Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981
File 009
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981 - File 009. 1981-06-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/559/show/550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-06-05). Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/559/show/550

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981 - File 009, 1981-06-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/559/show/550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 5, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 Montrose Voice / June 5,1981 Books A 1700-mile Australian desert 'strol' By JOHN PINKERMAN Copley News Service TRACKS: By Robyn Davidson, Pantheon, 256 pages, $11.95. With the price of books soaring beyond the limits of inflation, this fascinating story may be the best bargain of the 1980s. Twenty-seven-year-old Robyn Davidson (that was her age in 1977 when the action in her story unfolded) was and likely still is a remarkable young woman. In her story, she exhibits a toughness and a sense of de- cept for the aborigines whom she conquered with understanding. She never did fully understand, much less appreciate the white humans. They included tourists, newsmen, television cameramen anxious to gawk at and write exaggerated stories about the "camel lady" and miscellaneous others who interrupted her experi- termination that defies the imagination. At the same time, there is an extremely gentle strain in her makeup, particularly regarding animals, wild and domestic. If you don't believe in her toughness, just consider her basic accomplishment — a 1,700-mile walk from Australia's Alice Springs to the Indian Ocean, accompanied by four camels and her pet dog, Diggity. She conquered and-or survived desert, drought, near flood — and human beings. The human beings seemed to trouble her the most ex- ence with nature. She found beauty everywhere — in stark desert, in mountains and mere hillsides, in all manner of desert plants, in cloudy skies and clear skies, in cold nights and miserably hot nights — and particularly in the wildlife she encountered even though her life was endangered several times by wild bull camels. As for hunters, her contempt was in the extreme. It became even worse the night her beloved Diggity wandered from her makeshift campground and came back a bit later retching and obviously fatally ill. He had been tempted by strychnine- laced meat tossed recklessly throughout the wild by men in helicopters — for the purpose of wiping out the dingoes, wild dogs that are a part of the Australian bush. Davidson and Diggity, who seemed to know he was doomed, shared a final minute of affection — then her rifle shot put the faithful friend out of his misery. This unfortunate incident marred the latter part of her successful conquest of the desert, and almost as sad was her parting with her camels — put into "retirement" in a safe haven when she flew back to Brisbane, and on to New York to first record her accomplishment for the National Geographic. "Tracks" is a gem indeed, particularly at a time when so much trash is emerging from even reputable publishers. A LIFE IN OUR TIMES - Memoirs: by John Kenneth Galbraith, Houghton Mifflin, 563 pages, $16.95. These are probably difficult days for Galbraith now that conserv ative economists are in positions of power in Washington. It was Galbraith, a devotee of the free-spending, liberal policies of John May- nard Keynes, who has been most identified by the public mind with the economic theories first spawned into political reality by the Democratic administrations of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. But this book is much more than Galbraith economics. His life has had an extraordinary range — from administrator of wartime price controls to the interrogation of Nazi war criminals. He has known well the powers of his time. Well worth reading, even if you don't agree with his economics. TERTIUM ORGANUM - A Key to the Enigmas of the World: by P.D. Ouspensky, Knopf, 298 pages, $15. This book by the great Russian philosopher first appeared in this country 60 years ago. This new, revised translation is welcome, indeed. Outspen- sky's mind penetrated to the heart of things: the nature of matter, cause and effect, space and motion, the transformation of energy. It's not easy going, but his ideas are engrossing and could change your way of regarding the world. THE NATURAL WORLD COOKBOOK: by Joe FiCi-ts, Stephen Greene Press, 283 pages, $15. This is a cookbook with a difference. There are all kinds of unusual things: hobblebush jelly sauce, apple cattail root casserole, rabbit pie, day lily buds and pork, wild leek and Indian potato soup, rose hip nut relish. Heaven knows how all this stuff might taste, but the recipes look very