-!!002. Callas: (214) 458-7227 POLICE OFFICERS WANTE_O _ Women and men. Good uiery and benefitl :..~..~, ~ <!::' (~~.J, ~~of~~~ Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston In the Montrose Voice Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10C &*'regular word or 15C PEA ALL CAPITAL WORDin•pointtype,uahownhete (lfus1ng few wordl in thca aia or It oentenng on• IWM. eornput• •804• hM. ~ing ma1urnum I regul•r wordl or5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS lo• llM.) 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WOAD in 8-point type, as shown here_ (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 6 regular words or 4 All CAPITAL WORDS to 1 line.) 30C per regular word or 45C PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In I-point bold type, u ahown hero. (If u1lng few wordl In thll 1lze or If ~ntertng on 1 llne, compul• 1t $1 .50 1 llne, using maximum 5 Ngular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS loo llno.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) SOC per regular word or 75e PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, as shown here. (If using few words In this size or If cen­tering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few worda in any one aize ahould be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or IO point). Simply compute each word individually. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE JS A MINIMUM charge of 13 per classified ad. BLlND BOX NUMBERS can be a .. igned for $2 per week extra. Run the aame c/auified 4 weeka in a row and deduct 15%. If your classified ia lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper. Include your name, address and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houaton, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill. • ABAIU•-110 P.c:lftc-12t·t427 country See our ad elsewhere this issue •BRAzos RIVER BOTTOM:Z-400 Bruos- 528-11192 country .i9.i.!I AJi-l'ATCH=.22i4 ~ w:-Hoicombe--115· See our ad elsewhere this issue eCH!.sES-1411 Ric:hmond-520-1146 dl9CO ,•. .C.H, I CKEN COOP-535 WntMlmM 529· e ~""Ridllnond 521-22511 disco ~CO~VE" -':~°1!_'! "S~n'.rd--~5-2::-.:4---0-=17-=..-0 --_~ The Voice has more Montrose readers, more Montrose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One. eTHEDHl'-~ ....~..2. 1~-m=1c-- 5ee our ad elsewhere this Issue eOtFFERENT DAUM-1732 W .. thel!Nr 529· 15281 .. IMr ei:OiATI-SALL Y'S-220 Avonct•19-5211-7525 •l!IJ'-11tJ llUchmond-IZ7-t07t See our ad elsewhere this issue ~E_)(~-1E.!_1_89'1~~ Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice iaAU:ro~noJ "~5.22-1111 See our ad elsewhere this Issue eGAY BOY 1NffANAT10NAL (G 8.1.)-1419 A•chmond-526-8803 eOAANf' -ITl'tllT aTATION-t11 ,..,......_ ·-· See our ad elsewhere this Issue - ·- -·· -- .HoU:-HOuH-109 T-.--S2l-IOll See our ad elsewhere this issue eJ R .,:-a-P.c111c--521-25111 . -JUST MAAION i.LYNN·S--=811 F11rview- 528-11110 ._bta~ - ell(IHOA"D-3012 MU•m-S2MHI with piano •ntert11lnm9nt See our ad elsewhere this Issue "Montrose Art" by Ed Martinez, exclusive each week in the Voice e '"iCTNDRED SPIRITS 5245 Butt•lo s,p-:twty~758 predomln.nUy ~n .e.L...A MPolT~~17~1 .....~ ._. See our ad elsewhere this issue eLAzY J· -312 Twm-521-9343 e loAD1NG ooci<-1735~mer-5.2{). 1111 Mthl>rd11CO e1MA,.n:...1022 w .. ~n.:e.1 See our ad elsewhere this Issue Attend MSA softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside eAMIONITE su;i.534 W•theimer-52&-7519 dllCO, •ho- .m-CHMLOTTi-a:..:i-11 W. 0--:.21- IMO country See our ad elsewhere this Issue eMONTAOSE M1N1Na co· -I05 Pie111c--52i- ~~ - - ---- ·- - •NUMll"I 2-JOCI Wnth•lrMr-SH-4511 ~-See our ad elsewhere this Issue -iPIN-K-l.L.IPHANT.:.1211 !;.._;,-.,,-Do40 See our ad elsewhere this Issue eRANCH::=eiiO~ l,q•!!