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Montrose Voice, No. 321-A, December 16, 1986
File 004
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Montrose Voice, No. 321-A, December 16, 1986 - File 004. 1986-12-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5757/show/5747.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-12-16). Montrose Voice, No. 321-A, December 16, 1986 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5757/show/5747

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 321-A, December 16, 1986 - File 004, 1986-12-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5757/show/5747.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 321-A, December 16, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 16, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript DECEMBER 16, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 AIDS: New Findings May Show Why Gay Men Victims By Jan Ziegler WASHINGTON (UPI)—The AIDS virus is capable of infecting cells in the colon and rectum, a finding that may help explain the high proportion of AIDS among gay men, researchers said last Friday. Dr. Malcolm A. Martin, chief of the laboratory of molecular microbiology at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the finding was unexpected because it was thought the AIDS virus attacked only lymphocytes and monocytes, both white blood cells crucial to the body's immune system . However, the finding may help explain how the virus is transmitted during anal intercourse, he said, a technique favored by many gay men and practiced occasionally by heterosexuals. "It's thought the reasons gay men become infected is because there's a lot of trauma (to rectal tissues)" during anal intercourse, he said, allowing pas sage of the virus from semen into the recipient's bloodstream through minute tears. But he said the research shows "no trauma is necessary. Anal intercourse, whether it's heterosexual or homosexual, might be dangerous to one's health." "The big overall picture is maybe the portal of entry in people who practice anal intercourse is the colon first. The virus can be transferred to lymphocytes and they gain access to the ciruclation. That's the way you set up this rip- roaring infection." Once the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus attacks cells of the immune system, in about 30 percent of cases, resistance to infection is gradually destroyed and the victims fall prey to a variety of diseases. Martin and his colleagues did not find infected colorectal cells in people carrying the AIDS virus. He said that is the next step in resarch. What the scientists did was grow the MontroseVoice HOLIDA Y SCHEDULE To better serve Montrose and the Houston gay community, the Montrose Voice is now published twice a week (except during certain holiday weeks, including Thanksgiving 1986, Christmas 1986 and New Year's 1986-87, when the Voice will be publishing only once during the week) Al! editions of the Voice will be free (except through our vending machines) and will be available through our regular distribution outlets. Also, home delivery is available in Greater Montrose at $1.25 per week (price is regardless of the number of issues published during the week). Issue Release Display Classified Distn- Rate " Date Deadline Deadline bulion Card 319a Tuesday. Dec. 2 2pm Monday 319b Friday. Dec 5 5pm Wednesday 320a Tuesday. Dec 9 2pm Monday 320b Friday. Dec 12 5pm Wednesday 321a Tuesday, Dec 16 2pm Monday 321b Friday, Dec. 19 5pm Wednesday 322 Wednesday. Dec. 24 2pm Monday 323 Tuesday, Dec. 30 2pm Monday 324a Tuesday. Jan 6 2pm Monday 2pm Monday 5.000 50% 2pm Monday 10.000 100% 2pm Monday 10.000 100% 2pm Monday 5,000 50% 2pm Thursday 10,000 100% 2pm Monday 5,000 50% 2pm Thursday 10.000 100% 2pm Monday 2pm Thursday 5.000 10.000 50% 100% 324b Friday. Jan 9 5pm Wednesday 2pm Thursday 10.000 100% And every Tuesday and Friday through January The Montrose Voice ir EVERY TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY The Midweek Extra- News and Ads that Can't Wait til the Weekend • EVERY FRIDAY The 'Big Edition'—With the Largest Houston Circulation of all the Gay Publications To advertise before our estimated 40,000+ readers each week, call us. We'll help you convince our readers to be your customers. Estimated readership figure assumes a pass-on rate factor of 28 cells in culture. Because it is hard to keep this kind of cell alive in the lab, the ones Martin's team used were cancerous and were thus able to continue multiplying. They found three of the five cell samples from the colon and rectum could be infected with the AIDS virus, while none of other types of cells—such as lung, pancreas and ovary—the scientists studied were susceptible. The colorectal cells were found to prouduce the kind of RNA, or genetic material, that directs production of a molecule called CD4. This same molecule is found on the surface of the T4 lymphocyte and the other immune sytem cells known to be attacked by the AIDS virus. "It's very likely if you look hard enough, if you do studies with fresh normal cells, a simliar thing might occur