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Montrose Voice, No. 94, August 13, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 94, August 13, 1982 - File 001. 1982-08-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5541/show/5512.

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(1982-08-13). Montrose Voice, No. 94, August 13, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5541/show/5512

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 94, August 13, 1982 - File 001, 1982-08-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5541/show/5512.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 94, August 13, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 13, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript LL v 0 'Second City' at - the Tower Story in Montrose Live, page 21 LAS What is the Montrose Voice doing In Dallas this week? See page 2. Sally's wins MSA Softball Championship Photostory page 15 THOSE The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #94, Published Weekly Friday August 13 1982 Good Evening Montrose weather tonight: Partly cloudy and warm with a low of 73:i. Saturday: SunnBf' 6:49AM. Partly cloudy and hot with a chance of afternoon thundershowers and a high of high of 96, Sunset 8:02PM. I Federal judge orders 'Gay Olympics' not to use the word 'Olympics.' Page 5 2 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 Why is Houston's gay newspaper in Dallas this week? Well, we're here because the National Gay Leadership Conference is being held in Dallas this weekend, spon­sored by the Dallas Gay Alliance at the Grenelefe Hotel, and we welcome delegates from around the country to Texas. Also, we want Dallas to get a good look at Houston's gay newspaper­this one week only-because starting Sept. 10, Dallas gets its own ... GAY NEWS [ s GAY NEWS P. t-J1 OP>' AVv V(lr-~ D A L L A s GAY NEWS Af\D THr OAK AWN VOC-- 0 A L L A S GAY NEWS AND THE OAK LAWN VOICE Gay News will be a weekly Dallas gay newspaper, with high professional standards, extensive local and national gay news coverage, major articles on Dallas/Ft. Worth gay enter­tainment, nationally syndicated columns and features, and much more. We're coming Sept. 10. Watch for us every Friday, just about everywhere. Sunday. August 15. the Briar Patch softball team will attend bar & entertain 4-8 with happy hour prices 6 free buff et Attending bar-Tom, Jeff. Richard and Bill-singing the Briar Patch 2294 W. Holcombe 665 9678 HAPPY HOUR 12-8 Everyday Customers Pool Tourney-9pm Monday Spaghetti-7pm Tuesday Pool Tournament-9pm Wednesday Buffet-4pm Sunday Robbery, then stealing victim's car, happening frequently in Montrose By Johannes Stahl Robberies by a group of black males who hijack their victim's vehicle at knife point have been reported frequently in the Mon­trose area in recent weeks, said Homicide Detective Sgt. John Donovan. The group has been reported to police as often riding bicycles, he said. "We've got ... under surveiUance, but we ~~someone who can identify them," he He urged anyone with information con­cerning such robberies to contact Detec­tive John Moore at Houston Police Department, Homicide Division, 222-3651, or 222-TIPS if the caller wished to remain anonymous. Victims of Midnite Sun shooting in improved condition By Johannes Stahl Both victims of an August 5 shooting in front of the Midnite Sun, 534 Westheimer, had impro.Jed, as of 12 days later, hospital and poHce officials said. • Michael Green, 27, was discharged from Ben Taub Hospital August 7 and Nathan Simpson Jr., 21 , was transfered to Jeffer­son Davis Hospital, according to officials at Ben Taub. uwe're working on leads," said Sgt. John Donovan, Houston Police homicide detective. The information coming from the two victims is not complete and they're not being cooperative, he said. He attributes the lack of cooperation to the fact that "Both of them have been booked down here (Houston Police Department)." A gunman fired five times into a crowd standing in front of the Midnite Sun, injut­ing Simpson cr itically and Green seriously. Simpson received three gunshot wounds in the chest and Green was shot once in the neck and again in the leg. The gunman was seen by a witness before and after the shooting. She described the man as a white male in his early 20s, 5'6", and weighing between 115 and 125 pounds. The witness said the man had shoulder-length hair and might be Hispanic with a slim build. The gunman drove a vehicle described as a small foreign stationwagon. The car was an older model with faded white paint. Police recovered a spent .12 guage shot­gun shell in the alley between the Chicken Coop, 535 Westheimer, and the adjacent building east of the bar. Donovan asked that anyone with other information concerning the incident con­tact Homidde Division at 222-3651or222- TIPS if the caller wished to remain anonymous. Organizers Gearing Up for Fall Art Festival The Fall Westheimer Colony Art Festival is planned for Saturday and Sunday, October 16 and 17, with space applications for artists and postercontestentriesavail­able at the Festival office now. Sponsored by the Westheimer Colony Association, the semi-annual art festival is held in the 100 to 1100 blocks of West­heimer from Bagby to Yoakum each day from 9:00 a.m. to dusk. Applicationa for space for artists and craftsmen diaplay area must be made with the festival office, 908 Westheimer, by Sep­tember 15, they said. Only original arts and crafts of original design and execu­tion will be accepted by the association's Selection Committee, they announced, adding that all applications must be accompanied by three slides or photos of the artists' work. Entry into the semi-annual festival pos­ter contest must be by noon, Sept. 13, they announced. and all entries must be mailed AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 or brought to the Westheimer Colony Association office. Posters should be 2Qax26a (vertically rectangular) in no more than three colors, with black included as a color. An award of$500 is to be presented for the best poster design sub­mitted. The poster is to be used to annonce the Fall Westheimer Colony Art Festival. After an extensive campaign by members of the Association to secure the closini; ofWestheimer from Bagby to Mon­trose during the two-day festival, an ordi­nance was passed to close the street by an unanimous vote of City Council for the 1982 Spring Festival. The association said it feels certain the street will be closed again for the Fall Festival. Shrink Says Americans Aren't Guilty Enough Just when you thought you'd conquered all those guilt complexes, along comes a Philadelphia psychologist who thinks maybe you should feel guilty. Edward Fish, according to the San Jose (Calif.) Mercury, says too many Ameri­cans are equating guilt with hangups, and spend a lot of time trying to overcome it. That can be wrong, he says. There are plenty of people who suffer guilt for things they've never done, but lately he's seen lots more people who don't feel guilty when they should. Those people, he says, can lie, cheat and do others in without batting an eyelash. Fiah says guilt is appropriate when you've done something wrong-it's nature's way of teaching you not to repeat the action. Coke is Thin A Canadian physiologist has come up with a diet that's sure to please junk food freaks, reports Vegetarian Times. The weight-loss secret: drink two or three colas a day. All that caffeine and sugar supposedly helps burn off fat-and may even prevent colds. Montrose Mouth Volleyball Tourney this weekend The Montrose Sports Association's Volleyball League hosts its Houston Invitational Tournament this weekend, with teams here from New Orleans, Dallas, Ft. Worth, Austin and San Antonio-plus six teams from Houston Reception will be Friday night, 8-12 at the Barn Saturday breakfast will be at Brasserie Too, fol lowed sharply by play starting 9am at Fonde Recreation Center (east on Memorial, Rusk exit) and at Gregory-Lincoln Education Center (Taft at Dallas!. The semi-finals and final games will be starting Jpm at the Fonde Center, with awards presented immediately after the tournament Dirty Sally's will host a bar-b-que for the players Saturday mght, 8-11 , and both Miss Char1otte·s and Numbers 2 will host players that night for partyt1me So, now you know where to go to scoop up a volleyball player this weekend. -·- Our own Gay Switchboard has expanded its operating hours on weekends, says Rich Neil, director You can now buzz them starting 3pm Saturday and Sunday (from 6pm weeknights) to midnight And that number is ~3211 And what will they tell you when you call? Just about anything you'd want to know. about all of Houston's gay organizations and clubs And they provide professional referrals and telephone counseling -·- Carl Rentz is the new president of the Westheimer Colony Association. He's the owner of Frames & Nostalgia Other officers elected for the 1982-83 administration are Michael Groves of Lloyd Jones Brewer & Associates, vice president; Italia Catania of the Godfather Restaurant treasurer; and Frank Lindley, Montros~ property owner, secretary John Daniel of Liberty Bank was elected as "member-at-large." Phil Apicella was chosen as festival director. The association is the group that stages the twice-a-year Westheimer Colony Arts Festival-recog nized as one of - if the the-largest event of its kind in the country This fall 's festival is set for Oct 16 and 17 -·- Buzz Smith and others are trying to organize a raquetball league and will have a meeting at 9pm Tuesday (Aug 17} at the Barn Buzz hopes other racketball enthusiasts will drop by and help get the league going -·- Our sister city to the north, Dallas, gets a new weekly gay newspaper starting Sept. 10, to be called Dallas Gay News, atso to be known as "DGN " The MONTROSE VOICE will be assisting DGN in getting established, which explains why this issue of the VOICE-this week only-is being distributed in Dallas. It's to show our neighbors what kind of newspaper they can expect-starting in four weeks -·­'' Tubs for Two Thousand." Thafs what the Tea for Two Thousand collective has dubbed their annual Labor Day party this year The reason: this year's party will be at the Midtowne Spa The group has rented the entire two-story fac ility for the September 4 party. Now that's throwing in the towel! The group will split the profits from the event between th~ Montrose Counseling Center and Kaposi's Sarcoma Committee Houston -·- Moonlight and love songs are never out of date on the outside deck at Tim's Coffeehouse. They've installed a juke box outside with popular show tunes from the 60s and 70s AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Judge Revokes Word 'Olympic' from the 1 Year Ago 'Gay Olympic Games' Aug. II, 1981: New Kinsey study on homosexuality released A major new study of homosexuals by the Kim.ey Institute for Sex Research showed there was little or no Rupport for most of the traditional throries about the origins of homosexuality. Re~t>archen1 J)r. Alan Bell. Martin S. Wein­ber!' l'. and Sue Kiefer Hammersmith con­C'luded that homosf"xual orientation does not seem to eml·rge, as is the popular belif'f, ~·auAe parf"ntfi affect the child'R sexual ori(·ntation. Rather. they said they thought that homosexual orientation usually emerg('d from a deep-eeated predisposition, possibly biological in origin, that first appears as a failure to confonn to society's &tereotype of what it means to be a boy or a girl. Au11. /.1, 1981 New York State loitering law challenged An upstatC' New York gay rights orgnniza· lion filed suit in Federal court seeking to overturn the New York state loitering law, whit'h tht'y 1mid 1~ u~ed by local police to hara88 guy people The Mnttac-hine Socif'ty of the Niagara FrontiPr filed the cla1tl'i action suit, they said, on twhalf of "an estimatt>d half million gays in Nt-w York Stott' • Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copynght 01982 Office hours: 10am-6pm HenryMcClurg f'()blisherifdltCN Jo~~*;,,~ahl Billie Duncan enterl•mmMl·spo<ls-ed1tor Ed Martinez Wilham Marberry •dverl1tmgd1rector David PeUuck •dvert•smg Lyt Harns •dv•rt11mg Gene Oliver •dvert1Jmg Fourldmg Member Gay Preas Asa0\,11toon New1 S•rv,cu tnt&fn1t1ona1 Gay N•IW'I Agen.:y. Pac1!1c News 5erv1ce ~~~zr:~~:E·~~~;:;;~;~if~:E:.F~~~:~~= POS1M4STER Send actd ... UCOftec 1103311 Montrose 130fHouStonTXP1006 SubM:flpl10l'l••r11·,,IJS $49peryHl{~IUl.llSJ S29pet•i. moritMt26tnUft) orS125perWffkltessthan2&•uea) N•l><Ni•l-1VeflJngreprennt.tffV'9 >oeOtSab.ato R1ven(k>ll M11rketing 866 IJtri Avenue New York 001 2,21 242-'863 Adver1s1ng d .. d w Eu;h 1uesc1ay IJ:OOpm tor nue­' ete•sed~hFr10..yeverung Nol eroer1vetr11er•Ad~•n11ra1osc"ledul•f1V('-Awllt'O toellectll 1982 Next week in the Voice: An exclusive interview with Mayor Whitmire By Richard Primavera Via Gay PreH Asaociation Wire Service Regardless of the legal issues surrounding a damage suite filed Monday August 9, 1982 by the International and U.S. Olym­pic Committees (IOC and USOC), this action provides important new evidence that homooexuality and the rights of gay men and leRbiane are subjects of unpre­cendented interest and concern in many countries of the world That was one opinion of defendants who have spent nearly two years organizaing the world'R first Olympic-Atyle athletic and human rights demonstration designed to "educate the general public on the vitality, variety, and versatility of the gay community .... " On the eve of what woulds have been called the Gay Olympic Games, Judge Samuel Conti issued a temporary restrain· ing order requiring the gay event's spon­sors to stop using the words Olympic and Olympiad-at least until a full hearing which wes set