_:::_~~-1-730 __ eMICM..~2702 K...,.-12M212 "';;1h-;;;: taur1nt.Mein1erta•n"*"t See our ad elsewhere this Issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice eR~W~2W92ii:e;-i,..n •e. T..W., 1NS::-"5W9i1"9.,..,.r~520-0244 i..o..n eVfNT\JAl-N-212> ... !n-122..0000-­See our ad elsewhere this issue ORGANIZATIONS Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ASTRO Rainbow Alhenc.-524-4193 (YOiee & TTY} BERING ~!al Methodist Church 1440 Hawthom9-526-1017 United Methocli1t wor· lhip temce 10:50am Sun iiLACK I WHITE MEN Togeth« (BWMT}-529- 500fl. 747-9812 (MonlJOM) cHuR~C-H~OF~C~H~.=,.T~--.~,.~..~w~.- .• . hel!Mf-7n ·9'lee worWup MMCa 12-30pm """ CHURCH OF CHRtSTIANFAITH--413W•lhel- ::.;,~:~~ ~~, TUM ~1 ng1 ct101r pnlcilCtl ~- .....ning Max Angst's comic satire-­each week in the Voice CifiZENs FOR HUMAN EOUALITY (CHE)­eoe Fenn1n 11301- 23&-ellM board n.et1ng ltCOnd Tue.ct.vs COLT 45-S (aodal cklb)-meett et Btato. Riller Bottom, 2400 BrUOt-526-9192 ,C,O ..M..M..U NITY COFFEEHOUSE- prot-ct ol CONG BETH CHAIM meet11 at MCCR, 1'119 O.C.tur- 529-4878, 524-6190: Ml'Vlce I 10Cl1r 1pn 19eond I fourth Frldll)'I CONROE AREA Gay Women-756-0354 COURT OF THE SINGLE STAR "'"11 et Pink Ei.pMnt, 1211 Leeiand-e59-0040 CRISIS HOTLINE 221-1505 The Voice has more Montrose readers, more Montrose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One. DATA PAOFESSIONAL.S-mMtl et Le Ouintli Motor IM. 4015 Southwlill Fwy.-622-7909. 523-M22: meeting NCOnd Tueedllys DIANA FOUNOATION-2700 Muon-524--5711 OIGNITY- rnMtl 11 C.thok 511.ldMll Cen19f 1703 Bol1ov1r- 528·784' mfftlng• 7pm Saturdays EPISCOPAL INTEGRITYI Hou.Wn--meets et Aulry ~. e2M Mlll~26--0MS !Meting 7~ MCOnd Tueed1ys Tremendous circulation in Montrose--the Voice FAMILYiFRiENDS of Gliy.-864-6339 FIRSTUNITAAIANChurch-5210FlfW'ln-52&- 1511: WOl'Shlp MNlce 11:1$am SIJn GREENSPOINT/ FM1HO Aru Fu-Awly Frlenc»-121-1111 GAY I ALIVE Sti.ring Experience (BASEi 521-1311. 52t-Olt1 GAY ARCHIVES of T-- projecl of lm.r.ct GAY ATHEISTS Leap of ArNrlc8 524-2222 GAY HISPANIC CAUCUS-2722 Newm11n 112- 521--0037: mMtl 3rd Thuf'ldlyl GAY ITALIAN Group--521-11&44 GAY NURSES & PHYSICIANS of Houston-c:/o GPC. -4800 Mii in 1211- 1n-2211 GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPCJ-4800 M1in • 217-521·1000: g.ner•I bu .. neH meeting 7 30pm f1r11 Wedneed1ys; educ.lt!OMI forum 7 30pm thin:! WednMdays Attend MSA softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside OAYPRIDE WEEK 82 Committee-meets 11 Kindred Splnts. 52•5 Buffllo SPMC:fwliy-7M · :!s~;~:=~;;...'"~·~,,~--- HEPATITUS HOTLINE Jim or David et m- 2297 • pro)Kt of GPC'1 Med•Cll Commilt9e HOME COALITION 1409 0.kdale-521-0199 HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH Al h•nce-729 Manor-5:n-41888 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice Houston Af911 GAY & LESBIAN ENGINEERS & Scl ent l ata · 52 11 -7388 mutt 7pm •th Wedneadlya ~OMMUN ITY ClOWNS-882.a:J1• .H.O.U. STON HUMAN RIGHTS LEAGUE 523- HOUs=T=o~N~M~oT=o=.~c,~C~lE~C=lU~B-<I~.~. ~..,- .,.-•. 1022 WMthllmer- 5211-11851 HOUSTON TAVERN GUILD: members Include Bldl1nd1. Bem. Dirty S.lly'• , Exile, Mary·• . Mld­nlte Sun, Truck Stop Pulitlzer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice e KPfT "-doo. F~1il0¥9tt~ otOOO: "WllcM 'n Stein~ ~Y rw:uo lhoW 10pm­midntght Thurs LAMBDA ALANON-mMtl et lit Unilltr\an Church. 5210 F1nn1n- 521-tn2 mMtin; Frf 9119nin0 LESBIANS & GAY PEOPLE In Miedieine-865- 47tl0 meetJno 7:30pm first S.turd•va "Montrose Art" by Ed Martinez, exclusive each week in the Voice Max Angst's comic satire-­each week in the Voice MONTROSE CIVIC Cklb (NMnown) meets It B«ing Chun:h. 1...0 Hawtnorne-522-1000 meetmg 7 30pm tounh TUlldaya MONTROSE CLI N tC- 1~ WettheuMr 528- 5~1- open ll-10pm Fri. 1-Spm Sun , ll-10pm TUM. I Thurs MONTROSE COUNSELING Center 900 Lewitt ~~~~~~~~.