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Montrose Voice, No. 281, March 14, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 281, March 14, 1986 - File 001. 1986-03-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5421/show/5392.

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(1986-03-14). Montrose Voice, No. 281, March 14, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5421/show/5392

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 281, March 14, 1986 - File 001, 1986-03-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5421/show/5392.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 281, March 14, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 14, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript mo11lrose VOICE 'The Newspaper of Montrose" Friday. March 14. 1986 Issue 281 (713) 529-8490 Who Is Gary Larson Find out, inside Marion Pantzer Shot During Robbery Attempt Montrose Community Mourns Loss of Club Owner By Connie Woods Muntrmw \.'oice Staff Reporter "It's a sad dny in our community," said Marian C'olf'man regarding the murder of "Just'' Marinn and Lynn's owner Marion Pantzer ''Marion was an inRtitution. She pro­vided a space for us when no one else would. And I was a partofthatspact>," i:;he added. Marion Elizabeth Pantzer was gunned down in hn bar at 12:[-)() a.m. Tuesday as she stood talking with friends at the 903 Richmond locntion. According to the police rPport, a prrimn with a Mki mask on his face entered the front door of tht• duh and waved a gun nt tht• hnrtt·nder PE>te Flores Pantier had alwavs warned her t-mployees not to resist a· robber. Although the masked ma·n said nothing, Florei:i went to the cash register to remove the cash. The suspect then walked to the end of the bar where Pantzer was standing and shot her an unknown number of times, accord­ing to investigators. "Pelt! said he heard two shots," Ricci Cortf.:'l. bar manager said. Cortez also said ohe thought that Pantzer pulled her KUn to protect Flore11. Her gun was found near her body. Police said the BUSJ>l'<.'l left the bar through the front door and fled to a car where a driver was waiting and sped away. The car was described a~ a 19t'O or I9Al four-door Toyota. "'The entire co~munity feels the 1068 of Marion," Coleman., owner ot Kindred Spirts and the House of Coleman said . .. She made so manv contributions. She was there when a l~t of us needed her­when no was else was there. "One Chri~tmas the woman I wais ·with had committed suicide. Marion invited me over for Christmas. I 1A·iH never forget it," Colt·man added. 'It is such o shock and !oss to everyone," Cine of Panuer's employttR said. "'We could always depend on her and so could her customers." Pantzcr had owned and operated "Ju•t" Marion and Lynn's for almost 14 years. The bar, according to many of her custo­mers, had been a cornerstone of the com­munity A veteran of Wc1rld War II, Pantzer served in the United States Army WAC, AAF, WA AC. She was employed for years b' the President First Lady Health Club i~ the executive offices. \\'hen she moved to Houston, she worked for the Harris County Child Welfare Ser,'i.ce. Aft.er retiring from the welfare service, she opened her club on Converse where it remained until Jast fall when she relocated to the Richmond address. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 Ob God, she's back again/ Ted Swindley, Artistic Director The outrageously hilarious, scathingly funny lesson of a lifetime! SISTER MARY IGNATIUS EXPLAINS IT AIJ~ FOR YOU Featuring jean Proctor as Sister Mary by Christopher Durang Late Night Performances Friday & Saturday, llpm Sunday, 8pm All performances - $8. Charge tickets to: MasterCard, VISA or American Express GROUP RATES AVAIIABLE Tickets also available at Showtix, in Tranquility Park Co-presented with The Montrose Voice FOR TICKETS CALL 5 2 -S TA G E 3201 Allen Parkway at Rosine MARCH 14 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 Bar Owners Tell of Rudeness by Agents Alcohol Regulatory Agency Speaks Before HOBO By Connie Woods Montrosr Voice staff reporter Members of the Houston Organization of Bar Owners had the opportunity Wednes· day at its regular monthly meeting to ask queRtions and get answers from a repre­st> ntative of the Texas Alcohol and Bever· age Commil:ision. The gay bar owner's grdup, known by the initials HOBO, held its March meeting at the Bra1.0s River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. Gene Thomas, an administrator with TABC, took questions from the group con­cerning policies and problems the bar owners have been having with the law t>nforc(•ment agencies in Houston. One of the issues discussed concerned problems with law enforcement agents comin.c to the bars during peak hours to check for lirenses. "Why is it they come during our peak times when we have a lot of customers in the bar? Couldn't they check for licenses during the day," Alan Pierce, HOBO president, asked. Thomas pointed out that officers come during peak hours to see that the laws are being kept. "Violations occur when people montrose VOICE ANO TEX~,•STAR MONTROSE. TEXAS Populat>un lest 1985) 32.000 Cenl&.la lrlk:tl 401 01. 401 02. 402 01 402 02. 405 02. 4-03 •r'ld 404 01 Zip codes froughlrJ 7700i>, 77019 rporto0nJ. 77088 Bounded tr0U9hlr' S~d Or llllfHI). Allen P1rklllfar fnorthl Main SI (HSI) us 59 llOlllh) uhtude IMonlrOM Blvd •I W1t•lne1rner Rd) 29"44 13 N long•htde W22'50''W Al!ltude 40' ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR MONTROSE 0eo"geG• .. nlaa Hou.tonC1ryCOll'Xtl(ditt Cl D01 Bafbr r7'J/ m.9JJ Elfrenc:olee Hem1COun1yC~rrpe11/ 1001 P ..... rOtl 11131221-fllll W•llet' Rankin Constllble (pel !) n S.nJacmto. f1'31n1-5'00 DelMa Oar'I Tl!l~n Hou• ol fl4o•-nt1!•v• I ~ 17) 1911 SW fwy 11'31510·Ml68 CraigW11ah•"OlOn Te•119enllt1tfd111 131 T.123Cat"""-f113!~f3'3 M•ll•ey nd us ~ ot Reo•-U1h- d1SI 18) 919 Smith •820. flt.1} 1:Jg-r.JJ9 The Newspaper ol Montrose Established 1980 OUR 28tst ISSUE, MARCH 14. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 OISTRIBUTION 10 500 cop1ea week1r In Houston lhrough 140 '""!Of d11t1100toon points 1n tne Mon1roH. the Village. the Heights Nl•mared pau·CNl rata lactor 28 u11mat.O reMJersh•p ~. •OO wtHkly 17!i cop,.. weekly etsewtlere fff1m•tedpal-011t1le fac1or2.5 estrmated reader•h•p f40 wMk/y TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (GUARANTEED) 10.1175 cop1n weekly rota/ estimated reedersh1p 29.840 wHkly Contents copyright 1986 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg. publ13~r·ed•tor Linda Wych&man.ghl" edilor Conme Woocls..news David Roumlort.Pf"odUCflorl Scott Cutsinger, 8111 O'Rourkareviews Steve Warren.nat•OIW coue~1 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere Te>eas (800} 222·1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere U S {800) 225-0227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulhollandied.,.ms•ng d1rec101 Kuen MyrOW'e«ount eHcu1"'e Founding Mem~r• Greeler MontrOH Bu11neu Guild. Gay and L•t>tan p, ... Anoc:1ahon "-• Service Pacific News Service POSTMASTER Senct MtdreN corre<:hOt\I 10 408 Avondllle Houlton. n: 77006-30211 SUbaC#lpllOtl rare In US 1t1 aHIMI enrelope $49 per year (52 , -.U..J. S29pera1• month• 1a&iuu.1.orS1 25perweek ci.u tha,, 26 -.U..) Back lttuea $2 00 HCh Nation.I advenlling f8/HffMlt•twe Joe DtSabalo. R~I Mtlrk•t•ng. eel 8th Avenu.. ~ YM 10011. (212) 242·8863 Ad¥#1111ng deM/liM Wed~. 5 30J>m. fol' iuue releeMd Frlde)teYWllng NotK:e to MIVwfiHfa loc-•l~1a1ng rateachedui. ~A •..•.e.f lect•wiOci 12. lt14.•nc1Elghl-Awlllbe*'111C11"'8Jan 3, ~""''"' TheMontroaevo.ceoo.not-r~ .. blhly lof ~lfl'lg C1-lfN ReldefW ahou'd D"• !he ~to •ny deceptwe .tYetliaing are there-during peak hours," Thomas told the group. Thomas said his office has received 600 complaints since Jan. 1. The majority of the complaints concern selling liquor to minors and drunks as well as complaints of prostitution. Pierce pointed out to Thomas that the bar owners are in the middle. Citing sev· era) events whi<'h have occurred in bars recently where officers arre8ted a custo­mer after entering the bar already intoxi· cated, Tom Corrigan of the Bayou Landing asked for an explanation. "Why did the police wait until the per· son entered my bar to arrest him?" Corri· gen asked. ThomaR replied, "They wanted to see what the bartender would do." The group voiced other remarks over agents' rudeness to the bar owners. Tho­mas pointed out that the TABC is paid through the monies from the bars. "Agents are risking their jobs if they are rude with gay bars. I would think they would be on their best behavior," he told the owners. After Thomas finished answering ques­tions, Pirrce brought up the seriousness of robberies in the Montrose area. "SevPral T STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS1KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON FRI. 8:30AM 5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MON., WED., FRI. EVENINGS AND SATIJRDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston, TX 77fll7 621·7771 lll Z of you have been robbed recently And now we have a death." he told the group referring to Tuesd8y morning's murder of Marion Pantzer, owner of "Just" Marion and Lynn's. The group discussed ways of discourag­ing robbers from "hitting the bars late at night." Jay Allen, owner of the Galleon on Richmond, suggested the use of video cameras behind the bar Pierce also suggested to the group that a reward be established for the the Marion Pantzer case. He proposed a$.~ reward and said that several people had already committed to contributions. Pierce appointed u committee to determine how the rewLi.rd and contributions should be hannled AIDS Virus Found in Women's Fluid In the continuing search to determine how the AIDS virus is spread from one individ· ual to another. researchers now say they have identified the virus for the first time in women's genital secretions. In separate reports published in the latest issue of the British journal Lancet, researchers from San Francisco and Bos­ton report finding the AIDS virus in the secretions of eight women. While this does not mean the virus can be transmitted from women to men during sexual inter­course, the researchers suggest casual sex and multiple sex partners be avoided. To better sen!e your needs .. . Tom Audette, direct.or of the Montrose Clinic, said the findings are "not a great revelation," and that isolating the AIDS virus in women's secretions had always been considered possible. While researchers say the likelihood of a man contracting AIDS from a woman is probably slight. George Budd, administra­tive assistant of the KS1 AIDS Founda­tion, says heterotiexual men and women need to "play safe." He added that although the risk of lesbians contracting AIOS is low, "They should also begin to look toward safe "ex ." TEXAS STATE OPTICAL announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 University 528-1589 Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-6:30 p .m. Cl<>SM Monday --.... TSO-South Main 4414 S. Main 523-5109 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Saturday 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 Victim of Slow Business Houston Guest House Shuts the Doors By Pete Diamond Montro&e Voice Staff Reporter Despite some sunny predictions for the Montrose economy, the Houston Guest House has fallen victim to the economy's darker side. Calling the two hou~es located al 104 and 106 Avondale "a tre­mendous financial burden," a spokesman for the owner said the decision to clORe the Guest Hou:-;e was made this past weekend after a great deal of cons1dt>ration. '"The Guest House wa~ a significant drain in this economy. It wa.ti ridiculous to continue pouring money into it," said the spokesman, who asked not to be identi­fied. '"The downturn in the Houston econ­omy has affected everybody. It's cheaper to close down the Guest House than con­tinue to operate at a negative ca.sh flow-" The Guest House had been operating at an occupancy rate of25-30 percent. but60 percent wru; needed to break even for cov­ering "tremendously high·' utilities. staff salaries and mortagage payments, he said. The decision to close the Guest House was not made on the spur of the moment. the spokesman Raid. He added that up until the past few weeks. renovations and other improvements were being made on the houses. The cloamg of the Guest Hou~e was especially a shock for a Toronto man who arrived on Monday to see the furniture being moved out of the houses. David Hull said he left the cold and snow ofToronto to spend two weeks in Houston at the Guest House, He added that his reservation had been confirmed the day before he left for Houston. but when he arrived he found a note stating that "due to circumstances beyond our control. the Houston Guest House is closing-" "It's really a dissappointment. It always made my trip to Houston," said Hull. who had b<>en coming to the Gueal House for the past five years. The Guest House spokesman expre&Red regret.a about closing the houses, but said the Po88ibility exists that the Guest House Dul' to mounting financzal woes, the gates to the Houston Guest House complex were closed last Friday fConnie Wood.o; photo) may reopen if the Houston economy picks None of the Guest House's three staff up in the near future. In the meantime. the members could be reached for comment. two houses will be offered for sale. Fundraiser Held for 21.06 Fight Several leadns in the fight to repeal Texas Pfnal Code 21.06 were in Houston last Fri.day. March 7, t:D raise funds for legal expenses. From left to right are, Tom Co/.eman. rxecutwe director of the Texas Human Rights Foundation; Gene Harrington. 