for August 19 in the same U.S. District Court. The historic complaint filed by local attorney Vauf{hn WalkE>r is based on ~ec­tion llO(a) of Public Law 95-606 which attempts to aRsign exclusive rights to usage of the ancient words to the USOC A letter from F. Don Miller of the U80C laHt January to Thomas F. Waddell, M D., presidt·nt of the game's non-profit and volunteer sponsoring organization-San Francit1C'O Art.8 & Athletes-requested voluntary abandonment of the word Olympic and related terms. On the advice of local atorney Mary C. Dunlap, Waddell replied then that use of the words in conjunction with the "Gay Olympic Games" is protected by the "guarantees of free speech and the associ· ation of the First Amendment (to the U.S. Constitution), which expressly prohibits Congresa from making a ny Jaw(s) a bridg­ing those freedoms of the people of this nation." In asking Miller to acknowledge the validity of the name "Gay Olympic Games," Waddell also wrote last January 26: "I respectfully urge you to consider that The games will !JO on, of course. Shou:n here, soccer practice with international chairman of the soccer committee Josh Persky (kicking). the term 'olympic' is a generic one, of deep historic origin, that belongs to all people and that is widely used by many and diverse groups of people. to identify and C'elebrate a variety of activities ... " Still scheduled for August 28 through September 5, the "Gay Games" currently involve about 1300 regi~tered athletes from about lOOtownsandcitiesin lOcoun· tries, and unmeasured thousands of volunteers and contributors. Several Houstonians are going as well as a Montrose Sparta Asociation volley­ball team. (See story on sport pages.) In addition to the athletic events throu­gout the city during the nine-day celebra­tion, two entertainment events are to be sponsored by the organizaing committee to benifit the project. Waddell said after the Monday court action that, as far as he knows, "this is the first time they (the USOC) has prosecuted anyone for using the term 'Olympics'." He continued: "They st.ated quite clearly in court that they see the term "gay" in front of that word fOlympics) as in sOme way demeaning it. If that isn't p~ejudicial. I'd like to have someone descnbe to me what prejudice means." •·what is particularly irritating," said Waddell, "is the fact that the USOC has known for at least seven months that we have continued to use that term. and they could have filed for an injuction early this year." Defense attorney Mary Dunlap expressed the same determination and confidence in this case that she projected during recent successful federal litigation against the Immigration and Naturaliza­tion Service on behalf of lesbians and gay men visiting this country. Dunlap said she expects to move for relief from the temporary restraining order before the full hearing before Presid­ing U.S. DistrictCourtJudgeRobertPeck­ham August 19 at 9:30 a.m. She could not be more specific until studying the sur­prise case further. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 CUSTOM DESIGNED JEWELRY TO FIT YOUR OWN INDIVIDUAL TASTE AND LIFESTYLE Visit&: consult with our prize-winning European goldsmith with a fine arts degree in gold &: silversmith. Our Price $250 Our Price $300 Our Price $250 Reg. Retail $500 Reg. Retail $600 Reg. Retail $500 Gita's Jewelry Handcrafted lnvesunenlS in Fine Jewelry Call 680-3579 7728 Long Point Rd. Only 15 minutn from Monlro!or Every specially designed piece includes fr<e p rofessional appraisal by an independent apprai~r 523 Lovett, Houston Lee LaForge presents Kim Yvette & Dianne Chaiston Every Sunday in August 9 to 1 Thursday, August 19 C&W Night & Dance Contest HAPPY HOUR 4-7 TUES-FRI WELL DRINKS 2 FOR 1 BEER 854 Live DJ 4 nights a week Every Friday & Saturday evening, entertainment by Maryanne Mahoney and Mata Hari Marquerite at the piano for Happy Hour Wednesday-Friday We're open 6 days a week for your rinking & dancing pleasure (closed Monday (713) 523-3396 Gay Community Organizes Committee to Meet with Police Chief By Johannes Stahl A committee has been formed which will present concerns of the gay community to Houston Police Chief Lee Brown. Thia waa announced to the gay media in Houston by Kent Speer, administrative assistant to City Councilman George Greania11 that Officer Dora Tenorio was named "liaaon" to the gay community. Larry Troutt, public information officer in Chief Brown's office, said Tenorio will serve only aa a contact within the chiefs office for information on situations that have already developed such as police raids or shootings in the gay community. Troutt said the confusion arose from a series of different meetings between Speer, the Police Department and City Hall. "No intentional misinformation was given out by a nyone. It's the bureaucracy involved," he added. Speer said that the tenn liason was interpreted differently by the parties involved in the meetings. He agreed that his understanding of her duties were in accord with Troutt's statements. The eight-member committee has been formed of business, religious, organiza· tional and political representatives within the gay community, according to Speer. He stressed that the committee has not been appointed by Brown, but will meet with the chief to work out solutions and compromises to problems presented to it. "Their reports will made available to the public," he said. The committee will be of a "consensus vote" nature and will not have an official chairman or president, explained Speer. He feel8 that this will be the best arrange­ment to present problems to the police department. Gay Man Ousted from Fraternity International Gay Newa Agency The president of Michigan State Univer· sity has overruled a university board and upheld the ouster of a gay man from a fraternity President M. Cecil Mackey, in overturn­ing the action of the school's Anti­Discrimination Judicial Board, said that fraternities are exempt from college poli­cies barring discrimination against homo· sexuals. The board had ordered Delta Sigma Phi in May to reinstate John Nowak, who had been ousted January lO by a vote of the other fraternity members. But Mackey's seven-page decision said that fraternities and sororities are exempt from university policies. "Social fraternities and sororities have long been recognized at Michigan State University as having a special relation­ship to the university, but not as being part of the universtiy," he wrote. Nowak, who will take over in the fall as pr~sident of MSU's Gay/ Lesbian Council, said that he was "shocked and distreased" by the decision but did not know whether he would take further action. Carson Without Guests Pacific New• Service If you like J ohnny Carson but can't stand his gue8t8, this may be the TV show for you. The talk show host's production com­pany is looking into the possibility of put· ting hie 11Camac the Magnificent" and 11Aunt Blabby" routines into a half-hour syndicated program. The new show would also indude sketches from the "Mighty Carson Art Playera," a1 well aa monologues and con· versationa with the audience. AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Presenting FOUR FABULOUS DAYS OF AUGUST Male Strip of Linda Clifford Live ... in concert the Year Thursday, Aug. 19 Theme party 'Midnight at the Oasis' Saturday, Aug. 21 Wear your beach wear Special guest Rachel Wells, Miss Gay America 1978 Sunday, August 22 The Copa supports the D.Q. Ball Game Saturday, Aug. 14 8 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 UNDITICTIBLI With your natural weave-you 're going to look ~.~.and act better. You'll be a winner. And everyone loves a winner. What arc you waiting for? The Hair Weavers, Inc. Houston Office 1200 S. Post Oak Rd., Suite 420 Houston, Texas 77056 (71J) 622-3290 Call our Representatives Call tomorrow for a no obligation personal interview. 1r -------T-HE- H-A-IR- W-EA-VE-R-S -------I I Suite 420, 1200 South Post Oak Rd., Houston 77056 I I [ ] Pleatr .wnd frtt lileraturr on your hair weaving technique. I ~~ I : AddttSS Phone I I City s.a .. __ zrp ___ I -----------------------· 24-hour radio dispatched UNITED CAB YOUR BLUE & WHITE TAXI Serving the entire Houston area 654-4040 ) \( Come One, Come All! 7am-7pm Happy Hour 7 Days a Week THE DEEP Grant at Jackson 528-8234 Gay Busine ss Alliance Meets By Johannes Stahl The Greater Montrose Business Guild held their first meeting to determine interest from the gay business community in forming an alliance along the lines of a chamber of commerce. But only two of the five sponsors of the organization were present. The meeting, held August 9 at Bering Memorial Church, 1440 Hawthorne, focused on whether to continue planning for such a group in Houston. The represen­tatives of a total of 10 businesses present indicated a desire to try to continue on a month-to-month trial basis. William Marberry, who chaired this organizational meeting, said that the impactofthegroupwill be directed to "eco­nomic and business issues. This is not a political organization, we already have plenty of those." A decision as to whether the group will include non-gay businesses as well as gay businesses was postponed until the next scheduled meeting, September 13. They are considering if the direction of the guild will be geographic, concentrating on all Montrose businesses, or include gay busi nesses from all over the city. The group did indicate a desire to affil­iate with the National Association of Busi­ness Councils. NABC is a national, tax exempt chamber of commerce comprised of gay and non-gay supporters of the gay community throughout the business and profesaional strata. NABC currently has 18 affiliates in the United States. 'I fights to the finish when I snorts my spinach' Well, blow me down. Authorities in Con­necticut say local drug dealers are diluting cocaine by mixing it with spinach, reports the Seattle Times The vegetable is baked in an oven until it becomes a yellow-white ash, they say. The pulverized end product reportedly makes the drug seem more pawerful. Slugfest in Northwest What's green, sticky, and runs a race in 100 houro per mile? Answer: the stars of the Elma Cham· pionship Slugfest, reports the Seattle Post· Intelligencer. The small town in western Washington has strict rules for its annual 24-inch race for slimy thoroughbreds. No starting blocks are allowed and owners must point their racers in the right direction. Any slug exhibiting a romantic interest in other racers is expelled from the track and equaehed. To keep the racers from getting, well, sluggish, race organizers pray for a sunny day. "We've found they really race faster in the sunshine," said Ron Woodman, adding that t.he slugs like to finish the race so they can crawl under a rock. Reagan: more popular after 40years President Reagan's standing in the public opinion poll& may be dropping, but he'• et.ill doing better than he did 40 years ago, saye Psyclwlogy Today. While the April Gallup Poll revealed 43 percent of Americana approved of the way he'• handling his job, a poll of actoro' pop­ularity in the 19408 said the number of American• who would "make a special effort" to see a Ronald Reagan picture waa a mere 30 percent. ssso 0' Kirby ·1272 2702 Kirby S24·1272 10 MONTROSE VOICE I A UGUST 13, 1982 Letters Reader Reacts to Police Bar Checks From C.J. Schlueh I would like to ask all of you: How many of you have been in a bar when it was raided by the police? How many of you have done anything about it? Or did you just go home at the end of the evening and forget it? How many of you were at the Barn this past Saturday night when the cops walked in? To tell you the truth, I am sick and tired of it. I am tired of having to prove my age, even though my looks show the obvious. I am tired of having a good evening upset because the Police Department decided that they wanted to check things out, and figured that we are good candidates for doing so. But I am sure that I am not the only one who feels this way. I want to urge all of you to write to Mayor Whitmire, the City Council and the Police Department, expressing what I imagine is your displeasure with the way the current situation is. The actions of the police department are not going to stop unless we all get behind each other and bombard City Hall with our statements. Let them know that we have had enough. We won't stand for any more. 