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Montrose Voice, No. 36, July 3, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 36, July 3, 1981 - File 001. 1981-07-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5827/show/5802.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-07-03). Montrose Voice, No. 36, July 3, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5827/show/5802

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 36, July 3, 1981 - File 001, 1981-07-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5827/show/5802.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 36, July 3, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date July 3, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Is that Montgomery Clift looking at John Wayne with stars in his eyes? The Celluloid Closet Growing up gay with the movies. Special feature, page 15 Montrose Voice Friday July 3, 1981 Good Evening Montrose weather tonight: Partly cloudy and wann with a 30% chance of evening thundershowers and a low of78°. Sunrise: 6:26AM. THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, ISSUE #36, PUBLISHED WEEKLY Saturday: Continued partly cloudy and warm with a chance of afternoon and evening thudnershowera and a high of 95°. Sunset: 8:25PM. Gay Pride Week 81 Special 3-page Photo report page 11 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 Wll.DWOOD SALOON 1504 WESTHEIMER 528-9040 GET YOUR FIREWORKS OFF WITH US THIS WEEKEND JULY 4TH SATURDAY FREE BARBEQUE 3PM SUNDAY BEER BUST NOON FREE WEENIES & FIXIN'S SATURDAY, JULY 4 CELEBRATING THE GRAND OPENING OF SPLI featuring New York Underground Leather, 501 Jeont and much more you will adore our prices Mon-Fri 4o>12; Sat-Sun 12-12 MONDAY, JULY 6 KAMIKAZE A NON-STOP PARTY WITH LIVE DJ'S lOAM-lOPM FRANK COLLINS SAM McGUILL KEN BAILEY PLUS SURPRISE GUESTS BIG SCREEN LIVE VIDEO BY BUD MACK FEATURING THE DARING KAMIKAZE COCKTAILS, SCHNAPPS AND AMARETTO, ALL $1 COMING THURSDAY, JULY 9, "PINK FLAMINGOS" CONGRATULATIONS TO THE PARADE GRAND PRIZE WINNER, THE DIFFERENT DRUM WE LOVE THE DIFFERENT DRUM JULY 3, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Gay Pride Week closes, largest ever Last Sunday's Gay Pride Parade attracted a considerably larger crowd, and considerably more participation, than previous parades. The reason may be because of Houston's overall continued growth, which means the gay population is also growing, or because the political climate is prompting more gay people "out of the closets." Or perhaps both. 35,000 people watched or participated in the June 28 mile-long parade. And 15,000 attended the annual Gay Political Caucus rally at Spotts Park later in the evertlng to listen to featured speakers Sissy Farenthold and Anthony Bouza. Farenthold, a former popular Texas politican who ran for governor in 1970 and 1972, and Bouza, chief of police in Minneapolis, spoke on human rights and gay liberation issues that brought repeated cheers from the gay men and lesbians. Despite muddy grounds, which prompted several impromptu mud wrestling contests, several thousand more had turned out than GPC president Lee Harrington was expecting. And most other GPC officials had earlier said they thought Harrington was being overly optimistic with hie hopes that 10,000 people would attend the rally. A dozen more unite were involved in this year's parade over last year. Several orgartlzatione and clubs had hired professional float builders this year, rather than amateurishly producing their own. Others took the amateur route but ended with professional results. Thie year's Gay Pride Week parade also had three bands-two more than last year, with participation by the Oaklawn Concert Band of Dallas and the Great American Yankee Freedom Band of Loe Angeles, along with the Montrose Marching Band. Sean Johnson, a board member of Christopher Street West, the organization which stages the annual Gay Pride Parade in Loe Angeles, said he thought hie group would be inviting the Montrose Band to participate in 1982 in Loe Angeles, and he was hoping the Loe Angeles band would be back in Houston that"8ame year. Traditionally, Loe Angeles and Dallas hold their parades the same ~ Sunday, with San Francisco and Houston holding their seven days later in late June, enabling each band to participate in two Gay Pride parades each year. Loe Angeles had been going annually to San Francisco but decided this year to buck tradition and accept an invitation to Houston. The cost of the trip for about 100 band members was said to have come close to $30,000, with both cities helping in the fund-raising. All three bands in Houston participated in a Spotts Park concert on the eve of the parade. About 4000 people attended. Later that evening at Houston gay clubs, one might have thought he was in a different city, with all the Loe Angeles and Dallas T-shirts visible. Montrose News Man clubbed, then shot to to death, on dark Montrose street Benjamen R. Nickerson, 27, was killed about 2:15 a.m. Sunday morning, June 28, when walking in the 1700 block of Missouri. A friend with him said two men drove up in a car, got out without say­ing a word, and began beating Nickerson. He said Nickerson then began to tight back, and they shot him. The suspects then drove off and were not immediately identified or arrested. Nickerson lived outside Montrose at 4112 Spencer. Guardian Angels in Montrose? Curtis Sliwa, the 26-year-old leader of New York's Guardian Angele, said he may still start an affiliated group in Houston, despite opposition expreeeed by Mayor McConn and Police Chief B.K. Johnson. Being interviewed on a Houston radio talk show by long distance in June, Sliwa was asked by a caller if the group would operate in Montrose, a neighborhood where gay people are frequently attacked by homophobic outsiders and where police express homophobic views of their own. Sliwa said hie group would consider Montrose for that reason. When interviewed in a Chicago newspaper (on the subject of the Guardian Angels also expanding to Chicago), Sliwa said no one in his group had ever had a complaint from the gay commurtlty. He said that in New York they frequently patrol gay neighborhoods watching for instances of violence being committed against gay people. The New York Guardian Angels are said to now number 700 with several hundred other members in Detroit, Atlanta, Loe Angeles and Phila­dephia. Man dies in Montrose fire Fire Dept. officials say aJune27 tire at a frame house at 111 Stratford in Montrose was deliberately set. The blaze claimed the life of Franklin L. Fent, 33. The house had been divided into several separate apartments. The Saturday morning blaze was reported by Fent'• downstairs neighbor about 1 a.m. when the neighbor was said to have heard noises that may have indicated Fent was trying to escape, including a stomping sound and the sound of a kitchen window breaking. Fent'• body was found near a window in the living room. Fire officials were reported to have said they believed the tire started in two places in Fent's bedroom. Fent was said to have been alone at the time, with hie roommate at work. There was little or no damage to the other apartments in the house. Special photo report on Gay Pride Week page 11 Ben Sargent 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 Fire guts pawnshop A Montrose pawn shop at 1014 W. Gray was destroyed by fire early July 1. Fire investigators were investigating the possibility of arson, as the location had been the scene of several other fires. Shaw's Pawn Shop was destroyed and nearby businesses suffered smoke damage. Officials said a fire occurred two year ago when a burglar tried to open the back door with a cutting torch. The two-alarm fire was reported about 5:00 a.m. Wednesday and tapped out about an hour later without injur­ies, fire officials said. An adjoining paint store, a glass 1hop and a storage area also suffered damaged. Police schedule softball game with church group "to promote relations with minority groups" The Houston Police Department had scheduled a softball tournament last weekend in Edgewood Park, featuring local church, neighborhood and other police teams. The tournament was scheduled to be Saturday at Edgewood Park, 5803 Bellfort with trophies awarded to winning teams. Ava Plummer, a coordinator of the event, said the tournament primarily wa1 designed to improve relations between police and minority groupe, reported the Hou.ton Chronick. Plummer, who ii also Police ChiefB. K. Johnson'• special liaison for black community affairs, said the tournament was not related to a decieion by the Houston Police Officen Aaeociation not to participate 1n a softball game the week before with the Montrose Sports Association, as part of Gay Pride Week festivities, the newspaper reported. Plummer claimed the HPOA was not involved in the scheduling of the Edgewood Park tournament. Danburg and Leland make late plea for the ERA Two Montrose political representa­tive1 appeared on the ateps of Houston City Hall June 30 in a "last-minute" effort offering oupport to the Equal Rights Amendment. Under current law, the amendment must be pa88ed in 38 states by June 30 of next year in order to become law. Texas, however, is among 35 states which have ratified the ERA. State representative Debra Danburg and U.S. representative Mickey Leland, both Democrats whose die· tricte include Montrose, were among the speaken at the rally. Reward offered for clues in death of Cohen The Houston Police Department's "Crime Stoppen" program June 29 named the killing of jewel merchant Thomas Cohen as its "crime of the week," offering up to $1000 in reward for clues leading to an arrest and indictment. The muecular and handsome Cohen with his partner Don Darragh was Montrose News known to the gay community as the operator of ETC., a jewelry boutique at Numben in 1978and1979. He had also with Darragh once operated the boutiques at Cuddle'• and the Old Plantation discos, both gay. Police and the Crime Stoppers program gave this account of Cohen's death: Last May 24 at about 7:00 p.m., a Sunday evening, Cohen was returning from a trade fair to his office at 3329 Richmond, carrying two briefcases filled with gold jewelry and diamonds. Upon entering the office building, locked for the weekend, he was approached by two men, one carrying a .38 or .45-caliber revolver. Cohen was told to "freeze," but he stepped forward and shots were fired at him. He died several hours later. The suspects grabbed his two briefcases and fled in a 1974 stolen beige Camero bearing Texas license number DUM-317. The men were described as being in their late 20e. Both were seen wearing dark clothes and ski masks. One wore orange ostrich-skin boots. Crime Stoppers can be reached, anonymously if necessary, at 222-TIPS. More Ben Sargent 8 ing he red WO !en nee ·in ,ng pre ~. at - JULY 3. 