21.08 Gulf Coast coordinator; Don Bakrr. plaintiff, and Barbara Jane Anderson, 21.06 atate coordinator fPete Diamond ohotoJ By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter The Texas law that makes sexual activity between two consenting adults illegal­often referred to as 21.06-hae far· reaching effects that deny basic human right.a, according to speakers at a Houston fundraising reception Friday. March 7, at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel, held in sup­port of repealing the law Don Baker of Dallas, who seven years ago filed a lawsuit to challenge the sta lute's constitutionality, called it a threat to members of Texas' gay communities "Each day it is on the books it does a little bit more hurt to you and me," Baker said. "It denies you and me the most basic human rightR-to affirm ourselves." Although 21 .06 was ruled unconstitu­tional m 19ii2, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals tn New Orleans overturned that ruling Aug. 26, 198.5, recriminalizing gay men and lesbians in Texas. Individuals workmg to repeal the law, such as Har· bara Jane Ander~on, 21.06 state coordina­tor, say the law affects everyone in the gay community. Anderson says that under the law gay men are not the only people who are crimi­nals in TexaR. She also says the term .. sod omy law," as 21.06 is sometimes referred to, i!i misleading. As long as 21.06 iM upheld by the courts, gay men and lt'llbi­ans can more easily be harasRed in ban and other mef>ting places, and be denied freedom of assembly, employment and businetts and professional licenses. The law also can be used in custody suite to take a child away from a gay or le.bian parent, Anderson says, even if that parent happens lo be the better parent for the child. Following what he calli; a low point in the battle to strike 2L06 from stale law books, Texas Human Rights Foundation executive director Tom Coleman says a definite comeback is now being made toward gaining support for repeal of the statute. For example, one positive step for ward Coleman mentioned, is that Texas Attorney General James Mattox has expressed that the 1982 ruling on 21.06 should not have been appealed. Coleman stTP.ssed, however, that fight ing 21.06 is, and will continue to be. an expensive battle, and called for the help of gay community, whether it be in the form of voluntttr time or monetary donations. H• added, "Whatever we are able to do. nobody will be ahle lo look back and say we didn't do our best" GPC is Moving its Headquarters By Connie Woods Montrosr Voice Staff Rrporter Annise Parker, Gay Political Caucus pres· ident, announced on Thursday, March 13, that the organization would be moving its headquarters to 900 Lovet~ Suite 101, this weekend. The GPC will be moving its meeting place from the Dignity Center on Fannin. The first announcement that they were moving was made at the Wednesday night, March 5, regular meeting. Aecording to Parker, the Dignity Center 1s inadequate for the caucus' A needs. "We (were) looking for a new location for our offiee as well as for a meeting place~" Parker explained. "Dignity Center has bet.·n a good place for us in the paf!t, but we must try to find new facilitieH," she said Wedn~day, prior to the announcement that the Lovett Blvd. location had been secured. Gearing up for the elections, the caucus unnouneed that it had begun its screening of political candidates seeking the GPC endorsement. The screenings will con­tinue through the end of March. The caucus also discussed its upcoming fundraising events. The Pet-o-Rama will be held at Cherry­hust Park, Easter Sunday, Mareh :JO. Parker also encouraged memberH to attend the fundrai1:1ing event this Sunday, March 16, at Kindred Spirits featuring Romanovsky and PhillipK with Rawslyn Ruffin, a HouHton singer. The event beg­ins at 7;30 p.m. with a $10 charge and sponsor seating for $25. The caucus voted to hold its Community Awards Dinner, Saturday, June 21 , in C'elebration of Gay Pride Week. The dinner had previously been scheduled for the fol­lowing Friday night but was in conflict with an activity planned by The Gay & Lesbian Hispanic Unidos. Remington Place Apartments ••special** 1 Month Free Rent 1 Bedrooms $265 & up $100 Deposit 2 Bedrooms $290 & up $150 Deposit 4 Pools, Hardwood Floors, Distinctive Floor Plans, Convenient Location Call Teresa or Pam 965-0589 2210 Mid Lane (Inside 610 Loop, near Galleria) Certified PLUMBING Fast, Fair, Friendly Your Neighborhood Plumber Licensed and Insured MARCH 14, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Looking for ROMANCE? You've found it! There are an estimated 250,000 gay MEN AND WOMEN in the Houston area. and yet many cannot seem to meet the right person' If you are unattached and over 19 years old and would like a civilized alternative to singles bars. welcome to Lambda's Unlimited Dating Service! As close as your mail box, Lambda will let you enjoy single life the way it should been1oyed. with ready access to an almost unlimited supply of interesting dates Lambda's members are gays that are looking for an interesting and fun way to meet successful gays like you. With an effective, computerized method, you can meet gay partners for dates, friendship or life-long relationships that are fun and safe' This service is exciting because it enables you to meet gay people who fit your preferences for age, race. residence, personality and lifestyle. Even before you meet, you and your computer­ized match have a lot in common. Many find it uncanny the way their dates match their personal­ities and tastes. Membership J1.ist fill out this form and mail 1t together with the low $35.00 pr aces.sing fee, and. you shall receive a mmi~um of five dates This membership includes your name listed 1n the computer for an entire year, during which other new members may be matched to you and receive your contact information on their lists of matches. If in the event you meet someone and no longer would like your name to be matched with others. please contact us. If you are not satisfied. we will make a prompt, full refund of your$35.00 membership feo. Instructions Please fill out the form as completely as you can The Irv th and accuracy of your answers are crucial in receiving r >mpetible dates. Answer all questions directly on the form. Fill m the blanks tor questions 1·4 Answer the remaining questions by check mg the description of your choice. Put more then one mark when you Jee! it is necessary When you complete the questionnaire go back and put a star (*) next to the five qualities you feel are the most 1mportant. A. All Information on every member 11 held In lhe 1trlc1est of confidence. Please print clearly. Name Address Ctty Phone State Zip By signing this. I agree that Lambda's Unlimited Dating Service will not be held liable for any behavior of the people I meet through its services Signature Date 1. Your age 2. Occupation 3. Your Height 4 Weight _ 5. Your Sex M Your Race· Data of Birth White Black Hispanic Other 7. Do you date members of other races: Yes Seldom Never_ 8. Your political stand Liberal Conservative None 9. Your po11tical 1nrerest. Active Moderately active Do not care 10. Your birthplace US/Canada Asia Europe Lahn America Afr1ca Other WAd:J 11. How much formal education have you had? Some high school __ High school grad Some college _ College grad Some grad. school Advanced degree 12. How intel/Jgent do you consider yourself? Exceptionally bright _ Above average About average __ Below average 13. What yearly income do you consider adequate? $8.000 or less _ $9,000 to $14.000 _ $15,000 to $19.000 _ $20,000 to $29,000 $30,000 to $49,000 ~ More than $50,000 Does not matter 14. Which Houston area would you prefer to have your match live m? Montrose/Heights Inner Loop _North Houston _ South Houston - East Houston _ West Houston B. 1 Which activities/social do you enjoy? Biking Driving Sailing Bicycling Dancmg Studying Talking Listening to music Competing in sports Partying Walking Working Eating Creating Art Organizing People Traveling Shopping Fixing things Attending meet1ngs Entertaining Horseback nd1ng Camping Tennis Card playing Dnnkmg Volunteer work Jogging __ Cooking Gambling Rock Concerts Softball _ Computers _ Seeing sports events Singing Going to movies Dining out Aerobics Electronics Golf 2. Which do you consider yourself" Non·smoker _ Non·drmker Light smoker Light drmker _ Heavy somker Heavy drinker Occasionally experiment with drugs Never use drugs Smoke pot Use inhalants Heavy drug user 3. What kmds of parties do you enjoy? Loud & 1vety All Quiet & d1gntfied None 4 What goals are most important to you? Wealth Serenity Populanty Knowledge Power Respectability 5. Which would best describe your social attire'> Jeans/Casuat Preppy1Forma1 Western Drag Leather Transvestite 6. Where do you en1oy gomg on dates? Movies Weekend trips _ Driving around Outdoor activities Museums Sports events Clubs Dinner Concerts & plays Dancing Each other's homes 7 Which of the following words best describe you? Romantic _ Sociable Lazy Moody Tough _ Sexy Witty Tidy _ WetHnformed Dominant_ Anxious Reserved Emotional Old·fashioned Possessive _ Demanding Healthy Quiet Aggressive Shy _ Patient Talkatlve Affectionate Tolerant _ Athletic Opt1mistimistic Curious Self-reliant Passive 8. Which of these qualities do you value most in a date? Looks_ Build_ Intelligence __ Patience Honesty Ambition _ Loyalty_ Oaring _ Manners Passion Money Strength _ Punctuality Decisiveness Kindness _ Sophistication __ Self-assurance _ Sense of humor Understanding _ Mystery Excitement -· Virtue - 9. Which applies to your charactensticfs) most? Very masculine __ Somewhat feminine Fairly masculine Very feminine Butch 10 What type of people are you most comfortable With? Outdoor types . _ Cultured __ Working people Artists Average folks Intellectuals Professionals 11 What typo(s) of books do you read? Science fiction Classics Humor Non·flction Poetry Novels Texts Mystenes Fiction 12. What type(s, of music do you en1oy? Rock Jazz New Wave Disco Classical Country Western Reggae Light classics Religious Folk C. 1 What 1S your current