'Please Correct Headline on Stokes' From Wayde Frey Auali.n Regarding the article on page 12 of the July 23 VOICE, "Gay Minister's Ouster Considered," I would greatly appreciate a correction from you in your next edition. Your headline was wrong. Troy Stokes has never been a United Methodist Minister. The only openly gay Methodist minister I know of in Texas is Gene Leggett, and the Southwest Texas Conference kicked him out of the ministry for it in 1971. Troy Stokes is a layman, not a clergy­man. I think it is important to make that clear to your readers. Also, the Southwest Texas Conference is wanting to kick Troy off of the Board of Church and Society, not out of the United Methodist Church. They're not kicking people out of the Methodist Church for being openly gay­at least, not yet. The clipping from the Austin American­Statesman that I sent you pointed out that Troy Stokes never entered the ministry. I quote: "Frustrated in his desire to be an ordained minister becaUBe he knew it would require him to 'keep my private life not private but secret,' Stokes chose to teach Sunday school at University United Methodist Church ... " Please correct this misinformation in the VOICE. Troy and I will appreciate it. (We11 watch for the correction!) (Editor's note: Here's a late development on this story This past week. the leader of the Southwest Texas Conference of the United Methodi•t Church said Stokes will be allowed to retain his seat on the church board. Bishop F.rnest Dixon of San Antonio said he polled 996 clergy and lay delegates to the annual conference after a rash of protests from some in the church commu­nity over the election of Stoketi Stokes was elected to the 30-member Board of Church and Society at the confer­ence'• annual mef'ting in June. And despite the remarks of some of the more vocal, fundamentalist elements of the church, Dixon says the majority of those he talked to favored Stokes staying on the board.) Dallas Player Salutes Lone Star Classic From Bill Whalen Da11H Independent.a, SoftbaJI Team Last month I had the pleasure of partici­pating, along with the rest of the "Dallas Independents" in the Lone Star Classic softball tournament. · I would like both to congratulate and thank all who were involved in planning the Lone Star Classic for a very well orga­nized, well run event. I think I can speak for everyone on the Dallas team in saying that we had en enjoyable time and we will look forward to next year'a event. GPC Secretary Repondsto Critic Responding to GPC Secretary From T. Vega Secretary, G•y Political Caucu8 Regarding the letter from S. Cuniberti in your (last) issue, I am terribly sorry Mr. Cuniberti received the incorrect impression at the GPC meeting and from my letter to the Voice. I will try to make it simpler. The GPC would like to invite individuals to openly discuss solutions to incidents which arise before going public. The key words are invite and discuss. At no point in my letter was the word uprevent" used. It did not state that GPC desires to read and/ or delete material harmful to the organization. AB for denying anyone their right of free speech; that is, once again, not our goal. I repeat the key words are invite and discuss. The concept of collective leadership is centuries old. It did not begin with Karl Marx. There were experiments with var­ious forms of collective leadership throu­gout history. Whether it be called a parliament, congress, Board of Directors, triumvirate or whatever; it is still forms of collective leadership and is not inherently Marxist. Just because one philosopher uses a word does not mean that whenever that word is used it is conveying that phi­losopher's ideas Many things are achieved behind the scenes legally. I don't especially care for this method but it does work. It leaves room for negotiations. Organizations, individuals, government, etc., who com­promise on issues behind the scenes don't Jose face. They are not perceived as flip flopping on issues. Their public image is not reduced. Consequently there is more room for compromise or discussion. For many this is very important. I don't know Quality Dental Care. The Smile Store. At Quality Dental Core, we've discovered on important fact, No matter how well we do our job, you're not going to appreciate your beautiful teeth if you hove to go through a lot of discomfort to get them So we use the latest comfort systems ova i loble. "Happy gas," premedication and 5-channel stereo headphones. And because your time is important, if you hove to waif more than 30 minutes for your oppointment-we'll buy you lunch. It's as simple osthat. Quality Dental Core, Complete dental services in comfort. Now that's something to smile about. Quality Dental Care Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway at Kirby 523-2328 Bring in this od ond get your teeth cleaned for $5. Offer expires September 30, 1982. POOR DADDY'S 3416 W. DALLAS (NJ<~AR DrNLAVY) 528-8922 An "unusually" fine dining and relaxing experience. Small and Intimate with the kind of service you deserve' Moderately priced. OPENING !-\PJ<~CIAI. Poor Daddy will treat you to a bottle of house wine WITH THIS AD and your dinner for two or more I...t•NC'II , WF.EKDAVf.i DINNER, 1-:v1·:nY NIGirr UF.fiEHVATIONS WEI.COME why. I am sure many psychologists have llliliiillll! spent many hours studying this aspect of human behavior and probably still can't explain it. As for the original letter not being ea:.-:~=-a:.a=:.. printed, I agree with you. it should have appeared in print Jong ago. Terry Harris was to have gotten the letter out. When qul"~tioned about it he stated that the Cau cue did notdeti>rmine a specific time frame for its release and there were other high priority item~ requiring immediate atten· tion. I take issue with Mr. Cuniberti's use of the phrases "rife with Marxist rhetoric' and ··in the midst of this furor " I believe the u~e of thei;e phrases are a bit extreme and detract from the true emphasis of GPC's request. I sincerely hope this clarifies my thoughts on the subject and this issue, and GPC's intentions, and that this issue is put to rest. I know of no other simpler explanation. R.J. PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS "CELEBRITIES ILLUSIONS EXTRAVA­GANZA" SUNDAY AUG. 22 SUNDAY AUG. 29 LAURA BRANNIGAN IN CONCERT! SINGING HER #1 HIT "GLORIA" AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 # . · ~ Advance Tickets Available -, 11 ,-, I I C C T U C I Iii C 0 l_I ,-, I I C T ,-, l\I T C \/ 0 . C C ::1 C _ C C C 'l ::1 1_1 1_1 I.LI '- -' I I I '- 11 I '- '' I I 1_1 1_1 _1 I 1_1 I I, I 1_ /\ I I _1 _, L 1_1 '-' -' -' I 12 MONTROSE VOICE/ AUGUST 13, 1982 Mid-Summer Update on the Movies By Dick Roger• The first wave of summer films are now a few . month& old, and producing what Variety calla a new high in box-office receipts. Yet it's sometimes difficult to tell the memorable films from the ripoffs with­out seeing them all. Uoing my own admittedly biased stand­ards, I've made up a list of "yesses " "no's," and "maybes" for your inform~­tion . Then, I've added some alternatives for stimulating summer viewing. YES! E.T. Spielberg's Peter Pan, a sweet­natured and skillful story of a boy and his alien. Some moviegoers have complained that it's a children's movie, but it is child­good seen through the rose-tinted glasses of a nostalgic adult. Some sequences are pure magic. POLTERGEIST. The odd partnership of Spielberg and director Tobe Hooper (Texas Chain.saw MaBBacre) has produced a ghos.t story that io altematingly scary, charming and dumb. The Hooper gore doesn't quite mesh with Spielberg's humor and taote, but there are enough thrills and gentle satiric humor to make this entertaining. BLADE R UNNER. The ideas in thio sci-fi thriller are hardly original (remember Westworld and Eocape From New York?), but Ridley Scott has directed with a visual flair that lifts the film a notch above average. Harrison Ford is the harried hero who must destroy the human· looking androids before they wreck civilization. Blade Runner is bit downbeat for a summer movie, but it is far more original than most sci-fi ventures that have opened so far. NO! ANNIE. Overproduced and over· stuffed, this blow-up of the Broadway hit io distinguished only by its phenomenal price tag. Depending on whom you believe, it cost somewhere between $35 and $50 million, but the money is not vis· ible on screen. Carol Burnett and Ann Reinking inject a little fun into the proceedings, but Annie has neither a mind nor a heart, just a bunch of prefab kids singing prefab songs on prefab sets. FIREFOX. Clint Eastwood's attempt to capitalize on the current conservative, anti-Soviet mood back.fires because of sluggish direction and murky photo­graphy. If he's going to make a right-wing movie, he could at least make an entertain­ing one! MEGAFOR CE. A ridiculous, futuristic war movie, combining advanced hard· ware with swashbuckling derring-do. If the actors were better, it might have mus­tered a dopey charm, but Barry Bostwick and Persis Khambatta are as wooden as the plot. THE THING. John Carpenter tries to gross us out again and succeeds. This is one of the goriest films ever made, but shocking as it is, it hao little suspense. The low-budget '50s movie of the same title is far more creepy. All the specia l effects in the world cannot disguise the director's lack of imagination and vision. MAYBE: STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN. A much better film than the origi­nal wide·llCJ'een version of the cult TV favorite, this sequel is still mainly for "Trekkies." If you loved the stilted dialog and philosophical bromides of the old Enterprise crew, you'Il be well satisfied with the new movie. If you didn't, stay away. ROCKY III. A well-engineered exer- Movies cise in redundancy by Sylvester Stallone. thriller by Jaques Beinex-a visual treat The writer/ director/ star knows how to and satistying film on all levels. manipulate the material for maximum MEPHIS TO. The 1981 Academy impact and box office$$$. Your move! Award winner for best foreign language GREASE 2. A pleasant, if not very film.Thisstoryoftherioeofanambitious exciting sequel to the highest-grossing and amoral actor in Nazi Germany is a musical in film history. The new movie is gripping variation on the Faust legend. superior to. the original in its narrative, GARDE A VU. A fascinating French ~~t~:oang:~: 0~c~::~ ~~~011~k:i!~e1::_;d &hnee~:!odrama, starring the late Romy wit of Stockard Channing, as well as the ' I LOVE YOU. A charming and funny ear-splitting but infectious score. Brazilian sex farce with Sonia Braga, who li~rb;e ;ei::c~~e~o~:nx~ella~~~l~:i~: ~~1:n~~~bine seductiveness with wit and Michele Pfeiffer and Lorna Luft. ATOMIC CAFE. A sometimes funny , OR, YOU COULD SEE: sometimes fearsome documentary about DINER. A witty, nostalgic look at the atomic bomb, built from old film clips American youth in '60's Baltimore. of the '50s. DIVA. A delightful French comedy- Happy late summer viewing! r-----------------------i The SIERRA HIKER retails reg. $55 s3599 524-6606 Water repellant, Breathable nylon upper, Inside shock, Flexible rubber leg sale, Lightweight, Padded collar, Firm toe cap Men's flat, Terry Towelling inside to make it absorbent for this heat, $29.99. 10:3-6:30 M-Sat. SHOE WAREHOUSE 2024 WESTHEIMER (at Shepherd) L-----------------------~ Come and get lei'ed Friday the 13th Hawaiian Night Tropical drink specials Happy hour if you wear a Hawaiian shirt Door prizes Steak night 6pm Wednesday on the patio Saturday & Sunday $5 liquor bust 4-7pm Houston's wettest happy h9ur 220 Avondale 529-7525 AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Happy Hour Every Day 7am-8pm c~ eoop SU WE$TMEIMER-HOUSTON•S26-t240 Every Monday 25C Draft Beer 14 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 ..... . INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) l Tel: 523-2795 • A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT ... Only $3.75 (plus drink) Buffet served 11am-2:30pm Monday-Friday **** DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY 4 to 10:30 pm * * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE) * Chief cook with 20 years experience-just came from China * ~ Chicken Kew * Sha Cha Beef with Cashew Nuts * Chinese Style * Shrimp with Roast Squab Lobster Sauce * Oyster with * Chiu Chow Style Duck Ginger & Green Onion * Sharks Fin with *And Many, Many More FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA Shredded Chicken . . . We will prepare for you a very special Chinese dinner * **** Mixed Drinks ... * Professional Bartender ... * Lovely Waitresses ... A UGUST 13, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Next Stop: San Francisco Dirty Sally's Wins Softball Championship By Billie Duncan The stands were full, the field was finally dry and the tension in thedugoutscould be scooped into a cone. Dirty Sally's and the Galleon had battled their way to what would be up being the championship game in the MSA Softball play-offs. Just the day before they had faced each other in a game that Sally's had won by a single little itty bitty point. The Galleon had defeated Sally's in one game of the Lone Star Classic and knew that the possi­bility existed that they could take them again. Riding on the victory was the chance to play in the Gay Wor]d Series, and the sweet s~ell of San Francisco was floating in the BIT. The Galleon has just smothered Jim's Gym 11 -1 and were raring to go. Sally's was rested and ready. Barry Pirkey stepped to the plate for the Galleon and gave himself a one-man ticket home on one mighty swing that really connected. Sally's stumbled around in the field for a while, looking like a bunch of beginners. By the time the Galleon finished at bat, five runs were on the old scoreboard. Bill Fike helped considerably by smacking a two-run good-bye ball that kissed the tree­tops as it went by. Houston 's champion team, Dirty Sally's, on the way to the Gay World Series. This picture snapped right after their 23-12 win over tM Galleon. bases loaded, Don Davidson stepped to the MSA Sof tball plate. It was Casey at the bat, with the LAST WEEK'S RESULTS difference being that (unlike Casey) Davidson connected for a grand slam that had the crowd on its feet and screaming. Sally's scored another run in the third to make it 17-5. Saturday. August 7 {playoffs) J1m·s Gym 12 Montrose Mining Montrose Voice 10 A&K Jewelry 9 (8 1nn1ngs) Dirty Sally's 13 Galleon Jim's Gym 9 Montrose Voice Sunday. August 8 fpl11yoffs) 12 2 DIVISIOOB 1 E/J's Protein Suppliments 2 Bushwackers Sports Div1sionD 3. Five Easy Pieces 4 Hole E Rollers 1. Happy Traits 2 Galleon One 3. Gator-Aid 41nteract THIS WEEK'S GAMES (All g•~ •I SUld•~ Bowi. 8200 Br.-m•1n) • Monday. August 16 First round Roll-Offs. 9pm First round Total Pin Tournament. 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bow ling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thursday. August 12 Results next week HIGHGAAIES Kevin Hull Butch lnsh Larry Lentz Robert Arriaga Thursday. Augusts 226.212 Robert Preston 210 220.212 Bob Akins 204.202 218 JerryNewton 204 213 ~~~ ~:~~ ~~ STANDINGS fT"•oughAugust5) 1. JustManon&Lynn·s 7 Thursday Knights Tropical Fruit 8 Hang 10 2 For a Few Daddies 9 Thursday Night More Tncks 3 Chases 10. 