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 ----- - 4th of July Celebration THE OjFFEAENT OAU-4f am? Bamf Thanli You Sir! Friday Night (Wham!)-Uniform night. Happy hour prices for all military uniforms. Saturday Afternoon-The Double Eagle Band· 4-7pm. Beer Bust 3-9pm. Saturday Night (Bam!)-Western night. Happy hour prices for all in western gear. Sunday (ThanJi You 5ir?)-Beer bust 3-9pm. Leather night with happy hour prices for all in leather. Music by Bobby Konrad Home of the American Leathermen Dress Code after 9:00 p.m. After hour movies Fri.-Sat. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 Serving Montrose and Houston UNITED CAB co. Drivers­759- 1441 Taxi Excellent earnings if your are over 25, have a Taxi License and have excellent driving safety record. Work your own hours by leasing a taxi cab. 1514 Leeland 759-1137 Get that summer tan without the work! We guarantee it! Call today! r w 8 ~j c~ c~ co~ th~ ha cl th ·H1 ch "h JULY 3, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Leland vs. Paul over use of Ellington for refugees It's amid charges that "criminal acts such as homosexuality" will move in WASHINGTON-Rep. Mickey Leland said in late June that he supports the idea of using Ellington Air Force Base near Houston as a temporary detention center for Haitians, Cubans and other refugees entering the country illegally. Four other aitea elsewhere in the country are said to be also under consideration for the detention center. Residents near Ellington have said they do not want the former Air Force base used as a detention center, claiming it would bring crime into their area. One resident, speaking at an emotional public hearing broadcast on Houston television, said she feared her children would be exposed to 11homosexuality," among other things, if refugees were housed at Ellington. Rep. Ron Paul, a conservative whose district includes Ellington, listened to the woman, and said he would try to Dem bones convince the Reagan administration not to pick Ellington. The Houston Post reported that Paul later sent out postal patron messages to 250,000 households in the district urging residents to write government officials to protest the proposed use of Ellington. The Post said only a "few dozen" letters from Paul's constituents had been received by government officals within the first days after Paul's mailings. Leland, the Post said favors using Ellington , saying the Houston economy is so broad based and strong, it would provide a good place for the refugees to filter into the mainstream of the community. Decision to uphold state obscenity law should have little effect here A 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding the constitutional· ity of Texas obscenity laws will have little effect in Houston because alleged pornography dealers have been prosecuted under the law for almost two years, Harris County Attorney John B. Holmes Jr. said last week, reported the Houston Chroncile. "Law enforcement can't come to a Turning Point by Klara Sener Montrose News screeching halt because someone attacks your statute.'' the newspaper quoted Holmes. "We face that with every new law." He was reported to have said prosecutors here have felt since the law was passed in 1979 that it was constitutional. "I'm pleased that the 5th Circuit agrees that the statute is written in accord with the federal judiciary' a idea of due process." The law increased some penalties for selling obscene books and made illegal the sale of so-called obscene devices. It also said that persons who sell pornography or obscene devices are presumed to know what they are selling and that if any person has six or more similar obscene divices, he is presumed to poses& them for sale. The law, for the first time, made it a felony to wholesale pornography. Holmes said he knows of only one felony charge filed here under the act. After the bill was passed, but before it went into effect on Sept. 1, 1979, 45 adult book store owners, movie operators and speciality store owners filed suit in U.S. District Judge Norman Black's court asking him to find the law unconstitutional. They argued the law was too vague. Black first issued a temporary injunction forbidding Harris County officials from enforcing the new law, then ruled that it was constitutional. Police immediately began enforcing it. A three-judge panel of the 5th Circuit June 24 ruled that most of the law is constitutional. The judges said the conatitutionalitic of four controversial parts of the law depends on how they are interpreted by Texas courts. The four sections involve: • The definition of pornography and obscenity. • The definition of the promotion of obscenity. • The presumption the persons selling material know it is obscene. • The presumption that they are in the business of promoting obscenity if they possess six or more similar obscene articles. "We determine that, although each of these provisions presents a troublesome question of constitutional law, a decision on the merits would be inappropriate at this time," Judge Jerre S. Williams wrote in the decision. "The Texas Legislature has attempted in the challenged statute to regulate a matter of concern to the people of Texas-commercial transactions in obscene materials," Williams wrote. "The state has a legitimate interest in promulgating such regulations. The product of the state's legislative process may not be the statute we would choose as the best accommodation between the state's legitimate regulatory interests and the federal constitutional rights of its citizens." "Yet as a federal court, we possess no m.;,date to engage in the detailed editing of the Legislature's efforts to strike the precarious balance necessary in this sensitive area." Gifts & Accessories, 604 Westheimer, 529-8002. 12-8 Mon.-Sat. Environmental Designs/Fine Furnishings, 608 Westheimer. 10-6 Mon.-Sat. Major credit cards & checks welcome. Ample free parking. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 Judge rules INS can't deny gays entry to U.S. SAN FRANCISCO-A federal judge ruled that the government cannot exclude people from entering the United States just because they are homosexual, reported AP. Jn granting a preliminary injunction June 25, U.S. District Court Judge Robert Aguilar said the constitutional rights of the plaintiffs, Lesbian-Gay Freedom Day Committee Inc. and others, were threatened by an Immigration and Naturalization Service policy of blocking homosex­uals or those accused of being homosexual from visting the country, the news service reported. The judge was reported to have said that the injunction would result in "no threat to the national security or law enforcement" and that the balance of hardship-a key standard for granting relief-"tipped decidedly toward the plaintiffs." He said the defendants-the INS and Attorney General William French Smith-had not proved they would suffer harm because of his order, AP reported. Attorney Mary Dunlap had urged the judge to take immediate action because of the possibility that hundreds of people might be subject to interrogatfon. detention or denied entry for the 1981 Lesbian-Gay Freedom Day parade tn San Francisco, it was reported. The event was held last Sunday, June 28. She claimed INS policy violated citizens' First Amendment rights of speech and association, including rights to receive information and ideas as well as the rights of equal protection and privacy, AP reported. Assistant U.S. Attorney John Kern was reported to have said he did not know if the government would appeal the ruling. Norman Lear unveils media campaign Producer Norman Lear June 24 unveiled a national media campaign designed to counter what he called the intolerance of the "moral majoritar­ians," reported the Houston Post. Lear, a founder of "People for the American Way," said the campaign would consist of four brief TV public-service announcements which stress the nation's diversity and historic tolerance of freedom of thought. He aiad the spots would counter "the intolerant messages and anti democratic actions of moral ma1oritarians." The messages feature a variety of people who have friendly disagree­ments about everyday subjects such as music, sports and the way they like their eggs cooked. Each spot concludes: "Freedom of "df-app Jufi £jlhf" from ':Li & the sta-:1,,f c::l?auf~ !B'l.a1-1- c::i?ubbln9 c;;/f cf?utau~ant and <'Win£ !Ba~ OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 11-10 WINE, BEER & CHEESE HAPPY HOUR 4-7 with 2 for I Free Hors D 'oeuvres • Beat Hamburger in Houston with Fren ch Fries or Baked P otato and Relish Tray AJeiander Newioa Died, ... Braieewortb. 8utrollr. Etnc heisbt: 29'' On «U.