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Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 001. 1981-05-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5884.

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(1981-05-01). Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5884

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981 - File 001, 1981-05-01, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5905/show/5884.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 27, May 1, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 1, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript MontroseVoiee THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, ISSUE #27, PUBLISHED WEEKLY Names in the news, this week: Writer Ronald Bayer Part 2 of the inside story on how gay lib turned around the American psychiatry establishment. PAGE 6 The Organizers of Friday May 1, 1981 Good Evening 11-h'oee weather tonight: Cloudy and warm with a 30% chance of thundershowers and a low of 68°. Sunrise: 6:38AM. Saturday: Continued cloudy with a chance of thundershowers and a high of88°. Sunset: 7:59PM. av Run 81 , includfng (center) Advocate news editor Scott Anderson, In Houston this past week searching for a local correspondent. PAGE 2 Also inside-Supreme Court aides with Garv Von Ooteghem, but It's bac{ to the Appeals Court anyway. PAGE 3 Gay Time magazine coverboy Leonard Matlovich, opening a pizza parlor. PAGE 5 In the Montrose Crossword-entertainers Ernestine and Tiffany, and the Mining Company's most handsome bartender. PAGE 13 PAGE 2 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 1, 1981 The Montrose Voice -w-elco1D.es you to Texas A message to the Gay Press - Association, meeting this week in Dallas at the , Melrose Hotel Thanks for chosing the Lone Star State for the convention. We hope you enjoy our Texas hospitality. . The Nation Federal appeals court knocks down sex­uality as factor in awarding citizenship RICHMOND, Va.-A West German native who was denied U.S. citizenship based on his homosexuality should now be granted that citizenship, ruled the Fourth U.S. Circui t Court of Appeals April 27, news servi­ces reported. According to UPI, the court said U.S. District Judge Oren Lewis had erred in refusing to give citizen­ship rights to Horst Nemetz, who was operating a hair­styling salon in nearby Springfield, Va. • Lewis had earlier ruled that Nemetz had not estab­lished "good moral charac­ter," stated AP. Nemetz, 41, who came to the United States in 1967 and applied for U.S. citizen­ship nine years later, UPI said, testified that he had been living with an Ameri­can man he met six weeks after his arrival and that the two of them had a relation­ship as lovers. A hearing examiner of the U.S. Immigration and Natu­ralization Service rejected Nemetz' application for citi­zenship in January, 1980, reported AP. The news ser­vice said that the INS stated that Nemetz had "failed to demonstrate that he is a per­son of good moral character due to his admission of the acts of sodomy." Sodomy is illegal accord­ing to Virginia law. The appeals court said however that Lewis should not have used state law in making a decision, saying it believed Congress "did not intend purely private sexual activities to act as an abs<>­lute bar to a finding of good moral character," reported AP. "Nemetz's homosexual activity cannot serve as the basis for a denial of a finding of good moral character because it has been purely private, consensual and without harm to the public," UPI quoted the three-judge appeals panel. Continuing: "The record indicates that Nemetz in all respects sustained his burden of proving good moral character. He testified that he has been steadily employed and earning a good income since his entry into the United States, and he submitted affidavits of witnesses that he had been a good businessman and friend." Richard Murray, Nemetz's attorney, was reported as saying his client is "deligh­ted" with the decision. But Nemetz is "tempering his joy" because of the possi­bility that the decision may be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, Murray was quoted. UPI said it was initially unable to get a comment from Justice Department attorney Margaret Perry. Second annual 'Gay Run' set for July 26 SAN FRANCISCO-A foot race hoping to attract national gay participation will be held July 26 in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, organizers of the event announced. Titled "GayRun '81," it was organized byThe Advo­cate, a national gay news­magazine, and Frontrunners, a San Fran­cisco gay running club. The event was first held last year and, according to race director Scott Ander­son, "Response to last year's race was universally favora­ble. We expect to attract an even larger and more diverse field this year." The organizers said nearly 500 runners from ten states and three countries competed in GayRun '80. Frontrunners pres.ident Jim Milton emphasized that the race is open to everyone. "Last year's event was very successful in creating good feelings within the gay and straight running com­munities," he said. First prize for the winner of the race (to be determined by a drawing among the div­ision winners) will be a week's cruise for two in the Caribbean, they said. Entry blanks will appear in The Advocate or can be obtained by writing Gay Run '81, 1730 S. Amphlett, suite 225, San Mateo, CA 94402, they said. 'Dynasty' relying on gay theme to pull ratings The theme of ABC's Dyn­asty, the network's answer to CBS' Dallas, a continuing prime-time soap-opera-type drama, in recent weeks revolved around the trial of the star of show, who is accused of murdering his son's gay lover. In the script, the star, who is immensely rich and the leading citizen in the com­munity, came home one eve­ning nnd found hie aou embraced in the arms of the son's lover. Reacting with rage-the prosecuting attorney called it homophobia-he struck his son's Jover, who then was killed, and here's where the prosecution and defense disagreed. The defense claimed the blow, not sufficiently hard enough to kill, caused the lover to fall backwards, hit­ting his head on an object on the floor, killing him. The defense further maintained that the star's action was reasonable, saying the lover was trying to seduce his son. The trial is set to continue this week on Monday night at 8:00 p.m. on channel 13. Organize,.. of GayRun '81 survey the course in San Francisco'• Golden Gate Park, ecene of the planned July 26 race. PHOTO: CINOY C'HARU:S - .er ed LV­a he ~ te 2, - '• MAY 1, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 3 Supreme Court dis­misses county's appeal of Van Oote­ghem's suit WASHINGTON-The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed an appeal from the Harris County government April 27, which was trying to over­turn a lower court decision ordering it to reinstate with back pay its former assist­ant treasurer, Gary Van Ooteghem. Van Ooteghem was fired in July 1975 by County Treasurer Harstell Gray after Van Ooteghem had threatened to lobby on behalf of civil rights for homosexuals before the Commissioners Court the legislative body of the county government. The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans had agreed that the firing violated Van Oote­ghem's free speech rights. Gray's successor, Henry E. Kriegel, then carried its appeal to the Supreme Court, which refused to review it, but did so "without prejudice," which meant the county was being allowed to have another hearing on its appeal before the lower appeals court in New Orle­ans. However, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals had decided in early March on its own motion to rehear the case en bane or before the full body of federal circuit judges. This was very unus­ual, County Attorney Mike Driscoll was reported as say­ing, adding that a decision more favorable to the county was being made possible. Originally, U.S. District Judge Ross N. Sterling in Houston had ruled in Van Ooteghem's favor and ordered him reinstated with $56,046.92 in back pay plus attorney's fees. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the ruling, noting that a new work schedule for Van Ooteghem, who had previously set his own hours, could not be jus­tifed for any reason "other than the desire to thwart Van Ooteghem's lobbying on behalf of homosexuals." Since Van Ooteghem was hard-working and intelli­gent, the appeals court said, there could be no other rea­son for his discharge. In appealing the case to the Supreme Court, Harris County officials claimed it did not present an issue of "censorship of speech," but only a question of whether an employer may fix hours and place of work and fire an employee who will not comply. The courts had no evi­dence to find Van Ooteghem was discharged for any rea­son other than refusing to work his a88igned hours, county officials claimed. They also said the suit was between Gray and Van Oote­ghem, and the county itself should not be required to come up with money for the back pay award. The exact sequence of events of his firing were as follows: Van Ooteghem, who had been on the job six months, returned from vacation, told Gray he was homosexual, and would be appearing at a public session of Commis­sioner's Court to urge the county commissioners to adopt regulations protecting the civil rights of homosex­uals. Gray instructed Van Oote­ghem that, no, he would not be allowed to conduct politi­cal activity on "county time," which he defined as the regular work hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Gray demanded that Van Ooteghem sign a letter to that effect. Van Ooteghem refused and was fired. Since the firing, Van Oote­ghem had been involved in a variety of ventures, includ­ing the publishing of a biweekly gay newspaper, Upfront America, until ear­lier this year. ~~~~~T~~8 :;~~)J~~ ~/C::li•ht>d every Friday. Offices: 3520 Montrose, 1%Rl. • u · · Phone (713) 529-8490. Cont..nt. copyright Office hours: 1-Bpm. ~l~~::e1z~=~::~~~~ORIAL: Henry M<-Clurg, publisher,editor. Ed Items appearing in the Voice accredited to Co 1 . Francisco Chronicle Features Syndicate, Surbur~:.; .,.'t!e7• ServiclJ, ~t:d Feature Syndicate are copyrighted by thoaeconcem11 an~: urea, or m the Voice for use in this newspaper. All other itema i:et~ur~f!