mar•tal status? Never marned _ Divorced Widowed 2. Do you have dependent children? No Yes (living elsewhere) Yes (l1vmg with me) 3. Do you Ilka children? Yes Sometimes No 4. Are you considered attractive? Yes. very _Usually Sometimes No 5. Do you consider yourself? Stnctly gay Bisexual 6. How often do you date? Almost every mghl ... _. A few times a week Once a week Irregularly 7 How would you descnbe your past dating relationships? Meaningful_ Comfortable _Happy _Intense - Long-lived _Superficial Interesting_ Stormy - Platonic _ No patterri _ 8. What would our ideal future dating relationship be? Casual Considerate _ Physical Platonic Intimate Sensible Exclusive ntense 9. What age group do you usualfy date' ,t vanes A lot younger Somewhat younger My own A ot older Somewhat older 10. What type of facial and body IJair do you tmd desirable? Smooth hairless face Clean shaven Mustache Beard_ Hairy legs Hairy urderarms Hairless body Very l'\a1ry 11. Check the following miscellaneous body descnpt1on that you find deslfable m a date Small to average body b1..1ld Average to large body build Very large endowment Circumcised Nor c rcumc1sed 13. Check the lotlowmg 'hat best descr1bes you. Smooth hairtess face Clean shaven Mustact-e Beard Hairy legs Hauy arms _ Hairless body Very hairy Small to average bOdy build Circumcised Average to large body build Non-circumcised Very large endowment 14. What are your tavonte bedtime ac11v1t1es'> Cuddlmg/carcssing Phone sex _ Safe sex• French active French passive _Greek active Greek passive Expenmentat kmky Now that you have finished the questionnaire, go back and put a star(*) next to the quaht1es that you feel are the most important. D. Tell a friend about ... ambda's Unlimited Dating Service and you can receive 112 pnce on your next submittal for five names! This Is how It works All you need to do is have your friend mail in h1s1her application with your name filled in the reference area. How drC you hear about Lambda's Unlimited Dating Service? Gay community publication (specify) Friend (name) _ ----­Club {specify) _ Other ···Please make make a donation to help our friends m our community. You may donate to one or both of the follow­ing organizations. You may include your donation in the same check or make your check payable to the or~an1za­t1on of your choice Please specify which organization and the amount of your donation KS/AIDS Foundation. or F;ght Against 21.06 Please send completed form with $35 00 (check or money order) to: Lambda's Unlimited Dating Service P.O. Box 7418 Houston, Texas 77248-7418 (713) 496-3371 6 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson •1 t•NIVf"TltSAL PAE' SYNOtCATE "Eddie! I've told you o hundred times ne"9f to run w1th that through the house!" "OK, guys, lefs move In on those three heifers In the CO<nef. - Bob, you take the 'Triple R.' Dale, you take the 'Circle L.' and I'll take the 'Lazy Q.' • Custer's last view. The livestock would gather every morning, hoping tor one at Farmer Dan's popular "airplane" rides. Fortunes Taurus Sees Light at End of the Tunnel By Mark Orion For fflday. March 14. through Thursday. March 20, 1986 ARIES-Caesar was warned about these days a long time ago. Now is the time to heed the warning. You are doing great and enjoying every minute of it. En1oy the fun but don't forget about tomorrow Remember to save something for a ramy day, TAURUS-You have reached the end of the tunnel. It was dark for a while but you now see the light. Don't take your new found knowledge for granted. It is something no one can take away from you GEMINI-Very seldom do you pay attention to minor details when meeting a new person. But, somehow a special trait about someone new has impressed you. Is it the twitch of the eye, or maybe, the glimmer of the smile? Think about it CANCER-Spring is almost here and you can hardly wait. It's been a long, cold winter and you've been huddled up at home too long Get ready for a lovely time of sun and fun. A new hobby will provide you with some much needed exercise. LEO This is the height of your enter­taining season and you rise to every occasion. Whether 1t"s for a weekend or a few hours. your guests will feel welcome in your company. Enjoy the company and don't fret too much over details VIRGO-The demands of a new rela­tionship have you rearranging yoursche-­dule. Use your excellent organizational skills to add hours to the day. You'll find that by using time efficiently you can enjoy your social life without neglecting work responsibilities. LIBRA It's spring time and you're ready to bloom. Now 1s a fine time to update your wardrobe in favor of a fresh new look Exercise and a good diet will help you pull off the total picture. Others are sure to notice the new you SCORPIO-A new work assignment has you working overtime. Don't let it overwhelm you. You are quite capable of completing the job and superiors know this Just take 1t one step at a time. Don't allow the new occupational demands force you to ignore the domestic front SAGITTARIUS-You misunderstand a remark by an acquaintance. Although you are somewhat offended, there was no harm intended. Don't let an isolated inci­dent ruin the relationship. You've both invested too much time in your friendship to let 1t end now CAPRICORN .Your need to get away and your budget don't seem to be coop­erating. Consider a short, inexpensive getaway. I twill relieve the tension and not strain your wallet. Getting away will help put a domestic problem in a different perspective AQUARIUS You have reconciled dif­ferences with someone at work? This will improve both your emotional health and improve your productivity Now that that's taken care of, dive into that new assignment. Consult with superiors before making major decisions, PISCES-St. Patrick's Day 1s your kind of holiday. You will enjoy the revelry with friends. Don't be surprised if a lucky leprechaun has something special in store for you ., ... MARCH 14, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 UNIFORNI PAR1Y Thursday, March 20, 8pm-2am Happy Hour Prices All Night Long (LEATHER OR UNIFORM REQUESTED) 8 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 Rockefeller's is proud to present In Concert The Weather Girls with their 11-piece band just off the road with Joan Rivers 2 Nights, 2 Shows March 25-26 8:00/10:30 For Ticket ReseNations 861-9365 3620 WASHINGI'ON •HOUSTON, TEXAS• (713) 861-9365 ..,,.... ,,,.... . ,1 0 () e> o0 o 0 0 0 • I • l • I ....• ,,,I . . ....•,I,, .., Y'J·. A?£ ...,,, .. .. ;: announces that Tom Graham, attorney-at- :: !! law (50% Irish on his mother's side), who !! ;: has maintained a law office in downtown !i i: Houston for the past 30 years engaging in :! :: the general practice of law, is now :: i: opening a branch office at !i ;: 224 Westheimer in the :; ,,,'....". Tom's Pretty Fish building. !'. ,.... ,,... .... . I• Not specially certified ....•,l,, ...., .... ...., .. .. ·····••!••••!!!!!!•!•!!!!!!!!!••••!••••••!•••!!!!!!!!!!!!!!• Gardner Blue Haven is Now: Gardner Spas & Pool Service 5816 Southwest Freeway - Same Owner. Same Location for 25 Years­It is the Time of Year to Start Thinking About Refurbishing Your Pool 4?4?4?4?#'#'4?.l:?RR We Do: • Season Start-Ups • Drain & Cleans • Replaster • Retile • New Equipment Installations • Equipment Repairs • Regular Maintenance RRRRRR"RRR We Sell Equipment, Parts, Spas, Chemicals & Accessories Our Pre-Season Sale Is Now In Progress Gardner Spas Ir Pool Service Call Today-977-2112 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Prejudice-The Unadmitted Trait By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Neu:s America S·yndicate Sp1•rial to the Montrose Voice Pr('judice is th(' oldest form of man's inhu­manity to man. No matter what our rung on the ~ocial ladder, there is always some­onr below who can he scapegoated for our displt>nsure. When poet Robert Bums wrote that it's a gift to see ourselves as others see us, he probably wasn't talking about prejudiced folk. For they seldom realize (or will admit) that they hold biased views of oth­ers. Thr fact is no one is completely free of bias. no matter how noble one's inten· twnH. Ah('ad is a quiz drawn from rei;earch . To find out if you might harbor some sterro· typed vi<'ws of others. answer the items as follows: Disalo{Tf'l• (1); Agree somewhat (2); Agrt•f> (3). Then read on for explanationR, 1 I tend to lose my temper easily with Pf'Oplt• who rub me the wrong way. 2. I am strongly traditional and comier vative in my attitudeR. :3. I am in direct competition socially, educationally, occupationally, etc., with people of otht-r rthnic backgrounds. 4. I ofh•n wh1h fo great psychological pown and E;trt•ngth 'i I It-an toward severe punishmt•nt and a gt·nrrally hurd line of dii-;cipline for pub· lie offend('rs 6. Om·e I mnkemy mind up, it isn't easy tn change it. 7 I tend to l:w i-;trongly suspicious of the One possible antidote to prejudice is for opposing groups to join togetherin doing something coopera­tively. 11.C 1 molivrs of others: 14 1 namely, interpersonal influence. 8. I. knowveryhttleahoutpeopleofother If you look at each quiz item, you'll see t•thnic groups. that many of the traits described ran be o Answers The SU:>ry goes that a young child comes in from play to ask her mother: "Mom, what was thr namto of those people I was sup-­po~('< f. to hah•?'' The incident reflect" what is largely at the root of human prejudic-e, traC"P.d t<:> learning within the family circle. The p10neer on studies of prejudice was Professor Gordon Allport of Harvard Uni Vt'rsity_ He noted that prejudiced perl"onal· it1es have a tendency to cling to past solutions and not try nt'w ones Thev are inflexihlethinkt'rs and 11eem afraid tO sav "I don't know." · Out of the Nest Early and on Their Own The Loneliest Teens Hy Stan W<•st and Elizabeth Boyd l'ac1{ic Nt•u ·s Sert •1ct• Sprrlal to thr Montrose l'mu It's hc·t·n a long time tiince anyone told Jfi.yc•ar-nld Cindy Valdez U:> wash the disht'S or do her homt·work She moved out of her pan·nt.s' home thrN• yean1 ago and has heen living on her own every since. These days, t1he 8pends most of her time in front of her "shrine,' a 19-inch black and whilt• television set. Valdez's story is not unusual. Social workers and family counselors in cities aC'ross the country report that an increas· ing number of children are striking out on their own. Once out.side the family nest, te<>nagers as young as 13 or 14 struggle to cope with adult problems of housing, employment and health care. Valdez (who asks that her real name not hf' used) shares a tiny apartment in down· town Oakland, Calif. with her 22·year·old boyfriend, Jonathan. The floors are con· crete, and the room holds a small sofa-bed, an empty refrigerator and the TV. "For the last two years al1 I did was lay in bt-d and watch TV," says Valdez. "lfl had some weed (marijuana), I'd smoke it until the munchies took over, and then eat everything in sight." Thr C'upboards and refrigerator, how· ever, are seldom full. Her boyfriend covers the $200 monthly rent with earnings from a job washing cars and her mother some­timeR buys a few groceries, but most months Valdez struggles to make ends meet. "Rut because the choice was mine," she says, "I have no regrets." Tef'nugt•rH make that choice for diverse rt•asons-somc have abusive parents; oth· er8 nre push('d out by neglect. or abandon· ment. ValdC'z moved from her parents' nearby home after a serieA of arguments ovt'r her boyfritnd. Three years later, her par(•nts still rt•fuse to visit her 'Both of my parents were so hurt when I left," says Valdez. "Screaming, they told Although state laws vary, minors generally do not have the right to establish residency, sign a lease, consent to medical treament and in some states, hold jobs. ' me I waM a sinner and I told them good· bye·· Teenagers like these are a very small pe-rcentage of the estimated 1 million