4to 1 • TheRockettes 11. Gutter Sluts 5 Kindred Spirits 12. Kindred Sp1r1ts Aces High Leather&Lace 8 Salt & Pepper II THIS WEEK'S GAMES 1Al1gerr>M•!Stad!Um8ooa-·a200Br ... ,.....,, Thursday. August 19 Regular compet1toon, 9pm Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Not to be outdone so early in the game, Sally's marched to the plate with determi­nation and power. With two men on, Mario Marchena whalloped the ball over the fence to score three and Don Davidson hit a key double thatdid nothurtthecauseat all. In the fourth, the GaBeon pulled out a bit and scored two runs. Sall)'"s scored three. 11 J1m·sGym DirtySalty's 23 Galleon lolortd•yAugiAt HS t<inor9d$pir1ts(5245Buft1ioSpeectw1y. fi65-9756 ! 1t 830pms1ng1ee11mm•l10t1. S2entryw•!'lnert.hall R•nc:h(6820 1t- M•m . ~9730)•19pm.,s1r"1gleel•t'l•nlt1on 1 S2tir1try, W•Mer1•k••U 1SSOgu11r1nt .. ) 12 Tuud•y. AtJG'l.ISI 11 The crowds cheered and the scoreboard showed Galleon 5, Dirty Sally's 6 at the end of one. Now Sally's was warmed up. The first three men up for the Galleon were short- Walking of( the field, victorious. circuited. Zap, zap, zap. So, Sally's came back to bat. And they came back with a vengence, scoring six more runs! includ­ing a scorching homer by Ken Bailey that sent two pairs of happy feet over home plate. The Galleon could not get going at bat in the third, either, but Sally's provided a whalloping amount of excitement. With In the fifth, the Galleon started to perk up both on offense and defense, scoring four runs and keeping Sally's off the plate. But the sixth inning saw the Galleon go blank again. Sally's however, was not through for the day. Mario Marchena just couJd not resist hitting another 3-run homer. At this point things looked bleak for the Galleon. They stayed bleak. The last inning saw only one run from the Galleon. So, the final score was Sally's 23, Galleon 12. Galleon scorekeeper concerned a6 Dirty Sally's pointa mount. BOX SCORE OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAME Dirty Sally's 23 Ga/lf#OIJ 12 Sunday. August 8 Dirty Sally 's AB R H E~;~~i~ ~ ! i i Young 3b 5 3 3 DeSalerf 2 3 1 Davidson ref 4 2 2 Batley 2b 3 1 l Grayc 3 O O Pace 1b 3 1 2 Catespr 0 0 0 Cr11gp 3 1 O Meunchowph 1 O O lotals 38 23 20 Gal/eon Pirkey rf 5 1 3 McKjnstry2b • O O Foreman If 3 1 1 Castilloss 4 1 2 Kessler lcf 4 2 1 Gorep 1 o O Webberp 3 O 1 Fikelb 2 2 2 Belgard c 3 1 1 Harwellrcf 2 1 2 Collake3b 4 3 2 totals 351215 Leh on base-Sally's 3. Galleon 10 Doublee~Momson (2). Young (3). Davidson. Pir· key(2). Webber Homeruns~Marchena (2). Davidson. Bailey, Pir­key, Fike Sacnhce-Bailey. Gray, McK1nstry, Foreman 1982 PLAYOFF FINAL RANKINGS TMm 1 Dtny Sally's 2 Galleon 3 Jim's Gym 4 Montrose Voice FINAL 1982 REGULAR SEASON STANDINGS Galleon Jim's Gym A&KJewelry Montrose Voice Briar Patch Won L091 South D1vi.s1on 10 3 769 8 5 815 6 7 462 5 8 385 3 10 231 NorthDtvis1on D1rtySalty's 12 1 923 - MontroseMming 8 5 615 Barn 6 7 462 Mary's s 8 385 Brazos River Bottom 3 1 O 231 Chronicle Softball Tournament LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Tuesday, August 10 Montrose Voice 7 Northw•st Gyros O (forfeit) Thursday, August 12 Montrose Voice vs Casa Ole (re.suit nut issue) MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK'S GAMES HIGH GAMES Monday, A~~.:~RIES Bob Akins 255 Bob Akins 631 Doug Campbell 241 LOUIS Schneider 822 Louis Schnetder 233 Doug Campbell 599 Bob Craig 599 FINAL SUMMER STANDINGS Dtvi.s1onA 1. Daddy's 2 Eurotan lnt'I 3. Lowest lane 469ers Dw1s1on C l Cock-Ta11ers 2 C11tzen Pain 3 Slow Hand 4 Semen Recruits L•mposl12417T1met8l'f'd 528-89'21 J •l8pl'\,Sl!'lgl991•mt­n• toon.S28"llry. winF'lertlke•n WedflMd•y.AugtiSITB Bn1rPatch(2294W HCMcombe. 66S--98781at9pm, &if'Slle ehmmat1on. $2et1try, $50pr1ze G81(1419Roctvnond.~ ) •18pm.11ng•eellt'lui•· hon.S2W1lry.w1MMl•keellarodn.wpo01cue Thul'90•y.Avguatl9 Bam(710Pk11tc,528-9427)at9iirn.cioubleehmm•r•on.S2 entry. S25 l1rst rourid pr.ze. $15 HCOnd round pm.e JustMar•onaridLyl'ln·a(817F•1rv-.s2s-9110Jat8pm,$2 entrylee.w•nnertllke•ll E/J'a !1213 Roctirnond. 527-9071) •I 10pm double eum1ns· llOf\, $2et'11ry. W1~n«take•l1 MSA Tennis LAST WEEK'S MATCHES Sunday. Augu.st 8 Cancelled.rain TOP TEN STAND~N;~ 1 R+chRyan 1. Mike Green 2. Fred Lopez 2. Donny Kelly 3 Jim Kitch 3 Rich Corder • Ron Landrum 4 David Garza 5. John Ryan 5. Peter Lee 6. David Robicheaux 6 Roben Arriaga 7. Richard Cot 7. Charlie Brown 8 Lester Vela 8 Eddie Chavez 9 Jon Colben 9 Jim Olsen 10 Michael Houston 10. Larry Collins THIS WEEK'S MATCHES {Courtslocatect~kGregorParllTenniaCenter T•keGult Fr-1y10Utti. ei.rlCalhouF'IJuttpet1UHc.npuaon~) Sunday, Augu.st 15 Regular compet1t1on. 10:30am Olympic Update See related story on the Gay Olympics elsewhere this issue. The Gay Olympic Games in San Fran­cisco are expecting several Houetonians. Tom Burns is entered in track and field and the West End Stars are entered in vol­Jeyball, Mark Brown of the organizaing committee said this week. He also informed the VOICE that the games are in good financial shape and ticket sales are picking up. They will be aiding the organizers of the Gay World Series with transportation. The World Series will take place at the same time. Mark said that the Galleon softball team had indicated that they were consid­ering going to the Gay Olympic Games, but that he had not received final word from the team. The Galleon placed second in the MSA Softball championship play-offs last weekend. 16 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 Scenes from Sunday's Galleon vs. Dirty Sally's championship game. Other games: Jim's Gym eliminates Mining Company 12-8 Jim'• Gym opened Saturday against the Montrose Mining Company in a battle of the 2nd place teams from the North & South Divisions. Theo game started as a see-oaw battle a• both team• had the led at different times through the first5innings. Going into the 6th inning the score was tied at 7 each. In the top of the 6th. the Mining Co. BCored 1 run, but Jim~s Gym tallied fi in the bottom of the 6th to take a 12-8 lead Jim's Gym held the lead during the Mine's last at bat. which went quickly wtth 3 fly-outs that ended the game and the :-1eason for the Mining Co. Voice beats A&K 10-9 in an extra inning In Saturday's second game, division rivals A&K Jewelry and the Montrose Voice squared off. Even though A&K fin· ished the regular season ahead of the Voice, A&K had dropped both regular sea­son games to the Voice and they were look­ing for revenge in the playoffs. But the Voice scrambled for 4 runs in their half of the 2nd and in the 4th scored 3 more to take a 7-f> lead. The battle continued and going into the 7th inning, the Voice held a 9-8 lead, but A&K wasn't quite finished as Ken John· ston delivered his third homerun of the day to tie the score. In the bottom of the 7th, the Voice mounted a serious scoring threat only to have the potential winning run thrown out at home plate in an excellent defensive play by A&K, which forced the game into extra mn1ngs In the 8th. A&K couldn't manage to score and the Voice tallied once more to end the battle and advance to the last 4 teams Sally's edged Galleon 13-12 in their Saturday game In the showdown game Saturday between the Galleon and Dirty Sally's, everyone expected a close game and all knew that it was probably the most important game of the season for both teams. But it is doubt­ful that anyone expected the excitement and tension that the game delivered. Sally's opened the bottom of the first scoring once after holding the Galleon scoreless in the top of the inning. Neither team scored in the 2nd and in the top of the Galleon captured second place. The photo taken when they u·ere all smiles after their 11·1 win over Jim's Gym. 3rd, the Galleon tallied twice to momentar· ily take the lead Sally's tallied 3 runs on Mario Marche· na 's 3 run homeurn in the bottom of the third and at the end of 3 innings the score was Sally's 4, Galleon 2 Sally's scored again in the bottom of the 4th to up the score to 5-2. In the top of the 5th, itwastheGalleon's turn to provide some excitment as they sent 12 batters to the plate and scored 9 runs capped by Barry Pirkey's 2-out3-run home run Sally's didn't give up though and scored 3 more rune in the bottom ofthe5thandat the end of 5 innings the score was Galleon 11 and Sally's 8. In the sixth inning, the Galleon didn't score and in the botom of the sixth, Sally's scored 3 more runs as Jerry DeSale deli vered a towenng 3 run homerun to tie the score at 11 In the top of the 7th, the Galleon tallied once to again take the lead. So the bottom of the 7th was do or die for Sally's. Sally's put their first 3 men on base with the help of 2 Galleon errors and a base on balls, then Vernon Harris delivered a line drive single to right field scoring 2 runs and giving Sally's a 13-12 victory over the Galleon. The victory moved Dirty Sally's to the championship finals. Jim's Gym beats Montrose Voice 9-2 and advanced to a guaranteed third place spot In Saturday's last game, Jim's Gym and the Montrose Voice paired off. After the excitement of the first 3 games on Satur­day, this game was very quiet as most of the fans had lefL the field and almost everyone was already emotionally drained from the earlier games. This game saw Jim's Gym score 3 runs in the bottom oft.he first inning, and thoi;e 3 runis would turn out to be enough to win the game. Again in the 3rd, Jim's Gym scored 4 more runs sparked by Rick Errard'e 3-run homenm and in the 5th scored 2 more runs to take a 9-0 lead. In the 6th, the Voice finally managed to tally twice, to make the eventual final score Jim's Gym 9, Montrose Voice 2. The loss eliminated the Voice from further playoff competition, but gave them a solid 4th place finish The victory for Jim's Gym moved them to the semi-finals of the playoffs against the Galleon. Galleon beats Jim's Gym 11-1 Sunday to advance to championship battle Sunday's first game pitted the Galleon against Jim's Gym in the playoff semifi· nals. The winner would advance to the finals to face the unbeaten Dirty Sally's team This gaml• saw neither team score in the 1st inning. In the 2nd, Bill Fike delivered a 2 run homerun for the Galleon and Rick Errard a solo homerun for the Gym. So, at the end of 2 innings the 8Core was Galleon 3, Jim's Gym 1 In th• :lrd inning the Galleon tallied 4 more ruR sparked by Grant McKinstry's triple and Don Kessler's double. In the 5th inning the Galleon scored again on Bill Fike's 3 run homerun (his second of the day) and in the 7th the Galleon scored 2 more runs to take an easy 11-1 victory. The loss eliminated Jim's Gym but gave then 3rd place in the playoffs. Monday Bowlers Finish Regular Season After a king-of·the-hill competition in Monday Night Bowling that saw many teams as the king at one time or another, the final results are now in. The top eight teams will now play each other in a roll-off that will pick the top of the top for the summer season. The competitors will be Daddy's, Euro· tan lnternation, E!J's, Protein Suppli· ments, Bush wackes, Cock-Tailers, Citizen Pain, Happy Trails, and Galleon One. These teams will be ranked according to how many games they have won or on the tot.al number of pins popped in case of a win-loss tie. Then on August 16, the number one team will play the number eight team, the number two team will play the number seven team, the number three team will play the number six team and the number four team will play the number three team Out of that competition, four teams will emerge. On August 23, that group will play with the number one team matched against the number four team and the number two team matched with the number three team. The next week, August 30, the last two teams will square off to determine the roll· off champs. At the same time, the rest of the teams in the summer league will compete in a total pin handicap tournament, and all play one another. At the end of the season, each first place team in each division Will receive trophies and the roll-off winner wiH get something special FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9:30-1:30 The Happy Trail Riders Country & Western Boogie Band SUNDAY 5-BPM Bourbon Street comes alive on Fairview with the Dixie Kings Sunday Happy Hour 12-3PM 715 Fairview 521-2792 THE proudly presents Keoki Kona at the keyboard, Top of the Hole Wednesday-Saturday 5-1 Sunday 3-8 Happy Hour 7am-7pm Monday-Friday Join Dee every Saturday morning 7am-1pm Schnapps 50<t Amaretto 75<t 7-10am 109 Tuam 528-9128 AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 OPEN Monday-Saturday Jlam-2am, Sumlay lpm-2am Gay hours Monday-Saturday 4- 7pm Tuesdsay-The Fabulous Dixie Kings 8pm BYOB Rita "Poppa Bear" and Bird 5731 Kirby, 521-1444 Parking in rear Watch for Grand Opening OPEN Monday-Saturday llam-2am, Sunday lpm-2am DOUBLER SALOON Appearing Sunda_ys & Monda~ thru August LIUNSHAR~ 402 Lovett 527-9866 To captivate you again ... Sheila Ceasar and Joe Thalken Tuesday thru Saturday beginning at 9:30 p.m. Happy Hour 4-8pm Our chef has done it again! Elegant dining and wonderful prices. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 Drag Queens vs. theMSA Sponsors Set for Saturday By Billie Duncan In order to further the principles of fair play, to bring pride to the hearts of friends and family and to prove that the Montrose is indeed an insane community, this Sat­urday evening at Levy Field a group of female impreasionists known as the Drag Queen All Stars will play softball against a motly group put together from the ranks of the sponsors of the MSA Softball League. Naomi Simms is coaching the Drag Queens, as well as working on the uni­forms. The VOICE has been informed that the uniforms are red and white with rhi­nestone trim. Players have the option of wearing tennis 1hoes or matching pumps. Naomi has requested that fans of the Drag Queens please wear red and white also. With a litUe cooperation, perhaps the entire stands could be color-coordinated. Particular care is being taken by the players to make sure that they have the correct make-up style for nighttime soft­ball. Mike Teager, who serves in many capac­ities for the DQ's. said that the team is currently in rehearsal for the game. He also commented on last year's game, which the Drag Queens won 17-15, by say­ing, "It was a real strange game." Jay Allen of the Galleon will be the umpire and the chief for the game. Jerry DeSale of the Softball League reported that Jim Reagan (president of Montrose Sports Association) will play. The players on the Drag Queens are Naomi Simms. Kelley, Mias T (who was a star in the game last year), Donna Day, Bernadette, Charlie, Nikki, Coco, Jerry Harper, and Jahonau Reis. The ranks of the sponsors team will be filled out by various popular andlor attractive bartenders from the Galleon, Copa, Dirty Sally's, Barn and Montrose Mining Company, as well as bar owners V .J. Abney (Ab) from Brazos River Bot· tom and Jerry Kaufman from the Briar Patch. Billie Duncan (moi) is supposed to represent the MONTROSE VOICE. After the main line game, the MSA Ten­nis League will play an exhibition game against a select team from the MSA Women'• Softball League. Son of Sequel With sequels like "Star Trek Two" and "Rocky III" chalking up big box office returns, the producers of "Surf Two" are betting their movie will make more money than the original film, reports the Los Angeles Times. It's a pretty good bet: there was no "Surf One." "Surf Two" is a spoof of '50s beach movies, featuring surfers addicted to a drink called "Buzz Cola" that turns their hair pink --..... ~ .... L.1 .... ...._ SAN FRANCISCO s24g Round Trip Air Call Rick for Details Serving the Gay Community cgtat.s,F se,ea_se, Houses & Apartments, Montrose & Downtown area Base Realty Inc 330 Fairview 524-1871 Hardwood floors, mini blinds, track lighting adults only c:befuxe c::J? enooation HOUSTON 77006 SPECIALIZING IN PAINTING GENERAL CARPENTRY PRIVACY FENCE AND DECK DESIGN COMPLETE LANDSCAPING SERVICE WRITTEN ESTIMATE WITH DRAWING 524-0038 JON BARTON Sahdji at the Copa By Nick Fede You can really appreciate the talents of a regularly scheduled group of impression­ists when they put in a better performance than the scheduled special guest. The special guest was Sahdji from Reno, Nevada, w.ho performed in the Copa's Sunday show August 8 with regular stars Naomi Sims (Newman Broauh), Hot Chocolate (Larry Edwards), and Kelley (Kelly Lorino). The other scheduled regu· Jar star Donna Day (Don Shelton) did not appear that night because of an out-of­t. own engagement. 0 Hi, and I wish I were," said emcee Namoi Sllnns as he greeted the crowd while standing in front of a black-and­wbite glittered backdrop that bears the new Copa logo. When introduced, Sahdji appeared on stage dressed in a black-and· white costume as he performed Dionne Warwick in a medley of her hita that included "Walk On By" and "Anyone Who Had a Heart." His performance and cos· tume throughout the first two numbers were sadly dated (circa 1960). In comparison, the sizzling Hot Choco­late performed an outstanding version of Gladys Kinght's "Coming Home," that enchanted the crowd who smiled as he entertained garbed in a striking lavender gown that was garnished by a silk bow that peaked to a point above his shoulder As "Twice As Hot," Naomi Sima and Hot Chocolate later performed Ashford 'ind SimpHon 's version of Diana Ross's hit 'The BoHs" and then presented another of the singing duo's hi ta, "Is lt(Still) Good To Ya," which the crowd responded to with much applause and a standing ovation. Kelley proved once again that he can gracefully high-kick with poise as he per· formed Olivia Newton John's "Totally Hot,'' Naomi Sims entertained the crowd with a light and bouncy version of "Sum· mertime Fun" that feature tropical chore­ography that evoked warm feelings and hot times. Sahdji performed later as Tina Turner in a medley of her hits but during some of the number, his lips were not in synchroni­zation with the music, which cracked nois­ily through the club's sound system. He had a difficult time trying to correcUy han· die his mic, and was awkward when mov­ing and adjusting the mic's stand. The crowd was not impre88ed. "I guess I'm what you'd call a throw­back because I don't do things that are on the disco top forty," he said referring to material he performs. In his last number, Sahdji presented the Diana Rosa hit "Mirror, Mirror," in which he moved with some style and lifelike real· ism. He made some crowd members long for the bygone Thursday nighta at The Copa when impresionist Cocoa excel­lently performed that number with versa­tile dancers and mirrors made of silver Mylar, "I just spent four days up at the lake with her (Diana Ross) and I copied her dreds and mannerisms," said the boyish impressionist in a post-show interview. He referred to the small amout of tips given him during his performance of "Mirror, Mirror" by saying. "If you're doing the illusion well, well, you just don't tip Diana RoAH." He performed as one of the leads in "Hello. Hollywood, Hello" at the MGM Grand Hotel in Reno. where he danced •·under the name Ron Friedman ns a boy and as Sahdji as a girl, and the audience never knew the difference." He has acted in four movies, one or which , "WUSA," had him playing the character Hollywood. "'who dresses in drag and casht's .. hi8 si~ter'~ welfar~ check,'' he said. He and his WJfe own _a custom desi~n costume ~hop that is located in Reno, and he designs his own gowns after whirh she then executet' unto cloth. He added with pride that "I do all the bead work on them." When aRked if his wife ever accompan· ies him when he Pf'rforms out of town he said, "I don't like my wife to see the shows because she notices everything wrong with (his) the wardrobe. His policy after accepting offered tips while performing is to "always try to say thank you if I take the tip when I take a breath." He believes the "U.S. is becoming much more cosmopolitan like Europe," because ulf a man can walk on-stage and give the illusion of being a girl, then the audience is impressed." The crowd was for the most part impressed by the topnotch talent, creativ­ity and innove.tion that is put in weekly by Copa's own Houston all-stars. It was all evidenced by whom they tipped and applauded. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose (Fnd8)'.Augu1t13.throoghlhutlldliy.Augustt9) •PIANO Donn• Corley with Charlene Wright 9pm Tuesday through Saturday and Mary Hooper and Bill Hudson 9pm Monday at Rascals. 2702 Kirby, 524-6272 J1m Cater & Jett Longino8pm Friday; Tom Wllhams & Jeff Longino 8pm Saturday; Greg Davis 8pm Sunday & Monday; Tom Williams 8pm Tuesday; Lee Laforge 8pm Wednesday: Mickey Aankm & Roxie Starr Bpm Thursday at Keyboard. 3012 Milam, 528-6988 Richard Askm and Dana Rogers 10pm nightly {except Monday & Tuesday) at the Copa (piano bar) 2631Richmond.528·2259 Sheila Ceasar 9pm Tuesday through Saturday and uonshare 9pm Sunday & Monday at Baja's. 402 Lov­ett, 527-9866 Alexandra Haas and Michael Bailey Friday, Saturday Wednesday & Thursday at Arno·s, 4002 Montrose 52S·2993 •ORGAN Keok1 Kone 5pm Friday & Saturday. 3pm Sunday & Spm Wednesday & Thursday at the Hole. 109 Tuam 528-9066 • COUNTRY & COUNTRY/ROCK The New Happy Trail Riders Country-Western Bog~ gie band 9 30pm Friday & Saturday at Happy Trails 715Fa1N1ew 521-2792 Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9-3Qpm Friday & Saturday & 830pmThursdayattheExile.1011 Bell.659-0453,& 8 30pm Sunday at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos 528-9192 Ftymg Blind Band 9pm Tuesday-Saturday at Miss Charlotte's, 911 Drew 528-8840 Mustang Band 930pm Friday & Saturday & 830pm Wednesday & Thursday al Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Happy Tnal Aiders 9pm Wednesday at E/J's. 1213 Richmond. 527-9071 •GUITAR Susan Christian 5:30pm Friday; Reynolds & Rand 5:30pm Monday: Rawslyn Ruffin 5:30pm Tuesday; and Lyr1530pm Wednesd1y & Thursday 1t Kindred Spirits, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS Dixie K1ng1 Qpm Saturday & 8pm Sunday at Happy Trails, 715Fa1n1lew, 521-2792 Mata Hari 9 30pm Frtday & Saturday and Lee LaForge. Kim Yvette & Dianne Chaiston 9pm Sunday at Bacchus. 523 Lovett, 523-3396 John Day & Co 6pm Sunday at E/J°s, 1213 Rich­mond. 527-9071 1.1\ll The ADO Jau Quartet 8pm Sunday at Harrar's. 428 Westhelmer,526-2895 Robert Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday & with Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday. Saturday, Wednesday & Thursday atLasBrisas.6UW Gray,528-9959 Windrose9 30pm n1ghUy (except Sunday & Monday); and Horace Cnsby9.30pm Sunday & Monday at Bird· watchers.907Westhe1mer.527-0595 • NU WAVE/PUNK The Sputs 9-30pm Friday. the Leroi Bros & the Rattle Cats 9 30pm Saturday at Omni. 1540 Westhe1mer. 528-4230 The Best of ComedyWorksh1pVotumell8:30& 11pm Fnday & Saturday & 8 30pm Wednesday & Thursday Manuel Labor IS the Not the President of Me1uco 8 30pm Sunday & Monday at Comedy Workshop 2105 San Felipe. 524-7333 Stand-up comics nightly at Comm1xAnnex. 2105San Felipe.524-7333 Max Mavm. Jeff DeHart. Adam Leslie 8 & 1030pm Friday. 730. 10 & m1dn1ght Saturday, &830pmSun· day. and Jeff Altman. Robert Aguayo & Adn1enne Tolsch 8.30pm Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday at theLaffStop. 1952-AW Gray. 524-2333 • IMPRESSIONISTS Donna Day. N11:0mi Sims & Hot Chocolate Sunday evttning at the Copa, 2631 Richmond. 52S-2259 Llllfe Bobby. Tracey. & guests SundAy evening at Exile, 1011 Bell, 659-0453 Playgirl Foliles 10 30pm Saturday at Pink Elephant 1218Leeland.659-0040 • MISCELLANEOUS T1lent shows Tuesday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond 528-2259. Wednesday evening at M1dn te Sun, 534 Wes1he1mer. 526-7519. & Thursday evening at Twrns. ~ Weathe1mM. 520-0244 EXPRESS YOURSELF FR~~"~s>'S JERRY'S INFLATION" FllUITER PRICES Hal rcuVblowdry or haircut & set, $10 Permanent waves $35 523-0438 Attention SCUBA DIVERS! Labor Day Weekend in Cozumel, Sept. 3-6 Call Bruce for Details Serving the Gay Community GYRO GYROS SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 Young in Montrose, Old in Experience. A full service advertising agency specializing in exemplary graphics and creative merchandising, with the dedicated ability needed to promote and sell your service or product. Give us a call: Walters, White and Associates 3330 Graustark St., Houston, Texas 77006 713/529-6292 NEVER A COVER CHARGE Sunday, August 15 8-lOpm John Day & Company :::;;;T~fii Jlff~r~8a~~~ TURsday: Steak Night Wednf"sday: Country & Western Night-Live Band Thursday: Free C&W Lessons by Dmnis Rodriguez 7-9pm Pool Tournament lOpm Movies nightly on the patio OPEN 7AM-2AM 1213 RICHMOND• 527-9071 Extra parking on the corner o( Mt. Vernon & Richmond AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Personalized Custom jewelry & Rings Designed to Reflect Your Lifestyle! Serving Montrose Siner 1974 Immediate Cash We Buy • Gold • Silver • Jewelry • Gems • Coins • Watches The ROUGH CUT I 520 Westht:imer Suite K 520-7050 • A CLUB FOR WOMEN AND THEIR FRIENDS Live Entertainment weekday• 5 :30 · 8 :00 Happy Hour, Monday thru Friday 5 :00 - 7:00 Cherry Wolfe, O.J Appearing Thursdays thru S undays Pool Tournament every Monday 8 :30 w in n e r takes a ll 1st Monday o f every m onth Free C&W Dance Leaaona 8 :00 Last Sunday of every month C & W N ight, featuring the Mustang Band 7 :00 . 11 :00 SECURITY I NO COVER (l.D. required) 5:::.~0u~:·~:.~s:;::-: 713/ 8815· $7158 We wish to welcome Richard Kurtz to our staff as our Montrose Deisgn Consultant (also serving River Oaks and West University). Watch for the change that's coming 11316 Weathelmer 531-9600 Open 10-9 M-F, 10-6 Sat, and 12-5 Sun for browsing 520-5560 531-9600 A&A FURNITURE CENTER We carry the fine SEALY POSTUREPEDIC line --~ Comp11.mentary .. ' ~' , .1. 1 ,• : . .. '1· . smhaorpgpaerirtsa s& to our 1 \ • ~~ browsers l\ 1 ,\I' •. ~ .-------------------. I THIS WEEKEND 20% OFF I all special orders : Must present this COUPON : --------------------- <!U MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 r------------------------ Lowest Prices on Alterations Trouser Waists & Bottoms Regular $3.75-Special $2.75 THE DESIGNER'S ROOM 224 Westheimer 522-7106 ------------------------~ The Galleon congratulates Dirty Sally's on their victory andwlll bhea rrdo footirn tgh em~ ----~~~= as they represent Houston In the Gay World Serles In San Francisco. 'ilq£ ~nlfoun 2303 Richmond 522-7616 Open 2pm-2am Happy Hour Dally 2-Spm MONTROSE TRAVEL The Search for Alexander September 17-19. $159 Round trip air. 3 days. 2 nights. French Quarter hotel, round-trip transfers. pn­v• te museum showing. weekend of Knights d'Orleans ''Mr_ Knight Contest." Otber weekends available. Call for info Denver Weekend 3 days. 2 nights. Hotel & Round Trip Air Fare. Welcome Cocktail. Many other special attractions Hosted by Charlie's Bar of Denver $199 based on double occupancy Call for details. 