-aed by oopyright by the Montrose Voice. e 01ce are POSTMASTER: Send addr_ee~ correc~ion1a. to 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Hou1tton, TX 77006. Subscnption rate m US: $39 per year, 52 iaauea, ors24 for 1ix montha, 26 iseues. ADVERTISING: Randy Brown, director. Advertiaing deadline: Tuesdays, 7:00pm. National advertising reprnsentative: Rivendell Marketing, New York . In April he was operating a computer company that specialized in accounting services. Judge questions verdict over Montrose/ southwest Houston cable TV franchise Whether a federal judge would back up a jury's deci­s10n awarding $6.3 million to a rejected Montrose and southwest Houston cable TV company was in doubt April 25. U.S. District Judge Carl 0. Bue was studying whether to support the multi-million dollar award to Affiliated Capital Corp. A jury on Feb. 17 found that Gulf Coast Television Co. and Houston Mayor Jim McConn had illegally con­spired in awarding the fran­chise for this portion of the city to Gulf Coast. A federal judge may change the decisions of a jury in cases such as this. Juda'e Bue said he hit a "roadblock" in trying to spot the evidence in the case. He gave lawyers for Affiliated two weeks to point it out to him. The jury found McConn, the city government and Gulf Coast guilty but Affil­iated said it would not penal­ize taxpayers by accepting any public money for the fine. Meanwhile, an unprece­dented hearing on whether Bue should outright void the cable television franchise of Gulf Coast remained post­poned after Affiliated had filed a new motion. Affiliated April 13 asked that it be allowed to argue for the injunction as a "poten~ tial consumer of cable servi­ces" as well as a competitor deprived of a franchise by unfair practice. Gulf Coast was awarded the franchise in 1978. Montrose News 'Chronicle' article credits gay political power The role of gay people in Houston politics has become "difficult to ignore," said Houston Chronicle political writer Nene Foxhall in the April 26 edition of the news­paper. "The endrosement of the Houston Gay Political Cau­cus now is sought by many candidates and few, if any, office holders or candidates risk public attacks on the homosexual lifestyle," Fox­hall wrote in the newspap­er' s weekly "Houston Politics" column. It went on to describe con­ditions in 1973 when the situation was different and politicans either shunned gay groups or outright ridic­uled them. City Council settles lawsuit The Houston City Council April 22 agreed to the $13,400 settlement of a 1977 lawsuit against several Houston officials over an ordinance that made it ille­gal for members of one sex to appear in public dressed in the clothing of the opposite sex, the Houston Post reported. The settlement was reported to have included $900 in damages to seven "Jane Doe" plaintiffs and $12,500 in legal fees for their attorneys. City Council repealed the ordinance after court pro­ceedings over its unconstitu­tionality was started. The plaintiffs said the ordinance violated the civil rights of transsexuals under­going presurgery treatment, a process requiring that men desiring to be women dress like the opposite sex for one to two years before surgery. Named in the 1977 suit were all members of the City Co':'11cil, the mayor, former pohce chief Pappy Bond and police officer R.C. Horn. Splash Day is Sunday GALVESTON-The annual "Splash Day" at Stewart Beach is scheduled for this Sunday, May 3. Stewart Beach is the favorite area of gay men and women and the annual Splash Day draws thou­sands from Houston. Jimmy Bartlett, who oper­ates a mobile disco service in Houston, said there would be a gay T-dance in the Bam­boo Hut noon to 4:00 p.m. 'This year we'll be inside the Bamboo Hut, and not actually out on the beach, but it'll be great," he said. Montrose recreation center planned Houston City Council late last month approved a con­tract with Mosely Associates to prepare plans to construct a recreation center in Cher­ryhurst Park, 1700 Missouri. The planning project was approved April 23 to be funded by the city's park bond fund. Montrose bank suffers $20,000 loss in check scheme An Atlanta man was charged in Houston in late April with operating a check-kiting scheme which authorities said cost banks $150,000, including $20,000 at Allied American Bank in Montrose, reported the Houston Post. David P. Rhodes, 35, was charged April 22 before U.S. Magistrate H. Lingo Platter with willfully and unlaw­fully overvaluing deposits at various financial institu­tions, the newspaper said, with bond set at $50,000. An affidavit by FBI agent John F. Foley said Rhodes overvalued his account at River Oaks Bank and Trust by passing insufficient funds checks drawn on checking accounts in Hous­ton and on the East Coast under different aliases it was reported. ' The agents affidavit said that River Oaks official H. Butler McCauley had advised him that the bank had been told by the Hous­ton Check Clearing House that Rhodes had used six ali­ases. PAGE 4 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 1, 1981 Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland, Houston 77002 659-0040 with your hostess, Laura Lee Love starting May 2, 10:30pm ($1 cover will go to performers) HAPPY HOURS Sunday: noon-8pm Mon-Fri: 4pm-8pm open 10om Mon-Sot, noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE ® WORLD'S LARGEST BOOTMAKER MEN'S WESTERN BOOTS SPECIAL SALE s3900 Quality Boots, Belts, Clogs & Accessories Dingo, Frye, Levis, Acme, Justin, Debpost, Wrangler, Senta Rose, Chippewa Open 9am-8pm Open till 9pm Sat. during mer Arts Festival 912 Westheimer at Montrose 524-7859 Announcement to Gay Clubs, Organizations and Shops The Gay Pride Week Guide Book Com­mittee will be soliciting advertising for this year's Guide again this coming week. But you can help by calling us to to reserve your space and help your community with it's biggest-ever Gay Pride Week. 529-8496 weekday afternoons A wide variety of sizes and types of ads are available-to fit any budget. This year's full -size color Guide is scheduled for release three week's prior to Gay Pride We e~ . w_e have artists available 1f you need help in designing an ad. The imf ortant thing is to call us early this coming week i you have not yet been contacted. Pro~its from the Gay Pride Week Guide go the Gay Pride Week Planning Committee, the non-profit organi­zation of volunteers planning your Gay Pride Week. THE SUNDANCE CATTLE CLUB INVITES YOU TO JOIN US SATURDAY, lOPM MAY 9 FOR OUR OFFICIAL CLUB COLOR BANGING ALL TEXAS CLUBS INVITED FREE PARKING FREE ACROSS THE STREET HORS D'OEUVRES AT FIRE STATION • BEER BUST FREE WEENIES ANDFIXJNS NOON-7PM 8AT·8UN THURSDAY MOVIE 9 :30PM JUtBJUlELLA • -' SNEAK PREVIEW (IPM, FREE NACHOS WELCOMING OUR NEW NEIGHBOR-TB& MONTROSS PUB u t tu in cl la 4 ab sa rel - n I DA ga am ge th1 Ho sec 1 or~ dir ket ad BP• mE plE' or1 co an CU! COI Pu' Mi We ne: l edi - MAY 1, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 5 Texans take a hard line on "victim­less" crimes HUNTSVILLE-Only slightly over half, 58%, of 1306 Texans surveyed in May by the Criminal Justice Center of Sam Houston State Uni versity think homosexuality, per se, should be illegal, the school announced through a Hous­ton Chronicle article April 24. The question on homosex­uality was one of sevceral in the survey. On other subjects, 72% said they believed mari­juana use should be against the law, 85% said they thought there should con­tinue to be laws against pub­lic intoxication, 44% thought gambling should remain me­ga!, 45% thought attempting suicide should be illegal, and 69% favored keeping prosti­tution a crime. Regarding alcohol, includ­ing the current 2:00 a.m. bar closing time, 4 7% said the laws were not strict enough, 46% said the laws are "just about right," and only 7% said the laws should be relaxed, Gay press meeting in Dallas DALLAS-A convention of gay-oriented newspapers and magazines was set to get underway May 1 through 3 at the Melrose Hotel in Dallas' Oak Lawn section. The meeting was being organized by Joe DiSabato, director of Rivendale Mar­keting in New York, an advertising repreHentative specializing in the gay media. Amon g t h e subects planned to be discuBsed was organzing nn i nter~ connected news . service among the gay pubhcation8 . Basics of the idea we_re ?'-•­cussed last ;rear at a s1m1lar convention m New York. At that meeting, it was Publisher Roy Hall of the Metro Times of Dallas/Fort Worth that suggested the next meeting be in Texas. d Dozens of publishers an editors were being expected. Re:p. Fields claims survey results say voters not for gay rights WASHINGTON-Rep. Jack Fields, the Republican attor­ney who last fall ousted Texas Congressman Bob Eckhardt, claims 96% of those answering a question­naire he sent out oppose "using federal money to pro­vide legal representation for homosexuals in gay rights cases," AP reported. The questionnaire went to residents in his conservative northeast Houston district, AP said. The question on gay rights was one of several. Fie ld s cla imed the answers show his constitu­ents generally back the Pres­idents economy programs, favor Jess government regu­lation and want a strong mil­itary, AP reported. Whatever happened to Leonard Matlovich? SAN FRANCISCO-Leonard Matlovich, the gay Air Force sergeant forced out of the s ervice but tht•n awarded $160,000 so he wouldn't sue for discrimination, is mov­ing to nearby Gue~eville, Calif., to open up a pizza par-lor. . to S This according an Francisco Chronicle colum­nist Herb Caen. Guerneville is "getting gayer all the time," Caen added. The name of the restau­rant will be Stump Town Annie's, Caen said. Matlovich was ousted from the service on homosex­ual charges in 1975 and the government agreed five years later to pay the money to settle the court battle. In return, Matlovich a decorated Vietnam vete;an agreed not to seek furthe; damages or to re-enlist in the service. In pressing his test Texas/TheNation case for gay rights, Matlo­vich had said he would try to rejoin the Air Force to serve as an example to the other homosexuals serving in the military. The financial settlement was prompted after a U.S. district judge had ruled in September 1980 in Matlo­vich's favor on his civil rights suit. At the time of the ruling, Matlovich 38, was working for an auu; dealership in San Francisco where he had become active in local poli­tics. His Washington lawyer, Patric ia Do uglass. was Q:)on. 