children between 10 and 17 who leave home each year, but unlike most rune· ways, they don'tsneak away without their parents' knowing. In some cases, parenli;; even assist in setting up the household. Often these teenagers settle in the same city or neighborhood and maintain rela­tionships with family members. But like most runaways, they prefer life on their own to the state's altemative­foster care or returning home. Conse­quently, motit shy away from social service agencieR, which are required by law to r{'turn them to the custody of a legal guardian. This makes it impossible to estimate the number of teenagers living without adult supervision_ But, says Sylvia Smith, direc­tor of the Alameda County (Calif.) Depart· ment of Children's Protective Services, "It is certainly not an uncommon situation here, and his problem is surfacing in many other parts of the country. Billy Woods (not his real name), 17, has succ('HMfully concealed his situation from all but a few truMtt"d friends for more than a year, Living in a shabby studio apart­ment in downtown San Francisco, he says he left homt> last year "to avoid being put out" by his mother and her third husband, who movOO the family four times in one year "Me and my little sister felt uprooted. like gypsies," Rays Woods. a Renior at Mis­sion High School in San Francisco. "So I got me a part-time job in a store and told my parent.a I'd had enough." Although his parents have recently agreed to help with expenses, most months Woods comes up short of money. He says he badly misses his sister, and being part of a family. To battle his loneli­ness, he writes short stories and concen­trates on his hopes of attending college next fall. For Valdez, Woods and others like them, the problems are legal as well as emo­tional. Until they ha\-'e gone through the legal process of emandpation and been declared an adult by the court. they remain minors in the ev~ of the law , Although state laws varY. minors gener­ally do not have the right to establish residency, sign a lease, consent to medical treament. and in some i<tatett. hold jobs. "Earning enough money to live on is always hard for these kids." says Gordon Raley. director of Public Policy for the Washington, O.C.·based Child Welfare League of America. "In some states, anyone under the age of 16 cannot even work. And even a 16 or 17-year-old won't have the nct>Ssary job skills to support himself." Medical care may be even harder to find than a job. Few minon. C'an afford treat· ment from private hospitals. but they usu· ally can't qualify for state-funded Medicaid without reporting parental income. MARCH 14. 1986 1 MONTROSE VOICE 9 They like cJear-cut views of things and are intolerant of ambiguity. Literally, they are narrow-minded. Allport's conclusions have been verified many times by other psychologists. o Score Total your points. Though this isn't an official test consider that your score means the foJlowing: S..12 points-You're mature and rela­tively free of prejudice. 13-17 points- You have an average degree of bin:-; 18-24 points-Move over, Archie Bunker. You are likely to have too many prejudices about others. TT)· to learn more about those you may dislike. You might discove-r that they struggle with the i<ame life problems that you do. o Reducing Prejudice Can prejudiC"e be overcome? Yes. Examine your own beliefs and ask: Have I outgrown some faulty notionsl"ve had about others? One possible antidote to prejudiC'e is for oppm1ing groupf' to join together in doing ~mething cooperatively. Studies of inte­gratt'd housing and of racially mixed pla· toons in the Armed Fol'CE's show that both sides became more mutually accepting than before they interacted. But not nil cooperative ventun·s have .ijUCh a desired effect. Much wiB depend upan wheth('r the parties involved feel unpreRsured about integrating and whetheT they are gh~en equal status. Even IP. tl-e case of an extreme medical eme•gen<·y many states require parental pem11ss1on bt·fore treatment of a minor. If parents carnot be Jocatt"d, the st.ate often assumes the role of guardian; however. that means the minor eventually ends up in the hands of a social ~en.;ce agency­exactl, y what these teen~ wish to avoid. Instead they often go without proper care, even though there may be assistance available. "It'~ a failure of the tK>cial service sys­tem that we don"t hear about these kids until they have reachd a crisis situation­in trouble with the law, livingon the street or in hospitals,·• says Raley. "Certainly in some cases the child is better off away from the parents, and a 16-year-old can usually survive on his own. Kids need adult supervision and guidance to thrive." While the problem of teens leaving home is not new to this decade, it is rapidly increasing in both urban and suburban areas. "We're seeing this in all families, from all economic backgrounds." says Raley ''It's not just a poverty-related prob­lem." Like the others. Terry Devereaux strug­gleE: to cope in an adult world. Bare walls, cold linoleum floo~. and a worn copy of Charles Dicken"s A Tale of Two Cities dec­orate the two-room apartment in East Oakland, where she moved last year after fighting with her mother over a boyfriend. She had hoped to find work att a secretary, but she is still unemployed. Her father sends her $100 to cover food and her grandmother payR her rent, but bills are a hardship. ~·r love them for all the support they give me," says Devereaux. who now attends an Oakland continuation ~chool ••Jfit wasn't for them l"d prohahh' starve." "Rut being alone is very hard." she says, admitting that she sometimes cries because shE" is ~o lonely_ "Especially at night, the Jonelines just overwhelms me." 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14. 1986 Spruce Up !}Ju Home for Spring with ... HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor •Roofing (All Types) • Remodeling • Sheetrock/Painting • Plumbing/Electrical •Tile/Masonry •Carpet •Cabinets •Decks/Hot Tub • Room Additions •Concrete • Foundations Repaired •Tree & Trash Removal • Insulation •Water Proofing •Fully Insured •References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 • I It. • HOGs Announce March Activities The Houston Outdoor Group has sche­duled several activities for the remainder of March. On March 15 the group will have an outdoor barbeque co"ered dish dinner. On Tuesday, March 18, the outdoor group will join the Colt 45's for an evening of roller skating at the Carousel Skating Rink off 1-10. The cost of the evening is $.1. 75 including skate rental. A portion of the proceeds from this event will benefit the Montrose Counseling Center. View Halley's Comet in the country ski('8 with your naked eye by joining the HOG'a for a trip to Lake Summerville, March 22-23. While some members will be in Lake Summerville, others will venture to Big Bend National Park, March 21-30. This is a large park located on the Mexican border along the Rio Grande River. The group will camp in the Chisos Mountains sur· rounded by the Chihuahan DeserL There are numerous hiking trails in the moun­tains and desert region for either the after­noon hiker or those prepared for a several day hike. On Friday morning, March 28, these lovers of the outdoors will leave for a trip through east Texas to view the wild­flowers. After camping out Friday night, they will return by another route on Satur­day. Anyone interested in any of the trips planned by the Houston Outdoor Group may call 680-3144 or 521·3641. Eugene Climbs to No. 3 on Houtex Top Ten Since the brginning of the year, Eugene ha• swadily marched up the C, Band A challenge ladders of the Houtex Tennis Club. Thi• past Sunday he defeated Donny Kelley &-3, &-4 for the No. 3 spot on the Top Ten challenge ladder. Fernando V., after two years of absence from challenge ladders, was defeated by David Garza 4·6, 6-4, 6-0. David Heiland was defeated by Mr. Bill 7-6, 2-6, &-!. Fer nan do and Oavid must win a match on the next lower challenge ladder to secure a position on the Hout.ex ladders. David Garza outlasted Pat Power 3-6, 7-6, &-2. Randy Miller defeated Mr. Bill 4-6, 7-5, &-3. Ron Rodd and Steve Bearden defended agaim~t Rick Massey 6-I, 6-4 and Thomas Cortez S-7, &-3, &-4, respectively The Houtex Tennis Club has returned to Wednettday night play from 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at MaeGreagor Park, 522.5 Cal houn Hd. Call David, 92&-7171, diredions or further information. Morris Takes Top Spot On Houston Tennis Club Ladder It didn't take newcomer Andrew Morris Jong to take over the No. 1 ranking on the Houston Tennis Club's Top Ten challenge ladder. Robert Holmes put up a struggle before losing 6-4, 6-2 to Morris. Randy Lunsford was the big winner this past weekend, as he jumped from No. 9 on the Bladder to No. 6 with his strong show­ing over Daiwid Hendrickson & l, 6-0. Lunsfonj also defeated No. 2 C ladder player Joe D. Well &-2, &-3. Morris also played in the Memorial Park Challenge tournament. He defeated four opponents to take the title and move up to the Group A top wn. Rick Hadnot won three matches in a row for the first time in this tournament before felling to Morris &-4, 6-0. MARCH 14, 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Sports Voice Steve Rheinecker (left) ran the K-9 Fun Run with his dog, Billie, and Randy Cumbaa finished the course with Junior (Pete Diamond photos) Frontrunners Compete in K-9 Fun Run By Pete Diamond MontrolW VoiN' Staff Reportt>r On your mark, get set, go! And off they went, some 600 dogs and their owners. "em-barking" on the two mile run of the Houston Humane Society's K-9 Fun Run along Allen Parkway last Sunday, March 8. Within thi8 group of runners and their canine companions were two members of the Houston Frontrunners. Steve Rhei­necker and Rillie, a 3-year-old black lab mix, and Randy Cumbaa and Junior, a 3-year-old black and white English Cocker Spaniel, were four of the 960 entrants in this year's K-9 Fun Run held in Sam Hous­ton Park. When the event was organized five years ago as a "low key, grassroots organi­zation," it drew only 108 entries. Since its humble beginnings, however, the annual event. has become so large it is listed in the Guineas Book of Pet Records as the world's largest dog race, accordinll to K-9 Pool Players Challenge Bowlers in First Annual MSA Cup Tournament The Montrose Sports At->sociation Bil­liardto League has issuE'd a challenge to the MfiA Bowling League to compete for th£'" MSA Cup. The tournament, which does not require entrants to havt> MSA affiliation, will be held Saturday, April 5. Match locations and opponents will be drawn at the Barn at 3:00 p.m. Matches will be played at The Barn, Marion & Lynn's, The 611, Hooters, and the Brazos River Bottom. The entry fee is $5 which will benefit the Gay Games II fund. The MSA Cup will be presented to the league winning the most matches. All teams wi ll meet on The 611 's patio after the match. MSA Billiards League rules will apply. Each player will play three games. Billiards League players may register by contacting Dennis Lord at 721-6505. Bowling leauge members may register by contacting Charles Hurst at 522-0840. Fun Run co-founder Davia Gallup. Based on the succet;s of last year's K-9 Fun Run, which drew .523 entrants, the run was expanded to include a one mile celebrity run as well as the two mile fun run. Several television newsc-asters partic· ipated in the run, including Richard Alder man, the People's Attorney of Channel 2 and his dog, who placed second in thE medium dog category of the two mile run A total of 360 dog' owner teams partici­pated in the one mile run, which was won by Bruce Sanders and his Welsh Corgi, Buster, with a time of 6:07. Finishing the two mile run in 12:30, Rheinecker said this was the second year he and Billie have run in the K-9 Fun Run. "It's a lot differt>nt from any other race," Rheinecker "avs. •·There's a certain amount of comp{.tition in any fun run, but not with this one. This is definitely fun." Cumbaa and Junior. who were running in their third K·9 Fun Run. finished with a time of 17:22, far ahead of last place fin­ishers Jean Poskus and her dog, Tina, who ambled across the finish line with a time of 36:13. Dan Lawson and Nike, a German She­pherd, won tht> two mile race for the second year jn a row, this year clocking in at 9:43. Debbi W amer and her Australian Shepherd, Blu, won the women's division of the two mile run with a time of 11:50. Sports Voice Calendar & Standings HouTex Tennis Club MSA Pool League Challenge Ladder Tea'TI Stand,~< Winter League, Weetc. 