-play at RaW'e • Soup & Sandwiches • Mexican Selection • Daily Specials-3-course lunch-$5 • Our Specialities: Quiche Lorraine, Beef Casser ole, Homemade Pate & Homemade Cakes IThe Beat Cheesecakes in Town) Live Entertainment Nightly ~~ Featuring Jawad-Jazz. Blues & Folk on Acoustic Guitar (first o f a aeries on Raul's Rubbing&) CnfortWl•tely iwtthin1 ~ known •hoal hi# cu.r bul it llUIY be a1snlftean• \h•t h1- ..,U. made on 16th May, 15M.. and proved 10th $rptftnbtr. lf:ie&. opened with LIM- cutmnary pre-R,rfonnabol'I dau­btq11eatin10 ""my .awlo un&o \he w-.d Trin.itio lhrM ~n• •nd on. God &o our bl ..... Lady• MllU• Milt)'• and to all th• hooh companie of huiv.n:· At thi.t dau aucb • fonnula, ln .authem En11and at le ... t. •Ul.-U that the •tat.or adhel'tlld to the old faith &andln1 on• ,...._,mount. Ala.net. ••u • Grwnwil'h armOW' with ~~:h:.~~.i: .. ~,:~.i:.~~~::,.~~·,~n:::~: lam developmftl:t 11f lh• ••poa. DINE JN OR TAKE-OUT ORDERS 914 <'Wut c/f[abama ,29-0627 thought: the right to have and express your own opi n ion. That's the American way." Amoung the well-known faces that appear in the spots are Carol Burnett, Goldie Hawn and Muhammed Ali. They were directed by Jonathan Demme, winner of the New York Film Critics' Beat Director Award for 1980. Moral Majority establishes legal arm LYNCHBURG, Va.-Moral Majonty, the New Right political-religious lobby group, announced establishment of a legal service section which it billed as a 40conservati ve version" of the American Civil Liberties Union. This is according to an AP news dispatch. A publicist said Moral Majority's Legal Defense Fund would be financed by the lobby group and it would ask local lawyers to hand.le legal actions involving "private and Christian schools, ministers and conservative citizens who have felt the sting of liberal legislation," AP reported. Bette Davis likes "her song" Actress Bette Davia has been reported to have called singer Kim Carnes to congratulate her on her record, Bette The Nation Davis Eyes, which is a top song on Billboard's charts. Mias Davis said she was delighted her eyes had helped. "I never thought that at the age of 73 I'd be a hit on the rock 'n roll market," she added. Public defender withdraws from case SANTA ANA, Calif.-The public defender's office has withdrawn from the case of William George Bonin, who has been accused of killing boys and young men in Southern California's "freeway killings." After the public defender's office cited a conflict, Bonin's case was postponed. The conflict was not made public, but it apparently involved the public defender office's representation of someone who testified before the Orange County grand jury, reported AP. Meanwhile, eight new murder counts were filed against Bonin, the prime suspect in a string of 44 Freeway Killer sexual slayings. The Orange County grand jury returned a 33-count indictment against Bonin, including 25 counts of sexual 88sault and robbery. The murder charges could result in the death penalty if Bonin is convicted. Bonin also has been charged in a Loa Angeles County grand jury indictment with fourteen killings. Bonin, 34, of Downey, Calif., has pleaded innocent to the Los Angeles charges. Special photo report on Gay Pride Week page 11 The MONTROSE VOICE is published every Friday. Offices: 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houston, TX 77006. Phone (713) 529-8490. Contents copyright ©1981. Office hours: 9am-6pm. Henry McCiurg, publisher/editor. Les Williams, produc t ion a nd distribution. Ed Martinez, editorial a 88ista nt. Member Gay PreBB Association and Texas Gay News Association. Items appearing in the Voice accredited to Copley News Service, San Francisco Chrorucle Features Syndicate, Surburban Features, or United Feature Syndicate are copyright by those concerns and are purchased by the Voice for use in this newspaper. All other items in the Voice are copyright by the Montrose Voice. POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houston, TX 77006. Subscription rate in US: $39 per year, 52 issues, or $24 for six months, 26 issues. J oe Keener, advertising d irector . Randy Brown, Ho uston a d vertising representative. Texas advertising representatives: Jim Olinger and Wade Frey, Connections, 2401 Manor Road, #118, Austin 78722, (512) 474-1660; Roy Hall, Metro Times, POB 225915, Dallas 75265, (214) 528-9944. National advertising representative: Joe DiSabato, Rivendell Marketing, 666 6th Avenue, New York 10011, (212) 242-6863. Advertising deadline: Every Tuesday, 7:00pm, for issue to be released three days later. n on he 73 t," lie ~m ho nd •'s ce as de he on lie JULY 3. 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Quasimodo's Sanctuary gets highest rating for food value QUASIMODO'S SANCTUARY (an antique bar and netaurant). 1985 Welch at McDuffie. Reviewed June 1981. OVERALL **** SERVICE ***· FOOD QUAUTY ****· FOODVALUE*****,ATMOSPHERE****· CLEANLINESS*** •c..ibk.••poor .................... rood.••••• .. .,..b By Jonathan Dough At 1881! An inexpensive restaurant with a great atmosphere and respecta­ble meals. Qu88itnodo's Sanctuary ia a new Houoton restaurant (a straight one, which opened in December), inspired by the days of the Hunchback of Notre Dame. It's the sort of place you know you'll enjoy before you even enter-as we drove up on a rainy Fri­day night, the low lights, shining through the windows seemed to prom­ise a warm and comfortable reception. Our steaks arrived actually sizzling under lots of onion, prepared exactly 88 we ordered them. They were ade­quate in every way. A fantastic baked potato accompanied, stuffed with but­ter, sour cream, cheddar cheese and bacon bits. Scrumptious! We did not choose to have cocktails, but could have chosen from a full bar selection. Instead we enjoyed good hot coffee and icy milk. Our bill came to $20.18 which included steaks, salad, rolls, baked potato, and beverages; two could enjoy complete dinnero there for under $12.00, e88ily. (A friend assures me that the Reuben Sandwich, for instance, ia deliciouo; it's priced at $3.26.) We sat upstairo; since the bartendero often double as waiters, you'll find ser­vice to be better downstairo, in sight of the bar. Chances are the owner, George, will come by your table to say hello; although he didn't know us, he showed us very peroonal attention and really made us feel right at home. Qu88imodo's Sanctuary. The food is Judge disagrees over purpose of suit by Falwell LYNCHBURG, Va.-The federal judge hearing the Rev. Jerry Falwell's $50 million lawsuit against Penthouse magazine indicated he does not agree with the suit' a accusations of invasion of privacy, libel and conspiracy to damage Falwelrs reputation, reported UPI July 1. Falwell, head of Moral Majority, sued Penthouse after the magazine published an interview with the TWELVE ... FOURTEEN ... SIXTEEN INCHES? No sir. We are not kidding! STAR PIZZA WILL DELIVER* HOT & JUICY TO YOUR DOOR •within 2 mile radius. * New York-Style hond thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep dish pizza * also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian Pizza * Starburst Deluxe Pizza (the worksl) * Super Sandwiches & Salads * fantastic Desserts * Imported & Domestic beer CALL 523-0800 PLEASE ALLOW ONE HOUR FOR DELIVERY MENTION THIS AD AND GET $1 OFF * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOM 2111 NORFOLK HOURS Mon1 11130am· 11 :OOpm Tue1 sorry, closed Wed: 11:30am·11 :OOpm Thurs: 11:30am·11 :OOpm Frh 11130arn-mldnlght Sat! 4:00pm-mldnlght Sun: 4:00pm-10.30pm good; it's inexpensive. The atmosphere is, as the menu says, "quaint, cute and friendly." The soft lights turned out to be from gilt chandeliero dangling from a high ceiling, from wall-mounted lantemo and from creatively arranged tiny lit­tle lighta that look like Chriotmas. Music from the 40s and 50e (the kind your mother probably loves) helps to provide an ambience you won't find many other places. Seating only about 60, Quasimodo's features a large side bar, private upstairo dining (just two tables), and some of the largest tables you'll ever see in a restaurant. A blackboard lists the daily specials. political/ religious activist. U.S. District Judge Jam es Turkeaid the central issue is whether the writero breached an agreement by selling the interview to Penthouse-an issue Falwell's suit does not raise, reported UPI. Judge recalls magazine which depicts Tarzan, Jane in the buff NEW YORK-U.S. District Judge Milton Pollack ordered the July issue Restaurants The menu offero a variety of tasty­sounding sandwiches from $2.25 to $3.26; more substantial offering• are priced from $4.95 to $8.95 (the Top Choice Sirloin, their most expensive dinner), which both my boyfriend and I selected. We were lint served a small salad, only four vegetables, yet certainly worth the 804 cost. My Italian dressing was acceptable; but next time I'll order the Green Creamy dressing-I oampled my lover's, and we both found it deliciouo. Room temperature pumpernickel bread with margarine was not eope­cially appealing. The Nation of High Society magazine recalled from distribution because, he ruled, it "besmirched, tarnished and debased" the itnage of Tarzan and Jane, reported AP. Judge Pollack was reported to have said that High Society-which he termed a "sex magazine" -was not authorized to use the charactero, and its ten-page article, "Monkeying Around With Tarzan and Jane," shows them "purportedly engaged in explicit sexual activities and conversation." He issued the ruling June 25 as a preliminary move in a $3 million damage suit brought against High Society by Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 MEN, WOMEN, STUDENTS ARE YOU INTERESTED IN STAYING AND LIVING IN HOUSTON? WE HAVE GOOD-PAYING JOB OPENINGS. FUN JOB, PERMANENT, FULL AND PART-TIME POSITIONS. EXPERIENCE AT PHONE SALES PREFERRED BUT NOT NECESSARY. Light delivery help also needed. Must have reliable car. Call 522-6206 No collect calls accepted KPFT JACKPOT Inflation Fighter Program 3207 Montrose at Westheimer KPFT COUPON BOOKS FREE STUFF! Take advantage of KPFT's Inflation Fight­ers Coupon Book. Hundreds of dollars worth of entertainment, food and drinks at popular Montrose-area restaurants, bars and shops. Coupons good for free merchandise. All for $2995. Available at Inflation Fighters Office 3207 Montrose, suite 2 Just south of Westheimer JULY 3, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Gay Pride Week 81 Photo Review 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 Gay Pride Week 81 Photo Review ' JULY 3, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Gay Pride Week 81 Photo Review 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 TEXAS FIRST THE 2306J Open 7 nights, 9pm-6asn wMknights, to 9con w .. kends 2306 Genessee · {Fairview at Tuam) 528·6235 The South 40 11034 Almeda Genaa, 941-9796 Come ... our bar In the woods Old Fashioned 4th of July Picnic Saturday, July 4, Noon-? 