't ..£.e.ar.re. .,,fl(~ '.Jfti~ <WaH quoted as saying then, "I think it's a satisfactory set­tlement for Mr. Matlovich'a part." Matlovich was discharged after twelve years in the ser­vice when he wrote a letter declaring his homosexuality to Air Force Secretary John McLucas. Matlovich was a technical sergeant and went to court, but a federal district judge originally ruled against him. Then, finally, in 1978, an appeals court told the federal district judge to re<'ons1der "THRUST" MAY 20- 9PM-Till? the case on grounds the Air Force's homosex uality standards were vague and needed clarification. Later in 1978, that judge ordered Matlovich rein­stated, declaring that with­out c lear reasonable regulations, the Air Force could not discharge Matlo­vich. The standards said homosexuals will be dis­charged except in "unusual circumstances," but the appeals court said the stand­ard never defined those cir­cumstances. AN INTENSE PARTY WITH SPECIAL GUEST HE~MA HOUSTON ADVANCE TICKETS $5 TICKETS GO ON SALE MAY 1 AT PARADE COAT CHECK ADVANCE TICKET HOLDERS ARE INVITED TO ATTEND A PRIVATE CHAMPAGNE PRESS PARTY FROM 8PM·9PM ADVANCE TICKET SALES END MAY 11 D.J.-FRANK COLLINS TICKETS WILL GO ON SALE AT THE DOOR FOR $7 STARTING AT 9PM Feature Writer Ronald Bayer traces the gay liberation movement through the American psychiatry establishment By Dr. Charles Silverstein (Editor's note: Last week, we presented a review of Dr Ronald Bayer's new book, Homosexuality and American Psychiatry: The Politics of Diagnosi., (Basic Books, New York). This week we present an interview with the author conducted March 22 when he met with Dr. Charles Silver­stein. Silverstein's interview focused on the issues and themes raised in Bayer's study of the struggle on the part of the gay community to force the removal of homosexuality from the list of psychiatric disorders. Bayer has been an Associate for Policy Studies at the Hastings Center since 1978. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago, and is a Poet-Doctoral Fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Charles Silvenitein, Ph.D., is a psychologist in private practice in New York City. He is the author of Man to Man: Gay Couples in America, and is co-author of The Joy of Gay Sex. It was he who actually made the presentation on the reclassification of homosex­uality before the Nomenclature Committee of the American Psychiatric Association.) You have just written a book on homosexuality and Ameri· can Psychiatry. What makes it different from all the other books on gay topics that fill the sh•foea? In the great battle between the gay community and American psychiatry-a battle over whether homoeexuality should be called an illneSB­three themes are united in a striking fashion. First, I tried to trace the radical transformation of the self.perception of gays in the period since World War II-that is the transformation marked by increasing self·affirmation and hostility to psychiatry. The second theme has to do with the 1hifting attitudea of American society toward sexuality in general. Under· standing the struggle for gay liberation is imJl()88ible without understanding the changing attitudes toward sexuality, a change marked by the acknowl­edgement that sexual pleasure ia an end in itaelf and does not receive its justification from procreation. The third theme has to do with the ohifting attitudes of poychiatrista towards sexual· ity and ho11101exuality. All three themeo are part of the politica of diagnoeia. What do you mean by "T~ politics of Diagnosis"? The American Psychiatric Aasociation (APA l's decision on hom<»exuality waa politi· cal. First, because it involved the play of bitterly antagonisti­ca l social forces locked in controversy in a furious battle. The victory of gays was the result of that struggle Secondly, I believe that on the most profound level all diag­noses are political; they represent .social choices about human behavior and they represent decisions to classify certain behavior as acceptable or unacceptable. What made you, as a social scientist, write a book about homosexuality? I've been interested in the relationship between psychia­try and society, between psychiatry and the law. I spent a number of years studying the problem of addiction and the way in which the medical profession tried to reinterpret the meaning of addiction "transforming" it from a crim~ to a disease. Then I became interested in the psychiatric effort to explain crime and juvenile delinquency. Several years ago a psychoa­nalyst at the Hastings Center suggested to me that as a non-psychiatriat I might be able to write an interesting account of why psychiatry removed homosexuality from its sick list, "The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual." I liked the challenge of being a professional outsider peering in. You mentioned drug addic­tion and crim£ and homosexuality-so you are really talking about a basic question of how psychiatry gets involved with social problems rather than personal problems. I don't see it quite that way. I believe psychiatry became involved with "both" social and personal problems. The two are linked. In the Twentieth Century psychiatry began to assume a very inportant role in the United States in trying to explain, to control, to cure behavior that in other periods would have been called sinful or evil. For those who were appalled by the brutality of the law, the .. intrusion"' of peychia~ try was seen as a great advance. After all , it was better for doctors to treat addicts than to have them thrown into jails and beaten over the head. In the same way, it was thought to be an advance for psychiatriet1 to work on homosexu~lity. After all, if homosexuahty was an illne .. it was wrong to puniah homosexuals. From the van­tage of 1980, that may s~em otrange, but it was only thirty yearo ago that gay men and women themeelvee were debating the queation of whether homosexuality wae a di&eaae. Then what went wrong with this idea? Or do you think anything did go wrong? Because society remained hostile to homosexuality, medicine became part of the apparatus of social control and condemnation. The psychiatric outlook became a key element in society's continuing hostility to homosexuals. On a social Jevel, psychiatry served to bolster the status quo. The label "sick" provided justification for outrageous social practices-though, for instance, Freud always opposed the anti-homosexual restrictions of his time. You mentioned a couple of minutes ago how sjn became translated into eickness. Jn researching this book, you spoke with quite a few psychia­trists and psychoanalysts. On the basis of your experience with them, did you find that they were in fact talkinR about sin but calling it aickneaa, or do you think they really had a more objective uiew? Many psychiatrist.a believe that the advance of psychiatry as a " science" has made possible the replacement of values by "objective truth." They believe that disease like the .. disease ofhomotiexuality" exist in nature, are discovered like microbes. I think they are wrong. In fact, the point of my book is to show how social values determine our beliefs about health and illne88, When Irving Bieber says "all psychoanalytic theories 'begin' with the assumption that homosexuality is an illneos," he proves my point. There ie no question for me tha.t the psychiatric claesification of homoeexuality as an illness reflecte the cuJtural·religious values of our society-so does the classification of schizophre­rua. Psychoanalytic investiga­tions seek to explain how homosexuality comes into existence. The psychoanalytic PAGE 6 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 1, 1981 investigation of homosexuality can't tell us that homosexuality is an illness. In what ways did psychiatry have an impact on the way gays viewed themselves? In the early 1950s many gays believed that they were sick. There were great debates on the iSBue in the Mattachine Society and in the Daughters of Bilitis. Often gay groups invited proponents of the sickness theory to address them. One of the tasks of my study is to trace the way in which gays first accepted, then struggled with, the psychiatric perspective. Like Albert Ellis? Yes, Albert Ellis, who madeit very clear that he thought that homosexuality was a neurosis, was a key figure at meetings of the Mattachine Society-he was a guest of honor at conventions! Mattachine would invite him over all the time, and he would stand up there and tell them how sick they were and they would applaud. What accounts for the change? How did gays come to reject Ellis and the other psychiatrists? I believe that the struggle of gays for a shift in their status in American society was dramati­cally influenced by the power· ful political upheaval of the !960's-the struggle of blacks for civil rights, the feminist movement, the anti-war movement. Of course there were forces inside the gay movement, too, but the charac­ter of the gay struggle would have been very different in ways