2506 Ralph, 522-8747 BED HOUSE SALE! SALE! SALE! SIMMONS BEAUTY REST DISCOUNT CENTER Kings, reg. $600.00, now •17900 Queens, reg. $400.00, now *149°0 Other Sizes Available 906 Westheimer at Montrose 527-0188 Mr. and Mrl; Frankie Gusemono. who ha.le operated Princes for 15 years in the11 heart of Montrose locofiorl. toke pride 1n announcing their purchase of the restaurant Expect to find the some good food. friendly seivice and great prices that you hove always enjoyed 1n the post Only the name hos changed AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Montrose Live Second City to Appear at Tower By Billie Duncan Members of Second City are Second Citi· zens. And Once a Second Citizen, always a Second Citizen. Second City is, of course, a group of improvisational actor-playwrights who have been gaining recognition constantly for over 20 years. Based in Chicago, the group hae num· bered among its citizens Joan Rivera, John Belushi, Gilda Radner, Alan Arkin, Mary Gross, Valerie Harper, Avery Schreiber, David Steinberg, Bill Murray, John Candy and on and on and on. The original group spawned several companies as well as the SCTV (Second City Television Network). which is one of the few shows on television to have the guts to go on the air without a laugh track. Because there is no laugh track, how­ever, some people do not think that the show is funny. American TV viewers are ueed to having the tube tell them whether something is funny or not by providing raucue laughter at the end of every line or look. People who can think for themselves are tuning in in droves. The company of players who are about to appear at the Tower do not inclu_de any of the famiJiar TV faces. The cast is com­posed of six talented individuals who have developed their comedic talents in many ways and are now working their way up the Second City ladder. Part of the proceee for some of the per· formers ie the workshop part of the Second City where improvisational techniques are taught. Three of the touring com· pany's members gained entrance to per­formance via the workshop. Jeanette Schwabe has lived in Chicago most of her life and hae been either in the Second City National Touring Company or Paul Sills Story Theater for over two years. Another workshop grad is Jeff Michale who is also from the Chicago area and has been with the company for two years. He has worked as a stand-up comic around Chicago as well as working with Second City. The third performer to make it into the touring company through the workshop door ie Bill Applebaum who ie from Cleve· land, Ohio and hae been with the com· pany for a year and a half. He hae also been seen as an actor around Chicago and in some PBS productions. Jim Fay worked withJeffMichalein the Comedy Rangers and has now been with Second City for three years. Steve Aeead wae diecovered by Second City when he traveled from Minneappolie with Dudly Riggs' Brave New Workshop and wae eeen by the Second City people. The traditional etar·in·a·night story ie reserved for the pianist Ruby Streak who had been noticed by someone at Second City and then ... and then .. . Right. Some­thing happened to the regular pianist and Ruby streaked in to cover. She hae been with Second City for five years now. Mike Hagarty, director of the touring company spoke to the VOICE earlier thie week about Second City. "I guess it's our job to ~atc:_h what's going on in the world and give 1t back to the audience in a somewhat humorous ww~·~xplained that the ehow that will be presented at the Tower will be composed of material that was worked out mostly by other members of Second City, rather than the touring company. That tried and true material will take up the first two acts. Then the third act will be on the epot improvisations based o~ audience sugges­tion. This ie the do-or-die part of the ehow where the audience finds out iuet how clever the performers really are. Jane Morris and Jim Fay of the national touring company called Second City, opening next Wf!ek at the Tower. Mike Hagarty seemed to feel that improv and team comedy is much more interesting and exciting than stand-up work . In epealring of the people in the group who have done etand·up, he kept ineieting that they were not really stand-up comedi-ans. "I don't like etand·up comedy," he finally eaid. Then he added, "!like watch· ing a good etand·up comedian, but I hate to see some one who's neurotic get up there and fall apart." Jn improvisation he explained, "There Max Mavin: Mind Over Montrose By Billie Duncan It hae got to be a trick. No one can really know what a person is going t.o say or how much change is in a person's pocket or which card out of 53 that a person will pick. No one can tell exactly what time a watch will stop on when the stem is turned by a peraon sitting 25 feet away. No one can guess an entire hand of cards held by another person while the guesser is stand­ing with hie back to the card holder. No one, that is, except Max Mavin. Using audience members throughout hie ehow, Max defied the !awe oflogic and linear thinking. He started out with a few things that the audience could possibly pase off ae card tricks. Then he did some things with members of the crowd that might be passed off ae collusion with the people he picked. But as the 14tricks" got more involved and more and more of the people in the crowd (including people you know have never met Max Mavin before) were included in his presentations, if became more and more difficult to paee off hie show as a sham. Max Mavin is appearing through Sun­day at the Laff Stop, 1952·A West Gray, along with stand-up comedians Adam Leslie and Jeff DeHart. Max explained, "I don't think what I do is comedy." But whatever it is, it is highly entertaining. Dreeeed in black, with slightly diaboli· cal beard and eyebrows and jet black hair swept back in a decidedly delivieh manner, Max projects on sight a sense of danger and mystery. However, his manner is friendly, humorous and warmly intelligent. The only a udience member who had the nerve to try to give him flack was a man who objected to Max's earing. Max caught the man with hie steely gaze and told him, Max Maven. "! can eee why it might bug you. You're probably not butch enough to stand the pain of getting your ear pierced." Mavin insisted that he is not a mind reader, but that he merely uses his own eeneee of perception and psychology in order to get people to do what he wants them to do. He was careful to let the audience eee clearly every move that he made. He ineieted that the people involved in hie is a sense of support th.at you don't get in etand·up." He paused. "Another good thing about improv ie that if it doesn't work, you can always blame it on someone elee." Second City will be at the Tower August 19 through 21 for two shows a night. performance look carefully at the obiects that he handed them, including a demand for a thorough examination of the deck of cards. Cards got him started on his career 8:s a mentalist, actually. When hew~ a .child, he used to play Old Maid with his friends. Soon he diecovered that he was able to keep from drawing the Old Maid and to make sure that someone drew it from him if he had it. "I was a good Old Maid player," saip Mavin, "until people refused to play Old Maid with me." Hie abilities with the cards prompted one audience member to offer to back him in Vegas. Replied Mavin, "You're not the first one to think of that." He later explained that he baa visited Vegas, but "I don't go all that often. !goto visit friends who are performing." He also explained that he doee not enter Vegas in hie etrilring stage persona. "! don 't look like thie." At that point, he quietly ineieted, "Beyond that, I don't want to talk about it." When Max Mavin does not want to talk about something, the subject is changed. Hie parents both held poeitione in academia and Max still has a great love for the written word. He said that he reads 150 books and magazines a month. That is about five tomes or tomettes a day of one sort or another. Appearing with Max Mavin at the Laff Stop are Adam Leelie and Jeff DeHart. Adam Leslie appeared on stage in light grey wrinkled pants, a grey and rouge checkered shirt, black veet, bright red tie and bright red ehoee. Hie material con· sisted. mostly of consumer humor with some sex thrown in for good measure. Sometimes he merged the two. "They eay that Volkswagen Rabbit hae 90'lli • Duncan's Quick Notes Fllr<ln1: ,..Jth s...,., ... , The thrM membttoofTheFlirto(A-rinrSundtiy UNumbon)h•ve•nin<:Ndiblumountof lh,.tricalbadoli'f(londbotweo11them. And ... DolConlef•hoioalaoth<ch<>N­OftapheroflheJl'(> Up)huloered~.000 mil•lntourill&'aro11r1dtheworldandh.ao •PPHrodint.oloYiloionrom-..W..film. otocka.howo.ndO\httproduciio,.. R.bfioa,S..lliv.noianedout.m.;qin ornckband....dtbon....,,\toN-Y0<k City~'-o ';h•'-:amo. modtl,ptti"' firfirate.inslef'Callin•A.UBo~") hu1ono1oldinC.nada andMuioo. Wilh•!!lh-cmlentiaia.theyh.dbet. ierbeF>Od ~.~~bp~:;:~h~~:.. .~ :~t~~ ch....,andonl'ri<tayo..,dS.turdayaat L.mpoot.boi\achan .. haa ooclll't<l Theyan!nowpl.ayina:FridayandS.tlll" dayat8acchuoandnotplayin11atthe Lam"""'t at all. A ooll to tho LamPoOt fM commontwaometwitbadi.a:nnnoctedtal· •phone. butreirularcutom<n My tbedub iaattllfurKtioning. SttMf,,,,.."AC/w,....l,;,..." WliMJ>erlheywillhove01.herenlert.lin· montonweekendaornotiu<1....iionthat willboukedorhentholineoa .. _. MMnwhile, lriy S.odtu.o bu ooe of lheho-OClllntownoveryWfflitnd. Co-n Pia ........ : The Mon- SY<1>· phonicllandwillPl'H"'1t•concert.onS.p­tembtt25UtheTow.,. entitl«i "N­York, N-Yorli." Al\o:rthai,lheywillotartpacliinlltheir duffkbq-o f0ttthetriptoC11mp. A1•clltlon.a!: MainStndThMterwiUhold .udiUonoon 1'u8day, A..-uet17,from 6pmto8pm,1t2540TiQ>HBJvd. for 1 thildn!n'oohowentitledTJt;,N.,.,rSighlttl Ki)f~l>d ~!=~ S::t::!.!":: 6vo mon.,.dt...., .. ~.Form.,,..informa· tionc1 llS2'-6106 Thelhea1ni1inthe~ofmoviD1r toitonewlocation1ndiaraW"l1'fond1for •needed-erli ... byputtiOj[OU\ ICOUI· l-ofdon•lf<li1emae111Jed•'Th.et..o1 HokinlheEarthC.talopo." Theyoh.,..iaoudt•ripperf<>ranyonewho ioinohowi.-ineMthatilattractotop W.lentt.omaroundtbecountry. TheolOl')ltbath<>ldoU..ohowtoplhe• iatluitanaudilioniabein.-heldtoch...,. acbonaalineforaBtor.dw~ohow.Witbin thiafn.mo...,,k.tboa...iition-talllboi< lifo-..,in""n1anddanoo.S...,..,ofitio voz/:;:?~~~r.;;::.rt-"-kina:. ltwiUpl.ayattho M~l4l1Aug""t:U tbrou,gh2"7. Playgirl Follies This Saturday, Aug. 14, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover, starring Laura Lee Love & Lana Kane with special guests Madelyne, Garrett & Mitchell H•ppy Hour Sll1vrdaymldroll}M-2arn Sundaynoon-modnigh1 Mon-Frl•-&pm OPH11DM!Mon-Sa~ Noon Sun ...... A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant .. Oldest.& ~"' Friendliest . fJ , in Texas" -~ 1218 Leeland 659-0040 ... AUGUST 13, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 THANKS TEAM. WE DID GREAT! 4THPLACEIN THEMSA PLAYOFFS (AND WE DIDN'T EVEN KNOW WHAT SOFTBALL WAS 3 MONTHS AGO) 24 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat AUG AUG 13 14 AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 15 16 17 18 19 Fot•dd1!1(>(1.-I nformationat>oo1tevents 1sttdbelow lookforthespontormgorgan1uti0nunder Or;a."•HI• 1ntheMon.troseC1assrlted Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: lnU.ract's Commu­nity Coffeehouse 7:30pm midnight, 3405 ~ulberry •FRIDAY: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church. 5210 Fannin •FRIDAY-SUNDAY: National gay leadership confer­ence in Dal1as, sponsored b.) Dallas Gay Alliance at Grene­lefe HoU.I •SATURDAY: Montrose Clinic hosts blood drive to set up the Montrose Clinic Blood Fund •SATURDAY: Texas gay vol­leyball tournament at Fonde Recreational Center •.VONDA Y: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmam •TUESDAY: Montrose Sports Volleyball League l(ames 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School. 1101 Taft •THURSDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmam • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-midnight on KPFf Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 2 WEEK S: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Fran­cisco begin Aug 28, lasting to Sepl 5 U N 2 WEEKS: Gay Softball World Serie& begins in San Francisco Aug. 31 lasting to Sept. 4 • IN 2 WEEK S: Integrity Inter· national Convention opens in New Orleans Sept. 2. lasting to Sept. 5 •IN 3 WEEKS: "Tubs for Two Thousand" benefit for Montrose Counseling Center and Kapo­~ i's Sarcoma Committee at Mid towne Spa. 3100 Fannin. S.pt. 4 •IN 3 WEEKS: Texas Gay Conference in Houston, Sept. 3-5 •IN 3 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 6 • IN 4 WEEKS: Midwest Gay & Lesbian Convention in Chi­cago, Sept. 10-11 UN 5 WEEKS: 3rd Annual Gay American Arts Festival in Chicago opens Sept. 17 lal"ting to S..pt. 30 •IN 8 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference Oct. 8-10, Chicago •IN 8 WEEKS: Columbus Day. Oct. 11 •IN 9 WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America national convention in Houston, Oct. 15-17. Americana Hotel. 3301 Southwest Fwy. • IN 9 WEEKS: Westheimer Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 •IN J J WEEKS: Halloween weekend, Oct. 29-31 •IN 11 WEEKS: Elections, Nov. 2 BUSINESS OWNERS l 1JW•1 .. 1 frM MCh week :!.:.~ :~r:;t~t1:ln~·~i;::.~~.::~~· (bJ curr9nl d11play .,....,,IMB. (C) all Houston rczn~~Sl~!':i"~u~)(l:,:._~~~:'i!i~ organ1Ul""ll"IS .~k..t .. a.-troM Votoe d•trtbutloft polntt DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES ROOMMATE NEEDED to share nice house in Montrose area $250 + 1/3 bills. Call Alex or Don evenings or weekends. 528-6132 Architect graduate with 2 bedroom apt. to share in Montrose with some­one with similar interests. $180 + 1/2 utilities. 529-4275 Large one bedroom, hardwoods track lighting, central A&H. Mandell, Richmond area. $375+ Sid. 521- 1400 Montrosb/St. Thomas area Eff. apt Renovated. Cathedral ceilings, sky­light. Okay for busmess 1625 Rich­mond 522-6054 or 665-5207 Nice 1 bedrooms. some with private patios. $275+ Frost Bros area Sid. 521-1400 10 minutes to Montrose. Large 211 upper duplex with terrace. $450 month plus deposit. 