2sc Draft Fr- watermelon. Grills provided. 14Y, acres of woods & funl Bring meat & a covered dish. Free antsl Free sunburn! Sunday: 25« Beer Monday: s2 draft beer bust, 8pm· closing "WE THE PEOPLE CON­TINUE THE PARTY! CELE­BRATING THE 205TH 4TH OF JULY THIS SATURDAY AND SUNDAY FROM 5PM ... LOOSE MUSIC, MUCHO MUNCHIES, HOT MEN {INCLUDING YOU> AND ALWAYS GOOD VIBES." VENTURE-N 2923MAIN HOUSTON GROOVIN' • CRUSIN' • BOOZIN ti ti li E JULY 3, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 "The Celluloid Closet: Homosexuality in the Movies" Until the 1930s homosexuality simply "didn't exist"; then later, gays were portrayed as "miserable, doomed or evil" figures Article by Joe DiSabato THE CELLULOID CLOSETc HOMOSEX­UALITY IN THE MOVIES. H,.,,,.,. & Row, 10 Eaet 53rd St., New York, NY 10022. Publication date: July 15, 1981. $15.00 hardcover; $7.95 trade paperback uThere have never been lesbians or gay men in Hollywood films. Only homosexuals." With this statement, Vito Russo ends his book The Celluloid Cwset: Homosexuality In The Movies sum­ming up in thirteen words the begin· ning. The Celluwid Cwset is an exhaustive report on how Hollywood has dealt with the portrayal of gay men and lesbians throughout the his· tory of the cinema, and why this por· trayal has been so unfavorable. Russo covers this subject both chronologi­cally and thematically, documenting his points by citing the way in which over 300 films have treated gay people and illustrating his study with over 120 photographic stills, many never before published and some from scenes cut from the released films. Russo's basic contention is that American film has portrayed gay men and lesbians in a manner which reflected America's attitudes toward gays and which would be found accep­table to the American audience. This has manifested itself in somewhat dif· ferent ways throughout the different periodo in the history of American cinema. From the early dayo of Holly· wood at the tum of the century until the late 1930's, homosexuality was oimply not a fact of life according to the film industry. This is the period during which any portrayal of a gay character was unthinkable. Rather, Hollywood frequently depicted what Russo referrs to as "the sissy," a man who is effeminate and/or weak and who as Russo puts it, "takes it on the chin' for everyone, becoming the scape­goat for the unstated homoerotic activ­ity of the real but insecure me!' a_round him. Using in each case male intimacy as the thing all men secretly dread, the issue is raised indirectly yet goes unmentioned. In a way, the sissy remained asexual while serving as a substitute for homosexuality." While European attitudes toward homosexuality allowed for the emo· tional aspects of the passions aroused in human relationships to be more directly explored, in America the ve!'Y idea of homosexuality was bound up m a definition of masculinity. Thie is seen in both the comic portrayal of men who, for one reason or another, wind up dressing as women (Fatty Arbuckle, Charlie Chaplin, Wallace Berry, etc.), and in the chance comic situations in which sissies often found themoelvee. Harold Lloyd's films offer good examples of this latter case: in Grandma's &y (1922) and in The Kid Brother, Lloyd is soundly beaten by the 0 real" men who discover that the "woman's" hand they had been hold· ing actually belonged to Lloyd and not to the woman they thought they were holding. Russo cites many more examples of the manner in which Hollywood por­trayed the sissy. Actors such as Frank­lin Pangborn, Eric Blon; and Edward Everett Horton made entire careers out - - Boddy Rogera and Richard Arlen 1hare a quiet moment in William Wellman'• Wings (1927). Book Feature of portraying such effeminate men. As the comedic value of the sissy became more apparent, films started portraying the sissy as more explicitly homosexual. By 1933 some films had all but erased the barrier between eieey and homosexual during moments of what Russo calls "seemingly con· scious innuendo." It is important to note that films still dealt with the subject of homosex­uality through innuendo in a comic situation but the sissy was no longer necessarily portrayed as asexual or as a weak, effeminate but heterosexual man. The reading between the lines which gay people had been doing until then was now alluded to more directly. As filmmakers became bolder, moral and religious leaders became more incensed. In order to protect the indus· try from outside censorship, Holly· wood developed the Motion Picture Production Code in 1930. Under pres· sure the Code was strengthened in 1934, and as a result borderline gay characters fell back into the old relia­ble sissy portrayal. In the late 1930s and 1940s Holly­wood began churning out "buddy films,'' usually involving, as Russo describes it, "a group of men going off to fight a war or to conquer a wilderness-men's work, in which female presence is superfluous but tol· erated with blatant condescension." The strongest emotional relationship in these films was between the male buddies, but the heterosexual romance was a plot ingredient which simply had to be there to allay the fears of the audience. What homosexual charac­ters may have existed in buddy films were there as a contrast to draw suspi­cion away from the buddies. Russo explains this phenomenon using many examples from very early buddy films like Flesh And The Devil (1927) starring Lars Hanson and John Gilbert through Red River (1948) star· ring John Wayne and Montgomery Clift, and Butch Cassidy and The Sun­dance Kid (1969) starring Paul New­man and Robert Redford to Semi­Tough (1977) starring Burt Reynolds and Kris Kristofferson. In 1961 the Code had to be revised substantially because several major producers (especially Otto Preminger) had found that lack of Code approval would no longer prevent box office suc­cess. The Code was lagging behind what the American audience wanted to see in the movies. The Code revision now allowed references to homoeex· uality on ocreen provided that "the allusion to sexual aberration was treated with care, discretion, and res­traint." The result of this change was more frequent appearances of specifi. cally identified homosexuals but chiefly as tragic figures who were sub­ject to blackmail or were otherwise vie· timized. The ending of pictures which contained homosexual characters always had the gay man or lesbian either being killed, committing suicide, or seeing the heterosexual light and being "cured" of their "depraved sick· ness." Gaye were always portrayed as miserable, doomed, andior evil fig. ures. As the line from &ys In The Band put it, "Show me a happy homosexual and I'll show you a gay corpse." In !968 Time speculated that Holly· wood was "using" homosexuality more and more as a subject because it had "run out of conventional bad 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 guys." AB Russo puts it, ''Homosex­uality waa never incidental or second nature to a screen character; after all, sexuality waa always the reason for u.oing a gay character in the first place. -.. The movies await permiaaion from the world-famous general public before they will portray gays as a fact of life. And the self-hatred of gaya in the film industry ia as much at fault as the ignorance of the general public." Thill last point ia interesting because it points out how the portrayal of gays through the years has created a terri­ble self-image problem for gay men and lesbians. If the only portrayal of gaya on the screen was either as effem­inate buffone or as milierable, doomed or evil creatures, how could we have expected gay people, including those gay people in the film industry, to deve­lope a positive self-image? RUSBo devotee the final pages of the book to examining the current state of affairs in Hollywood. With the increas­ingly vocal gay presence in society dur­ing the 19708, the gay community has now asked Hollywood to more realisti­cally portray gay characters. Russo atates: ''To 'ask' Hollywood for any­thing ia a waste of time for any minor­ity group; to ask that a reflector of aociety show lesbians and gay men as being a part of, rather than being out­aide, the social norm when they have not yet become a visible part of it is unreasonable, contradictory and des· tructive to gay life and liberation." AB Russo points out, television both through regular series and television movies has been far ahead of Holly­wood in a more reali1tic and favorable portrayal of gaya. This has been the case for several reasons, among them television's regulation by the Federal Communications Commission and its vulnerability to activist pressure through negative