that are scarcely imagi· nable without those other movements. I can remember that many of us looked upon the black movement in particular, an~ the begmnings of the women 8 movement as our gu,de. The feeling wa• that they were a model for us How did gay groups successfully force psychiatrists to re-think the issue of homosexuality? That story is the central concern of my book. Briefly the mobilization of the energ~ of social protest-energy that was both intellectual and forceful. rational and coercive, com­pelled official psychiatry _to rethink the issue. But J>8.ych1a· trista did not oimply capitulate in the face of a powerful assault. They began, under gay pressure, to rethink the question of homosexuality. It is inconceivable that the change could have occured without that pressure. Psychiatrists who claim that the change was the result of research and changing theories are wrong. They mystify the process. There is no question that the APA change made a lot of gay people in this country, and perhaps around the world, feel better about themselves. They claim that if we admit that they have the right to declare we are not sick, we implicitly give them the right to declare anything they want to about us. To take that position, one has to assume that psychiatry as a social institution isn't very important. I think that ignores the power that psychiatry as a social institution has in the United States. Despite the claims of critics like Thomas Szasz, psychiatry is not as dominant as the church in other period a of history, but itie powerful and its influences are very important. Sometimes those influences are subtle, somtimes not so subtle. The decision to focus on psychiatry was a terribly important one. Gays, like Frank Kameny (pioneer Washington, D.C. gay activist), chose it as an important target Ronald Bayer PHOTO, RICHARD NEUGEBAUER in fashioning a movement for social liberation. Your poaition then is that anyone who feels or felt that we shouldn't fight for those <:hangea is ignoring the fact that the APA is very powuful and it is better to have them a~ friends. At least not as enemies. More important than the change in official labels, however, will be the consequences. How will psychiatrists be taught about homosexuality? What will their textbooks say? How will "gay" psychiatrists be treated ~Y their colleagues? What role W!ll official psychiatry play. in opposing anti·gey aoc1al practice•? These are .•ome i•au88 1 try to touch on in my book. It is stiJl too soon to answer any of these questions in a definitive manner. They are crucial, however. co im l hi we ac ha •id str aw cou sev fee ps str T. ow the boo the the deci uali F rise men the E thos· stru1 Tho oom thin! trisu It diffe clim1 the con1 mov1 hav1 AmE re co inter of C< reso• lea di atmo from tu rm It'• imag not E socie aa a poycl gay a Yo. a co coun thin. righ in1t1 laws !ti beni1 th er• rev er kind• It' pred other but! - I was impressed with the a difficult time for gays-as I 81 fairness of your presentation of think it will be a difficult time t/i,, conflict. How have psychia- for women and for blacks and trists reacted to your book? people who generally don't ul In general, they have been have power in our society. surprisingly favorable. I decided early on that a political How can gays defend them-diatribe would serve no useful selves against this? purpose . I believed that a The only way gays can stance that allowed the protect themselves is to sts material to speak for itself maintain a position of organi-would be of great importance. as zational vitality-such vitality The truth in such bitterly is unfortunately one of the nd contested aubjects is very victims of a period of general g. important. social conservatism. Gays will t}i,, I know passions ran uery have to struggle against the high in those days. Yet you tide, and against the desire of r were able to give a step-by-step many in a time of repression to account of things that were pull back and seek anonymity. eel happening without being on It is one of the ironies of the ey sides. period that every minority ey To capture the passion of the group, every weak group, will re struggle without being swept seek to hold on to what it has, ve away by it was harder than I not linking itself to other re could have imagined. Today, groupe that may be losing ut seven years afterward, the power and prestige. Yet, the as feelings of the gays and only way each minority group psychiatrists are still quite can protect itself is by acknowl- a strong about those even ts. edging the links it has with ry other groups. es The only place I found your You spent a lot of time on this a own values coming in was in book, researching it and he t/i,, last couple of page• of the writing it. Has it changed any he book-where you warned about personal attitudes of yours? as the possibility of a reunsal of About gays? as the Psychiatric Association's It taught me to appreciate, in in decision to remove homosex- a way I could never have is uality from t/i,, list of disease•. appreciated before, the extraor-re For me, the possibility of dinary difficulty of the struggle es such a reversal must be seen in against social conventions that e, the context of the awful are "internalized." It also changes now occurring in provided me with important n American society. The change insights into the way1 in which ly m psychiatric thinking in the "client groups" can alter the early 1970. has to be under- relations of power between r atood in terms of the major themselves and professionals ), social upheaval in the United who seek to dominate them. et States of the 19600 and the 1970s-the rise of feminism, the In terms of your work and rise of the civil rights move- your colleagues who found out ment, the anti-war movement, what kind of book you were the generational upheaval. All working on: Did any of them those things lent force to the wonder about your motivation? struggle on the part of gays. Wondering if you were gay or Those changes began to shatter coming out? some of the conventional At least one. There are thinking on the partofpsychia- multiple motivations-some trists. hidden, some conscious-for I think we are in a very why one undertakes any piece different social and political of work. But, for me the climate right now. The mood of motivations were primarily the country is profoundly intellectual and those that conservative. The eocial weren't intellectual were movements of a decade ago political. have ~01t. their strength. For me, it was the great America 1e heArinning to challenge of this project to try recognize the lose of its to understand the relationship international standing, its loss of the struggle of gaya to other of control of international social struggles. To understand resources. All those things are what that struggle shared with leading to a conservative social the other struggles of the 1960., atmosphere. We are eon1 away and how it was different. from the exhilaratin& daya of Following blacks, for example, ~ turmoil. gays were to challenge the It's impossible for me ~o cultural domination of those imagine that this change will they vie~ed as oppreeeors. But not affect the ways in which gays pioneered the social ~ society thinko aboutgaya-and struggle against the poychiat-u a result the ways in which ric establuhment, They peychiatrists will think about challenged those whose Power gaya. was justified as benign· You're 1aying gay• made ca ~ You ml'ntioned that we have great contribution .... a con1~rvatiue ca•t ln the Yea. Gays transformed the country right now. Do you critique of psychiatry fro~ a ~ thinlc there is going t~ be a literary critique into a social right·wing emphas11 on movement. That was an initituting more rl'pr~s1uue enonnous social invention. laws about hom,01exua.lity? We forget sometimes that y I think that m particuh1~ly ~ayo of struggling are social 1 b . ghted local comm um bes mventio.ns, To study men and t~~:e are possibilities tha~ a women ~nvolved in casting off reversion to the most repres~1ve conven~onal ways of under-- kinds of legislation is possible. ~tand1na: the world and It'• awfully dangerous to involved 1n the search fo predict what will happe'! m methods of changing the world other places across the nation, provides a moment of hope in but I do think this is going to be these times. MAY 1, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 7 A musical romance from the heart of Broadway - Order your tickets today! 8:00 p.ni. Saturday Sunday Tuesday Wednesday Thul'lday Friday May 23 May 24 May 26 May 27 May 28 May~ Qrch. A·V- -- - $18 $18 $18 $1S $18 $18 Q_rch. W-88 SOLO OUT $15 $15 $15 $15 $15 Orch, CC-1-'H $12 $12 $12 $12 $12 $12 Boxes SOLO OUT $1S $18 SOLD OUT SIS S1S Grand Tier SOLD OUT $15 $15 I - $15 $15 $15 Mezzanine SOLO OUT $ 8 $ 8 $ 8 $ 8 $ 8 ll_a!cony $ s $ s $ s $ s $ 5 $ 5 GROUP RATES - call 227-0091 . No ·efund no ~ 1nce ff1t1onJ. All dates. cnts 1nd 1epert0trt sub1e<:f ro c,.,1nge SINGLE TICKET ORDER FORM Mail to: Houston Ticket Center, Jones Hall. 615 Lou1s1ana. Houston, TX 77002 (PLEASE PRINT} Name _ ---- Day Phone ~------- Address ----- Eve Phone. ----------- City_------ ------ Stale_ ____ Zip #ofSHll FIRST CHOICE I SECONn CHOICE TOTALS CATE I LOCATION I PRICE I CATE I Loc ... TioN I ;,"a- I I I I I __ ,__ 0 Enclosed find check tor lota1 amounl s~oca Charge NO. Of Hiii - - I( 75 • (P1y1ble 10 Houston Ticket Cent.,) Also enelosed 11 my t1x-decluehble O Ch•rge my •ccoun1 lor the 'ull amount donatlOft 1n 11\e •mount ot O VISA O Mpt•ard 0 American E1tpreH Account• E•P--- TOTAL Signeture ----------------- PAGE 8 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 1, 1981 ...