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Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981
File 008
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Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 008. 1981-05-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5891.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-05-01). Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5891

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 008, 1981-05-01, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5891.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 1, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript / was impressed with the fairness of your presentation of the conflict. How have psychiatrists reacted to your book? In general, they have been surprisingly favorable. I decided early on that a political diatribe would serve no useful purpose. I believed that a stance that allowed the material to speak for itself would be of great importance. The truth in such bitterly contested subjects is very important. / know passions ran very high in those days. Yet you were able to give a step-by-step account of things that were happening without being on sides. To capture the passion of the struggle without being swept away by it was harder than I could have imagined. Today, seven years afterward, the feelings of the gays and psychiatrists are still quite strong about those events. The only place I found your own values coming in was in the last couple of pages of the book—where you warned about the possibility of a reversal of the Psychiatric Association's decision to remove homosexuality from the list of diseases. For me, the possibility of such a reversal must be seen in the context of the awful changes now occurring in American society. The change in psychiatric thinking in the early 1970s has to be understood in terms of the major social upheaval in the United States of the 1960s and the 1970a—the rise of feminism, the rise of the civil rights movement, the anti-war movement, the generational upheaval. All those things lent force to the struggle on the part of gays. Those changes began to shatter some of the conventional thinking on the partof psychiatrists. I think we are in a very different social and political climate right now. The mood of the country is profoundly conservative. The social movements of a decade ago have lost their strength. America is beginning to recognize the lose of its international standing, its loss of control of international resources. All those things are leading to a conservative social atmosphere. We are eons away from the exhilarating days of turmoil. It's impossible for me to imagine that this change will not affect the ways in which society thinks about gays—and as a result the ways in which psychiatrists will think about gays. You mentioned that we have a conservative cast in the country right now. Do you think there is going to be a right wing emphasis on instituting more repressive laws about homosexuality? I think that in particularly benighted local communities there are possibilities that a reversion to the most repressive kinds of legislation is possible. It's awfully dangerous to predict what will happen in other places across the nation, but I do think this is going to be a difficult time for gays—as I think it will be a difficult time for women and for blacks and people who generally don't have power in our society. How can gays defend themselves against this? The only way gays can protect themselves is to maintain a position of organizational vitality—such vitality is unfortunately one of the victims of a period of general social conservatism. Gays will have to struggle against the tide, and against the desire of many in a time of repression to pull back and seek anonymity. It is one of the ironies of the period that every minority group, every weak group, will seek to hold on to what it has, not linking itself to other groups that may be losing power and prestige. Yet, the only way each minority group can protect itself is by acknowledging the links it has with other groups. You spent a lot of time on this book, researching it and writing it. Has it changed any personal attitudes of yours? About gays? It taught me to appreciate, in a way I could never have appreciated before, the extraordinary difficulty of the struggle against social conventions that are "internalized." It also provided me with important insights into the ways in which "client groups" can alter the relations of power between themselves and professionals who seek to dominate them. In terms of your work and your colleagues who found out what kind of book you were working on: Did any of them wonder about your motivation? Wondering if you were gay or coming out ? At least one. There are multiple motivations—some hidden, some conscious—for why one undertakes any piece of work. But, for me the motivations were primarily intellectual and those that weren't intellectual were political. For me, it was the great challenge of this project to try to understand the relationship of the struggle of gays to other social struggles. To understand what that struggle shared with the other struggles of the 1960s, and how it was different. Following blacks, for example, gays were to challenge the cultural domination of those they viewed as oppressors. But gays pioneered the social struggle against the psychiatric establishment. They challenged those whose power was justified as benign. You're saying gays made a great contribution.... Yes Gays transformed the critique of psychiatry from a literary critique into a social movement. That was an enormous social invention. We forget sometimes that ways of struggling are social inventions. To study men and women involved in casting off conventional ways of under standing the world and involved in the search for methods of changing the world provides a moment of hope in these times. May l, 1981 / Montrose Voice / Page 7 Hoafaft Grand • A musical romance from rhe hearr of Broadway - Order your tickets today' 8:00 p.m. Saturday May 23 Sunday May 24 Tuesday Mav 26 Wednesday May 27 Thursday May 28 Friday Mav 29 Orch. A-V SIB S18 S18 S18 SIS $18 Orch. WBB SOLD OUT S15 S15 $15 $15 S15 Orch C.C HH $12 $12 $12 $12 $12 $12 Boxes SOLD OUT S18 $18 SOLD OUT $18 $18 Grand Tier SOLO OUT $15 $15 $15 S15 S!5 Mezzanine SOLD OUT S 8 $ 8 S 8 $ 8 $ 8 Balcony S 8 S 6 $ 5 S 5 $ 5 S 5 GROUP RATES — call 227-0091. No refunds, no cancellations. All dates, casts and repertoire subject fo change. SINGLE TICKET ORDER FORM Mall to: Houston Ticket Center, Jones Hall, 615 Louisiana. Houston, TX 77002 (PLEASE PRINT) Name. _^__ - nav ptlone . City_ _ Eve Phone_ . State FIRST CHOICE SECOND CHOICE D Enclosed find check tor total amount (Payable to Houston Ticket Center) D Charge my account tor the full amount a VISA D Mastercard D American Express Service Cherge No. ol seats x .75 = Also enclosed is my tax-deductible donation in the amount of Account # _ Signature . -Enp- TOTAL TOTALS
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