impact on its adver­tisers. :Moreover, television's 24-hour programming ia in constant need of new social issues to deal with, includ­ing homosexuality. Thua we are seeing positive portrayals of gays on televi· sion much sooner and more frequently than in the movies where such positive film projects and The Front Runner, Rubyfruit Jungle and Consenting Adult have been turned down by every major studio. In The Celluloui Closet, Vito Ru88o has thoroughly analyzed American film as it has portrayed gay men and lesbians throughout the years. Few institutions have had more influence on the way Americans see themselves as the Hollywood film. The way in which Hollywood portrays any minor­ity or oppressed group is important because society's attitudes toward minorities and oppressed groups are reflected by and freq uently shaped by the Hollywood film. Moreover any group's self-image ia also profoundly influenced by the way in which it ts constant y portrayed in the movies. It is as important to understand the atti­tudes of Hollywood toward gay men and lesbians as it is to understand the attitudes of society as a whole toward gays. Only whith this understanding can negative attitudes be changed. Russo has given us a comprehensive, well-wntten, highly readable, and extremely entertaining study, one which ia long overdue and very neceesary. ~ arbck funu•Md by IRSobato on lwkolf of Hor~•Row. Arthur Bell and Doric Wilson discuss with Vito Russo homosexuality on the silver screen (Editor's note: The following conversa­tion was tape recorded recently at Julius', a popular New York Green­wich Village gathering place. Arthur Bell, Doric Wilson and Vito Ru88o have known each other for a long time. Bell ia the author of Dancing the Gay Lib Blue• and Kings Don't Mean a Thing. He is a journalist who writes regularly for the Village Voice. Doric Wilson baa written over thirty plays in the paet twJmty years, including Now She DanCf!~ The West Street Gang, A Perfect Relation1hip and Foreuer A~er. Vito Ru880 io the author of The Celluloid Cwset: Homosexuality in the Mouies published by Harper & Row thia month.) Vito: We're aitting in a bar that was a setting for The Boyl in the Barui and Next Stop Greenwich Village. Doric: It was also the bar in which Edward Albee met the young guy who became the character of Nick in Who'• One of the few tender momenta between leebian chBTacten in American film history. Alexi.a Smith and Melina Mercouri in Jacqueline SU888.nn'• Once i• Not Encugh(l975). Al Pacino dancea all nig~t at an all night 1ex club while searching for a killer of homoeexual men in Cruitins (1980). Book Feature Afraui of Virginia. Woolf? The guy waa an archaeologist who was married to the daughter of a college president. Arthur: What we should do here is tape a three way conversation if Doric doesn't mind. Vito: I'm surprised. I've never a udi­tioned for one of Dorie's plays. But not being conventionally beautiful like Lana Turner . ... Doric: Actually not many of my characters are conventionally beauti­ful unle88 I'm doing a number on them for it. Arthur: Vito, you're not conven­tional but you're beautiful. Vito: Crap, Arthur. Arthur : Tell ua about the book. It's called The Cel/ul-Oid Closet and it took ten years to write? Vito: I've been talking about it for ten years, Arthur. It took eighteen months to write. But I began taking notes for The Cellul-Oid Cwset back in 1974. It was a matter of tracking down hundreds of films in which there were supposed to be gay characters and checking them out. I saw almost 450 films all over the world. I concentrate on American films but it's really a history-complete with lots of photographs-of the ways in which lesbians and gay men have been pre­sented in the media and it's written from a feminist perspective. What interested me most was di&e0vering obscure gay characters in films, the onee people don't usually notice. Arthur: But actual homosexuals, before the 60's? Vito: Sure. There was a gay cowboy in a Stan Laurel short in 1923. Arthur: There was drag, though, right? Vito: There was always drag, Arthur. Arthur: What a horrible thing for young gays growing up to see all the time. ... Doric, did you love strong women in the movies? Doric: No. I grew up on a ranch and I liked historical films. Vito: When was the first time either of you saw something gay on the screen? Doric: The first gay thing I remember was that all the gays I knew were going to see Gigi to look at Louis J ordan's box. I wentbut i didn'tseehis box. Arthur: I didn't relate to gays on film at all. The first time I knew there was something homosexual going on was in Aunti Mame in the late 50'e. There were those dikey women at the party in the beginning. That was twenty years ago. Doric: I think I identified with sophisticated men or women. Leslie Howard got to me and Cary Grant and Noel Coward. Vito: I always hated all those wimps. I liked Jimmy Stewart in The Glenn Mil/,.r Story. I snw it every day until my father stopped me from going to the movies. Arthur: See, I didn't even know what homosexuality was until I was seventeen and then when I finally found out, I wasn't looking for it in the movtes, I was looking for it in the bnrs. Doric: That's a good point because when I was gr,..wmg up on t"'e ranrh. movtes didn't represent reality to me, they represented entertainment nnd I wa•n't looking for anything real in them. Vito: Well, then I was thirteen years old and the first gay films started to JULY 3, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 open. It was 1961 and Th'1 Childrens Hour, Victim, Walk On The Wild Side and Advise and Consent were all released around that time. I saw Sud­denly Last Summer when I was inhigh school. Doric: A gay publicist got me into the first showing of Some Like It Hot in 1959 and obviously the word had gone out about the last line in the film being so funny and the whole audience was gay. Arthur: When I was very young I used to get the hots for Jon Hall and Tyrone Power when they wandered around in those sarong movies. Vito: Probably our experience is being in audiences with other gays rather than seeing them on the screen. Recently a friend called me and yelled "Tum on channel 7! Thie is the movie that made me gay!" It was The French VITO RUSSO, author of Tm. Cel­luwid Ck>set: Homosexuality in the Movies, was born in New York City. He received his B.A. degree from Fairleigh Dickinaon University and his M.A. degree from New York University. Russo is a free-lance writer who baa been writing articles, film reviews, and interiews since 1970. Russo has worked in the film depart­ment at the Museum of Modem Art and in film distribution at Cinema 5 Ltd. While working at the Museum of Modem Art and serving as an officer of the Gay Activists Alliance in New York, Russo created a lecture on the subject of homosexuality in the Ameri­can cinema. At the same time he began research on hia book. He has traveled the country giving his lecture, ''The Celluloid Closet," at college&, film aocieties, theaters and film institutes, including the Ameri­can Film Institute in Washington, D.C., and the Fox Venice Theater in Hollywood. His lecture has been covered by major television and print media across the USA and in Europe. Russo's writing has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers, including Rolling Stone, New York Magazine, Newsday, The Village Voice, The Soho Weekly News, Chris­topher Street, Gay News, The Advo­cate and The Washington Blade. R.;,.so live• in the Chelsea section of New York City. Line with Jane Russell. Arthur: Suddenly I understand everything. You know, I remember identifying with comic books and years ago there was one called Th'1 Human Torch. And the Human Torch had no clothes on. He was just sur­rounded with fire, his skin was always burning and he had a tremendous body. I'm surprised I'm not a pyromaniac. Doric: A magazine called Tomor­row's Man came out when I did and my first hero was Glenn Bishop. Arthur: I haven't heard that name in twenty years, Doric. Vito: I remember a gay book called Maybe Tomorrow by Jay Little and the hero was a guy named Gaylord LeClair. Doric: Also there was a book about World War II and a British woman wrote about being in Burma with her Laurel and Hardy in bed together. husband. The Japanese did homosex­ual things to him and it turned me on. Arthur: I'll bet you loved World War II, Doric. Dunkirk wasn't gay. Tokyo was. Vito: June Allyson wasn't gay but Rosalind Russell was. Arthur: Iceberg lettuce isn't gay but Romaine is. Vito: The ingenue isn't gay but the heroine's best friend is. Doric: An awful lot of gays identi­fied with the leading lady's best friend. I loved Eve Arden. Arthur: The Greek Chorus behind the stars. It's interesting. About four or five years ago I had an interview with Bette Davis and I asked her if she knew why gay men like her so much. She said, "Yes. Because they have the best taste." Doric: You know, it might just be that simple. VITO RUSSO Book Feature Vito: I've noticed that a lot more actors are willing to play homosexuals these days. Doric: A lot more straight actors, you mean. it. Vito: Yeah. Gay actors still won'tdo Arthur: What's this new one called? Vito: Making Love. Arthur: Yeah. They tried to get bigger names than whoever they got and none of the stars of the stature of Pacino and Hoffman wanted to do it. Vito: Well, they got Michael Otkean and Harry Hamlin who are fine. The movie ie about a handsome, married thirty year old doctor who decides to come out to this wife and family after falling in love with a West Hollywood clone. Arthur: It has a clone? Vito: Well, it's written as a typical clone in the screenplay but who knows what they'll do with it. Arthur Hill is directing it. Michael Otkean is sup­posed to play the doctor