------------------------------------. Ge~ting away with a group, a friend or just by your!ieU'. Let us help. B@.,,11.,, ,,;,, .... _, Servill~ the . travel needs of Montrose. • .. Yoar Travel Eipert!I 522-1922 Serving Montrose and Houston UNITED CAB CO. "Growing with Houston" 24 Hour Radio Dispatched 759-1441 (l'Kro-ne/ n pl cronies: a close friend, esp. of long standing) Le Bar & Cafe Lunch from 11:00 Dinner from 5:30 After-Hours from 11:30 Sunday Champagne Brunch noon-5:00pm 1322 Westheimer 522-1521 Cronies new summertime menu includes COOL GARDEN FRESH SOUPS, CRISP SALADS with all the extras, LIGHT and FLUFFY OMELETS Terry Ulrey is back as General Manager tJnited Cab CULLEN needs a few PAINT qualified SBODY men and women SHOP Day lease, 6S0·•88S Week lease 16•0 owner/ Crawford Custom operator painting, 759-1441 insurance repairs, free 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM estimates ~ • MAY 1, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 9 Art This Week in Montrose (Friday, Mayl, through Thursday, May7) Art League of Houston- 1953 Montroae-523-9530 All Media Open Show 10:00am- 4:00pm Friday, noon-4:00pm Saturday, 10:00am-4:00pm Monday through Thursday. Contemporary Arts Mu­se um -5216 Montrose Blvd.-526-3129 The Americans: The Land­scape photography exhibition in the Upstairs Gallery; Sylvia Mangold: Nocturnal Paintings in the Downstairs Gallery, 10:00am-5:00pm Friday and Saturday, noon-6:00pm Sun­day, and 10:00am-5:00pm Tuesday through Thursday. Cronnln Gallery-2008 Peden-526-21548 Photographs by Ansel Adams, William Clift and Eliot Porter daily Friday, Saturday and Tuesday through Thursday. Fine Arts & Collectors Gallery-1776 Montrose- 527-8367 Assorted artists daily Friday, Saturday and Tuesday through Thursday. Harris Gallery-1100 Bis­sonnet- 522-9116 Works by Tony Bass, daily except Monday. Hooka-Epetein Gallery- 1200 Bissonnet-522-0718 Polychrome wood sculpture and watercolors by Jacqueline Fogel daily Friday, Saturday and Tuesday through Thurs­day. Moody Gallery-2015-J W. Gray-526-9911 Assorted artists daily Friday, Saturday, and Tuesday through Thursday. Museum of Fine Arts-1001 Bissonnet-526-1361 The Booton Tradition: Ameri­can Paintings from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: Upper Brown Gallery; Ambroioe Vollard: Library Gallery; In the Way of the Master: Chinese and Japanese Painting and Calligraphy: Masteron Study Gallery (Friday, Saturday and Sunday only); Frederick Sommer at 75: A Retrospective photography: Romansky Galleries; Early Chinese Art Selections from the Asia House Rockefeller Collection: Lovett Oriental Gallery; Impressionist and Post-lmpreseionist Selections from the Beck Collection: Jonee Gallery; 10:00am-5:00pm Friday and Saturday, noon- 6:00pm Sunday, and lO:OOam- 5: 00p m Tuesday through Thursday. Rothko Chapel-1409 Sul Roe. Mark Rothko abstract expres­sionist paintings and Barnett Newman's Broken Obelisk sculpture. St. Thomae University Art Dept. Gallery-3900 Yoakum-522-7911ext.292 Graduating Seniors Art Show lOam to 4pm Friday and Monday through Thursday. Texas Gallery-2012 Pe­den- 524-1593 Dorothea Rockburne: Works from the Egyptian Series Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday aftemoon•. Watson-Willour & Compa­ny- 2000 Peden Laura Russell and Otis James daily Friday, Saturday and Tuesday through Thursday. Wildcatter-3517 Washine­ton- 869-5151 Oil industry-related works MontroseArt /Movies daily Friday, Saturday and Tuesday through Thursday. River Oab-2009 W. Gray-SU-2175 Shamrock-7017 S. Main-797-1446 Wmct.or-5078 Ricbmond~-2650 •SHOWING ALL WEEK La Ca1e aux Folleo II (1981 comedy, in French with English oubtitles, rated R) st.erring Ugo Tognazzi & Michel Serrault: Greenway Movies This Week Near Montrose Michael Cimino'• Heaven'• •FRIDAY ONLY Gate starring Krio Kristofferson (1980, rated R): Loew's Saka Twin ~=e~"o':~:! 2:ture: 8:00, (Friday, May I, through Thursday, May 7) The..terw in and near Montroef; Alabama-2922 S. Shepherd-622-5176 French Qu.arter-3201 Louieiana-M?- 0782 Galleria-Loop 610 at Wettheimer- 626-4011, 62&-014-0 Greenway-Greenway Plaza Under­sround- 626-3339 Loew'• Salu-S. Poat Oak al San Felipe-627-9910 Muaeum of Fine Arte-Brown Audito­rium, 1001 BiM011n~26-1361 Rice Media Center-Univertity Blvd. at Stockton, entrance 7, Rioe Univer· •ity-527-'863 Lion of the Desert starring Anthony Quinn, Oliver Reed and Rod Steiger (1981 adventure, rated PG): Galleria Friday the 13th, Part 2 (1981 horror, rated R): Shamrock Donald Crombie'• Caddie (1981. Houston premiere, AuatraJian) starring Helen Morse and Jack Thompson: 2:45 (Sat. & Sun.), 5:00 (Sat. & Sun .), 7:15, 9:30, River Oaks Arch Brown'• Pier Group• (gay male erotica): French Quarter Joe Gage's Handeome (gay male erotica): French Quarter TUE-MAY 5 .ZAP CLAP REVUE THUR-MAY 7 NEW WAVE NITE DJ-13RJCE GODWIN LASER SHOW FRI-SAT &SUN •SATURDAY ONLY Belli11ima; 8:00, Museum of Fine Arla WI'UESDAY ONLY John Hu.oton'o Beat the Devil atar~ing Humphrey Bo1art, Jennifer Jones & Peter Lorre: 10:30, Mary's, 1022 Westheimer, 52S-885! llTHURSDAY ONLY BarbarelJa (1968 adventure) 1tarrin1 Jane Fonda: 9:30, Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Weot­heimer, 528-9040 MON & TUE-MAY 11. 12 TEXAS ENTERTAINMENT SPECTACULAR OF THE YEAR THUR-MAY 28 MR. & MS. GAY PRIDE WEEK CONTEST -I SUN- MAY 3 SHOW WITH NAOMI SIMS HOT CHOCOLATE 'i7' & DANA MANCHESTER WEDNESDAYS 10<: DRINKS Montrose Theater PAGE 10 I MONTROSE VOICE MAY 1, 1981 'Jesus Christ, Superstar' planned at Tower Theater Equinox Theater's produc­tion of Jesus Christ, Super­star is set for the Tower Theater at 1201 Westheimer May 16 through June 14. The Best Little Whore­house m Texas is scheduled to close there May 10. Equinox's Jesus Christ, Superstar at the Tower will be the same version the com­pany staged in April at the Miller Outdoor Theater in Hermann Park, they said. The announced staff and cast included Bruce Bowen as the production's director, J. Brent Alford as Jesus, Tommy Hollis as Judas. and Maria Ballas as Mary Mag­dalen. Preview performances are planned for May 16 and 17, with the opening set for May 19. Live Theater This Week Near Montrose (Friday, May 1, through Thursday, May 7) (Nina Vance) Alley Theater (large stage)-615 Texas- 228-8421 William Shakespeare's &meo and Juliet, directed by Louis Criss and starring Scott Wentworth and Patrizia Norcia, 8pm Friday, 5 and 9pm Saturday, 2:30 and 7:30pm Sunday, and 8pm Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday. (Nina Vance) Alley Theat­er' a Arena Stage-615 Texas-228-8421 Hugh Leonard's Da (comedy) starring Dale Helward and Robert Donley 8:30pm Friday, 5 and 9pm Saturday, 2:30 and 7,30pm Sunday, and 8pm Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30pm Thursday. Black-Eyed Pea-2048 W. Gray Texas Opera Theater' :Face on the Bar Room Floor midnight Fnday. Chocolate Bayou Theater- 1823 Lamar-759-9840 George Bernard Shaw's Can­dida (comedy) 8:30pm Friday and Saturday, 7pm Sunday. Comedy Workshop Cabaret and the ComixAnnex-1905 Montrose Concerts Concerts This Week In & Near Montrose (Fnday, April 24, through Thursday, April 30) Ab and the Rebel Outlaws (country band) Friday and Saturday evenings at the Exile, 1011 Bell, 659-0453; Sunday afternoon and Thurs­day evening at Brazos River Botu>m, 2400 Brazos, 528-9192. Randy Allen and the Double Eagle Band (country band I Fnday and Saturday evenings at Brazos Rive-r Bottom. 2400 Braze•, 528-9192; Thursday evening at the ExHe, 1011 Bell, 659-0453. Richard Ellis with Wayne Lyles (piano and vocal) Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Wednesday evenings at Jasmine (otraight), 1512 W. Alabama. 526-0975. Paul English Group (contem­porary jazz) Evenings except Sunday at Cody's (straight), 3400 Mon­trose, 522-9747. The Gathering (jazz.folk) Friday, Saturday and Thurs­day evenings at Hungry International (straight), 209 Westhieimer Scott Gertner Quarter (jazz) Evenings except Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers (straight), 907 Westheimer, 527-0595. Ju111tine Band Friday, SatuTday and Thurs­day evenings at Our Place, 1419 Richmond. 528-8903. Peggy King (piano) Nightly at Baja's, 402 Lovett, 527-9866. Mar11Uerite (piano) Friday and Saturday evenings at 523 Lovett Club (otraight), 523 Lovett, 524-0706. Mickey Moseley (jazz singer) Friday Saturday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings at St. Michel (otraight), 2150 Rich­mond, 522-0041. Crala Smith Quartet with Terry Mason Gazz) Sun~ay and Monday evenings at Bird~at<:hero (otraight), 907 We•the1mer, 527-0595. S. Shepherd-524-7333 Comedy Tonight 8:30 and ll:OOpm Friday and Saturday, 8:30pm Tuesday through Thursday. The Ensemble-1010 Tu­am- 520-0055 Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright (comedy drama), 8:30pm Friday and Saturday, 5pm Sunday. Equinox Theater-3617 Washington-868-5829 Ira Levin's Deathtrap (comedy/thriller) 8:30pm Friday, Saturday and Thurs­day. Jones Hall-615 Louisiana-222-3415 Houston Grand Opera's All the King's Men Friday; Houaton Grand Opera presents Carlisle Floyd's Willie Stark 8pm Friday. Main Street Theater­Autrey House, 6265 S. Main-524-6706 Edward Albee'• The Lady from Dubuque (comedy melodrama) 8:30pm nightly. (Houston) Music Hall-810 Bagby-222-4461 Theater Under the Star's Gypsy (musical) 8:00pm Friday and Saturday, 3pm Sunday. Stages Cabaret Stage-709 Franklin-225-9539 James McClure's Lone Star and Laundry and Bourbon (comedies) 10:30pm Friday, 9pm Saturday: 3pm Sunday. Stages Main Stage-709 Franklin-225-9539 Space/Dance/Theater's Gulistan-The RoBe Garden (ballet) 7:30pm Friday, 5pm Saturday, 7:30pm Sunday, 6pm Wednesday and 8pm Thursday. Tower Theater-1201 West­heimer- 522-2452 The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (musical comedy) 8pm Friday, 5 and lOpm Saturday, 3 and 8pm Sunday, Bpm Tuesday through Thursday. Vaudeville Theater-308 Milam-226-9552 Urban Theater's Inner Wonder (musical) 8:30pm Friday and Saturday, 5pm Sunday. Nobody covers your neighborhood like the Voice Look for us each Friday Universe Fast moons runs rings around planets By Andrew Fraknoi ~AN J.'RAN cHRONICl.E FEATtREs Scientists at Cal Tech recently discovered a new moon around Jupiter, which turns out to be