~~j~'/_.Mllth work«I MONTROSE PATROL 520 WHlhlimer 5211- 2273 MONTROSE SINGEAS-meeta II MCCR. 11111 =~~~~·":""'::.=T=s~.~ssoc=".'." T "'1'°'•o""'°M(°S"A°"1- 822-330< MontrOM Spot1I BOWllNG playa I t Stadium Bowl. 8200 Br...am&in-lllO 15111. 11111-1523 gamea Mon. & Thurs. ftenlrtga The Voice has more Montrose readers, more Montrose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One. MontroN Sports SOfTBALL 523-a9» dlys. 5ZJ..<M13 ....... ..uon p11y ~rH 17-July 111; pleyofta July24-Aug. 1 MontroN Sportl WOMEN'S SOFTBALL 721- 9371 MonlfOM Spom TENNIS-52 .. 2151 : Texas Cup June 211 et MemoNI Tennil Center: "V. S ep.niy Gey• NlllOMI Tenni1 Tourn1ment In S.n Francleco Memorill Dey WMltend MONTAOSE SYMPHONIC bend meets at Ber· Ing Chul'Ch. 1...0 Hlwtho~27-tllllt' mMt· Ing 730pm TUM.; conc.n llpm Maly 22. Tower ThUl9f, 1201 w..thillT* MUSTANGS (toeill club) meeta It the Bem. 710 Peciftc-521--9427 . club night Thurs OPERATION DOCUMENTATION project of GPC RICE Univ Glyl L..Ciln Suppor1 G~524- 07" TEXAS BAY AREA Oeys-332-3737- ..-M•ng Thufa_ ..-.nlng Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice TEXAS GAY CONFEfilENCE IX 1111-7231 , =.=c.~~ t&T~~1 tc111Avondalll; TEXAS OAV TASK- 'OACl!:-629-7014. 522- 11159 atlte conf9Nnce In Houlton Sep!. 3-5 TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Foundation 15111 Mlryland-52'Ml131 -TEX-AS- R1IDE Rs-c/o Mlry'1, 1022 WMtn.1- UNITAAIAl<W'UNIVERSALIST 0.y C.ucu1-c/o 1•t Unltlnt.n Church, 5210 F.-.~~20-97117 521-6842; meeting ttlWCI Sun. al'temoonl WESL.AYAN FELLOWSHI.,_....... WESTHEIMER COLONY ARTS Aaocilt!Jon­llOll W..thefmer-521.0133 tall fMlvlll Oct 1&- 17 MAY 21, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 25 Tongue in Cheeks Codes take the surprise out of an encounter By Peter Harrison Peeking in at a singles bar for hip swingers hllB made me aware of how much of the magic and mystery we l18ed to knowiegone. The atmosphere in the place waa a familiar combination of heavy hunting vibes and jubilant freedom familiar from the daye of the mid-'608, when gay bars became explosively and openly gay. Before that time, we sneaked into "mixed" bars, nudged around bumpy numbers dropping key worda in hope that they would be picked up-hoping we would be picked up. Then, if you got lucky, you went home and happily took what you got. Now, I find myself surrounded with mating dances and costume codes BO complicated that they make Hapaburg court ritual look as simple ae dialing the time of day. It all started with those damned key chains, or rings, or what­ever you want to call them. Top men were euppoeed to wear them on one eide, bottoms on the other. I never could remember which waa which. I have problems making left and right turns in traffic. Besides, was the location in question the left when cruising the backside, or the left when contemplating baaketview? Unsatisfied with those deviliah devices, someone dreamed up a color code for hankies that haa become Byzantine beyond belief. Suppoeedly, everyone wean a color to indicate his sexual needs and practices, and the location-right or left again-indicates the role he takes in its execution. Right or left from front or rear? And what color means what? The only one I ever recall i8 yellow, which helps only in eliminating prospective partners in an act I don't get into. Then, there are those cute T-shirts that are meant to make things easier. Humbug! When I first aaw a torso marked "hard," I got an entirely erroneowi impreBlion that wasted a lot of time for me until I saw his partner, "easy." "Slave" sounded interesting until I noticed that he waa already accompanied