and Harry Hamlin the clone. The clone is promis­cuous and can't settle down and fall in love with anyone. He disappear& from the film before the end. It doesn't work out between him and the doctor. I thought that was a realistic touch. It never works out with doct.ors. Jesus. look at that. Doric: Who? Vito: Over there, the waiter. Doric: Oh, I wasn't looking at him. I was looking at that big one over there who look& like Michael Greer. Vito: He doesn 't look like Michael Greer. Doric: He's big like Michael Greer. Ask him if he wants to marry a playwright. Arthur: I'm so desperate at this point, if Charles Laughton came along I'd jump him. Doric: I had him last night. You want his number? He rejected me at first but he was drunk and I talked him into it. Vito: What? You're seeing Charles Laughton? I thought he was dead? Arthur: Go back to the waiter, Vito. Vito: No, I'm listening. Doric: I must say I don't want to see just happy gays on screen or TV. That's boring. Vito: Me neither but a little variety would help. Arthur: I want them to be real. Doric: Yeah but what't real to you? Everybody's got a different version of reality. Vito: Or perhaps someone can create a new reality and make it believ­able. Robert Patrick said the Boy Meets Boy was so terrific because they created a past that never existed, a gay 1930s musical. Arthur: That' a the way it's going to work, finally. To create a story in which gay& are real people and the sub­ject isn't homo•exuality. Doric: Well, I can't wait to read your book, Vito. I was afraid it wouldn't come out while we still had movies as an art form . Vito: Should I make personal appearances on the back of a train? Doric: How about on the front of a train with grape leaves in your hair? Arthur: I think he's more of a caboose person. Vito: Is that a reference to my sexuality? Doric: Get somebody good looking to go out on tour for you. Vito: Doric, it was nice seeing you again. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 Montrose Movies/Concerts/ Art/Theater Movies This Week Near Montrose La Caire aux Folleo II (1981 comedy, in French with Englioh oubtitles, rated R) otarring U110 Tognazzi & Michel Serrault: Greenway The Boyo In the Band (1970): 9:30 River Oaks 1J~~n~~ 5~~~f6ced: 9pm at the Galleon, 2303 (Friday, July 3, throuah Thunday, July 9) • FRIDAY ONLY llTUESDAY ONLY Th•ten in and near Mont:n:.e: Alabama-2922 s. Shepheni-522-5176 Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Weetheimer, 528-8508 Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum 1732 Weetheimer, 52S-8508 ' French Qu.arter-3201 LoW.iana-527·0782 Galleria-Loop 610 at Westbeimer-626-4011, 626-01.0 Greenway-Gr.nway Plau Undeqround-626-3339 !Aew'1 Seb-S. Poot Oak at San Felipe-627-9910 Day for Ni11ht (1972): 7:30 River Oako The Stunt Man (1980): 9:45 River Oaks Repuloionl (1965): 7:30 River Oaks MacBeth (1971): 9:30 River Oako MUHUDl of Fine Art.I-Brown Auditorium, 1001 Bi.Nonnel- 1126-1361 Title to be announced: 2:15arn (Sat. morning), Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 52S-8508 Title t.o be announced: 10:15pm, Mary's, 1022 Weothamer, 528-8851 Rice Media Center-Univenity Blvd. at Stock&on, entrance 7, -SATURDAY ONLY •WEDNESDAY ONLY Rice Univeraity-527-~ River Oab-2009 W. Gray-524-2175 Shamrock-7017 s. Mam-797-1«6 W-m.i--5078 Richmond-622-2650 Title to be announced: 2:15am (Sun. morning), Different Drum, 1732 Weotheimer, 52S-8508 Caoablanca (1942): 5:30, 9:30, River Oaka Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 52S-8508 Five Eaoy Pieceo (1970): 7:30 River Oaks -SHOWING ALL WEEK Titlea to be announced, gay male erotica double !eatutt: French Quarter The Malteae Falcon (1941): 3:30, 7:30, River Oaks -SUNDAY ONLY The Laet Picture Show (1971): 9:30 River Oaks llTHURSDA Y ONLY Mel Brook1' Hiatory of the World, Part 1 (1981 comedy) otarring Dom DeLuiwoe, Madeline Kahn and Harvey Korman: 12:30, 2:25, 4:20, 6:15, 8:10, 10:05, Galleria Title to be announced: afternoon, Briar Patch, 2294 W. Holcombe, 665-9678 Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 Born Y eoterday (1950): 3:30, 7:30, River Oaks Solid Gold Cadillac (1956): 5:30, 9:30, River Oaks • MONDAY ONLY Fellini Satyricon (1969): 9:45 River Oaks Fellini'• Roma (1972): 7:30 River Oaks Title to be announced: 8pm, Wildwood Saloon, 1504 The Four Seaeono (1981 comedy) 1tarring Carol Weotheimer, 528-9040 Burnett, Alan Alda and Rita Moreno: 1:00, 3:05, 5:10, 7:30, 9:35, Galleria Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 Pink Flamln110'0: 9:30pm, Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Something for Everyone (1970): 7:30 River Oaks Weetheimer, 528-9040 Concerts This Week In & Near Montrose (Friday, July3, through Thunoday, July9) Ah and the Rebel Outlawo (country band) Friday and Saturday evening• at the Exile, 1011 Bell, 659-0453; Sunday afternoon and Thunday evening at Bro.zoo River Bottom, 2400 Br&200, 528-9192. Randy Allen and th e Doub le E a11le Band (country band) Friday and Saturday evening& at Brazo. River Bottom, 2400 Brazoo, 528-9192; Thunoday evening at the Exile, 1011 Bell, 659-0453. Paul Enlllloh Group (contemporary jazz) Evening• except Sunday at Cody's (1traight), 3400 Montrooe, 522-9747. Bob Henochen Trio uazz) 9pm-lam Tuesday• at Lao Briau (straight), 614 W. Gray, 528-9959. Houoton Popo Orcheotra Fourth of July concert 8:30pm Saturday free at Miller Outdoor Theater, Hermann Park. Houaton Symphony Orche.tra "Tchiak:oveky Night" free at Miller Outdoor Theater. Spm Friday. Dr. Rocldt (R&:B) Monday evening at Rockefeller'• (straight), 3620 Waohington, ~242. Juotlne Band (rock) Friday and Saturday• at Our Place, 1419 Richmond. 528-8903. Samantha Samuele (piano songstreao) From 9:30pm Friday, Saturday and from 9pm Sunday at Baja'•. 402 Lovett, 527-9866. Philip Settle Band (jazz) From 9:30pm except Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchero (otraight), 907 Westheimer, 527-0596. Art This Week in Montrose (Saturday, July 4, through Friday, July 10) Art League of Houaton-19113 Montrooe-1123-9113() All Mtdui Open ShtJw noon-4pm Saturday, 10am-4pm Monday through Friday. Contemporary Arte Mueeum-lS216 Montrooe Blvd.-1126-3129 Neil Jenney: Painting• and Sculpture, 1967-1980 in the Upotairo Gallery; Chark1 SchtJrre: Page1 from Boo~ Unpub!Uludin the Down1taiu (Perapectivea) Gallery; 10am-5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday, and 10am-5pm Tuesday through Friday. Hoo k 1-Ep1tein Gallery-1200 BIHonnet-1122-0718 Polychrome wood sculpture and waterco- 1 ore by Jacqueline Fogel daily except Sunday and Monday. Muoeum ofF!ne Arto-1001 BilSOnnet-1126-1361 New Accu1ion1 in Photography: Lower Brown Corridor; Sunlight on Leaves: Tiu /mpre11ioni1t Tradition: Maateron Study Gallery; lmprt11ioni1t and Po1t­lmpreuioni1t Selection• from tht Beck Collrction: Jonee Gallery; 10am-5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday, and 10e.m-5pm Tuesday through Friday. Rothko Cbapel-1409 Sul ROH Mark Rothko abstract expreaaionilt paintings and Barnett Newman's Broken Obeliak sculpture. Speedby'o Old Print Gallery-20111-F W. Gray-1121-9662 Will Bradley art nouveau prints 10am-5pm daily except Sunday and Monday. Wauon/de Nagy-1106 Berthea Works by Dan Rizzie through Wednesday. Watoon-Willour & Company-2000 Peden MATTRESS SALE -SIMMONS BEAUTY REST "-Sample1, Slight Damaga SPRING AIR, CRAFT MASTER Twin 99.00, fu ll 11 9.00, Qu .. n 169.00, King 199.00 SIMMONS HIDE-A-BEDS f ull 299, Queen 450, Sofa/ Love Seat 495 THE BED HOUSE 2115 Norfolk 523-8278 Hours Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Laura RU880ll and Otis Jarneo daily except Sunday and Monday. Wildcatter-31117 Waohin11ton-869- llllll Oil induatry-related works daily except Sunday and Monday. Live Theater This Week Near Montrose (Friday, July3, through Thunoday, Juiy9) (Nina Vance) Alley Theater (lar11e ota11e)-6lll Texas-228-8421 Agatha Chri1tie1a Ten Little Indian• 8:30pm Friday, 5 & 9pm Saturday, 2:30 & 7:30pm Sunday. Chocolate Bayou Theater-1823 Lamar-7119-9840 Kevin O'Morri1on'1 Ladyhouae Bluet 8:30pm Friday and Saturday, 7pm Sunday and 7:30pm Thuniday. Comedy Workohop Cabaret and the Combe Annex-19011 S. Shepherd- 1124-7333 Tiu Two-Bit Opera 8:30 and ll:OOpm Friday and Saturday, 8:30pm Tuesday through Thunday; improviaional comedy 8:30pm Sunday. The Enoemble-1010 Tuam-1120-001111 0Hie Davia' Purlie Victorioua 8:30pm Friday and Saturday and 5pm Sunday. Main Street Theater-Autrey Hou•e, 62611 S. Maln-1124-6706 Arthur Schnitzler'• La Ronde (comedy) 8:30pm Friday, Saturday and Thunoday. Sta11e1 Cabaret Staire-709 Franklln- 2211-91139 Mime, AU Mime (comedy) 10:30pm Friday and Saturday and 8pm Thuniday. Special photo report on Gay Pride Week page 11 Discover the power ol the little Montrose newspaper. The Montrose Voice now reaches over 14,000 people each week. .Discover the power of o llstlnt or small ad In the Clos.riffed seetton. 254 a word or $8 an inch. .Discover the power of o dlsplo31 odvertbement that reocha our 1o3'al followlne. Call 529-8490 daily, 9am-6pm. Ta. 1'Jae Montrose Vok:e. The power-full little rurwspaper. 'T 13 l2 12 12 y h II m y) y Montrose Classified • indic.c.. MONTROSE VOICE distribution point. BEDDING :m.!!!E!!""B!!!E!!!D!!!""H!!'O!!'!U!S!!E!"-•2•11•0- N•or"<"o"l'k- - 523-8278 Mattress Sale at the Bed House. See our ad eleewhere this ieaue. CLOTHING ~."H•B~OY·l L-ool_h« Oood_a •91•2•w.•u•.,•i•m,-~ 624-7869 •A PLACE IN TIME 1409 Richmond -Q-1 LEATHER-408 WMthelat.-52'7·9044 .•S..P.O RTS LOCKER-311 W•t.heimer-620- DATING SERVICES "A New Way to Meet Friends" For Information Mnd BASE A 11 to Al&.eraat.lv• Connec:don.e Bos: 10, 1713 WMLheimer "&J~';Tb~ DRUG STORE ....... '!!"~ .... --~"'!!'"~~ ~~~~:.