the fastest-moving satellite known in our solar system. Its discovery, togeth­er with information from the Voyager flyby of Saturn, provides us with important clues to explain the presence of thin rings around both outer planets. The new satellite was discovered by accident as scient­ists continued to sift through the thousands of photo­graphs from the Voyager mission to Jupiter. It is the fourteenth moon found around the giant planet and is nothing more than a chunk of dark rock, perhaps twenty miles of so across. Its distinction lies in its speed. It orbits so close to the cloud tops of Jupiter that it takes only seven hours and eight minutes to go around, Thus, the "month" determined by this moon is actually shorter than the ten-hour day on Jupiter. (Until this discovery, the record for shortest "month" in the solar system was held by Phobos, one of the two moons of Mars, and was a close seven hours and forty minutes.) The new moon moves in its orbit at an astounding 67,000 miles per hour, about thirty times faster than the speed of Earth's moon. But its speed Is by no means the only interesting characteristic the new moon presents to us. Its location is right at the outer edge of the thin ring, discovered by Voyager, which surrounds Jupiter's equa­tor. One of the 'big problems which emerged from the Voyager exploration of the J uipter environment was the mechanism which kept such a thin ring from expanding or being disrupted. Now, the new satellite may tum out to be the key. Its gravity could hold the particles which make up the ring in a narrow path. preventing their escape. EXPLORING , thP UNIVE RSt ~ Support for this view came from the next stop in the Voyager mission, the system of rings and moons around the planet Saturn. When Voyager 1 flew by Saturn in November last year, it took superb close-up photographs of the thin F ring (discovered by Pioneer 11 a year before) which revolves beyond the much thicker ring system we see from Earth. What Voyager found was that the F ring was, in a sense, shepherded by two small satell~tes (called S13 and Sl4 for now), one inside and one outside the ring. These newly discovered moons are also small chunks of rock very similar to the new Juipter satellite. ' Furthermore, Voyager also found that the smooth edge of the main ring system around Saturn was appar­ently the work of yet a~other small moon (815) orbiting just outside the mam nogs. It seems clear that there is an intimate connection between thin or sharp rings and ~mall _shepherding sa· tellites. But, as often happens m science, one good answer can precipi_tate dozens of new questions. Voyager I also di~covered that the main ring systems around Saturn ~ons1sts of many hundreds of individual ringlets. There Just aren't enough moons around to ac­count for all that structure and astronomers are now searching for a whole new theory to explain these rin­glets. We will keep you informed of their progress in future columns. Fraknoi ia 8 membf'r of the A1tronomical Society of the Pacific, which ia makina available to VOICE readera print.8 and alidei of the dramatic new views of Saturn and ite ringa and moon•. 1ent back by the Voyager probe. For more information and a price list, send a stamped, 1elf-addreHed envelope to: Saturn Pictures, A.S.P., 1290 24th Avenue, San Francieco, CA 94122. • it II. y g e e g MAY 1, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 11 GIFfS, FINE FURNISHINGS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 604-608 WESTHEIMER, HOUSTON, TEXAS 77006 10-6 MONDAY-SATURDAY AMPLE FREE PARKING 529-8002 PAGE 12 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 1, 1981 A MAN'S ill'· TEXAS'~ EXPERIENCE •. •. FIRST 2700 ALBANY 2 520-1522 rn Open 7 nl ... ts, from 9pm to6am Qffin. l 3 weeknights, to9am li lli -- WE~~~~DS rvr 6PM-8AM w FRIDAY NIGHT ill 3PM-8AM SATURDAY NIGHT BATHS 708 W. Alabama 2306 Genesse (Fairview at Tuam) 528-6235 529-6584 Meet and eat with your friends at the Goad Food Place WEDNESDAY SPECIAL OF THE WEEK Liver and Onions with Salad-All You Can Eat $2.75 Watch the Voice for a different all-you-eat special each week Mon trot• Stanford l c Ji Monday-Saturday 7am-1 Opm clo .. cl Sunday WE SUPPORT MOTHER RUTH'S ZAP CLAP REVUE Tuesday at Babylon co-starring the Mayor of Whacko City GROOVIN' • CRUSIN' • BOOZIN' VENTURE-N • 2923 MAIN JUST ARRIVED Men's Pleated Pants, Shark Skin Shirts, Boas, Pins and Heels 1409 Richmond • Houston do ii M al M ( ' 0 " •A 04 • A Al •f) o· • F :!2 J a 8 Ga m •K ll'l G· ~a .. , h• Montrose Classified MAY 1, 1981 MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 13 Hl'SISESS OWSERS r ) We 11.11t fl'f't' ea("h Wf'i•k la) all bu1nnH11 ettablish mt"nta at-rving a1t d1atribution pomta for thf' nl'wapaper. 1b1 currE'nt d1aplay advt>rtilll'rN, (l'l M-IHt.ed other e11tabliMh· mt·nta and 1d1•l"loct.ed14pecial t>venta. (21 Wt' hat frf!t> t'8l'h wt•ek. in bold. lati(f'r t.\'pl', information ahout all c1.1rrrnt di11play advert1Nt'l9 lthoM' purcha611ng_ a ili~"df~";"~'.[ i~ ~f~ J>Ofn· ~ii!.;7::;:. ~'} ~ l:7:h ~~~~i~-ra~~~:r::!!n~~~~~~! ms1,>r11on OR 20( per word or $7 pt't mch per iHUf' for thirUt·n or moreconaecutive 1uut'8, paid 1n advan_cf'. (4) ~all 629-K490, 1-Xpm, for more mfonnabon •°7ndi"Cate-8 MONTROSE VOICE distribution point ~~~."r: ~u~e:~u~:J~~?~Jri· ~!~~":'19'·t~1 ~%~.M~7~·ri: ~ft!'r!i:!~~ Mayl5 AUTO REPAIR CULLEN Va.int & Body Shop-1610 ('rawrord-6t50-1886 Custom painting, insurance repairs, free estimates. BOOKS •Wll.DE 'N' STEIN '>20 We theimer- 529-7014 Exch.1M1vt)y gay CLOTHING •OH ROY! Leather Good•-912 Wt!'11lheimer-321-7A:59 We sell Frye men's western boots. S1>e our ad elfwwhere this issue. •A PLACEiNTIMf;:._1.109 Rich-mond Gigantic selection of used clothinJ' at A Place in Time. Set' our ad elsewhere this issue. -<Tl i.EA1'HF: R-408-Weatheimf'r-527 · 004·1 •SPORTS LO( 'Kl':H-:111Wetitheimer­r, 2<MloM DATING SERVICES "A New Way to Meet Friends" 1-·or information •end SASE & 11 to Alternative Connection• Ros: 10, 1713 We.theimer ~~o~~·i111~·H.tt8 l.AMHDA t'OMP-72I-Mfi1 New in Town? Problems Meeting People? Call Lamb­dacomp. 721-5583. EROTICA •ADONIS Nrw,. -1407 Richmond-fi2:J. 0494 • AS\' .. l1M Bookat.ore- 1 ~1 H..JC:hmond • HALL PAHK Bookatore=i8J0 W Ala bu ma fi~ti!''~ N .. ..,,.. 240 WE-atht1mer- ~J~r,r~~:~la~~J~~1;~~~8Jh•ate';- Joe Gage's "Handsorne'' and Arch Brown's "Pier Groups" showing at the French Quarter. See our ad eh~ewh ere this issue. l;ay mrnuclullivrly, full ll'ngth all-male • KIHBY Nt>w1tand-J115 Kirl>y-f120 024fi - • :O·H\ 'DZ Nt"wa-:-1 U2 W Alabama t;ay mtn uclu111vely. EYEWEAR FLOWERS • RI.OOMERS 1618 s Sht,1herd ~24 ~:J7 •FRIDAY'S Flori;t°..:J33s w;st­heimer-~ 2·1-6318 Flowers in Montrose, or across the country. Call Friday's Florist. FOR SALE GCYT MMJo..llllNG to wll? Sell it in the Voice whl'rt' you"ll now reat'h 14,000 of ycur neighhora. GAY BARS .\) Ho••lon T•~trn <i•1ld ""m'Mr tad1ralll>n pl.....t in lh11 dJn'dar,Y a\ thrr noq11HL ··BAfJYL.ON·300 WP•lh;r.;;;r-52S: 6561 Mother Ruth's Zap Clap Revue Tuesday. See our ad elsewhere this issue. Gay men predominantly; after·houn Fri. &. Sat. e-veninf(a; impcreonalion ahow Sun l'vening with Hot Chocolate. Naomi Sima: •·Mothf'r Huth'• Zap Clap He-vue" IOpm Tut>fl.; doeed Mon.; l~ ~:~:!!t:i~~~~~ ~~ta~~r::~fih·;vt'~~!! May_ II & 12; rovntharge- nightly •BAJA'_S 402 IA.•veu. 62T.qf.\6f; Live piano enlertainf'mnt nightly Champagne brunch Sun. aftemnon. ' ;;.ffARN-=iiO Pacift;-h2il-:-94t7 - - ~:~1mt"onu~~~~i~~n:!f~:°l~rv~~f~:. mal'f(ltrita&.1wak night Tuts. k'hnappll n1a-ht Wtd., alt>ak night ThurM. home c1f the MWJtanp •HRAzos lUVtat HOTTOM· ·2400 BrllLOll··-.'lZS.9192 Gay men predominantly; Rand.Y Allen & the Doublf' EaKle Band Fn. & Sat ~v~n~n!ir ~hu: R~e:~1 lnA~~}~a!~C:~; aftt-moon & Thur11. evf'ninK; bet-r bust& ~0dn~°l1~~:· e~~t~i~:~0d~;~~' 1~!~~~: ~~er~."~!~:n-k:rt:a. .k v1?~fn1!ct. ~~'~': f.<:3! 45 Motor<'ydc Club; Lane~ Lalor apprtcialion party May 19 •BRIAR PATCH :.!294 W. Hokombe­fff,. 9fl.78 Buffet Sun aft('moon &. Thf'I eyen_ing; video movu.•a S:un. af~rnoon: "M1dmKht Bowlera 8ptt1al" Mon f'venrng: pool toumamt'nt Wed t'\'f'ning •BtrNKf.IOvsE-1704 We11thf'i;;;;: h:IO·lRl8 Taped and h\·e play l),J music by Mike Drewett. drink tipecial Sun. ('vemng. .Z.mcK1-:N CC>oP--b3b \\'t'lltht"imer:­M? S.2240 Liquor and ht"er bu11t11 Sa.t & Sun. afternoon a, ponl tournamenL Tun. rvtmng e<'OPA .. ·26:'11 Hit·hmond-.S.:S-2259 lhaco n1frhtly with Hil! Harwy & Lee Pow•r. 011 aound /J,. liw-hta; nftrr hou1'8 ~~-n & ~~n":~~&a~i~he'Don~~~n l~~ow Ernestinf' & Coco: Ernefltine- & malt' Rtrip C'Onl.f'.81 Mon. t'Venmg; Ern~atinf' & amateur 1mpeuonatlon show Tues. eveninK: 2fl¢ well drinks _Wed. & Thur11. evemriga; ('nver t'harge mKhtly COVT:-:!912 S. ShrpjW;;f.:.S24oi7Q •DIFFERJo:NT DRUM°=.17'32 Wffl­heimer- G2R~~OH Kink Inc., finally, this Saturday. See our ad elsewhere this iSBue. ~v~~in':!.n1i!:~\~; 1 J>.)1 ~:b;'Ko~;a'!t~ a(tt'r hllun Fn & Sat f\'en1n1•: bwr bu•U Sal & Sun. afternoons_. lat :;;;11:irM~~. ~:~1n8:~~~~f~11 1'u:~ fveninK; club night Wed .; homf' Amf'ri("an Leathf'rmen • A.JllRTY SALLY"S-2'lo Av~d81e-­~ 2H·7r12b ~·;:!.~~~,.~~::l 1~d~:>~~~f: ~i8gtht~\f~u:,, aie,.tc n11eht Wf'd • Jo: .r •. ·l2 Ja HH·hmond-?)27.0071 ;:-::~'.~{,. l~~t~.:{~·!l -f>5!)-04~ even1nM"•, 1pm t~~1 ;r• 1-ri & Sat ~~Cb~~~~~~i.t:'~oi~;"~i:ihth ~-l~'t~~ Handy Alll·n an.d tht Double ..:!:Se"il."~d Thur1. fVf'nmg, home Tnna Riders. •GAiLE0N-2JoJ Hichmond-~22 7616 Gay men prrdominantly; buffet Thur•. •venmg • GRANTSTREf"f.~TATION-911 F11rview-57S-&'l42 •THE HOI.E-109 Tuam-528-9066 The Hole's New Patio is Open. See our ad el~ewhere this iRsue. ~~~:~~i!f7~!