with vaginal cells," Martin said. Scientists have shown AIDS can be transmitted through normal heterosexual intercourse. It is uncertain how the virus can be passed from an infected woman to a man, although scientists have theorized tiny abrasions on the penis may permit the virus to enter. Although some scientists believe the virus also infects certain cells of the brain, Martin said his team's finding that the AIDS virus is carried in monocytes disproves this. Protein May Help Bolster Immune System CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (UPI)—Scientists have used genetic engineering techniques to produce large amounts of a natural human protein that may be useful in treating cancer and other diseases, the researchers reported last week, Dec. 8. The protein, known as macrophage colony stimulating factor— M-CSF or CSF-1—stimulates the activity of blood cells known as macrophages, which are involved in coordinating the body's defense against disease. The substance may one day be used to strengthen the body's ability to fight cancers and other diseases by boosting patients' immune systems, according to researchers at the Genetics Institute Inc., a biotechnology firm. The company has begun testing the substance in animals and plans to begin human testing in 1987, officials said. Natural M-CSF has been isolated in small amounts from human urine. Working with Japanese scientists, the Genetics Institute team showed that the genetically engineered substance is identical to the natural protein, they said. The substance is the third blood cell growth factor developed by the company. The other two are granulocyte monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and multi-CSF, which is also known as interleukin-3. Scientists are testing those substances and several similar ones for treating a variety of diseases, including cancer and diseases of the immune system, such as AIDS. Drs. Gordon Wong and Steve Clark of the Genetics Institute presented their work with M-CSF at a meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Francisco. Fortunes By Mark Orion For Tuesday evening. Dec 16. through Friday morning. Dec. 19. 1986 ARIES—So the big, tough guy is going to let them know just how he really feels, huh? Anger is real and fine, but don't let an outburst at the wrong time ruin what you've so carefully built. Being strong and being rigid are two different things. TAURUS—Oh, you kid! You've got this terrific talent for letting the child in yourself entertain and complement the adult. Others enjoy this quality in you, especially right now, when you can use it to bring a sense of play into your work. GEMINI—Aren't you forgetting something? Sure, you have an appetite for the unusual, but there are limits. Watch out for the far out. When something begins to become an obsession, it's time to take stock of what you really need and want. CANCER—That secret affair that you've been having will beeo much fun this week that you may be tempted to bring it out in the open. There's a war going on in your head. This is the time to be a general. Avoid being irrational, but take action. LEO—A weary end of the week can be avoided if you're able to see that the line between work and play is not as clear-cut as you thought. That person who made you feel so good last weekend could be a real help in this regard. VIRGO—Zip, wham, wow, shazam! Some unexpected energy and desire comes out of nowhere. Most people would feel that they were caught in a whirlwind, but you're able to managejust fine. A special and exciting time. LIBRA—The buzz of gossip and whispered innuendoes are flying all around you. While your ears are burning with all those crazy sounds, you're concerned with more important things like loving what you have and knowing how how deep that love goes. SCORPIO—Your friends get high just being near you, and your lover or other is •wearing a big smile. Fun and games and colorful pleasure. Spring is all over the place, and so are you: dancing, romancing, shining lights in dark places, making things move, watching them grow. SAGITTARIUS—You're concerned about the future and where you're going to be when you get there. You know that changes are coming up, yet there's that nagging uncertainty that won't let go A week to practice patience. It's coming. Really it is. CAPRICORN—The rules of the game are what's important to you this week. Stategy and moves are what you get involved in. Be able to bend with a sudden wind. Think about what would happen if you got caught with your pants down. Remember to laugh. AQUARIUS—Your emthusiasm plus your ability to share it equals joy. The ability to be sympathetic without being patronizing is a real gift. Whatever it is you've got. there's no way you can avoid giving it. PISCES—Dressing up or dressing down, wearing a mask or a strange disguise you don't mind. You know what it's for. You're carrying out last week's plans. Perhaps you're a spy in the house of love. Investigate. Examine, * 19B6 MONTROSE VOICE Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper ot Montrose
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