~~~~-~eto 8undri .. - Now Open! For Your Everyday Drugs, Cosmetics & Toiletries, Sun Glasses, Greeting Cards, House­hold Sundries ALL AT DISCOUNT PRICES Alexander's Drug & Sundries 1220 Westheimer (near Radio Shack) 520-7600 Open 9-S Mon.-Fri.; Sat. till 6; closed Sun. EROTICA :ADONIS N ... •-H07 Richmond-623-.049" tull-ienrth all-ma.I• moYi• 1hown on vidto •A.svLUM 8oobtor9-t20t Richmond •BALL PARKBooU&ore-1830 W. Alabama •DiNER'S Newe-240 W•t.heimer-628-8960 ~!!~n~~'$,u~:l:.~ ~~:~~~fui~!~~ fWllena'lhall-mat.IDO'ri•. •KIRBY N.-.&and-3116 KllbJ-620-0'246 1grtJDZ N...-1182 W A.lab&ma.c S"1 men a.duinly EYEWEAR FLOWERS ! et.OOMERS-3618 8. ~eph.-d-6U2937 .c-ARAV AN-211a 0uruav;v-&l>-1019 •ntl0AY'8 F10rl.t-1S38 W•thelmer ai+.8618 • Flowers in Montrose, or across the country. Call Friday's Florist. FOR SAU OO~r S!!O!!M!~E~m!l!N!G~to•.'.!U!!?'S~oll h~i~n lh~oV!!o'~ko wber. you11 rMcb 14,000 ol )'OU •hbon . GAY BARS ... _..,._..,. ___ ..., __ (A) Hout.on Tavern Guild membeorindication, plaoed in \hi• dinetory at their requ.M. •BABYLON-300 Weethelater-628-8661 Gay Pride is Year Round at Babylon See our ad elsewhere this ie1ue. ~~~~n"M8:tn:1r:=~n= ~n:::i•s.n!!.iC0':..~1dtw10'.a~i, ~-,,':!:! ~~~i,~o:;::~n~lh1~~= ~\~'y~~·~;':::.:=i~h~~: •BADLANDS Territory 10• A•on· dale-0~21&0 Booze, Beer & Menat Badlands See our ad elsewhere this issue. 8Mr bu.It IUpm Sun. •BAJA'B-402 LoveU.-627-9888 Live piano entertainment nigh~lr, at BaJa s. See our ad elsewhere th.ii iaeue. Liv• piano •nlartainm•nt Fri a. Sat. from 9-.30pm 6.S-..·'l'hW9. fromn 9pm; Champqne brur:ichl2-3pm&a. •>.BARN 710 Paciftc-628-9427: bu.fret &m af\ernoon· color ni1ht 6. pool tourn•ment =~!:..1.'1;'.;: o( th• Muetana._ .., __ 11.bl•Eaal• t. •v•nin~ mu.d 1""e11Uin1 :.C~; l'~:~. ~v~~~ 't!:t!t• :b:i doa• Sun. afternoon; WC dnnlui Mon. 6 'f'.11•· f.!!1~.dd,a:.:11::0r!!~t1:;~tea~~!'; m•n pnidommantly: hom• Coft •6MoWrcyd• Club •BRIARP~W.ff~ IJ66-9678: butr•t Sun . .rternoon 6; Tue. ~Mid!i.\t "~!ie::~q~~-~Mo~1=:: pool tournament Wed. evenlD.( •ACHJCKEN COOP-63fi Wf.lhiUD.r-6216- 2240: liquor and bMr bu•ta Sat. 6. Sun afternoons; pool tournament Th•. evetw11 COCKAT00-3400 TravJ.-627-9902· Vopon private party Sat. •vftli.nc' tluoqh ~n-1~- .COPA-2631 Richmond-628-2259: di«v nifhtly with Ri<' Harvey 6 .lM Powen on eound a. h1hta; af\er-houn _Fri. 6 Sat. ruaht.; =~':::iaev~~l~u~lg!,•·~ Jonu; piano enlertainm•nt weekday aftemoona; bew91)9da19-12pm Mon.;nffany ~e~~:.;~o.~~ti~~-~°.':i.7"Th1::: ~;~~=.:'ct·~~'°'bU,,_y_-01-?0-- •DIPFERKNT DRUll-1781 Wfft­hebaer- 628-8508 Where Men can be Men-the Drum. See our ad elsewhere this isaue. Gay men ucluaive:l;; d,,.. code from~; tr~~~~!.0:~-!:~'1~t ~ Mon. lhrourh Fri..; ~ bu.IU Sat. 6. f: =00~.i~=~u~°:iibt-W:f; hOllM American lAathenMn •ADIRTY SAl..LY'S-220 Avonda~29- !~:n!!:::r o~r: !.!~' ~~rl t~a.~ ~l ni&ht Wtd. • E!J'e-1213 RicbmoDd-627·90'71 • AEXILE 1011 S.11 869-0463: Ab 6. the Reb..l O.tlawa Fri. a. Sat .... nine•; 7~ bidf.t 6. 8:30ia iml)9rHDation ahow with ;!;~~~ ~!Y:i,~ur~ CO::bT~!;.0~d Thun. ev•niac; ~ 'mu Ric*s. -OALLEON-2303 Richmond-622-7816 eJr:r~nantlr. mo"- 1pm Moa.· • GRANT STREET STATION-9ll Fairnew-628-8342 .-T.H..E HOLi HOUsK-109~ 4th of July lasts 3 days at the Hole House. See our ad elsewhere thia iaaue. 4th of Jv.ly barbeq• Fri. Sat. It S- ..nJ8TKARION&LYNN'S--817Fairriew 628-9110: 1ay womm pndomiaantly • KINDRED SPJRITS-5246 Buffalo Speedway-eM-97M; PY womm pndomj· nandy. •LAMPOST-2417 Tlm• Blvd.-628-8921 PY womm precSozmiwKly. •LOADING DOCX-1736 W•th.un.-62(). 1818: beer buet hom &pm Sun.; Gay m•n pndom.inant1y. •AllARY'S-10212 Westbeimer-1528- 8801 Watermelon & Weiners Saturday at Mary's See our ad elaewliere this iaaue. ~~y;m:a~~~d"!~=-t~ :=vt~~~p~T~~:~~':r.0{1:~ Motcm:JCM Club. •AMJDNITE SUN-634 W•theimer-626- .7.6.1.9.:. .i.m. peHonatioa •how• 811.n , A Wed •MONTROSE MINING C0.-806 Paciftc- .62.9-.74.8.8:. 1-ay. m et1 pradoatlnant1y; bte- butt -OUR PLACE-1419 Richmond-628-8903 Ju.tine Band Friday and Saturday evenina• from &pm; pool tourney Wad. 9¥.run.. •PARADE 1416 Richmond-62(1..1646: daoo whb Oti• Jam•, Frank Collin• 6. Phillip I...r1• on aoundU Fr.r:ak Whitten on lifihta; =r::~!i..1= ::::..tn:.=. wi.; •..P.I.N..K. ..B LEPHANT-1218 lAelHd A Montrose Alternative-The Pink Elephant See our ad elsewhere this iaeue. -;::U•~. y~~; ~~a:1~ayi..m°!: •RANCH 6620\.\ Main 628-8730: beer :flit:; 1 ~h~~:um.y Sun.; h•ppy hour • ROCKY'S-3416 W. DaJIH-6~8922: ,-ay women euluively. •SOUTH "'0-1103' Almeda-Genoa- 941-9796 July 4 Picnic in the Woods at the South 40 See our ad elsewhere this iBBue. :~~~h:!:i·:~::t;l.~ ~~~.tJ!~ &from8pm Mon. :..~~~m~:~:t;•is.6~~~\l:J ~---- - ~--- ~~ •AVENTURE-N-2923 Mala-622-0000 Party with Pride at the Venture-N. See our ad elsewhere this iasue. Li••play ~/4ili 1;j~y n~~~lal C: Q;:; Mo_nin- S~ A.uoaaUon nicht Mon..;~ Jliaht Tu•. •WILDWOOD Saloon-IGO' We.t­helmer- 628-IKMO Thursday night movies at the Wildwood Saloon See our ad eleewhere thi1 iuue. ::;-P~u~o~r~I~~ nr~-;::: t~n~ ~':,'!j =~:;:\clJJ!;!~'!:1.;.;:= Ch.'l!.e t-.309- Than. home Sundance C.ttl• GAY BATHS Texas' best. The 2306. See our ad elsewhere thia iuue. Gay men aclv.-.ively, mambtnh.ip required, opn ni.ahtly . HAIR CARE ·.~~~~--..~~'!'"" .... '!! ;.u~NEL HAU'~ YoU:um-628- •tiALONDANIEL.:1&« WNUi•i-r~2(). 9027 J ULY 3, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 To advertise in the Montrose Voice, call 529-8490, daily 9am-6pm. The Voice is the choice, read by over 14,000 people every week. RETURN WITH OS TO ••• e;'f"~~ I l~h.""'1 Mr.and Mrr. THI! MWICAC TNfMl! Tt116 MQA.OC"'5T. ,.Ji ~ SET THI! NOOO FOR 11.MEAN lOM.e#~ 'l' ;:,,, s -? ....,..,,. . )), L~ff £ ~ I j' ,,,r;i; , ) I j rt IN n-e e.AA:l..Y ~YS OF """°'°' ~ DISCOVl!ReD Ttte1"" COULD HAVf ReADY-1"\AOe ~e...czs CoY Alf\ING THE ,AD\IENTl.RES OF ~UDY-fSTA&JSMEO COWC-STRJP CHARACTERS. ON!': OF THe F!R5T s~ ro ee- M~ OVER Ttte AIRWAves WAS THe POPULAR A+'r. AAO ~­c: Ri!ATeO e,y CLARE ~IGG& JACK SNIART, ~LATER e«:AMe ~-~~~~~~&~:~ BY .J:ANE HOuST'ON, Dl!!STINED TO eeco,y.e A SUPP'ORTIN6 N:..TRe68 ON S0>P OPeRAB (SM!! WA5 NiRS. 6AO~YeNOR ON areLLA £l.o4££A.S) M11 AAO..fHIS. ~MIERED ~ cee IN 1929. LAT'E" A~ WITH TMe SAMe TITLE eur NOT ~D ON n1f! CO'l\IC 6TRIP AtRE'D OVeR KNX LO~ ANGeL.~e. IT F'eATURE!D eoDle Ai...ee'RT AC. JlMNHt" AND l eeoRGtA FIFIELP A5 JANE '---~--~~--- _"(;opleyNewi~ 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 3, 1981 BARGAIN MATINEES-•2°0 Mon. through Fri., all ahows before 6pm. Sat., Sun. & holidays, lot matinee only manager 1;003.1)66::107;309:35 Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland, Houston 77002 659-0040 "g:Jfay 9 Lif '3offLe21 1c with your hostess, Laura Lee Love and regulars Lana Kane & Eydie Mae Every Saturday, 10:30pm ($1 cover wlll go to performers) Thia w-k Special Mystery Guest HAPPY HOURS Saturday Mldnlght-2am Sunday: noon-8pm Mon-Fri: 4pm-8pm open 10am Mon-Sat, noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE THE H 0 LE PEOPLE AT THE HOLE HOUSE INVITE YOU TO A GIGANTIC 4th of July 3-Day Picnic Fri-Sat-Sun, July 3-4-5 EAT FREE Featuring Joe's Award Winning Bar-B-Que Beef & Bacon Bean Bake Casserole plus lots of hot dogs with all the trimmings All 3 Daysi Compliments of the Hole 109 Tuam 528-9066 JULY 3, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 JULY JUlT 3 4 HEPATITIS HOTLINE-Jim or David at ~~ 1 project of GPC'1 Medical .H.O..M OPHILE INTERFAITH Alliance-523- HOUSTON COMMUNITY CLOWNS--a62- 831' JULY JULY JULY JULY JULY .H,O,.U.,S.T.O N HUMAN RIGtITS LEAGUE­5 6 7 Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY: Interact/Houaton'a Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midnight at 3405 Mulberry • FRIDAY: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin • SATURDAY: Independence Day, July 4 • SA TU RDA Y: MSA ooftball team against New York City team July 4 • SUNDAY: Montrooe Sporto Association volleyball games 2pm in Cherryhurot Park • SUNDAY: Montrose Sports aoftball league gamee at Levy Field, with teama from the Galleon, Briar Patch, Jim's Gym, Montrose Mining, Brazoa River Bottom, Venture-N, Different Drum and Saddle Club •MONDAY: Montrose Sports Bummer league bowling, 9pm, at HELP WANTED HOME FURNISHINGS :e~Y~M~A~N~'•""""1n•,•.•,,•o•,.•_·.~.~.'"!w!!•.,-,_ hetmer-629-8002 Byman's fine furnishings, custom interiors. See our ad elsewhere thie issue. KEY SHOPS -RE~E~0~'8~-U"I"U": "W"H~th-•-lm~e. r. .i.i:. .U..l ~20 CommonweaJth-623-2927 Reed's Key Shops in Montrose, 2 locations. LITERATURE : WILDE 'N' STElN-620 W•theimer-62&- 7014: excluively l•Y LODGING : HOUSTON GUEST HOUSE 108 Avondale-520-9787 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." MAIL BOXES : KWIK KAlJ. Mail liu..-&117 Montrnlle-- 622-1898 MUSIC !oowNBEAT Rfcprd• 2117 Ridunond­h23- 8.1'8 - -----­• RJ{COHifRACK· ...1109 S. Shepherd..-624· 8602 ~TIENTION OHGANIZATIO,NS. Call the \'Mc• with your ora•nn:atton • n..-1 and .-.Unr dat• 529-8490. ati.moorw. 8 9 Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeomain • THURSDAY: Texas Bay Area Gays meeting • THURSDAY: Montrooe Sports Association tennia matches 7:30pm, Memorial Park • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-midnighton KPFJ' Radio, FM-90 Selected Events Later • IN I WEEK: Full Moon July 16 U N 8 WEEKS: "Gay Run '81" in San Francisco July 26 U N 4 WEEKS: Reno Gay Rodeo July 31-Aug. 2 • IN 4·6 WEEKS: Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churcheageneral conference in Houston, Aug. 3-9, Shamrock Hilton • IN 9 WEEKS: TexB& Gay Task Force Conference VIII in Houston Sept. 4.7 EPISCOP Houee,6266 July 14 FAMILVAFHIENDS or Gay1-m..u at ~CCR.1919 llectitur-M4-&.339: meetin1July fTR~TUNfTARiAN Charch-fiTO Faruun-626-1671: Lambda Alanon m..U.na Fn. eve~1nr: Wonhip •rv- Sun. monuDf GAY ARrHWESOfTaM~M;Ji,MTy-:. 629-1014: a pro)IJCt o( lnteract.'Houton. GAY Hl~PANW CAUCuS-t'll9·"44Ri ~ cAY-NURSE!