2/1 garage apartment $350 plus deposit. Ten­nant pays gas & electnc. References required 926-3975 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Help Wanted Salespersons to sell gift items to busmesses in Montrose area Excellent commissions Call Ron. 827-1991 POLICE OfftCERS WANTED Wornen•fld~ Goodu1ary•ndbenef•t$ !~:T d':·,,:~~7·~-i:-20~. ~~ofhHo::::~~ The number one source of community news in Montrose- the Voice GAY BARS (\)HouatonT•,,.,.nG1>11d~b9f1nd1c•hon pl8Ced1nth1SO•rK10ry•ttheirrequest ::,.;~~UI -Si:JLMtt-523=3398-lr;.ent«- See our ad elsewhere this issue !~:i!:;;:.:;-m-~-----;;"1h"T.iiiU-See our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 e '8AAN -710Pac1flc -!129-9477. Oil1.1ntry See our ad elsewhere this issue Montrose Classified • BRAZOS- AlvER BOTTOM-=2400 Bmos 529-9192.country ~~IAJll PATCH-22fM W- Hoio""mbe---MS-See our ad elsewhere this issue eCHASES-1,1& R1C1imond-s~18'8 drte0 :~KEN COOP-535W8slheomer-526- e COPA 2631 Rtchmond-528-2259 disco W•lh$hOW$ See our ad elsewhere this issue CO~E-2912 s Shepherd-5!_'-~o 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment 9THE-0EEP-2212 ConvefM-521-8234 :~":.~~T oAUM -1732 WHIM•mer-m­See our ad elsewhere this issue e \OIATY SALLY'S -220 AVOOd11;._.:-529-75i5 See our ad elsewhere this issue • DOUBL~ A SALOON -5731 l<lfby-521-1'" See our ad elsewhere this issue eEiJ·. --1213 R.Cilmorid-SV-90f1 See our ad elsewhere this issue e\Eic1LE-10118en-65s-<i453 country- There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of the~e sty1es: 10tperr90u11r•ord~l5CPERALLCAPITAL WORD1t16-po•nltype, ass~""-'•llfuslog IM•ords•.nlh1SS•HOl'"•lceriter.ngon1l11>1 ::::~1~'-·~~:t~~~g:~~·~:,1:~~~r 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WOAD in 8-po1nt type, as shown here. (If using few words m this size or 1f centering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WOADS to s line) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 50¢ per regular word or 75¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, as 30C p..- regular word or 45• PER shown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORO In 8-polnt words In thl• size or If cen- :':!dw~:::'~ 1":1~~1°;;;e ~~~~~~~.~~~: terlng on a line, compute at on • tine, compute •I $1.50 •lino, $2.00 a line, using maximum using maximum 4 regular word• or 3 regular words or 2 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to• tine.) CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each word individually. You may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad. BUND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks in a row and deduct 15%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper. Include your name, address and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. Ads received by 5:30pm Tuesday will be in that week's newspaper. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. Sorry, but we cannot bill and cannot accept classifieds over the phone. • GALLEON -2303 R1chmoria-=-522.7e16 ~.~:~~E~=.t.f10NAL(G B~ :2C:..~2T STREET STATION -s11F .. ,...1ew­See our ad elsewhere this issue e HAPPYTRAILI 715fl•,,..•ew-521-2792 See our ad elsewhere this issue • HOLE HOUSE 108 Tu•m -s22-"e11e See our ad elsewhere this issue e .JR'•· 808P•c1l1C-521·2519 :2.J~:ifo~::~~~ & L YNN·s-:·a17 f11N1ew :,,~:~~~~:n~- '1012 M1l11m- ~5-2~9sa- p/10"0 Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice • KINDRED SPIRITS ·52,5- eulit.10 Speectw1y--~756prlldom•nantlyletb••n See our ad elsewhere this issue :.~MPOST -24171'1,,,..-Blvd -528-8921: 189~ • LAzyj.:31-2Tu1m 526-9343 ~8~~ ... ~~~~ = i73SWUtMm*'- .520- • ~MAR rs -1022 W•th•m•;· ~8851 See our ad elsewhere this issue Support, join your community organizations :,~~!':iZ!, SuN-534 W•theimOf-526-7519 eM1ss- CH-ARLOTTE'S--911 w Dfew-ill- 8840 counlry ~~NfROSE MINING CO -805 PWiiC-529- e N~M IEAI 2 300 Westh9omer-526-6551 See our ad elsewhere this issue =FICUU CLUB -27-01 At~nY' ope'.;;1ng See our ad elsewhere this issue e ONE ON ONE 101'1 W G-;•y 5iH:~ :.~~~~0~EPHANT 1219 leel•nd----65~ See our ad elsewhere this issue e RANCH--6620 ~ M11n-52&-8730 :~~~f~~: ~~~ .. ~~rtz;-524-6272- wrtti rea- See our ad elsewhere this issue ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations e ROCKYS--3'1flW D•!lu--52fl-8922 lesb••n :~INS-S35 Weett1e1me..--s20-"02.4.4- -iMt);in e VENTURE·N ·2923 Ml•·, •i22-oo00 ORGANIZATIONS :,~'!~I.A Chorut ~,., ol (Montrose) Church ~~~,r~i~~~~-~~~:~= 5?•M2BclubnightWed The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice ASTRO R••nbow Alh•1>ee· 524-4793 jVO.Ce & TTY) ~~:~~~ne~e;"~~·J, 1M80~~~t~hhu~~~-~~~~ 1h1ptefYiC91050amSun ~~~$~~1iWi5Workil-s29-11l13meel.e...ery ~~~ .. f~~~TE MEN Togelhflf (BWMT)--529- 1M0niro.e)-CHURCH OF CHRIST -520-K Wett­~~ er- -777-9286 wor1h1p HfYtCH 1230pm CHURCH OF CHFf1$TlAN FAITH- 413Wetth• .. r:~~-~::,~~i:Z~l~u::.~;•ng Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ~~~~~:~1~-~~o~;-c:~~~~d rueoo.,. ~!:5;~~;:rg~"'.!>~;=;•1 BiuO.A.ver eCc:iMMUNITv- CoFFEEHOUse-l>t"o,ec1 OI I/Hine 730p(nFrld~11t3"05Mutbefry ~~~~:-~~g:;··.:v~;cl~~~ 8pm2nd&.4thFr1day9 CONROE-AREA Cf1y Women~56-035.4 CR-1515 HOruNE--==22~1505 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment OIAL-•Gay·Alhellt -524·2222 pt'Ojecl ol Gay Athe11tlugueofAmetica DIANA F-6lJNOA-il0N ..::-2ioo Muon-524-5791 OIGNITY--meets it C•ttK>loC S1udefi1 Cent.,. 1703 Boltovar-520-92ti9. 52•76'4 meet•nos ~-~~y~- There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ~=·;~ ~Y:;~o:i ~~~!"'~..= 3'05f.4ulbeny FIRSTuNITARIANChorcti-5210Fanmn-5~ 1571'WOBhlPMfY•C•11 l5amSun ~r~~~~?}~, Fi.t19&0 Araa Fir-Away ~2":~3&; 1~;~~~J9~arong Experience 1GASE) • Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice GAY ARCHIVES ol fe~u pf0t9CI otlnteract ~~~~TH;J~:.;,~u~:-A~~A~=;~a Hotel.3301 Southw .. tFwy Houlton GAYHisPANtC-CAUCus- -2122 N-m•n 1112- 521-0001mee113rd Thurld•y• GAY ITAUAN-OrOup-526-.... g~~~~~g1PHvs1C1.-.NS01 Hou11of' CIO GAY POLITtCALCAUCUS (GPC-J-POB-666M ~~~~11~~w'::r.1,"eoo M••n •217 GAY PR10E-'WEEK i2-Comm•ttee-78"-86a9 Support. join your community organizations GAY SWITCHBOAR0--529-3211 Greater MOii1role eUS1NE_SS _GuiLO 1pontor ~~:~~~f~!u~;,~;~n';8~~:~~~: TraVt1ITechlr1~lagency HEPA nrUs HOTLINE-=J-,m or 09\'ld at 777- 2287 a protect of GPC't Medic•! Commll!ee ~~!ro!~~NTEAFAtTH A!l;".-nce. -729 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations HoU11on Ar9a.-GAY &l.fSBIAN ENGINEERS A Scienlists-526-7388 meata 7pm 4th Wedneadayt HOUSTON CO-MMUN1TY-cLowNS~--=B31..­HousrON oATA PAOFESSIONALS-meett 1n Eat Room. Holiday Inn Centr•I. 46'0 Sou1h Ma1n-523-fi922·mea1ing730pm2ndTvesd•y• ~TONt:WMAN R1GHTSLEAGUE:-sn: ~~~~~~fil~UB-UoMary'$ Houtlon TAVERN GUILD· rflefT'lbefl •re B•rn. 01rtyS.11y·1.Ex11e.M1ry"1.Midn•teSun vHlnc--=-3405 Mutberry__:5ig:7i)1,,.- -694-1732 Community ColleehouM 7 30pm-m1dn1ght Fn ~:;~o~1 ~u7c:;.~~a111loi~;:,"~'jJP~ar3~ Thursday1 INi"EGA1TYiHOu11on (formerly Epil«>p•t ~~~~~i~ga:-~~ ~.,°:~u.~:;1M11n- 1-NiE:AACT. educ11ion 1ubQ°roup ol l/H-lnc 3"05Mulb«"~--529-701469'·173~- The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice e KPFT- R•d•o. FM-9o-i"19loYett Btvd 526- 4000- ·w;k:le·nstem-;.yr.ctoo1hOw IOpm­mldmghtThur1 LAMBDA ALANO,;;-:=meet1 at 111 Umlln•n ~:t~ 5210 F•nnm-521-9772 meettng Fn LESBIANS i. GAY PEOPLE •n M44ic>ne-&65- 4760meet•ng7JOpm111 S.tutd•y• Lul-HERANS-CONCERNED--meett at Grace Lulheran Church. 2~15 W•ugh 521-()863. •53- 1;.::em~·~il· 3:;~~n1::~c:~:1oo~:ir~::: eran1Conc9f"nedlorG1yPeople.July29-Aug 1 METRCiP0LiTAN-c0mmun•tY Church of--lne Resurrectoon (MCCRJ· 1919 Oeca1ur-86l- =1~~.r~:fn~€°.~~~~1:~r Al1non meetmg 8pm M1.>l'I . Alcoh le• Anonym­ou1meet1ng1Spm Mon & Thun Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 MONTROSE Civic Club 1NunownJ--meet111 Bering Church. 1440 Hawthorne--522-1000 meet111g730pmlourth'.uetd~yt MONTROSE C:l1N.-C:-10.. -Weathe1mer:..S2&­~ ~u~10pm Fn 1-Sprn Sun, 6-10pm ~l~~_:~~?°NSELING C....ter-!)()()LoVtttt =1~~~~~ERS--rneatt at MCCR. ivli ~~OSE SPORTS A5SOC1AT1QN (MSA)- AUGUST 13, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 25 A Disturbed Peace In the face of death ... 1982 by Brian McNaught Last Friday, our friend Rick was told by the hospital staff that his lover, Ken, had a week, or perhaps a month, to live. Ken had Jost a good deal of weight, had persistent diarrhea, sores around his mouth, a consistently high fever and fluid in his lungs. Ken is only 27, a farm boy, who, after a year or 80 of a long'1.istance courtship, had finally moved here to set up a dream house and relationship with Rick. No sooner did he arrive, however, than Rick, seeing Ken 'scondition, insisted that he go to the hospital On Saturday, under the encouragement from people at the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, Ken had Rick moved to another hospital in town where doctors increased his chances of survival by 40 per cent. We are all maintaining a vigil now to see if Ken will make it home or whether he will be the latest victim of pneumocystic carinii pneumonia Their story is a particularly tragic one, but probably not too different from those told by the nearly 500 people who have battled the diseases dumped under the heading AIDS, Acquired lmmuno-Deficiency Syn­drome. Perhaps you have heard more about Kaposi's sarcoma. It and the pneumonia are getting a lot of press lately. One newspaper account called them unprecedented in the annals of medicine. Because so many of the victimes of AIDS have been homosexual and because 80 little is really known about the diseases, there has been consid· erable psychological turmoil in the gay male community. Rumors are flying right and left about who's got it and how they got it and how not to get it. Because the rumors are generally contradictory and because medical reports are frequently difficult to understand and digest, the problem of understanding AJDS is compounded. As I understand it, doctors don't know if AJDS is related to a virus which is passed from one prson to the other by such means as blood transfusions or sexual activity or if it results because of the presence of a variety of factors, such as genetic predisposition, a weakened system caused by use of poppers or other foreign substances, promiscuous sex, etc. It might. well be a marriage of both theories In other words, a person who has a genetic predisposition, has wea· kened his or her system with drugs or numerous previous battles with sexually transmiited diseases might be more prone to contract the virus or deveJop the cancer. The case histories of the many people who have fallen victim to AJDS vary so much that it is difficult to detennine a pattern. Gay specialists working on the problem are confounded not only by the death toll but also by the political impications of AIDS. What if, for instance, some task force commissioned by the federal government deter­mines that the disease is often pa86ed through blood transfusions and that the high number of homosexual victims suggests that gay men are more prone to be carriers? Will that result in recommendations from the medical profession that gay men not be allowed to give blood, just as persons who have recently had hepatitis are not allowed to give blood? Religious bigots are wasting no time in connecting AIDS to their theory God hates homosexuals. Think of how a general ruling on "gay blood" would fuel their political fires And what if it is strongly suggested that a lifei;t.yle of frequent sexual encounters in which the cell·rich semen of a variety of strangers enters one's system combined ¥t-ith a heavy use of poppers is a "probable cause?" Will gay people who have fought for sexual liberation be able (allowed) to tell other gay people that their lifestyles are dangerous to their health? Will they listen any more than people listen to warnings about the connec­tion between "rimming" (oral fan al &ex) and hepatifu.or betv.-een smoking and cancer? In ou~ ~ty, the people answering the rumorcontro~.1 information hot hne ~re adVJsmg_ callers u:> be aware of symptoms aSSOClated with AIDS. 'J'!:iey mclude persistent weight Jou, fever, lethargy, swollen glands and d1ar· rhea. They are also suggesting that people not be intimidated by the fear they will be diagnosed as only having the flu. It is clearly better to be safe than sorry when AJDS is concerned Research continues on ACDS but it may be a long time before we have any definitive answers. Until then, many in the gay male community feel as if they are playing Russian roulette. The gay community can help alleviate some of the tension by organizaing local efforts to address the issue The National Gay Task Force suggests a five point program which I consider comprehensive. The first. item is to work with city, st.ate and federal officials to coordinate the sources of information. It would be very helpful to a neighborhood health clinic or gay hot line, for instance, to have ready access to reports from the Center for Disease Control and data from the state's health department. Secondly, we need to educate the public and health care professionals with as much accurate information as we can secure. Free public forums, rumor control hotlines, health columns in the gay and non-gay press, radio and television reporting, if appropriately done, could do a great deal to eliminate frightening myths The gay community, especially, might have its third agenda item the need for addressing the psycho--eocial issues raised by AIDS. Gay Town Meetings, group rap sessions and gay radio dialogues which probed the psychological implications of the diseases would help counteract the per· sietent chipping away at self-esteem AIDS has generated Some groups in each city and state have the capacity to do significant work in this area if they have sufficient funding. Federal go~emment cutbacks have threatened many programs. Generally there is money available, though, and it is merely a matter of finding it and exerting pressure so t.hat the groups who need it get it Final~y, loca~ gay gro_upe need to probe the areas of risk r:eduction and prevention. If information gathered leads to clear conclus1ons, commu­nity leaders have the responsibility to communicate ihat information to th08e who count on them for guidance, even when that guidance is painful or "politically incorrect." My 8ense is that AIDS will pull us together rather than pull us apart. Already, non-gay profossionalh are looking to us for direction. AID!; is an en em~· we can chaUengt> in a mature and compauionateway.Jtcalls on us to support tho~e who wall and watch u their lovers stru~le for their liv~ and to guarantee others won 't fall prE'y to its physical or ])1'ychological effects 26 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 13, 1982 " Excuse me, but the others sent me up here to ask you not to roll around so much." Gary Larson " Somethin's in the air, Cart . .. The doc's getting that old twinkle in his eye again." Professor E. F. Gizmo and some of his many inventions Loch Ness mobs!