14 TEAM Recent Wi;. Total Matches. Total games matcheiii through Feb 23 DIV SION A TOP TEN LADDER 1 Four611 5-10 11-3 127--083 1 Jim Kitch 6 Steve Bearden 2 Bacchus B-7 10-3 122-073 2 Randall Dickerson 7 David Garza J Ranch Hands •1 .. 10-4 119-091 3 Donny Kelley 8 Thomas Cortez 4 Too 611 9-0 8-5 113-082 4 Pat Power 9 Eddie Chavez 5 Mary·s Naturalty 7·8 8-5 112-083 5 Eugene Brown TO Tiny Tim 6 Marton & Lynn·s ,, 5-7 094-101 BLADDER 7 BAB Shooters 0-15 5-7 on; .. 120 1 Sabe Velez 6 Mark Deardorff 8 Outlaws 9-0 5-<I 112--083 2 Lou Garza 7 Mr Bill 9 Slreet Cats 5-9 5-<I 098-097 Joe L 8 Rick Massey 10 Bacchus II 5-10 5-<I 069-106 4 Ronn Rodd 9 Randy J.Mler .)IV SION B S Larry Jarvb 10 B1U Santa1t1 1 The Bam 10-5 11-2 12'H>75 C LADDER 2 The Galleon 8-7 9-4 111--064 1 Rick Knapp 6 Rudy Gal"Cla 3 Lipstick '-<! 8-5 11&-079 2 G11be Herp1n 7 David Moskowitz 4 611111 4-11 8-5 108-087 3 Henry Eckhardt 8 Randy J1ersctleck 5 Kindred Spirits I 15--0 7-f> 118--077 4 Riek Martinez 9 S1eve Chesney 6 Kindred Spmts 5-9 ,_,, 103--092 5 Da1w1d ~ndnckson 7 The611 9-0 5-7 092-103 DOUBLES LADDER e JR"s 10-5 5-9 096-114 1 Sieve Bearden & Bill Santa1h 9 Lone Stars 4-11 3-10 068-126 10 Hooters r9 2-10 053-120 2 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregf'ant 11 Hooters 5--0 2·12 080-130 3 Eddie Chavez & Henry Eckl"\ardt Hous ton Tennis Club Regular Weekly E vents Challenge Ladder SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center matches through Mar. 9 Houston end HouTex Tennis Clubs TOP TEN LADDER 10:30am-1 :30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center 1 Andrew Morns 6 Rick Hadnot Women·s Bowling League 5pm. Stadium 2 Robert Holmes 7 Ed Farley 3 JC Barrera 8 Rich Corder Bowl 4 Arm1 Albanza 9 Oscar Martinez WW B. Bowling League7:30pm, Post Oak 5 Aon Bell 10 Edward de Leon Lanes S LADDER MONDAY: MSA Men·s Bowling 9pm. Stadium 1 Ron McCauley 6 Randy Lunsford Bowl 2 Billy Green 7 Da1w1d Hendnckson TUESDAY: Frontrunners, Memonal Park 3 Randy Miller 8 Oscar Ysass1 Tennis Center 4 Sieve Bryant 9 Rudy Garcia MSA ·Fun Volleyball League." 7pm 5 Roy Mendiola 10 Travis Wilhs WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League plays 8pm. CLADDEA venous locations 1 JV Khnger 3 Howard Brown THURSDAY: Frontrunners Memorial Park 2 Joe o Tennis Center 12 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 Neighborhood They're Montrose's Most Popular 'Straight' Bar Grif's Gears up for St. Patrick's Day Celebration By Connie Woods Montrose Vo,ce staff reporter If you've never been to Grifs for St. Patrick's Day, you'd best find your ~ham­rock and begin l'elebrating with one of the lar~est crowds in Hou~ton. ""This is the special time when we can all look back and smile." Michael Griffin. M,chtu'l Griffan, oumn of Grirs Inn, and organizer of the largest St. Patrick s !Jay ulebration 1n the southwest tConnie \foods p/wto) owner of Grife 8aid. "It's a time to be happy and forget about all of the problem• of the world." he added with a big smile and chuckle. According to Griffin, more than 3.000 people celebrated ot his place JaRt year and he expects just as many if not more this year Dunng last year's celebration more than 164 kegsofbeerwereemptied as well as 1000 cases of beer. "It figured to be about 15,000 to 20,000 beverages sorved during tbe day and evening The celebration will be no ~mailer Mein· day when Griffin gets to have his !o;pec1al day He said he knew of people who planned to attend the fun coming from Canada, New OrlE>ans, Dallas and other cities in the state. Even the governor plans to be a part of Grifs fun. Planfi for day begln a month before the event. "We will have the big tent up with about 16 portacans throughout the prop­erty," Griffin explained. "We will charge $3 per person to get in and sell drink ticket books. The ticket books will be good for the reHt of the month. Not just for the day." he fiaid. Griffin hBB a great deal of pride in the Montrose neighborhood. The graduate of the University of St. Thomas wants ''to bring people to the Montrose area just to have a good time. ' Although the St. Patrick's Day celebra tion will be held Monday, Griffin has already started the pre-celebration. On Friday night at 8:00 p.m., the finals for the St. Patrick Day's parade Queen Contest will be held under the tent. Bands will entertain and celebrity judges will attend to select this year's queen. Some of the judges will be Oilers, Rockets and Astros as well as city offi· cials. On Saturday, Griffin wiJI be putting the final touches on hi~ float by 7:00 a.m. to prepare for the big parade. "We'll have five bands here Saturday afternoon after the parade," Griffin said. Sunday will see volunteer~ helping to clean up. the place and get ready for the real celebration which begins at 2:00 p.m Of course, Griffin pointed out that anyone who would like can come by for lunch and just stay for the afternoon end evening Once again Griffin plans to have five hands around the property during the day and evening. And lots of green beer. Grif. fin said the only thing worse than parking in the area is the green beer and driving. Not only does everyone have a good time hut Griffin said he has seen several mar· riag~ come out of the St. Patrick't; Dey celtbrntion. "We have had more mar­riages comt'!out this than you can believe." hf! remarked ... And everyone sends me an inv1 • on just to let me know that they met here, ' he said y....:th great pride in his VOICC "We have big colJege support. Exes from SL Thomas, Hice, U ofH, A&M and others can SCP more of their old classmates here th1m they can by going to the class reun· ion," he explained Griffin has already scheduled many of his sports teams to help out during the day. "We have about 16 or 17 teams. including Roftball and soccer, who agreed to help out at least four hours Monday," he explained. And no one will enjoy the event any Lung time t•mp/oyees ,1lfarum Dodgen (i,•ft) and Helen Welder are tu·o of the many ml'mbers of the planning cvm1m1tff•e for Gr1fs lfln's anriual St. Patrick's [Jay N"lebration. The da.v·lonl( affair drau·s th(}usands to the MontN>M' area ea~h year and n•qwres almost .Yrar·round planning (C'onmf' Woods photo) more than Griffin . .. It is JUfit so much fun. We like for people to come and bring their kids during the day. We'll have a face painter for th«- kids,' Griffin pointM out. Sale to Benefit Bering Music Program Berm~ Memor1al United Methodist Church's choir will host a garagt' 1rnd bake snle n Sat uday, March 22, hcgin-­mng at 7:00 a.m. 1n the church's activities building, 14-10 llnrold Street nt Mulberry Th~ sale will feature home furnishings. clothing, appliann·s and homemade hnked goods. Pron•eds from thf> sale will bent'fit the growing music program at Bering Memor· ial For more information on the garage and bake sale. contact the church office. Mon· day through Friday between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., by calling 526-1017 'Ifs a great day to just have fun. And we will.' Grifs is locnted at 3416 Roseland just off Montr0t1e. Midtown Video 2043 S.W. FreewCl'j at Shepherd 522-2805 Your24 Hour V ideo Store Vldeo.XXX Movies Super Selection of Gay Flicks Wide Selection Regular XXXX Good Selection of General Movies Pantzer Opened the Doors for Many We Rent-Sell-Trade-Buy No Membership- No Hassle Commentary by Connie Woods M1Jnt10.r Voic't' Staff Reporter She was a friend. an acquaintance, a buddy. Manon Pantzer, who was mur· dered Tuesday morning, left behind more friends than she actually knew. "Don't print that because no one cares where I have been or what I have done," she told me during a recent interview. What Merion did not realize is that many people did indeed care where she had been and what 11he had done. More importantly, everyone cared about Mnrion Pantzer, As the shock ruNhed through the oommunity Tuesday, every· one was stunned. How could this havt' h_nppencd? Why Marion? The same ques~ hons echoed throughout Montrose. Phones rang off the hook. Everyone wanted to know if it were true, ard when the anp·er came, silence filled the- room Several of her friends gathered at t.he cluhDA.Rich .. on<HI,_ S~"""" noon as television and newspaper repor ters went to the bar for the story. It was difficult to sit et the bar where I have sat so many evenings talking with Marion This time she wouldn't walk through the door This time we would not be carrying on one of our philosophical conversations. The loss, the greatest loDs , to all of us who knew her is that she was alwayB there. Whenever I needed a comment for a story, whtinever I just needed someone to listen. and whenever I needed a friend I knf'w she would be there. In ::>ur interview Mhe explained why she opened the bar in the beginning. As she •poke. •h• deocribed the people who needed a place like "Just" Marion and l.ynn'a. "People go to the bar because they're lonely They want someone to tnik tc And my bartenders k"Jow that when people c me m that they want to taik ... Perhnpg peoptnlo g.o-ttJ'tnmt becaus• they are lonely. Perhaps they go a place wht>re they can be recognized and talkt>d with. Perhaps they, like many, go because "'Mand J,'s" was a comfortable place to ht-> Call it a homt> away from home; call it an open and free space. Call it Marion's. I sat at the bar Tuesday and looked around mt·. I could fif't> so much of Manon Pantzn. I tould ff>f"I her presence. I could feel my loss. As I let m.,· mind wander to days pnKt when I sat in lhe old bar. I could not ht•lp but think of the word1o1 to a song. "Isn't it rich Are we a pair? Me here at last on the ground. You in mid-air. Wht•re are tht> downs? .. But where are the clowns, there ought to bf! clowns. Well, maybe next year" And so the communitv lost one of its most beautiful clowns. - She Wlu ix- missrd more end more every day was each of us seek the fnend that we lfrd~r o y~e Purveyors of Fine Food & Spirts Open 7 Days a Week Join Us for Lunch Starting at llam 1834 Westheimc•r 522-702(1 HAPPY HOUR DAILY Well Highballs, Beer & Wine 1 25 Well Cocktails 1.75 Call Highballs 2.00 FRESH UST DAILY (IN ADDITION TO COMPLETE MENU) Quiche-Luncheon Features-Seafood Feature Fruit Feature-Pasta Feature Soups & Fresh Vegetables LATE NIGHT BREAKFAST Full Menu & $2.95 Breakfast from 1am Until 2am Sun.· Thurs. Until 4am Fri. & Sat FESTIVE SUNDAY BRUNCH 11-3 "A nefthborhood restaurant and bar unU,ue In Houston" 804 Pacific • Houston • (7U) 524-793.J 0 THE 0 0 LISTKEEPERS 0 0 522-2268 0 0 LET US KEEP YOUR LISTS: 0 0 0 0 • Unique Selection 0 0 *Business *Invitations • Free Mernbenhlp *Family *Christmas 0 • No Deposit For Members 0 *Friends *Direct Mail 0 and ••• O *Wine *Cassettes 0 o *Albums *Video Tapes o One day Free Rental for any one fl). non-adult movie. 0 0 0 ADDRESS LABELS OUR 0 FREE Rental 0 SPECIAL TY! 0 Initial entry 10 each 0 Prn1ted on pressure sensitNe labels 0 o 04 each A Friendly Neighborhood Bar OPEN TO THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY 2402 Mandell at Fairview 529-2949 Uve Entertainment Happy HOur S-7pm Hours: spm-2am CLOS.ED SLINOAYS 9150 S. Main 0 Vafld Mondays· ThJM<lys E>cptres March 24. 