by a "Master." Now there's a pink triangle T-shirt, and I'm not sure that I feel easy with that at all. The Lambda symbol i8 just as much to the point and has far more poeitiveconnotationa. You can adorn your bod with symbols which about out your intimaate measurements and CQnditions as well aa social comments of all kinds. It's juet the kid in me, I gueea, but I miee the good old days when aurprise wae a basic element of the sexual game. What fun i8 it to open a birthday present that announces what's inside and how to use it? Same here. Five minutes into conversat.aion-no, make that at first glance, you know your prospect'• sexual habits, dimeneione, frequency of usage, and pretty nearly what he expects for breakfast in the morning. And so, of course, does everyone else. When you leave the bar with an industrial-size, uncut, red-kercheif-right-pocket, key chained and booted gentleman, your evening ia plotted out ae surely ae the steps of a gavotte. No chance to embroider your love life with sweet fibe of wanton freedom; your lieteneni will know what you were up to, and probably how it went and for how long. Bring back serendipity! How nice it would be to open up the '50s and be able to eay, with real feeling, "How generous of you!" or even, "Well, it's the thought that counts, isn't it?" instead of the usual examination for truth in advertising. After all, consumer fraud can put a bigger dent in your enthW1iaem than no expecta· tion at all. Bring back surprise! Ah, the joy of that Marine who loved to sleep on his stomach. Ah, the excitement of that stockbroker who turned out to be Attila the Hun in pin-etripee. At the moment, tha hets are one atep behind and eome fun in advance of us. My prediction ia that this, too, shall paes. In time, we'll eee little gold "D'e" on the collara of female dominatarices, tiny Hershey miniatures for Mr. Good bars, and clerical collars for missionary·position-only fans. By that time, I hope to introduce my innovation to gay bars: a raffle that mates patrons by number. Everyone goes home with somebody and we all get surprised. •1982 SICIMw9U FMtvr. ~- 26 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 21, 1982 Gary Larson "Well, no wonder! . . This ain't the place." Never, never do this Wm119rs MMI. g,.pple, mllk• friends. All 50 Ntee. a.II 1tylel lnfonneihon •nd hot aamp6e ~lne$3 NYWC,SIWest10thSt ...... YM. NY 10011 . Join 1.19--MMt tM nng lluctsl PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS GWM, 28, ,.... lo H01J1lon, Mekl comrao.rle •nd fri.ndahip w11h other GWM. 1&-30 Photo Incl i.tt•r with dncrlpt10n, hk .. and d11hk•. lnterwt1, etc. will ~ ... Mme Gary, POB 6294, P ... oen1."'TX"-7'-'-7008=----­Am d;-ivlng to northeast Ohio over Memorial weekend. Seeking rider(s) to share driving and expenses. Leav­ing Thurs , May 27, and returning to Houston Tues., June 1. Those interested phone 472-0250 anytime for details Gary. f;o~f.rotC.rd ... .ori1p1usln0-::: V>dUlihHd lr\alNChOl'I $19 i5 MC/VISA Moon­rlH. 801t 20007, Hou1ton. TX 77225 Thol'l\H-John G,........ ee&-4878 RMdltr 1v11i.­ble lor peiniM. pn....,11counM1ing lnpert0norby ~~-- Garage sale. Furniture, clothing, etc Saturday and Sunday, May 22 and 23, 10 to 6, 2617-A Grant, 522-Q500. Relax and enjoy the BodyWorks massage. Gift certificates. Call Bill, 526-2470 evenings, weekends f:i.!"fca~';f~~~=~~~s~~;~ ALONE? NO LONGER! Our beauti­ful people (men or women) will accompany you while you enjoy Houston more. TexEscort. 751- 9000 Attend MSA softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside Going on a trip soon? Is there gay life in Bellevlew. Nebraska? Walla Walla, Washington? The Gay Switchboard of Houston will be glad to tell you abo
File Name uhlib_22329406_n082.pdf