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Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981
File 006
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Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 006. 1981-05-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5889.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-05-01). Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5889

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 006, 1981-05-01, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5889.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 1, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript May i, 1981 / Montrose Voice / Page 5 Texas /The Nation Texans take a hard line on "victimless" crimes HUNTSVILLE-Only slightly over half, 58%, of 1306 Texans surveyed in May by the Criminal Justice Center of Sam Houston State University think homosexuality, per se, should be illegal, the school announced through a Houston Chronicle article April 24. The question on homosexuality was one of sevceral in the survey. On other subjects, 72% said they believed marijuana use should be against the law, 85% said they thought there should continue to be laws against public intoxication, 44% thought gambling should remain illegal, 45% thought attempting suicide should be illegal, and 69% favored keeping prostitution a crime. Regarding alcohol, including the current 2:00 a.m. bar closing time, 47% said the laws were not strict enough, 46% said the laws are "just about right," and only 7% said the laws should be relaxed. Gay press meeting in Dallas DALLAS—A convention of gay-oriented newspapers and magazines was set to get underway May 1 through 3 at the Melrose Hotel in Dallas' Oak Lawn section. The meeting was being organized by Joe DiSabato, director of Rivendale Marketing in New York, an advertising representative specializing in the gay media. Among the subects planned to be discussed was organzing an interconnected news service among the gay publications. Basics of the idea were discussed last year at a similar convention in New York. At that meeting, it was Publisher Roy Hall of the Metro Times of Dallas/Fort Worth that suggested the next meeting be in Texas. Dozens of publishers and editors were being expected. Rep. Fields claims survey results say voters not for gay rights WASHINGTON—Rep. Jack Fields, the Republican attorney who last fall ousted Texas Congressman Bob Eckhardt, claims 96% of those answering a questionnaire he sent out oppose "using federal money to provide legal representation for homosexuals in gay rights cases," AP reported. The questionnaire went to residents in his conservative northeast Houston district, AP said. The question on gay rights was one of several. Fields claimed the answers show his constituents generally back the Presidents economy programs, favor less government regulation and want a strong military, AP reported. Whatever happened to Leonard Matlovich? SAN FRANCISCO—Leonard Matlovich, the gay Air Force sergeant forced out of the service but then awarded $160,000 so he wouldn't sue for discrimination, is moving to nearby Guerneville, Calif., to open up a pizza parlor. s This according to San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen. Guerneville is "getting gayer all the time," Caen added. The name of the restaurant will be Stump Town Annie's, Caen said. Matlovich was ousted from the service on homosexual charges in 1975 and the government agreed five years later to pay the money to settle the court battle. In return, Matlovich, a decorated Vietnam veteran, agreed not to seek further damages or to re-enlist in the service. In pressing his test case for gay rights, Matlovich had said he would try to rejoin the Air Force to serve as an example to the other homosexuals serving in the military. The financial settlement was prompted after a U.S. district judge had ruled in September 1980 in Matlo- vich's favor on his civil rights suit. At the time of the ruling, Matlovich, 38, was working for an auto dealership in San Francisco, where he had become active in local politics. His Washington lawyer, Patricia Douglass, was quoted as saying then, "I think it's a satisfactory settlement for Mr. Matlovich's part." Matlovich was discharged after twelve years in the service when he wrote a letter declaring his homosexuality to Air Force Secretary John McLucas. Matlovich was a technical sergeant and went to court, but a federal district judge originally ruled against him. Then, finally, in 1978, an appeals court told the federal district judge to reconsider the case on grounds the Air Force's homosexuality standards were vague and needed clarification. Later in 1978, that judge ordered Matlovich reinstated, declaring that without clear reasonable regulations, the Air Force could not discharge Matlovich. The standards said homosexuals will be discharged except in "unusual circumstances," but the appeals court said the standard never defined those circumstances.
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