1986 l.Jllllt I per Household AmNTION NIGHTCWB ENTERTAINERS Singers, Piano Acts, Impersonators Please make sure the Montrose Voice has a good quality (preferably 1n block and white) publicity photo ot you in our files forusewhenourodver­tisers ore engaging your services It wouldn't everi hurt for us to hove sev& ral photos of your smiling face Thank you The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 666-3464 SWlday, March 16th GIJIU Benefit for 21.06 Free Mexlc:an Buffet• Live Show, 6pm ALSO-Happy Hour All Day/ All Night Tuesdays-Beer Bust 6pm 'til Closing with Country Western Dancing Wednesdays-Free Sphaghetti & Dynasty Night Thwsdays-10¢ Cocktails (with $5 cover) TGIF Fridays 8-IOpm $1 well $1 long necks Saturday Biggest Country Western Dance Bar Live D.J Ram Rocha 14 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14. 1986 Lillian Halegua The Pearl Bastard "A mesmeric novel full of poetry.• -Judith Neville, Sunday Times A haunting novel of a girl's journey from childhood into sudden adulthood, from the suffocation of city and family to the brutal indif-ference of the sea This short, forceful novel, written over two decades ago, 1s now becoming a word-of-mouth classic. Carol Seajay, in Feminist Bookstore News. writes; •1 picked up this book to glance torough it for a few minutes one day, The Pearl Bastard and ZAP, I was gone. The quick con- 1;;;..-.111••1i11fi~ cise sentence structure? The compell-ing story line? .. I read this as the story of a young dyke-to-be setting off into the world to make her for­tune. And encountering incredible but all too common - obstacles.· The Pearl Bastard by Lillian Halegua $3.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Enclosed is $4.SO (includes postage and handling} for one copy of The Pearl Bastard. name __________ address ________ _ city---------- state ____ zip----- Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 4 EIGHT DAYS A WEEK Can Johnnie Ray Rousseau, a 22-year-old black gay aspiring nightclub singer, find happiness with Keith Keller, a six-foot-two blond bisexual foo tball jock who works in a bank? Will Johnnie Ray's manager ever get him on the Merv Griffin show? Who was the lead singer of the Shangri-las? And what about Snookie? ~ EIGHr DlTS I IEEI Somewhere among the answers to these and other silly ques­tions, Larry Duplechan has writ­ten the story of a couple as dif­ferent as - well, as black and white. And it's as funny, and sexy, and memorable, as any love story you'll ever read. EIGHT DAYS A WEEK by Larry Duplechan $6.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Enclosed is $7.50 {includes postage and handling) for one copy of Eight Days a Week, by Larry Duplechan. name _________ address ________ _ city __________ state __ Zlp ___ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 Mr. '!Almosf' Butch Contest Sunday, March 23, 7pm 25¢ Draft MC Mr. Ron Sioux Beef Brisket with All the Trimmings $2.00 Applications available at Chutes Deadline for Registration, Fri., March 21 Registration Fees and Proceeds from Food to Benefit The Montrose Clinic Prizes Donated By • Barn • Brazos Back Pocket • Brazos River Bottom • Chafing Dish • Chutes • Cousins •Eagle Leather• EJ's •Leather by Boots •Mary's •Touch of Leather• Venture-~! Home of Eagle Leathers "For the Man that Knows What He Wants" o Montrose to be Featured in Fashion Show 1:'he Montrose ~ill be featured in one of Reven fashion scenes that each capture the hfeHtyle and ~tt1tude of a particular area of Houston as Foley's hosts "GQ Live," the annual showing of the latest in men's fashions. With the ~heme "Foley'.s on the Town," the show begins at 7:00 p.m. tonight, March 14. ~rcordmg to Cherri Carbonara of Foley's, the Montrose scenes will feature fashions that are "fun and funky with an artistic flair." c3J11 :memoriam MARION E. PANTZER Manon E. Pantzer died March 11, 1986, in a local hospital. She was owner and operator of "Just" Marion & Lynn's, a Montrose nightclub Survivors include a brother George W Pantzer Il l, New York; nephews George Pentzer IV, Humble; James Pantzer, Jack­sonville, Fla. and beloved friend, Lynn Hornaday. In lieu of usual remembrances, the family suggests that contributions be made in her memory to the Society fo r Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 519 Studemont St., Houston. TX 77007; the KS/AIDS Founda­tion of Houston, 3317 Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006; or the Houston Area Women's Center. 4 Chelsea Place. Hous­ton, TX 77006 Funeral services were held Thursday, March 13. at Forest Park Lawndale Funderal Chapel. Interment was at Forest Park Lawn­dale Cemetery. OUR POLICY The MonlrOMt Vooce ....... cornrnemor1te the pau1og ol Montro• 19tdenll 11'1d Hoo5ton gay commumty rnembefl w•th 1n announcefTMJtll Frtends Of rellt•ves ol tile d«Hsed ITllY p<OW!Qe UI W•lh llcts about the per$0n"s hi•. n1me1 ol the cloMlt surv•vors. 11'1d bun1r 1rr1ngemen11 ProH Of ver.• c.n be metud«I Poc:rures are 1pprec111«11nd w•U be returned N11m9 ol the clec•ued should be 11t1ehed to th• photo lnfOl'"mlt•on should be provided 10 the MontrOM Vooc:e II the .. n ... 1 p()H•ble dlll Ind Wiii be pubhshed .,, Ille nel'tl 1v11l1ble edition There is no ch1rge IOf th•s service Since 1977 We Do All Types of Flfeplace and Chimney Repalfs D Smoke Problems 0 ~~o~ree~s D Water Leaks o Birds 1n Chimney o Loose Bricks in Fireplace & Chimney Conscious Cleaning Chimney Services In Monf'rose, Neady Eve'tyone Reads the Voice MERIDIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW 325 ~ S28e J9Slmo 73Si 569/mo '86 CADILLAC '86 MERCEDES BENZ l'IOE 300E 560SL 149/mo 4 911/mo 715/mo 329/mo 944 398/mo 4911/mo '86 MAZDA RX'1 2ll'Jlmo 626 178/mo 944 Turbo '86 TOYOTA Camry Celica 172/mo 185/mo CALL LEE BORBA (713) 975-1872 '86 HONDA AccO<d , .. ludo 1S9fmo t 1'9fmo '86 JAGUAR XJ6 S69/mo '86 BUICK Skyl•rl< Electri1 17'/mo 27'/mo l l "'0 [X)WN PA\MlNT • lO\\.tR MONTI HY PA.YMl"'1 • CA~ll fOR YOUR TRADE MARCH 14, 19661 MONTROSE VOICE 15 Sunday, March 16, 1986 For the 2nd Year Smiling Irish Eyes Contest MC'd and Judged at 5:30pm by The Newlyweds Maria Polanski and Pickles Fingermore Prizes to be awarded for best entry HAPPY HOURS lam-Noon Daily 5pm-9pm Mon. -Fri_ 11:30pm-12:30am Daily DJ. Lary Thompson HOME OF EAGLE LEATHER 1022 Westhelmer 528-8851 16 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14. 1986 THE BEST LITI'LE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTIY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 l l l 8 U R~)lJ LJ N E~ STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 1011 Bell 659-0453 Friday Night Show 10:30pm featuring Roxie Starr Saturday Aftemoon Sluts 6-8pm with Tracy & Victoria Lust M.C. Ms.Z Sunday-Special Variety Benefit Show 9pm-proceeds going to Lisa Renee Barnes who needs a liver transplant Coming Soon: The Ms. A Benefit Show for all her support to the community SPA-TO GO Specializing in portable spas. Shop and Compare More for Less $$$ SPAS FROM $1295 5816 ~ Frwy. (Chimney Rock Exit) Open 7 Days Dial: SPA-TO GO 772-8646 ~ .:-:-" ••See the stars•·· ... Monday-Thursday Ren• I llowe, Ge• Incl llowe for 1/2 Pnce• 'Deposit Required "Does Not Include Adult Movies 2016 MONTROSE Houston. Texas 77006 529-5544 Kl.ff and the Hou<~ion S)mphon ' prt>liii("lll "The Tower Concerts" at lhe Tower Thea ter Su n d a~. March 23, 7:30pm (:l1;11ln \\'uo11m:n. (:onducung Pre-- ( :oncc·r1 Pc·rro1manct' k11u11ng tht' 11.uvaul Glet· Club Pt()gram lkt·t hcnt·n Spring "'mar<.1 \\'11ot i11t·n Bamboula .\'quarrd \\'uor uwn (,rand Bamboula Puudl T ipJWll C0tnt' }'r \'om of Art S111gh· ritkt·h il2 '\ludt·n1' wi1h ID ~5) C..all 227-ARTS Happy Anniversary Robin Love, David NEW TREATMENTS A.l.D.S. IMMUNO-THERAPY CLINIC 704 MEDICAL TOWERS Houston, TX 77030 (713) 795-0098 MARCH 14. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 17 Films Oscar Nominee 'Official Story' Poignant but Slow By Scott Custinger Monlro.'ie Voice Film Critic o Official Story Argentina's official entry for Best Foreign Film might just walk off with the Oscar this year. While Norma Aleandro {who is the film's biggest asset) failed to get a much-d(~erved nomination, the film haR the Argentine government situation past or prei;ent, and this is definitely needed to understand the impact of the horrifying dictatorship. The highlight of this drama is definitely the performances. As a loving mother and 8tl'rn teacher, Norma Aleandro brings to Alicia a stunning vitality. Her perfor· mance is restrained and never over· wrought. yet we always sympathize with Norma All·andro !liars a.'i a u•oman seekmg the truth about her adopted daughter, Analia Castro in "The Offical Story" rerl'ived awards at several fesbvalR and Al<'andro shared the Cannes Best AdrNHJ Award with Cher !Mask). Be<>nu~w of the military crisis in Argen· tina during the seventies and early eight· frs. films of any political nature werf> not allowf•d to he made. Aleandro had to lt·ave her country in 1976 because of thr(•ats to hrr and her theater, but she returned in 1982 when the military regime was topplt>d. This film and lal-lt vear's Camila are a dn(•mntic resull{ence for Argentina. and filmmakers are now experiencing a new-found freedom. The Off1c1a/ Story deals indirectly with the prople and their children who diRap­peared during the brutal dictatorship and were never heard from again. A woman who has o five-year-old adopted daughter begins to believe that her child may be a child taken from one of the kidnapped mothers. Her husband, a businessman who once was with the previous regime, refuses to tell her where the child came from. thiH barrrn woman who loves her child so much insight. If you bore easily, this film might prove to be just a trial. o Highlander The makers of Highlander obviously had in mind something like Bladerunner or Terminator. Since that had already been done, they decided to add some historical drama and mui;ic by Queen. Throw in vidro music director Russell Mulcahy and a dashing ~tar ~Christopher LamberO, and you have-quite a mes~ Highlander ~uffers from what is often called "overdoing it!' We begin our story in New York, switc-h back t-0 16th century Scotland {and sE-vera1 other centuries), and finally end up back in New York with a fight scene featuring enough special effects to last me through most of 1986. People in the audience were so confused with all the flipping through the centuries, they kept yelling, ''Hey, where are we now?" The very, very thin plot concerns a group of men who cannot die unless their heads are cut off. Conner McLeod is the main warrior we follow, a Scotsman who manageA to survive from the 16th century to the prei;ent. His main foe is Kurgan (Clancy Brown from the Bride). a huge beastly man who is after Conner's head and the final prize that the remaining free man receives. The movie lurches back and forth between thf' past and the pre!'ent in Ney, York. In the past, he ha~ a beautiful wife who he outlivet>, and an ancient Egyptian warrior who teaches him how to survive. Sean Conney ii- great as the teacher, a man decked out in a peacock feather outfit that had to be from MGM's old wardrobe department. In the present, Conner is an antique dealer with a huge apartment filled with relicR from his past He must deal with modf>rn warriors always challenging him, but ht· (and Durgan) manage to decapitate most of them. Theend battle is brutal, silly The mother (Alicia) takes it upon herself to find out the truth. When her bet-1t friend tells ht'I' about being raped and tortured by the right-wing &quads, Alicia becomt·s more determined to uncover the atrocities that the government fails to acknowledge. The info1T11ation that she finds and the political people that she encounters are often shocking. Norma All·andro and Ht·ctor Alterior star m 'Thl• Of{ical Ston:" As th(• etrf'<'tK fill with grandmothers pmt(•sting the loss of their children and grundrhildren, Alicia begins to realize that ht·r child probably belong• to a dead mothrr. The end of the film ii; both poig­nnnt and terrifying as she confronb1 a hopeful grandmother afi well as her huK· hand, who suddenly turns violent wh('n ronfrnnted with the truth. l found The Off1C1al Story to be intt•rest• ing at times and very poingnant. but likt• many political films it is oft<'n slow The first hour of the film 1s espedally dral("gy, only picking up as Alicia becomes mon• involved with her earch. We are also v :v r u· 1Uund Other notables mdude Hector Alterio as Alicia'H husband Roberto. A quiet man whost• sutfden outburst at the end !;hockH us, Roberto is a complex charac-ter that Altt.