~.w{~~~~ a'W::-~11:~:: 11paghetti niJ(hl Thurs. .;·Jl..:Sl; MARIO:\-& -·i.YNN·s. ;i17 Fairview-fl2R·9110 Gay women predominantly. •klNOiu~I-;1;1R1Ts. n24:1 BillBIO SJ)el'dway-fi6,r:,.97,'j6 Gay wome-n prrdominantly •LAMrosT =24-17 Times. ·m\,(f -."i28- S9'21 Gay women predominantly ~Y'S-10_2_2 Wuthefm';"r- 628-SMI Shop Mary's after-hours 7 nights See our ad elsewhere this issue. Gay men predominantly: ~pt'({ muaic by ~~\~~~Ka1~f,.::~i:~·.h.?R:~it'fih.tl()~~~ movie atarring Humphrev BoR"art H~:30pm Tu~ •. Gay Pr1df' Wttk l~~O sh~e sho"' Mey 9; Gay Pr1dt> Wf't"k poh<.'1' raid commemoration niKht June IR; humf' Houaton Motorcycle Club •iMfDNtTF. SlJN-5.14 wf.lhf'imer·- 526 ':"."1l!l lmpf'rsonat1on ahow• ~un & W•d •vemngs. •MONTROSE I.ff NI NG C'O .-sos Pacific-5:l9·74fl.8 Gey men predominantly; hf.er buat Sun afternoon -OUR PLACE-1419 Richmond- 628-8903 Justine Band Thursday, Friday & Saturday nights at Our Place. See our ad elAewhere thih issue. Jualin1· Rand Fri S•t & Thura evenin.-a, pool tourney y.·f'd. •vr'!'linK. • PARADl-!-1416 Richmond -"':.ID-lfi.16 Disco with Otia Jamea, Frank ('ollina & Phillip Largt> with aftt'r·~our11 night!~ ~~~.;ed~;t~~~~~h~;;."~i;~~;loH •PINK Eii:PHAl'."T = l2iil l<ffland- 659-0040 Pl•.'-"M'ifl J"ollit'•".~atunlay; gft)' men predominantly ;fiANCH~20'. Main-5~·H7:-JO ~:~:y 1Tuu~~~~~~rn: ;:~~~~~r:r~: aJI day Wed. & Thura. • ROCK\;;S-34.16 W i>allaa-028-AA2"2 Gay womf'n exdua1 ,,eJy • . ADDU: CI.US:.0\l ·w fmw . .:.. ,28- 9261 Live t'Ountry band Fri , :-;at & Sun evenings; color night Sun. rvrningj to~'::::/Tu:Sea:vZ~~;~; ei:~ 'bu~l ~~ l'Vl'n1ng· h•re chest n1ghl Thur• •ven1na- • SA.~St:t:·~. 2700 Albany l>28-~12R •n\'tNS-bJ.'> WHthl"lmtt -522.fiOOX Gay \.\Omt'n prt'dominantly • A-VE!'IWTl'RE-!'IW-2923- Main-522· 0000 Yea Party, at the Venture-N. ~ our ad elsewhere this issue. I.1ve-·play ll.~ Jon David nightly. Gay men predommantly; ··rn-Party" Sun afternoon_ & ev.eninK: M"ntro1u- Sporta ARMOt'1at1on nll!'ht Mon bartf'ndl'ra mght Tues. .w-.-LDwOOD Saloon-HW·f Wt·•t· heimer-G2~90 t0 Happy hour all day, all night Monday at the Wildwood Saloon. See our ad el~ewhere this issue Beer but1t & hot doe• Sat & Sun ~~n~ounr ~~~~J'Tu~~~::i~1t~f:~ night'~.; ··Rarh8rella'' movie atamng Jane Fonda 9:30pm Thura.;. 1neak t~et~li:C1~b~l~b8~'h1~:~~ggM~~a~ce GAY BATHS •ARENA-2700 Albany-620-1522 The Arena: a Man's Experience. See our ad el~ewhert> this iBMut•. ~~ir':i~~~("i~••;e~~i ~~~·~~l~-1~ .Ci.uB-HOusT<>N-2205 ~·annin­~ i~n exduaively memberahip required, open 24 houn. Crossword Here is the third in our series of the exclusive Montrose Crossword. Many clues and answers deal y,rith Montrose people and places. Others are standard cross~ word clues and answers. The solution ap­pears elsewhere in this issue. Enjoy. ACROSS 1 Ne"'1. 4 Fowl Product ": .I.n ,o..n.m:li naw •Plf. 10 Put your -- to the ground 11 Of God (Lat.) 12 Gay gof'sip 14 Wai;;h 16 Metal bar 18 You'JJ never get a trick if you don ·t 19 Insecticide 21 Plural of iR 22 Safety agency (abbr) 24 O.utschland (abbr.) 25 Variet.Y of agate :l6 Air fo"orce Women (abbr.) 27 Voice box 29 Ernked 31 Leave off J5 \\-'hat a Westheim<'r hustler does with sex 36 Bicycle for two 37 Canadian capital 40 Se,.;ng the---on Emestine'e dret'a 41 Chromck's Sunday magazine 44 Same (prefixl 45 lu!pudtate 46 Ootnchlike bird 47 Littlt.- devil 4~ Long fish 49 Single numbt>r 51 Preuing 5.=> Exceptional 56 Mak• r ... 57 DJ --Rocha 6fl Crash agaimit 59 Printer's measure 60 Obtained DOW1' I Long fi•h 2 Aviation agency <abbr.) 3 HoneFt 4 SmaJI y,·h.ir:lpool ~ Tiffany Jont'!I" etatement to Mr. Houst..on Buildinjil' ht-am ---news in the VOICE --and tonic' 9 sexual ---- 13 Engli•h con8t'rvatlve 15 Gun advocac-.y group 17 Cowboy's nickname 20 After the showers at the baths. you -- 22 IR jndebted to 23 Sadist Marqws de--- 24 Tiffany Jones' statement to Ernestine 2.5 Draft animals 27 For fear that 28 College athl•tiC group 30 Thicken 32 Sticking to 33 Noted 34 Television award 36 --forone drinb "31< Bartender at Montros,e Mining .i9 Seek ambitiously 41 La.i letter 42 Afghan prince 43 !'weet tiubfttance 45 Villa al the Drum 47 Columnist's entry 48 Idols :50 Lyricist Gershwin 52 Brink 53 Recent (prefixl 54 Acquire To advertise in the Montrose Voice, your community newspaper, call 529-8490 daily 1-Spm. The Voice is the Choice, read by 14,000 of your neighbors each week. PAGE 14 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 1, 1981 Margulies •. NOW IF A MOOGEK SHOOLD NXOST 't'OO. YOU COUNTER WITH A PUNCH TO THE ~.A l<J..MTE CHOP TO THE NECK, AND A SWIFT KICK TO THE SO~PLEYJS. MARGULIES ~I SIJ8lJ4l8All FEll!U~ IS THATBEFO~ OfiAFT~ I ZMHIMWITH WI'{ POCKET TEARGA~ PAA/>.LYZ~?. .. Keeping Up by WilliamHamilton _J But, enough about my sexuality, what about your sexuality? •MHYI'OWNE SPA-3100 Fanrun-5l'..!· 2379 Gay men es.clullively, open 24 houn •2306 CLUB-2306 Geneuee-52S. 82311 Texas' first. The 2306. See our ad elsewhere this isaue. Gay men uclu1ively, membership required, opm nia:htly. HAIR CARE •LIONEL Hair Deai&n-3:l20 Yoakum- 526-449< •SALONDANIEL-1544 Weatheimer- 520-9327 HELP WANTED HOMES & APARTMENTS FOR RENT & t'()R SALE MONTROSE I bedroom in 1mall quiet comples.. $240/mo. plu~ gas and elec 1125 depo•it, no pell. 629-8178. HOME FURNISH­INGS •BYMAN•s Interior• (home furni1htn11)-808 Weathehner- 529-8002 Byman's fine fur. nishings, custom interiors. See our ad elsewhere th.is i11ue. KEY SHOPS REED'S Key Shope-1612 We•t­belmer A 1620 Commonwea.lth- 523-2927 Reed's Key Shops in Montrose, 2 loca­tions. LODGING •HOUSTON GUEST HOUSE-106 Avondale-520-9767 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." 1~ ----M--A-I-L- -B-O-X--E-S- --~ KWIK·KALL Mad Boure tan Monb'oH-S22-1896 MOBILE DISCO Houston's Music Man (mobile disco) 880-1481 The ftne.t in mobile party productiona. Arran1ementa for any •lze event. AJ.o available-ca~~~ J.0:~~te~iTft.d{;: but party In town. MOVING& HAULING SERVICES Movin~, h~uling, delivenes 520-7744 MUSIC •DOWNBEAT Rooonlo-2117 Richmond-523-8348 i~~RD RACK-3Hl9 S. Shepherd- NON-PR0Ji1T MONTROSE ORGANIZATIONS AVONDALE HOUSE-216 AvondaJe- 522-7372 •Mother'• Morninr Out" program Tue.. morrunp. BERING Memorial MethodiatChurch­t• 40 Hawt.home-526-1017 · lnte1rityJHouton'1 C<?mmu~ity fi~ff!1h~~J!~h~~~~i;~~ng~~: ~:e~~~l1i~!:~~vt%~i~:~•ton buaineH SLACK&: WHITE MEN Toaether-529- 5006. 774-359::=' ------- Catholic? For a refre1hing chanae, why not visit us at St. Christophers Missions of the Old Roman Catholic Church of North America 2931 Michaux (in the Heifthte), 8tti:~0i.,8~~tr.~'il':iii:d'· aeating, come early. iMontroael CHURCH OF CHRIST­t\ 20-K Wemtheimer-774-?JGS CttllRCH OF c RJRTIAN j;·Afrtt- 413 Westhrimer-~ ~:~;hi;~:rdvul~:7~~~ ~-r•;r:,nl M!~_i°/it:.e:~!~~~i.~~h~l~~er:;~i~ Wed. evenin1 CITIZENS F\)Ri{ HUMAN EQUAL!~ TY-609 F~nntn 1301-~ Board me.tine r,fay 12. cOCKATOO-~:u"oo'--Tra--vl_• _ _ Mr., Ml., Mi• Beno Gay Rodeo (Texu) Contelt 9pm.=-::Sa.::•::..,.., __ ~-~ CONG. BETft CHIAM!Gay Jew1- meet1 at MCCR, 1919 Oecatur-529- ~!2:;~a1 8pm May 8. DATA PROFESSIONALS-meet. at ta ~!;.~~:~~ Inn, 4016 Southwest Meebn• May 12. j)"(QN1TY-6~6.f4 ~~d!~~'f:.e~~~·· eveninr. Catholic EPISCOPAL !NTEGR!TY-meeta al Autny Hou.e, 6265 Main-020-8298 MeiPtin1 May 12. FAMILY & FRIENDS of Gay•-mwts at MCCR. 1919 Decatur Meebna May 10. -----­FfRST- UN1TARJAN Church-5210 Fannin-626-1671 Lambda meetin1 Fri. evenin1; wonh.ip llf'T"Vice Sun. mornin1. GAV A RC H l ~V~F.,.;Sc..o_r~T~.-.-.-.-_-c / o *>~ty, Houaton, 3406 Mulberry~ 8!~ ~H:r.~;~k?~i~i+~. People," Heritq• Day June 26. Tuesday Movie "Beat the Devil" starring Humphrey Bogart Jennifer Jones Peter Lorre Remember Mother Ruth's Zap Clap Revue May 5 at Babylon MAY l, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 15 Sunday Beer Bust 4pm Coming Next Saturday, May9 1980 Gay Pride Week Slide Show Have a special product or service available to the community? Get yourself listed in the Montrose Voice Directory. Now Playing at the French uarter KEITH ANTHONI AND JOHNNY KOVACS IN PIER &ROUPS PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY ARCH BROWN 3201 Louisiana I 527- 0782 rr i1 c 'v" n - MAY 1, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 17 Su~e~o~n !>axd (~~e'}~e~at (Fred) PAEZ TASK FORCE--c!o GPC, 4600 M•in #217-521·1000, 521-9186, 523-3233 Gay Pride Week, "We the People," Fred Paez Memorial Day June 27. MAY MAY 1 2 ORAL MAJORITY-1022 WHtheimer- 527-9669 MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY TEXAS BAY AREA Gaye-332-3737 Meebng Thun. evening. 3 4 5 Selected Events through 7 Days • Integrity· Houston's "Com­munity Coffeehouse" Friday evening at Bering Memorial Methodist Church, 1440 Haw­thorne • Gay Young Adults meeting Fri. evening at Church of Chris­tian Faith, 413 Westheirner .Oay Press Association con­vention in Dallas Friday through Sunday • Mr., Ms., Mi88 Reno Gay Rodeo (Texas) Contest, 9pm Sat­urday, Cockatoo, 3400 Travis •Montrose Sports Association softball games at Levy Field Sunday afternoon • Splash Day Sunday at Ste­wart Beach in Galveston, with gay T-dance in the Bamboo Hut noon-4pm •Meeting at Cockatoo, 3400 Travis, Tuesday, 7:30pm, for those interested in the Montrose Marching Band, Color Guard or Flag Crops in the Gay Pride Week Parade • "Mother Ruth's Zap Clap Revue" at Babylon, 300 West­heimer, Tuesday evening • Gay Political Caucus general business meeting 7:30pm at 4600 Main #217 •Integrity/Houston business meeting Thurs. evening at Ber­ing Memorial Methodist Church, 1440 Hawthorne ~FT Radio-419 Lovett Blvd.-526- Wllde 'n Stein &•Y r•dio ehow Thun. tverung LAM BUA 7"mePt.• •tlit ~t;:;;;; Church, 5210 f'annin MiePtine Fri. evenine. LUTHF.RANS CONCERNED--;;;p;u at Grat'I!' l.uthtran Church 2516 Wau,h-'i21-086.1, 453-1143 ' Meeting May 12. MKTROPOLITAN COMMUNITY Church-1919 Decatur-861-9149 Protestant wor1hip aervicu Sun morning &: evenine & Wed. evening; Montroee Srngeu meeting Mon . evening; Spanieh claaa Thurs. evening. MONTROSE CIVIC Club Neartown­H:~ o~!~ZI~O&i Church, 1440 MMting May 26. MONTROSE CLJN-IC-c10 c;1y of ~:~Gt~n 1~:_aJg~artment-1115 N Vmere!T di8e88e C.UI daily wefkday8, rape counel!'ling 1Mt1ion for woml!'n Wed enning; '"Mother Ruth'• Zap Cl•p R•vue" lOpm Tun., at Babylon . 