•~ ~C:t0~~.!~~~m ·~~~~~~;' ~m9!,MM &_~hura eoten1ng1 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment ~~'.'C::.~~tt~~~~:l~~ !:;: 523-0413 eves M•IOn pl•Y Apnl 17-July 18 l:Wi~~~~·~~n~3s!A:~~~Jnu~,!~~ ~~i~~~;iii~?~:l~1~~~~ MontroMSport1TENN1$-524-2151 Montr0H Spor11 VOLLEYBALL 880-2930 :1~~c:n:;":n!~:i t~7~l~~= ~'=~ MONTROSE SYMPHONIC b9nd-meets al Ber· lngChurch.1«0H•w1home-527-9669 meet- 1ng730pmTu• ~,~si~~~.!~S~~~r'ci~.;,,'"f::,~" RecrutlOf'tal Land Fund Comm•tt• Ot"gamu­honal meet1ng II 30pm. Ju...,_~.::..'--~ OPERATioN DOCUMENTATION project of OP£_ --- ---- RECREATIONAL laod Fund Comm1tte.­pro1ec: t of Mustang Club ~~~i Univ Gay/lnb1an Support Group-524- TEiASBAv AR~ meet•n°V ~~~·~9 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice TEXAS GAY CONFERENCE IX 889-7231• con­~ r~~~~ 3-5, Agnes Arnold Hill, University TEXASGAYTASKFORCE-529-7014,522-1559 TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Foundation 1519 Muyl1nd-52&-9139 ~-cJo M1ry·1~ UNiTARIAN/UNIVERSALIST Gay C1ucut-c10 111 Un1t1ri1n Church, 5210 Fannln-520-9787 5~2mMt1ng3rdSunatternoon. WESLAYAN FELLOWSHIP-864-1891 Pul itzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice WESTHEIMEA COLONY ARTS Auoclltlon ~WNthe•fMf-521-0133 l1ll l•tv1al0et HS-PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS TheVoiced09lnotr9Commendtheollerlnglor :1'!!'' :~~•1,'::~: .. ~:,,1~ H°oo!~:,~1~:! =~zi:;.~:,/:.~::!. ~0:flfl"!~:;;'P,,,:=1~ =~ u1l.butw1U1umenoleg1I01"f1n1n1calrHpon­~ ·bl_·1ty ~ M:I~ .. ·~~ ,~~~part•• W•nl • f••I, dark ten? It's as easy as taking a pill. Safe, non-toxic 80 tablets. $29.95 ppd. Check, MC, Visa MAIL WAREHOUSE POBoxS339& (713) 523-6927 Houaton.TX77052 J_3305Yupon1u•t1.s.4) Gr•nspoinV1980 1re1 U you're .. ngle. value ;c::t!·~~'f:e •;:k ~~~;:·· left : 48-page catalog of 2500 gay/lesbian books, magazines, records, etc. $2 refundable from AOL, 4014 Santa Monica Blvd , LA, CA 90029 !~i".:~~~r:rn:1 ~:1~i~.~. :~;,3~u:rt11?.. c1•l 1nHmln•llon rt delltr9d I •m lhe n•tur•I ~:~~~~~=~'1!Ti1~~;~9~8.1 ~A~ A~n1ii"1heprrvacio11Qu-;:-;;o;M,s20C-.tt V•n.493-"850before11pm loVEASFORA T LEAST e vEARS? AeM•rctie"7 Un1ver••tyo!Hou•1onGr•dU9leSchoolo!Soc1•I =~==:=~;:~,~~==::~ 1Y1•1I COMPLETELY CONFIDENTIAL AN~ ANONYMOUS C•ll Tony C•rrotl •I 52HI051 WITCHCRAFT, TAROT. MEDITA­TION instruction th rough classes, cassettes, correspondence. Moon­nse, POB 20007, Houston, TX 77225 (713) 666-4878 Support, join your community organizations BODY MASSAGE Your place or mine. Afternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations Relax and enjoy the BodyWorks massage Gift certificates. Call Bill, 526-2470 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS ••ox OFFICE 1625 Rienmond--522-1625 See our ad elsewhere this issue ::;~u~1~ousroN e11hs-22o5 F1nn1n.:.-55·s.­See our ad elsewhere this issue The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice :t~~~~~7~u~RrER Th llet'-3201 Lou ·~ •MlDTOWNE SPA :3100 Fannin- ~22-2379 See our ad elsewhere this issue RESTAURANTS •BAJA·s -402LO¥ett- 527-9866 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~3~~A5SERIE T00~~132f" Wetthe•mer.:_:526-. eCHAPUl lAPEC· 813 R~mond~522-2365 ~~CATUR CAFE- ·708 W A!1bern1- -528· ~;:ANKIE'I Montrote II Westheuner- -529- See our ad elsewhere this issue •GREEK 1-~~No .. 'J02TUam--52i-7CWO Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 :.!T!~~!:2~~65~1ndw1ch Shop-1536 See our ad elsewhere this issue ::'.~h!~,'~.·~~2~opl•n Cu111ne-ill See our ad elsewhere this issue • HONG THONG- ·424 wn1n911Mf.· -528-8275 e HOusfi)F PIES-3112 K1rb;.:....52i"3a1e -- :,:,~:.':~!~~:7~ c1ub R91t.ur;ni=243 See our ad elsewhere this issue • JAOE DRAGON- 224 wn1h •• m;;:s26-268J :2~~~EL0:S Ice Cremm::-;521 weii1-tl;;;;;;;: Next week in the Voice: An exclusive interview with Mayor Whitmire e9·ER$-1JO'Wnthe1m« e OMAR$- «>8 L.Ov•tt 514-- ~9 •RASCALS 2702Kttby -524-8272 Sae our ad elsewhere this issue eAAUL S BRASS RUBBING el• W Allbama-~7 'Montrose live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment e SPUO·U-LlKE ·416 WH!heimer--520--0554 •STAR PIZZA -2111 Norfolk-_:-523-0800 - See our ad elsewhere this issue •STEAK 'N' EGG--4231 Mont.rose--S2&-:-e,-35 ~2~M· Seo11ee Shop-:._l525-Wff1he1iMr.:.:m- •WINE SELLE-A- 1408 W•t~•mer---52&:"3878 SERVICES Attorney at L•w General practice. John P. Barnich, 523-5006. Evenings 528-5566 LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. Nonello Bruckner, P1ychologl1t, 523-2180. ~:7~E Financial Group--3Jo -F•1tv1ew-524· See our ad elsewhere this issue BAS( Ae-•lty- :l:i!Fa11 .... •ew 524·1871 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~itZJf:~.t:~:·":'. ::~~:' See our ad elsewhere this issue PAUL FRATt:ANALI. 0 0 S-6Chelaea Plac.- 523-7'32 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~IRCRAn h•ir ciore-21l0l.ex1ng1on-52i­See our ed elsewhere this issue ~!~~.~~~~~ 7~;or r•placement 710-A See our ed elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice :~~~!~~20-~~:7sr HOUSE IOdging-106 HOUSTON TAAVt:L cOnluUanta-:-821-2!77 See our ed elsewhere this issue :,~~;e~m~~~~A,9~2eauty School -327 ~~~ES 0 KRISTIAN PhD. hypnolog1st- -977- See our ed elsewhere thts issue •KWIK-KALL Ma•l Bolea-3317 MQfltrOW- 522-1896 ;!__~~OS Heir OMlgn- iii& w .. ,,,.. _ :4~0NEL Hair O..ig" 3220 Yoakum--526- :~~;2ROSE HAIR Ol.tgn· ·4317 MNllrOM-pUlilzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice :7~:'NTROSE TRAV!L -2506 Ralph- 52, See our ad elsewhere this issue ~:~~~.~~:O~-O~~~:•P•Pet"-3317 MOil- PATRICIA ANNE O'KAHE, 11torney- .332J Yoakum- 526-7911 See our ad elsewhere this issue e PRiVAfE POSTAL SYSTEMS mail boJCes- 1..!..l~~!_ll~mer-529-30~ __ __ ~~~~~O, lockam•lh-1620 Com~Mllh- ~u~IL?;"~lfL h•ir care- 1826 Cherry• Support, join your community organizations ~~7!DY PAINTING -5-400 8 1a.ir• Blvd -fle7· See our ad elsewhere this issue ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ~~VEL U:CHlravelaQency--5719K~rby--522- See our ad elsewhere this issue ::~~~::M~~~:7AIOAI 1727 See our ad elsewhere this issue w0R0CAAF-ftypeH1tino- 522-•251 SHOPS & STORES ~~~i~A·f GUTTERS gofts-4325 Montrose­:~~~~ R0ALlEf'll FIOnal ,a..ewestheln"ler- The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice ~'{~tC ISLE pet sttoP· 2011 swFwy •ASYLUM Adult Bo0k1tore-12o1 R~Chmorid •B-ALL PARK-AdUli-80ok1tore-183o_w_ Ala­b•~•- - - - •BASIC BROTHERS used clottuno~ 1220 Westhe•mer-522-1626 eTHE BED HOUSE ~115 NortOlk-523-8278 See our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ·~u~ IRIS 3611 s· Sheptiercl-523-1827 THE BLUE IRIS FLORIST, 3618 S. SHEPHERD, 523- 1827 ee00M TOWN eLooMS t1ow.,..-J210 s­Sn. pherd- 5ztr8110 ~~:,~g~-~·w.:~~~s·;r.:cJ Fin• eCARG~Ho-uSe-Tao2 Pirk--=-s29::o334" ~S~~NE OANCEWEAR~47CM Monlron--522- :.~~~:;~-~5-~;s'f111iary wear 5366 'Montrose live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment =ER'S° Adult N~ 2•0 WHU .. •tn•--528-­eOOuBRA\ tA JONES. tM Manhole Cioth1ng ... 1983W Gr•y-522·1080 ~WNeEl.TRealrds-2111R~CnmOnd:_-m:: • DRAMATIKA o•tts-3224 Voakum--529-5457 e FACE~11·=-·141iWfflh••m•- 521'_1~_1_3~ There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ~m~!~~~~~~f1~ P•·"', trim.no :;~~DAY s F1ori1t- -1j:38- Westh••m•r-524· OITA'S J9we1ry-eei>-3579 See our ad elsewhere this issue eK1R-eY Ne..st8nd.:J'115·K~;by-520::o246- ;_:~~'!~zt-~li.Rv lndl.o.n-121i Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice :Z~~·lea1hef .GC)t)61 -91-2 w .. 1-h.mer-­~~ i~!n.~~~E resale -boul.qu9-1'06 =~-1503Ya~-­~~ Tl.VSCOnatMAAON-1300W.t- See our ad elsewhere this issue • PLANT HOUSE--112 westhe•mer-526-7795 .-0-1-~~~0!~~-;--~~-527~4- Support, join your community organizations :2~~~0 RACK mus;c-3108 S. Shephefd­~~ uaH CUT 1ewe1-;v=sz0wt.1~1~sro= See our ad elsewhere this issue : 2= WAREH.OUSE-2024 w .. 1he•m« :!~~OCKER- c6olhmg- .3-11 Wfiih..­e STUDZA~l32w Alabama eTEXASCA-AAVAN&AnNd•..oFio-era-2115 [)unlavy-520-7019 :~,~~='~ETA c10ih1;;g=1-e2J eTOTAL~TY £~E= 1121 w- or._~--52M19Ci ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ::ei:Es CHIC eye.,.,ur-520 Westhe•mer--528= e TREYMANgifta-..07 W•llh•11T1W-523-022i ;~~,::: ~"=~2~TW~~~ The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice ew1LOE I STEtN bOC ~- W•thet­mu -529-7014 g1y AUGUST 13, 1ga2 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 ByTycho Fortunes For Friday evemng. August 13. through Friday evening. Augu.st 20 1982 The Moon •s m GEMINI as the weekend opens. enters CANCER at 1:41 a.m Sunday morn mg. LEO at 2:41 a.m. Tuesday morning and VIRGO at 3:40 a.m next Thursday morning ARIES-Funny how thei;:e things boomerang. Last week's need for con· trol turns around to become this wttk's discovery of someone who wants to control you. A new love might enter the picture, bringing exotic and delicious gifts. TAURUS-Think about it! You can't help but be successful at what you really put your mind to. \\'hat concerns you right now is self-respect and respectability. When you come on to someone, is all you're asking for "a little respect?" GEMINI-Let the moon be your guide this week. Take chances, trust your hunches, follow that dream! Enjoy the release that comes from laughter or tears. A time for partner hips to be fruitful. Can you taste it? CANCER-Jn )'OUr sign thu~ u·ttk: Venus (leal-•es Saturday morningJ. You'll feel needed, loved, cherished. You'll feel liken umber one, king of the mountain. top of the heap. This could lead to self-centerednt>Sb. couldn 'tit'> Not if you return a11 those feelings to the right person. LEO-Jn your sign this u:eek: Venus (tntus Saturday morning) and the Sun. Last week's feelings of unreality and haunting dreams have shar­pened into a keen sense of reality and how to make the dreams work. Confusion's out, clarity's in. A new version of your old self is making you happy and attractive. VIRGO-Jn your sign this u:eek.- Mercury. You're able to take some very original ideas and use them wisely. Things that were hidden come to light. Old love and a new venture seem to go hand in hand this week. Pillow talk can be profitable. LIBRA-In your sign thls u:eek: Saturn and Pluto. What happens when you combine passion with sincerity? You'll find out soon enough, since you'll be giving and taking plenty of each~ It could tum out to be bigger than both of you SCORPIO-Jn your sign this u:eek: Mars and Jupiter. You ·re an adven· turer, an explorer, a searcher after truth. You're looking for something more than action. You want to know where you are, who you are. and what it's all about. Use those Scorpio talents! Look behind the scenes. SAGITTARIUS-Jn your Blgn this u:eek: Uranus and NeptuM. The things that ordinarily get you down don't phase you at all this week There's an ease about your life, a natural flow of events that puts things in the proper perspective. You're enjoying all the games, of any kind. CAPRICORN-This week, you're the sleuth, looking for clues and rea­sons. Your mystery could lead you to some interesting and bizarre people and places. Things do get complicated sometimes, don't they? AQUARIUS-Work takes on new meaning and excitement this week. Since you've got the energy and drive, you can accomplish something important in that area. Meanwhile, back in the boudoir, a new friend could mean a Jot of fun in off hours PISCES-Aren't you getting friction burns yet? Tycho just keeps seeing sex, sex, sex in your stars, with no end-make that letup-in sight. It looks like things may take a more romantic turn this week. though. Keep, uh, plugging away •t1112STONEWAl;.FEATlJRESSVNOICATE Last Word Mayor surprises us By Henry McClurg I told Ed, "The Mayor will give us a private interview. All you have to do is ask through official channels." Ed said, "I don't think so. She'll probably want to con­tinue to maintain her distance from the press-and espe­cially from the gay press." "Oh no Ed. She'll talk to us .... I agree thatyou'regoing to have to ask her aide maybe four times before they stop ignoring you and are finally forced to grant the interview­but she'll eventually talk to us. After all, we are a ligitimate newspaper serving an iden­tifiable community. And we're her neighborhood newspaper-since she lives in Montrose." "Well, alright Henry. I'll ask for an interview. But I bet we get a run-around," said Ed Martinez, reporter for the VOICE. Folks, Ed and I were both wrong. We got the interview promptly after only one request. And it appears in next week's VOICE. But I warn you. This is not a folksy "How do you like your job so far"-type interview. See you next week.
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