•rio handleH to perfection. At; the grundmotht•r who thinks that the <laugh· tt-r Guby might bt>long to her daughter Ct•la Ruiz gives a small but moving por· frnya1 as Sara. AR the youn~Gaby ,Analia Cui;tro iR ttdorahle but not overly cute. I don't think that this film iA one that will ovt'rwhelm you likeJfisa:ingor L'nder· Firr This movie is very subtle, and the ev('rydny life of Alicia 18 not always that exciting to watch. If you have the patience to •tick with it. The Official Story is WJlI!li&ll f • . d.a<>fL • al and filled with special effects flying all over the p]ace. The grand finale is so over· whelming and busy. it i:-; actually boring as Kurgan and ConnerslaRh away at each other. I would truly hope that a movie like Highlander is not the wave of the future Mukahy directi; this movie like a telev1· i;ion blitz, f1U;t and furiou~ with little thought. The Scotland scenes have a nice look to them, but the Nt-w York parts look way too MT\' video. The rontraRt is way too jarring. and utterly ineffE'C'tive Christopher Lambert fGre:fatoke, Sub­u ·ay)does a decent job. but he·s notarealJv exciting act.or. The camera ~eem~ to fOC"US lot bia'-l!laring and Jes Ii what's going on in the film. However the swordplay iA truly marvelous and he does a good job with it. Too bad that once again, it's a case of too much swordplay that gets boring after a while. Highlander was ultimately too long time-wise and too ~hort story.wise. It would have elmo:,;t been bettertohaveju~t stuck with the historical side of the film. but I gue11s that after the Ladyhau·kdisa.s· U>r lest veer, the studios wouldn't want to risk it.· However, from the disgruntled eudi~ncE" at the screening I attended, Highlander is headed strai~ht towards a similar fate. .\fwu-.\foiu stars as Alice a t'lt:al'wus woman leading a double life m "M"· Other Husband ' · o My Other Husband This is ODC' of these cute little Frt>nch oome­diffi that is light. fluffy and lovable. We've sttn this aged plot about a woman with two husbands before. but director George Lautner does a fine job making the whole situation fre1'>h end entertaining. Actress Miou·Miou fEntre .. Vou ..... Gomg Plaus) is Alice, an attractive woman who left her husband Philippe and a child to head to Paris. She then met Vincent and had two children with him, although they never married. Ten years after she left Phi· lippe, she meets him again and they live together again. She !'lays with Philippe half of the week. and Vincent the other half. The only people who know whet is going on are her two girlfriends. Charlotte de Turkheim and Dominique Lavant are a scream as the girlfriends. both whom have problems of their own. One is marrying a man who still loves hi.ti. ex·wife, and the other m11kes up stories about spending time with a man who hBb 1eft her. Together, the thret" women are a terrible trio,. and their ~cen~ together are quite prt..>('IOUS. Meanwhile. Alice must finally face the inevitable when her two men actually meet. This is far from the end of the film, because she then tries to get them to like each other. The end of the film is very bitter&wttt. but possibly one of the few ways that things could have worked out. .'Jy Other Husband will play at the River Oaks Murch 16-22 for one week and l8 worth -vour time for some nice fun If you o.re m the mood for something light and often hilarious, gwe t.h:is httJe Frt>nch pas-tC)'. 18 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 14. 1986 Featured Each Week in the Montrose Voice A Talk with Gary Larson of 'The Far Side' This article presented out of promotional considerations Thousands of telephone calls have been pouring into the offices of the publisher of Gary Larson'11 runaway bestselling comic "The Far Side." Quei;;tions frequently asked include. "le this man sick?," •·where do these strange idea.'> come from?." and .. You guys got something against cows?'' In an effort to stave off the calls that are cloggmg company phone lines. Larson's publisher, Andrews, McMeel & Parker, IB releasing the following answers to often asked questions. The answers are drawn from the scores of interviews that Gary Larson has done since "The Far Side" books have hit all the nation's betitseller Ii:; ts. Per hap~ these answers can satisfy some of the curiosity generated by "The Far Side" rage as it sweeps across college cam· puscto1. tiptoes into suburban household.s­and captures the mind.i; of supposedly ~ane readers. Of course. these answers may produce a new generation of Lanmn addicts. But with nearly two million "The Far Side" books in print, it'1 time to provide some assistance for a reader's dilemma. Who is Gary Larson? He's a elim man in his mid-thirties. slightly balding with benign blue eye~ behind his wire rim glasses '"People always say. 'Gee, you look so normal.'" Bays Larson, "I feel embar· rassed. Like I should be there with one eye in the middle of my forehead." What kind of humor is this? Fr ends describe his humor as .. dry, sub­tle nnd sharp,·• while readers find it "bizarre, morbid and absolutely hilar­ious." Larson's mother says that his sense or humor JS almost innate. She recalled that when she woke him forGary'ssecond day of kindergarten, he said, "What, again?" One of his close friendi;, Ernie Wagner, a curator at the Seattle Zoo, summed Gary up best when he said: "He has the ability to tap into people's basic instincts and childhood fears. and find the humor in them." Larson himself says: "'People try to look for deep meanings in my work. I want to say "They're ju:-it cartoons, folks.' You laugh or you don't I don't react to cur rent events or other ~timuli. I don't read or watch TV to get ide&. My work is basi· cally sitting down at the drawing table and getting silly . • Where on earth does Larson find his ideas? ''I've always wanted to say that Jn my grandma's attic. I found this old hook in this trunk,' says Larson •·cartoon ideas . . I don't know. I've tried to figure it out. Why me? Why are these coming out of me? And I've failed miserably. It'i;t juiit there." He does. howevt'r,11peak nostalgically of childhood tripe to collect tadpoles. newts and salamanders. He still hat; a copy of his favonte 11torybook, Mr. Bear Squash You All Flat. Many ofhlB friends feel the in flu· ence of Larson's older brother, Dan, can· not be ignored. Dan used to wait for -year-old Gary to go down to the bas~ ment for firewood, a task Gary despised because "everything that was horrible in my imagmation lived in the basemenl" Then Dan would tum off the light, hold the upstairs door shut and call, "It's com­m- ming, Gary! It's oom-m-ming! Can you hear it?" How does Larson wo rk? LiAtening to musicians such as Dan Hicks. Duke Ellington. DjangoReinhardt. Charles Goodman or Benny Goodman, Larson wrileb and draws in a second-floor studio in his SeattJe home. There he's sur· rounded by such artifact.a as a stuffed war-thog head and a fossilized mastodon tooth, given to him by his grandmother He also keeps live pets that include several snakes and an Argentinian carniverous frog . What is the future of '"The Far Side?" Larson's lateNt book, Valley of the Far Side, is currently available in bookstores. Lorson often wonders. though, if"some­one's ~onna show up and say: "There's been a big mistake. The guy next door is supposed to be drawing the cartoon. Here's your shovel.' ' Any more questions? No? Well, as Gary Larson has said. "There are some people who'd rather take 'The Far Side' at face value. And they're the ones I don't want to pick up hitchhiking." o From Larson's Latest: "Valley of the Far Side" These cartoons were take from Valley of the Far Sule by Gary Larson, copyright 198..1) Universal Press Syndicate. Reprinted with permission of Andrews, McMeel & Parker. All nghts reserved. "Whal have I to ld you about eotlng In bed?" BOB Lovett Boulevard Big Bang $1. 99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or sausage and 2 Pancakes EXTRA SPECIAL!! Our Regular 1/3 lb. Hamburger Only $2.25 521- 1015 Hour~ 7o~11pm Mon· Thurs. 7cm-M•dnoght Froday 8om-Modnoght Saturday 8om-11pm SUndoy "Fire!" _:J MARCH 14. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 19 EXPERIENCE THE ENERGY AT 15,000 WATTS OF AMPLIFICATION SIX THIRTEEN-FOOT SPEAKER TOWERS 500 PERSON CAPACllY DANCE FLOOR REDUCED DRINK PRICES 20 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 Quiet Little Show Is Full of Suspense The Alley's 'Pack of Lies' By Bill O'Rourke .W'ontrose Vmce Theater Critic Pack of Lies (The Alley) is a quiet little show that wm knock your socks off. The play is about spies, but if you're expectmg James Bond, stay home! Very little action happens onstage. Not much mrre happen~ offstage. There are abi-o­utely no gimmicks. However tf you like cerebral ~uspense 1n the John LeCarre vr.'l, run to the theater A man (Robert Stranel, who is vouched for by Scotland Yard. comes into a J)(.'r· ffftly normal British home and announ­ces in a chillingly off.handed self-deprerntmg manner that his unspec1- fied agency needs their ~econd-floor win­dow to spy on their neilii?h borhood The husband is a civil servant with a security clearance He muddles through and pretty much accepts everything with a quiet aplomb. Charles Krohn ii-; rapidly bec'lmtng one of my favorite actors. He does everything h(" can with this role qu~"· from Carousel. I wanted to hear him do the whole thing. Joe Bourgea has a clear comir spark, yet somehow he was able to k(•ep me from thinking about Jerry Ikwis when he sang "You'll Never Walk Alone." Those were the stand-out performances. Director Chad Edwards is to be congratu· lated on presenting a very pleasant even· ing o Notes The eighth annual National Concert Band Performance started yesterday at the Ramada-Houston Hotel. 777 Polk This i~ the fir~t time this conference has been held in Houston The The 7th Annual Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts continue:-; through Sunday in the Hobby Airport Hilton. The guests of honor are special effects wizard Ray Harry Hausen, San Francisco author Brian W Aldis, fantasy artist J amei; Christensen. and literary critic Collin Montrose Live I.. :• • • .. ~ • • .. • • • • • , .. . 4 II • • , • • • • Romanovsky and Phi/bps bring romrdy and son!( tu Kindn•d Spint.o,; this Sunday, ~'tfarch I fi rleft to rlghtJ Jensie Anderson as Julie Jack.i;on. Holly Barron and James Belt:hu as Helen and Peter Kroger; Charles Krohn and Hill Tanner as Bob and Barbara Jack1;on. star in the Alley Theater'_., production of High Whitemore's "Pack of lies" The evening belongs to Jill Tanner as the wife. This is a strongly written (by Hugh \\thitmore), i;:;trongly acted portrayal of a very weak woman. All of the acting is so good that one can forget it's acting. Malcolm Morrii;:;on's direction and Michael A. Ryan's ~et (which favors seating sections one and two) let the audil'nce feel like we are peek ing into a neighbor's home a." they pttk into a neighbor's home as they • Some Enehanted Evenmg (Actors Workshop) is absolutely the best show I've ever Bttn at this theater. The only really embarrassing moment is before the over· ture when the cast tries to tack a totally irrelevant, basically unneC'essary plot onto this revue of Rodgers and Hammer- 11tein music Sherry F.ngstmm has a sweet voice and a nearly shy manner like a young Shirley .Jones. Gretchf'n Sween is a perky brunette with some real ginger in her style. Stacey Young has a mellowness. beautifully suited to ''Something Wonderful" from The KrnR and I Joe HarJ)t"r has a grent way with a dra· matic song. I felt a little cheated when he did a cut version of Billy Bigelow's ''Solilo- Manlove. The conference organizers can be contacted at the hotel, 645-3000, for more info. The HSPVA Jazz Festival starts this Wedne8day. The loss of KLEF 1s a great blow to our city'!