-i-APHYSICIANS-or Ho•tcin-c/o GPC, 4600 Main #217-'777· 2287 - GAYPAITT:~9831 GAY"PEOPLEirl-Medlei---;-e---5:z2..7;MO GAYPOLffiCALCA~ M;in •217-621-1000: 1elf·deren .. MiurH1taru ~'!!~~~~~ ~~!e::i~i-r!.~! b;~i:.; ]"~; GAY Pridfl W•lr. 81 GUIDE 111~rnmiU.e- 6:19 tl4.9fi GAY- Pfi""d; w-;.--.;_ Iii PARADE 1Ub· commlllff-16'7 Parlr.-6219'l96 G-AYPRibF. Y.;-EEK 8 -Pl.ANN-ING Comm1l~21-9295 riAY--Pn~ -~I i•uHUcm' ff};: comm1t&M-627-0ti.'K1 GAY YOUNGAOuL~1lC'hurdi.of Chn.tlain Faith. 413 W•U..imer-371-1269: mM1n1 Fri ewn1ni HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB-c/ o Mary'1, 1022 W•thei.mer-628-8861 • KPFT Radio, FM·B0-418 Lo•ett :!:!·tt:.~O::h~~:: St~1n ray r.dlo LAMBDA ALJ.NON-meeuat let Unitarian .C.h.u.r.c.h.. 6210 Fan1UD-s2U772: meetiac Fri. Free venereal disease testing this week You can visit the City of Houston Health Department at 1115 N. MacGregor for free, confidential testing and treatment-phone 222-4297 Compllmenu of the City of Houston Health Department & the Medical Committee of GPC Thi• weekly ll1tin1 a tree public 1ervlce of the Montro.e Voice MONTROSE COUNSELING Center-900 ~~~~=-~O'--L--6-:>J_W_•_lh_o ___ l~2r.~1 &.~~ ..i. 10am-6pm. Fri MONTROSE SINGERS-meet.I •t MCCR. 1919Dllcatu---627·9818 ~~:~.~SP~r\'1?.~~.1l~i!~~°&f1~bb'1~ 657467: practice 7:.31).IOpm Thurs MONTROSE SPORTS VOLLEYBAu,..= =·s~~~enyhurst Parlr.-622·3487: ram• MONTROsESYMPHoNIC BAND. MontroN Marchiq 8and~27-9669 MUSTANGSf.Odal dub)-c/othf8ain,71o Padftc-5is.9427· color niaht Mou oPERAfiOi.T oocu-M£:"'1TAt~ Main '217-li2J.IOOO: 1 pro}ed ofGPC 11"nldl PAffiASK PORCE-cio GPC, f300 Main .il7-62H('(Xl. 621-9186, 623-323:3 ORAL MAJORITY .---IfoMEeo;.lition- 1409 Oa.luia1......&l.OJ98 RICE Univ. Gay1J.-tdan Sa~ GrotiP- 6U012< SUNDANCiCAITLE COMPA-NY(IOci&i ~:.~.!~~~~o;,:b ~~~otoW~ 1604 TEXAS BA Y-AREACfay1-332·373'7: mM'linl Thurs. evenin1 TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE-106 Avondale-529-7014, 5:.!0·9767: Conferenc. VUI plannm1 .... ion TllM..; Conftttnoe VIII SepL 4·7 TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTSfo"oundation-62& 9t:-~ TEXAH RIDERS motort:yle club~;o the" Eailto, 1011 Bell~· color n1Jht Mon fflifffARTAN-i l:NiVF.-NSALl~T C;-;-,. Caucu1-c/n In Unitarian Church.1>210 Fa.nnin-!'i:l4·'1624: m.t1n1 July 19 WESLAYANt·ffi:OWSH~ WE.<;THEJMEK COLONfARTS Aa.ot'ialioo-908 Weillhlima-621.(113:1 Gary Larson The Voice is the Choice for over 14,000 Houston readers each week etting away with a group, a friend or just by yourseU. Let us help. B, .•.,•. ,. ,..., ­Serving the travel needs of Mon~. B r•.•.., . ..,..,. .. . Your Travel E:qJert. 588-I9iHI 3205 Montrose Houston Employment Opportunities at the Voice 1. Advertising Salesperson The Montrose Voice has another opening for another advertising sales person. We are a young company, growing into a larger one, under the sales and promotional skills of our advertising team. The market is there waiting, but we need someone to help us reach all of it-someone with a professional manner and appearance, with an ability to be quickly accepted. She or he will understand the vital relationship of service to sales. Come grow with us. You'll enjoy the satisfaction of making a worthwhile contribution to the gay community and the challenge of pioneering a new product. Car required. Flexible hours. An opportunity for an excellent income. Call Joe Keener, advertising director, 529-8490. ~~ cELE'BRATION '~ j ~ 11'7 FRIDAY, JULY 3 ··~* :~ .#,~ DJ- JON !TT~~~ AFr~H~! ~!~ONTRERAS ~ ~ SATURDAY, JULY 4 '- 1' OJ'S- MIKE LYNCH & JONNEY CONTRERAS SUNDAY, JULY 5 FOURTH OF JULY EXTRAVAGANZA IN A TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE WITH NAOMI SIMS1 BRANDI WEST, KELLY & THE RETURN OF JANET PAGE WEDNESDAYS 10<: DRINKS JULY 3, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 PERSONALS PLUMBING .............................. - MONTROHE PLUMBING COMPANY, ,.,. :n~-:!~~~·i:;h~ :ri~~::rrc. .....P.U...B..L..I.C..A...T..I.O..N..S.. .._ INNER-VIEW-631 Weetheimer-622.-9333 • Mofttro-•• Votee-3620 Moniro•• n:n-629-8480 The "Montrose Voice," the newspaper of Montrose. Deadline for next iuue: 62~3:oo'fo~ ~dJ~~i.~ or aubscription•. Next iuue to be releaaed Fri. evening, July 10. TWf'-J:.:i3 sCrlith #1o3--62'1-9i l l RESTAURANTS :e•J,W.A.•,,-._-......L. o.v .e• u•-•.2~7~.. ~...! ""'- Baja'8 for Lunch! See our ad elsewhere this issue. Cham~SM brunch 1Z..1prn Su~ ,•,l,w.,,t. --.&.. Ql.fE- RANCH- 1626 w-;u;_;m;= •BRASSERIE Rutaurant-516 w_ Ala­bll. ma-628-87« .CuAPui.TAPEC Me:r.ican Re.taurant-813 Rkhmond-622-23&1 •HOUSE OF PIES-3112 Kirby-62S.:J811 • PAUL'S CAKE PACTORY-3207 Montr'OM-6UMM •RAUL'S BRASS RUBBING-81' W. AJabama-529-0827 You'll Really Like Raul's Brass Rubbin2 See our ad elsewhere this iasue. e'l'EDDr8-WNthel1Hr eSTAR PIZZA.·2111 Norfolk-628--0800 Hot Pizza Delivered! 523-0800. See our ad elsewhere this iBSue. •STEAK 'N' EGG-4231 Monb'oM-628-8135 ROOMMATES Roommate Connections Share expensee, build a friendship. We provide; the referral• •H.h ref-n-r:,:~: tfo'n0 ~~!.~!!a.)~:f.!;.'• 526-8002. SHOPS .•.A.L.L. .T.H..A.T.. G..L.I.T "T"E"R"S ~(t-lf-l-l)--4-3-2~15 ~Ji-~s~i; -..- A-,,-.-.-.. -,,-.-.--.=., WHthelmer-629-8002 New, now open- B~an' s Gifts See our ad el1ewhere thie issue. •FACETS(si-f"i. )- 1412 Wntheimer-1523- 1412 .OYr10NS-1GOS Ville at 15th-888- 3830 Lead-Crystal Prisms, Herb & Interior Plants, Fresh-Cut Flowers, Vari­Colored T-Sbirts (Helshta, Garden Oak.II, Montroee A moret) Tuea.-Sat. 9-7, Sun. 10-6 -TEXAS .iiJNtf° 00.-Taft at WaJcJ.- 6~-8215 7 Come Shop With Us-Texas Junk ComP.anY. See our ad elsewhere lhie i.Mue. You should try my analyst. He d-sn't charve for his sessions If I call him up and talk dirty on the phone. TALENT AGENCIES TANNING CENTER EuaOTAN-6215 Yoakam-62~100 Get that summer tan without the work. Eurotan. See our ad elsewhere thie iaeue. TAXI ·U-N-IT-ED- -Ca-b--7-5-~1-4-11- ------­United Cab, in Montrose and throughout Houston, 24 hours. 759-1441. TRAVEL AGENCY : PRE8TIGE Trnel-3206 llontroee- 022-1922 Prestige Travel Agency in Montrose. See our ad elsewhere this issue. YARD & GARAGE SALES SECOND ANNUAL GARAGE SALE 10% goes to Montrose Patrol Help us help you 204 Marshall .t:JY°W~4, 11>am-l>pm Samant'haReads Your Stars If you were born this w .. k: Ties to close friends are of great importance to you. You are warm and sympathetic to the needs of others but are sometimes a worrywarl You tend to soak up the emotional climate around you, so a healthy, positive one is essential to your happiness. You enjoy entertaining. AlllS: Your visibility will be high thia weekend, Aries, ao be aure you look your best and perform with pizzaz. Think of ways to make your home more comfortable. Watch for a business­pleasure combo, expect company and listen to a pal. TAURUS: You've laid your groundwork:, Taurus, maybe even built your prototype. Now, you have to see if it will fly and try to enlist the aid ofothera. Your presentation plays a key role. In the near future, the next full moon is July 16. That'• when you'll get real confidence. GEMINI: A certain mutual attraction can prove quite exciting. Do be careful, Gem, that one of you ion't loolrinir through rose­colored glaaaes. (Reality io very pleasant in ita own right!) Snappy weekend comes to sparkling fini. MOONCHILD: Continue plans for personal development. Pos­sibilities are endlesa, Moonbaby, and the sky's the limit! If a personal situation seems restrictive, you really can work around it. Later, celebrate your birthday. UO: Your social calendar is full, Leo; but never fear, there's plenty of room for romance, too. Then, be diplomatic, steer conversations away from sensitive areas and don't let secrets slip. Days whisUe merrily by. VIRGO: One who is uncooperative merely poses a small detour, Virgo, not a deadend. Take it in stride. Friendships can blossom into aomething else. Later, you'll need your objectivity to cope with varied emotions. LlallA: Vacation plans may be changed a bit by circumstances beyond your control. Be very open with partner; keep both of you out of the dark. Days clo•e with a lria&. SCORPIO: Spend time and money wiaely this weekend, Scorp. Concentrate on your own enterprises; don't invest in others'. Later, emotions run high and it may be hard to keep perapective. SAGtnARtUS: Look before you leap,Saj. Don'taccepthearaay evidence; test it yourself. Financial propositions may be tempt· ing; check with your budget first. Latterdaya bring news from a friend, maybe long-distance. CAPRICORN: You may hear goesip about those near you this weekend. Don 'tjump to conclusions, Cappy. Listen with a large grain of salt if you listen at all. Later, your advice is asked and a worthy cause may not be so worthy. AQUARIUS: Romantic vibes abound, Aquari. They're more apt to be frivo)oua flirta tion than heavy hearthroba, babe. so take 'em in a light vein. Then, someone's problem calls for logic instead of a shoulder and days end with glee. 'ISCIS: You have oodles of imagina tion, Piacea. You can create a dream picture of anything you want. Now, let your fertile imagination help you find ways to turn your dream into reality. (Probably a litUe work io needed, too!) Trend by Henry McClurg I'm resting Gay pride Week wore me out. I'm sure it wore you out as a spectator. So I hope you can imagine how it wore out those of us who gave our time to help produce it for you. Looking back, I think the most profound aspect of this year's Houston Gay Pride Week was the fact that the Dallas and Los Angeles bands were here. And probably the second most profound fact was that folks, we had an elephant in our parade. And (of course) the third most profound fact was that we had the best-looking gay men and women in the country here for our parade. But of course, we have that all year around. 24 MONTR OSE VOICE I J ULY 3, 1981
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