good — and fairly easy to fix. For woodchuck pie, however, it might take some doing to get the main ingredient. A FIELD GUIDE TO THE ATMOSPHERE: by Vincent J. Schaefer and John A. Day, Houghton Mifflin, 359 pages, $13.95. A thin layer of gases held to the earth's surface by gravity keeps the engine of life going It's called the atmosphere and it breeds such things as clouds, hurricanes, life-giving rain, tornadoes and snow. It also shields out deadly rays that would destroy life. This book is an excellent introduction to a subject that is important to all of us — in an age when people vent into the air man- made pollution that could ruin our Drotective shield. People SUSAN CLARK That's why the lady smokes cigars By NANCY ANDERSON Copley News Service MIAMI - "It's better for your health," said Susan Clark as she lit her cigar. After practicing a scene with Gabe Kaplan, she was practicing her vice (if you care to call it that) in the fenced yard of a Miami warehouse. The warehouse was loaded with whiskey, top-grade stuff, but its*yard was loaded with armaments, all props for "Nobody's Perfekt," the movie in which Clark and Kaplan were starring. Also starring were Robert Klein and Clark's husband, Alex Karras. Peter Bonerz, who used to be the dentist on Bob Newhat's TV series, was directing and playing a cameo. Susan's cigar was no slim, ladylike affair but a big, smelly roll of tobacco of the sort George Kennedy chomps. It seemed odd in juxtaposition to her beautiful face. But, she was explaining, it wasn't filling her lungs with nasty, death-dealing nicotine, and so she preferred it to a cigarette. A year or two ago, she said, a doctor told her that, white all smoking is bad, cigar smoking is preferable. healthwiseto enjoying a more ladylike cigarette, "Because you don't inhale. Also, this will last me all day. One cigar will last almost anybody for hours unless you happened to be Winston Churchill who'd go through a box of cigars and a quart of brandy between sunrise and sunset." Susan began smoking when she was about 14 years old, because, amongst her peers, it was the sophisticated thing to do. For a while, she smoked only in a locked bathroom until a neighbor called her parents to ask whether their house was on fire. At that, Clark's mother and father invited, "If you're going to smoke, smoke with us." So she did. With them and others. Finally, health-aware at last, she turned to stogies as less dangerous than weeds and more attractive than chews and dips. Though they've played romantic partners on screen, Clark and Karras aren't the loving couple in "Nobody's Perfekt." She plays Kaplan's sweetie while Alex plays one of his kookie colleagues in an attempt to hold up the mayor of Miami. The movie is about three mental cases. Kaplan, Karras and Klein, who decide to fight city hall starting at the top. Kaplan plays Dibley, a guy with a memory problem. He keeps forgetting things like how to start his car and how to make love. Karras plays Swaboda, a man devoted to his mom who happens to be invisible. And Klein is a schizoid who ping-pongs between Jimmy Cagney and Bette Davis personalities. Who says DIANA ROSS isn't ambitious? At the recent Academy Awards she told the press that "I hope next time I see you I have one of those heavy things in my hands." Diana would love to find a good film property, but she's having trouble finding money to finance her return to the screen. Question — who's the most durable continuous host of a network variety series? Answer — according to the next edition of the "Guinness Book of World Records" it's DICK CLARK, whose "American Bandstand" has been nationwide since August 5, 1957. That's 24 years, passing ED SULLIVAN's 23 years. BUt. as long as we're counting, the real champ is BOB KEESHAN, who has been hosting "Captain Kangaroo" on CBS since Oct. 3, 1955. And LAWRENCE WELK has been on TV for more then 25 years, but he's disqualified because more than eight of those years have been in syndication, not network. These Guinness folks are very strict about their rules and regulations. ROMANTIC NOTES: Jackqueline Bisset, last month romancing Warren Beatty in Manhattan, is this month discovering Jon Voight in Hollywood. ... Meanwhile, Jackie's ex- playmate, French industrialist Victor Drai, is hot and heavy with scrumptious Shana Hoffman (she of Peter Strauss palimony fame). ... And Valerie Perrine is all atwitter over another rich Frenchman. He's Claude Ravier, and he's usually to be found in the company of Cathy Lee Crosby. Till Valerie came along. ... Rita Jenrette, estranged wife of Abscamed Congressman John Jenrette, is heavy dating Hollywood writer Jeff Silverman. She's also taking singing and dancing lessons, and giving lectures under the auspices of the Richard Fulton lecture bureau.
File Name uhlib_22329406_n032_008.jpg