Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981
File 006
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981 - File 006. 1981-06-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/559/show/547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-06-05). Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/559/show/547

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981 - File 006, 1981-06-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/559/show/547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 32, June 5, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 5, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript June 5,1981 / Montrose Voice 5 Music Solo success predicted for Brenda Russell BRENDA RUSSELL HOLLYWOOD - Background singers tend to be just that: gray figures careful not to draw any glitter from the star. But sometimes they emerge to become stars in their own right — like Brooklyn- born Brenda Russell who did backup work for Barbra Streisand, Elton John, Bette Midler, Robert Palmer and Neil Sedaka. Brenda went solo in 1978, and she admits that the spotlight shining directly on HER was terrifying. "But fortunately," she said, "I was supported by friends." Brenda is not yet a star of the first magnitude, but that liquid velvet voice should do the trick. She is especially effective with pop, rhythm and blues, and love ballads. Her latest album for A and M is titled "Love Life," and songs range from the sultry "If You Love" to the bluesy "Thank You." She wrote all of the songs, and is a fine poet — like, for instance, the "you sell color — I see a rainbow" line in the song, "Rainbow." TESS - Movie Soundtrack (MCA) - Philippe Sarde wrote the background music for Roman Polanski's dramatic tale of life in 18th century England. He captured beautifully the texture of early English music and it merges smoothly with Polanski's camera magic. The soundtrack was performed by the London Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Carlo Savina. COMPLETE ARTIE SHAW - Volume V, 1941-42 (RCA) - Some fine things in this two-record set of songs recorded by the celebrated Big Band clarinetist They include "Georgia on My Mind," "It Had to Be You," "Beyond the Blue Horizon," "Blues in the Night," "Roc- kin' Chair" and "St. James Infirmary Blues." Highlight of the LP is the two-part "In- firmary Blues" that stretches out for more than six minutes. GLENN YARBROUGH - Just a Little Love (First American) — This is the singer who was featured in the Limeliters back in the 1960s, and then went on his own for many years and achieved success with offbeat songs. He did one album of Rod McKuen's love songs. Then he dropped singing and went sailing the seven seas. It's been years since he recorded anything, and it's good to hear that familiar voice once again. ED BRUCE - One to One (MCA) - Bruce is a fine, honest talent from Tennessee who projects the image — both musically and visually — of a leather-garbed frontier man. He's the composer of a hit song with one of the longest titles in existence: "Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys," Bruce sings some more of his own compositions on this LP, but also is equally effective with songs by Jesse Winchester and Charley Craig. ORIGINAL BIG HITS (Stax) - There are two LPs in this release, each containing 15 hits from the 1960s and 1970s. Included are The Emotions' "Shoutin' Out Love," Johnnie Taylor's "Cheaper to Keep Her," Isaac Hayes' "Shaft," Rufus Thomas' "Do the Push and Pull," Shirley Brown's "Woman to Woman," and The Staple Singers' "I'll Take You There." Nice walk along memory lane. The Voice is Your newspaper TheNation Name-calling racist is suing the sheriff Claiming violation of civil rights Convicted racial killer and homophobic name-caller Joseph Paul Franklin is suing the Salt Lake County sheriff for allegedly violating his civil rights by locking him in a cellblock with sexual deviates and informants, and photocopying his mail, reported UPI June 1. Franklin, 31, filed the suit in U.S. District Court. He was convicted in March of violating the civil rights of two young black men by killing them in a sniper ambush. The former member of the Ku KIux Klan and American Nazi party- acting as his own attorney—demanded $50,000 damages from Sheriff N.D. Pete Hawyard, chief jailer Darrell Brady and eight deputies. He complained that he had been placed in a cellblock with "seuxal deviates, rapists, child molesters and other abnormal persons" in an deliberate attempt to provoke him into breaking jail rules so he could be punished. Franklin was sentenced to life in prison after he was found guilty of violat ing the rights of two young blacks who were shot to death last August as they jogged out of a city park with two white teen-age girls. Franklin was also scheduled to be tried June 8 on first-degree murder charges in the case by the Salt Lake County attorney. Franklin also faces murder charges in Indiana and Oklahoma for similar racial killings. The avowed racist referred to a prosecuting attorney as "you faggot" in an April 10 court proceeding. Although Franklin denied shooting the men, he said he believed they deserved to die for "race-mixing." "Got any more lies, you faggot," was the statement Franklin was reported to have made to the prosecutor after he was sentenced to the maximum penalty of two consecutive life terms. According to an Associated Press news report: About ten marshalls wrestled Franklin to the floor in the March 24 outburst, which began with him telling U.S. District Judge Bruce Jenkins, "This whole thing is a farce." In addition to calling Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven Snarr a faggot, he yelled at Snarr's assistant and called him a "trained monkey." He then said Judge Jenkins was "nothing but an agent for this communist government." Supreme Court rejects challenge to Navy rules Navy said it's dropped the regulations anyway WASHINGTON-The U.S. Supreme Court June 1 rejected a challenge to Navy regulations that required the discharge of sailors who engage in homosexual acts. Government lawyers had claimed that the disputed regulations already had been discarded. A ruling Oct. 24 by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted the Navy the right to discharge homosexual personnel. The authority "to maintain the discipline of personnel in active service," the court said in that case, was the proper right of the Navy. The court also noted that other regulations on homosexuality gave the the Navy "at least some flexibility" in making decisions on gay personnel. Bryant moving to Alabama Wedding bells may be ringing Anita Bryant reportedly plans to move to Selma, Alabama, from Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she returned last year following her divorce in Florida. Selma is the headquarters for her "Protect America's Children" organization and also the home of Larry Striplin of "Circle S" enterprises, with whom she has been romantically linked. Bryant was divorced last year from Miami disc jockey Bob Green. Miss Bryant, a leader against gay rights, has reportedly purchased an interest in a Selma dress shop and, according to Bobby Ames, director of research for Protect America's Children, an option on a Selma home. Published reports in Selma said Bryant and Striplin would be married but no wedding date had been set. The Voice is read by 14,000 people each week.
File Name uhlib_22329406_n032_005.jpg