300 We.theoimf'r Mother Ruth's "Montrose Clinic on Wheels" this week: Visit our clinic near Hermann Park at 1115 N. MacGregor (phone 222-4297). And re­member Mother Ruth's Zap Clap Review at Babylon Tuesday evening. Compliments of the City of Houston Health Department. MONTROs•: COUNS•:uNcJC;n. T. - 900 ( .OVt'tt lm-6:.l9-f(l37 6 7 Selected Events Later • Lance Lalor (City Council representative from Montrose) Appreciation Party and fund-raiser May 19 at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos • Montrose Sports Association hosts first annual Interna­tional Gay Bowling Organiza­tion Tournament May 23-25 •Gay Pride Week Planning Committee meeting 2:30pm May 24 at the Copa, 2631 Richmond • Gay Pride Week, "We The People," June 18-28 with ... DMary'e 1980 raid commemoration June 18 DCity-wide gay club night June 19 DMontrose Sports Association softball games with Houston poliCE" and fire department teams June 20 O''Salute Dallao" day June 21 OF.ducabonal forums June 22 DNabonal Day of Rememberance June 23 DGay youth day June 25 DHeritage Day June 26 DFred Paez Memorial Day June 27 DParade and rally June 28 •The Advocate Experience seminar June 20-21 TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE-528-3636 Confer@nce VIII Sept . .4-7. TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Founda· tion-526-9139 g!!~!:1~~:iy,~i1:~!86h~~~~2~b Fannin-524-7524 Next meetina May 17. WESTHEIMER COLONY ARTS Auociation-908 Westhei.tner-521-0133 PERSONALS PLANTS • Dallas Gay Pride Week ~~e~~~tf~~~i~~Wi:tio~·~r parade Jun 21 .-~~~-~- n w plant . M intenance aervice. •"GayRun '81" in San Fran· •.v.~.•·.•.•·.·.• 23-,,,._. _____ cisco •Texa a Gay Task Force Conference VIII Sept. 4-7 MONTROSE BAND-me•t.a al Cockatoo, 3400 Travi•-627-9669 Interested in being part of the MONTROSE MARCHING BAND, COLOR GUARD or FLAG CORPS during the Gay Pride Week Prade? Then attend the meetin!I' at 7:30pm again th1e Tuesday at Cockatoo, 3400 Travis Or call Andy Mills at · 527-9669 See our ad elsewhere thia iaeue .. Meeting 7:J0pm Tu•. •t Cockatoo. :w.X, Travi11 PLUMBING MONTROSE PLUMBING COMPANY. gay owned and operated, work dependable. prioee compftitive. Day or night call 520-1997. PRINTING KWIK-KOPY Pnntinr-3317 Montn:.e--."'122-1896 PUBLICATIONS INNER-VIFW-. 20 Wtttheimer-522· 9333 ~-Vc>iCe=a52·o Mo;:;t;Oie #227-629-8490 The "Montrose Voice," the news­paper of Montrose­the number one publication in your nei2hborhood. Deadline 'tor ne•t '""ue: Tuee., Mf~~ :d~~~i:f:( '-;,';.J~~:!~!° tion•. Next tl8ue to be releued Fri. afternoon, May8. 'iWf~~#iOO::Smw RESTAURANTS •BAJA'S-.02 Lovett-fi27·9Hfl6 h~t,,~~lJ:.~~~9NCH~fi~26 wMt­Good Texas Barbeque at the Bar-B-Que Ranch. · BRASSERfERutiUJ.";nl· -illW Alabama-f>~7« .:Ct1APULTAPECM~ R;;t;;­rant- 613 Richmond-622·2366 · CRON-IES= 1322 WHtb--;r~;;= 522-1621 Cronies has new Summer Menu! See our ad elsewhere this issue. After·houre Fri . A Sat evenin1•; champagne brunch Sun. &ftttnoona. Gary Larson 1b~ 7- ··>- ... . A t/\Ul\l'.. M£t)Th ex 1 t ~r Ett~f.. TUE DJrf'EJiE.HT DR\JM •HOUSE OF PIES-3112 Kirby-5U :JHl6 •SPU [j. i.I: IJ KE-:f 16 WestheTr;°er-=.52o. 0654 ·STEAMTAaLE:.1osw A~ 628-8246 Liver & Onion Special Wednesday at the Steamtable. See our ad elsewhere this iesue. ;sTEA-K7N7 EGG· ·4231 Montro&e-528- 8135 ROOMMATES Roommate Connections Share expenses, build a friendship. We provide the referral• with referencea, photoa and •II •pproprlate Information. Profee­aional Screenln1. 526-8002. SCHOOLS •BLUE WATER Diving School­We1theimer at Montroee-528--0634 SHOPS •ALL THAT GLITTERS (gi(ta)-4325 Muntro.e- 522-6976 ;FACETS cii"Ct.'-)-,;..1_4~12~W.--.t h-.~.m-.-,-_ 523-1412 Greedy Annie's - Emporium 7413 Airline Little bit or Montroee on the North•ide. Clothe., furniture, eollectiblea, inL11tant h•lrloom•. 897-4646 •TEXAS JUNK CO.-Teft at Welch-624-6267 Come Shop With Ue-Texas Junk Cornn any. See our ad e1seWhere tliis issue. •'fRf:YMAN <aift.>--407 w---;;theimer= '23-0'.128 TALENT AGENCIES Wallflowers SIGN AT NUPIST COLONV ENTRANCE: 0 0 PLfA~E d~ WITH us I r- C> 1981 Suburban FHturn ffl 100 1!00 f A II D 1 I D I Ill T lAUNOllll INOO TlllY DOT Allf OIHA Oflll ONYX ,_ ' L A " Y N X fDUCID CIEAll lfll TANDEM OTTAWA HEM llT 110 DENY IMU IM' OA" OIOIT llllONINQ Ill: A 111 I II I D N f I lllAM fMI OOT MAY 1, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 19 TAXI UNITED Cab-769-1411 United Cab, in Montrose and throughout Houston, 24 hours. 759-1441. TRAVEL AGENCY PRESTIGE Travel-3206 Montroee-622-1922 Prestige Travel Agency in Montrose. See our aa elsewhere this issue. TYPESETTING & GRAPHICS ~~:r~:n~~!e~~~~~~f:'~~·- Fast, accurate, com­puterized typesetting-and nrintinl!'. Small and'l.arce Job•. l'l.iblicaUon•, catalocs, brochures, fonne. We •pecialize in complicated, unu•ual project.I. Let ua f{ive you a bid. YARD & GARAGE SALES The Voice is the Choice 1• n Montrose • The best local news coverage-more stories, more details • Great national gay news coverage-among the best of any publication in the country • The only weekly listing of the arts and the movies in Montrose • The most extensive-and accurate-weekly listing of Montrose organizations, and what they're doing • And the most Montrose advertising-more space each weekly issue from Montrose clubs and shops than any other publication. • For advertising information about next week's Montrose Voice, call us Monday or Tuesday afternoon, 529-8490. Sa'lnanfhaReads Your Stars If you were born thi• WMk: You are realistic and practical. You have a lot of ambition and drive and are willing to work as hard as you need to achieve your goals You tend to be rather shy and reserved, keeping your feelings to yourself, until you know another person quite well. ARIES (3-21/4-19)' Move cur­rent pro1ect in practical direc­tions this week, Aries. Lead others around to your way of thinking with gentleness and tact, so that you don't scare them off_ later. a surprising event changes the ptcture TAURUS 14-20/S-20)' Cupid 1s off and running, Taurus, and you have no diffK:Ulty 1n keep­ing pace. You can gift yourself in two ways thtS week. Oevel­optng a certain creative poten­tial can add dollars to your p~ybank. Hurray, babel GE-I (S-20/11-20)' You h8"8 even more to say and to think about ttian usual, Gem. So try tor extra rest, for you Twms expend more energy .tust thtnk­mg than most people do work­ing. And you don't want to be tired when Venus comes knockiny MOONCHILD (&-21n-221, Lon• up your contacts and help a fnend, Moonbaby. Then, a domestic situation requires patience and careful cons.der­ation. Don't listen to gossip Later, Cupid is 1n a party mood; don your glad rags and go. LEO (7-2311-22)' Will- wdl reap rewaTds tor you this week, Leo. so dust it otf and use ii. Then, be the votc:e of reason; certain stubborn turkeys need to hear it. later, be ready for anything, ·cause that's what's apt to happen! VIRGO (1-23/ .. 22): Not every­one is as punctual and orga­nized as you. Virgo. You're like­ly to run into one who appears as flaky as one of last winter's snowstorms Don't run away. babe. Get out the shovel and dig tor his hidden assets Treml LIBRA (t-23/10-23): You have a proposmon to consider Libby. II you have objeet1ons to it, make sure they're valid ones and not just excuses Look for the positive angles. Days shim­my to sassy hni with a surprise or three_ Whee! SCORPIO (10-24111-22)' Both social and busaness rOlts tmd you on thefr achve hsts. Scorp. By the way. there are two things that turn you off: A SOcial ct.mber and a take Be on watch for al least one of these this week.. SAGITTARIUS (11-23112-21)' New associate can be very persuUve. SaJ. His ghb tongue could mask a con artist or a brainstorm of real merit. Inspect carefulty, sweetheart Days fhp by with gymnasties - the tumbhng vanety. CAPRrCORN (12-22/1-11): Two doors open to you this week. Cappy. One has great potential, the other winds to a dead end. The one that holds greater possibilihes tor your creativity is likety the better one. babe. Week continues with a snort AQUARIUS (1-20/2-11)' You're an innovator and a Ire.think­er, Aqueri. and you enjoy the new and different. Thrs week, sbck to the tned and true. The fam1Mar may be bOfing, but it's dehn1tely safer than the thin J1mb you WOCJk:I perch upon. PISCES (2·20/3-20)' Your tune probably won't be your own this week, Pi.Sees Home and family act1v1ties are popping Everyone from casual acquain­tances to very close associates seems to need you. Escape for at least a day 1ust to play {C) 1981 Suburban Features Your choice of music says something about your sex life "Trend" is a new column in the VOICE, beginning this week. Each issue wl?'ll ~v.e you a final thought to ponder. This column is a 1omt effort by the staff of the VOICE. In future years, disco will not die, but it may change names-as things tend to do. What is disco today, was Elivs and the Beatles in an earlier reincarna­tion. Disco has the the natural beat of the sexually­satisfied. The unorganized sound of punk rock music, on the other hand, may be the music of the sexually-frustrated. Do not be confused by the term "rock and roll." What they're calling rock and roll today bears little relation to the rock and roll of Elvis or the Beatles. The music of Elvis and the Beatles, as with disco music was smooth, organized, logical rhythm. Toda;•s "rock and roll" is rough, unorganized and illogical. Some prefer this, of course. We're not saying it is wrong. We just saying that by your subconscious choice of music, we believe you are announcing whether you are sexually frustrated or sexual satis­fied. Agree or disagree? Write us a letter. PAGE 20 I MONTROSF. VOICE I MAY 1, 1981 Everyone interested in participating in the Montrose Band for I meet at 3400 Travis (the Cockatoo) again this Tuesday, May 5, 7:30pm or call Andy Mills at 527-9669 for further information. If you don't have an instrument, come anyway. Instruments can be provided. Also, come by the Cockatoo or call Andy if you want to be in the Color Guard or Flag Corps
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