-! cultural life. It will be sorely misNed, not least by those whose job it is to attract more settlers by projecting a healthy eity image. It is a great pity that instead of a good classical radio station and a good jazz station. we will now have one station trying to be both Good luck, KUHf1 ... Newton Wayland has been named the principal conductor of the Houston Pops for the 86-A7 seasons. This fun·lovingcom· poser of the themes for the TV series ''Nova" and ''Zoom~" has already pro­grammed a piecE- for garden host>H and orchestra BR well as his own arrangement of a kitty litter jingle .... If you have arts and crafts and you want to sell at the Houston Festival. call Bar hara Metyko at 52J.ll993 today' The dead line for applications is tomorrow! . .. Seulptors: The city of Lafayette, La., is holding a juried competition. The winner will be commissioned to do a statuE-ofthe Marquis de Lafayette. The first of several deadlines is on April 1 Contact the Cultu· ral Arts Counl'il of Houston, fi27-9:l30, for info. Auds: M11 10 Glossy (which won first prize m Thcuter Rhinoceros' lesbian play wrights contest last yf'ar); cold readings: ,JW (2/l-31\); 8 :!2 & 2.1, ~:00 p.m.·4:00 p.m., The Grrup, 3221 M"Jam; Info: Joe W tts, 261> 1000 or 022-2204. .:.i Celebrate! Erin Go Bra ugh! As tl true son of the auld sod, r ne-ed no other excust" all week-Saint Paddv's Day! . On the other hand, there are a few nifty birthdays, too. 14-Billy Crystal 15-poet Ruth (Patchwork Majority) Simpson. 17- Rudolf Nureyev. 18-Edward Albee, whose Et·erythmg rn the Garden is cur­rently playing at Main Street Theater. 19-Sergei Oiaghelev, the Ru sky dance impressario. 20-novelist James (Quatre­fo1/) Barr. Enjoy' o Openings Remember, ONO! mE"ans One Night Only! New Mexico State University Wind EnsE-mble. <Ramada-Houston Hotel, 14. 3)-Freebi°'. 01'0' Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (JonE'S. 14 }-their Houston debut, ONO! Good Times Brass Band of Houston iRamada·Houston Hotel. 14)-Fref'bies. ONO' Part of the Milky Way (Country Play· hou&e, 14>-a family moves to the country, crossing paths with a band of traveling musicians. This Sam Havens play won the CP's Third Annual Playwright compe­tition. Milt McLeod !Firehouse Gallery, 14)­readA his own poetry. Open readings after· wardit. Freebies. ONO~ Dral(on 's Custard (Company Om1tage. l!l>-a new Barbara Coyner comedy for children . German Rand EnsemblE- (Ramada· Houston Hotel, 15. 1 ::'JO)-Frrebieti. ONO~ Houston Concnt Band (Ramada· Houston Hotel. II\, 3>-Freebies. ONO! Firat Annual Conferenct Band (Rnmada·Houstnn Hotel, l!l, 6·10)· FrN·birs. ONO! lLS. Air Forrf' Hand of the Wef!t (Ramndu·llouston llotf•I. 15, 1-U'l)­Frtiehies. ONO~ Ralph Kirshuum (.JonPs, lfi>~celhst' HSO. l..t•if .St>gPrstam ronclucting. Orangr. :;how ':tWl Munger, 1;,_ Hou.'iloman Ratndyn Ruffin J?uest stars u·ith Romarwt·sky and Phillips Grand op(>ning for the '86 ReaRon. Houston eerentric Jeff McKissack's environmental art salub.> to the orange hm1 to be seen to be believed. RomanovMky and Phillips (Kindred SμiritM, 16)-0riginul, out-of-the-closet music with &oaring harmonies and uproarious lyrics. Guest starring Houston folk singer Rnwslyn Ruffin. Presented by the Gay Political Cau<·ui;. ONO! High Rise (Tranquility Park, 17 noon)-Fr('('biE'8. ONO~ • A CPlebration of Bayou H<'nd (Museum of Finp Arts, Jfl)-Re<·oJmizing 20 years of bt'ing oJ>('n to the puhlic. The Clouds (U. of H., 19, 12::10)-Th" Peter Arnott Greek Marionettf' Theatf'r Childrt•n undt·r 12 not admitted. ONO! MARCH 14. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 ____ ___..., ~-~rl~ TAFT .A.. l.J'T()~l<Yrl,'E Mad Video, THE video store for MOntrose, announces its Spring/summer special rates: PLUS: Nan-member daily rental-$2.50 Member daily rental-$2.00 Adult selectlons-$4.00 Video players-$10.00 + 1 free movie Free popcorn with movie rental Every MOnday two-for-one movies Plenty of free parking along with other unique shops to browse In Keep your receipts and receive 1 free movie rental after every 5th paid movie rental 3939 Montrose 521-0706 Open Daily 11am-10pm, Sunday 2pm-10pm 14-11 'l'API', 522-2 190 * Oil Change $2995 * A/C Check & Charge $2695 * Check Cooling System $2795 J)():-i'T :-iEGJ.i'X'T B ET!-;'\' GENERAL REPAIR AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION ELECTRONIC nJNEUP AIR CONDITIONING <(~ COUSINS Mon., March 17 St. Patrick's Day 8:30-12:30 WITH The B. Jays Band .. ,, ... ~ .... 1t ......... ,.. ... ,. Country Express Band Fri. & Sat. Nights 817 Fairview 11om-2om 528-9204 The ffiontrose Uoice announces a new Public Affairs Column 'j\sk Citl) Hall', '81.J Houston Citl.J Councilman qeorqe qreanias Ever hdd d problem unth Citq Hdll? Anq citq service? Perhdps qou 're just curious dboul some dspect of our citq government or the services it is required to perform for its citizens (streets , police . gdrbdge . hedlth . utilitq reguldlion . or even the zoo) . Councilmdn ~rednids will dnswer qour questions . dddress qour concerns. or help qou get dround Citq Hdll "red tdpe " Write "Ask Citq Hall," c / o IDontrose Uoice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 'l'lOOG (\.lour question will be answered in the IDonlrose Uoice. Confidentialih1 can be maintained if d e sired. On personal issues, Councilman (ireanias will provide a personal answer.) Startinq in ffiarch in the Ilewspaper of ffiontrose 22 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 114LLIYOP TBBPABSIDE Out of the wild comes VALLEY OF THE FAR SIDE, Gary Larson's newest best-selling cartoon collection. Featuring the usual assortment of insects and animals, cowboys and cavemen - all engaged in a variety of warped s,ituation comedies - VALLEY OF THE FAR SIDE will bring new peaks of pleasure to every fan of THE FAR SIDE. .....-:;;;.._.~ Order a copy for your favorite fan of The Far Side today! Please send me Please include $1 for postage and handl ing per book or- _ copies of VALLEY OF THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each _copies of BRIDE OF THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each _copies of IN SEARCH OF THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each _ copies of BEYOND THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each _ copies of THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each Send to: Valley of the Far Side clo Montrose Voice 4400 Johnson Drive Fairway, KS 66205 dered. Total amount enclosed ___ _ 0 Check 0 Money Order 0 Visa 0 MasterCard Address----------------- City ________ State ___ Zip __ _ Credit Card#--------------- Signature as on credit card Explf. Date (If check, make payable to Andrews, McMeel & Parker.) Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. -i I I I I I I I I 'I I I I I I I I I I f ~~~-ot~to<-;~, . ~ K.J. s ~ :i @, PREVIOUSL;:,~~~ARE BETTER ; : ~ ~ 11830 AIRLINE ~ ' - 2 blocks South of Aldine-Bender j ~ 445-5849 ~ MARCH 14. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 23 • r-~~~~~~~~- CfcapuOl'•pee Sisters Specials llpm-8am 2 for l ( 3/ 20-3/ 31) Open 24 Hours as of March 20, 1986 Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the ·~ Community l HOURS: NOON-2AM ~ HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12-7pm ?j· s22-2365 iP Double Drinks, 75¢ Beer ' ) , ...._ _ &_13_Ri_cmn_o_n_d __, 24 Hours Daily ~.- MONDAY TUESDAY ~· .if: Late Night Domino's Pizza ";I I..-.·. ' SUNDAY HaP 1 P 0 Y_ 2 Hour Party Bpm ,;.i:;·.·$ St. Patrick's Day ~ Party l Dinner Spm WEDNESDAY THURSDAY '. -•- Green Beer and Extended Happy Pool Tournament ,.. ., Green Drink Hour ~.•.· Specials $4.00 Entry \.Q Noon 'Ill Midnight Winner Takes All 't 00 Dynasty Party .iS ~ ~:.. FRIDAY SATURDAY ,t~ ~. ~· ~~ NO COVER! /~ :~ ~ PARTY!! PARTY!! PARTY!! ~· . ~ . ~ HELP WANTED-ALL POSITIONS NEEDED (ask for Kim) ~ .. i:!:l w.~ ... ~ei.,·:~·a-,:r2i.i· , ~· .... wq''V'"'<P' ~~ </r"."'S'."•'<IO~~~,fetl~~ ""'~~~ Que:::;tion:::; About Hea l th ~ . r, :~Medicine Chest Beglnnirg fipr i l 4. the Medicine '.::hest debut,, in the Montro~e Voice. fi s.ervice of the Montr.::.se Clinic. the Medicine Chest t-.Jill :answer readers~ qi.Jestions about health, health care and maintenance. Hnon<dmou questions can be mailed to : The Medicine Chest c r;, The Montrose Voice 408 fr.;onda le Houston , Te as 7"'()(16 mom rose VOICE The Nevvspa.per of Montrose is novv a.va.ila.ble a. t a.11 9 Mon trose-a.rea. s!!~~ c:l*~l\ I/ I/ It's that Day so Wear It v~~ Pub Prices All Day Long 50¢ Draught 1.50 Well & Beer c,O~(l 715~::\ 521-2792 24 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14. 1986 Montrose Soap NRG Donates to KS/AIDS Foundation By the staff of the Montrose Voice Many items appear in Soap out of commercial consideration From proceeds of the March 2 Evelyn Tho­mas concert at NRG. more that $1200 was raised for the KS/AIDS Foundation of Hous­ton. NAG's John Hanley. said. "'the club was happy to help this organization and cause m their fundrais1ng effort. We are interested in helping other community service organiza­tions with their pro1ects and programs -CJ-Mus/ ca Femina. a duo consisting of Kns­tin Aspen. flutist. and Janna MasAsulan. classical guitanst. will be performing in concert this Sunday. March 16 at the First Un1tanan Church. 5210 Fannin, beginning at 7:00 pm. The concert 1s sponsored by Womynspace. Tickets are $8.00 in advance and $10 00 at the door. For info 864-5628 -CJ-The Exile will hold a benefit show for Lisa Renee Barnes at 9:00 p.m. Sunday Darling 1ttle Lisa needs a liver transplant -CJ-Also at the Exile. manager Gary wonders why Michael always leaves his front teeth at home Last Monday 1t seemed that Gary thought he was Carol Channing doing Hello Dolly' CJ-What" s a person to do before noon? The B•you L•ndlng has about the cheapest drinks 1n town tf you're out at that time soc well drinks. 25C draft. S1 bottle beer (And there are dozens of other specials. See sexy Montana and the ad on the back cover.) CJ-The Crew at JR. ·s starting March 22. will be holding a car wash on the third Saturday of every month -CJ-It's happy hour all day/ all night at JA's every Monday. Stop by for the (in)famous 3-in-1 specials A spaghetti dinner from 9pm-m1dn1ght eases the late night hunger pangs Also. margaritas for S 1 25 will ease the Wednesday 'Hump Day" blues all day/ all night. -CJ-The Rock N Horse 1s havmg its Grand Opening this Saturday Go see Narene and Kelly at 5731 Kirby -CJ-Th1s Sunday at The Ranch. 1t"s a GLHU benefit for the 21.06 fight Free Mexican buffet & hve show. 6pm -CJ-Mondays are now ··customer Appreciation Nights" at The 611 with happy hour all day all night This follows on the heels of their 2nd anniversary party last night mobbed to the rafters -CJ-The long-anticipated Venture-N Umform Party 1s this commg Thursday Dig out the old military gear and be there . -CJ-Unbehevable but true. Mary's is having its 2nd annual Sm11tng Irish Eyes Contest. It will be MC"d and judged by the newlyweds. Mana Polanski and Pickles Fmgermore 0 Don:t forget those Sunday brunches at Cut~ ters 11 to 3 Get yourself all properly nour· 1shed before you start to hit the beer busts You'll last longer that way F\ Aye, ohe 'Yi/ Wearing of ~\.{ ofie Qreen .. and "a drinkin" it tool Monday-Saint Paddy's Day 2:00pm to closing Green Draft Beer Green Shot & Drink Specials for only "a little of your green 6acks," 'J say ... Irish Whiskey-Mldori Melon-Cream de Mint if it's green, It's on special Featuring DeKay per "Fuzzy Leprechauns" f il ;!-!'{Wt;! iw?f ;t =tali 'i"l•).r, 2400 BRAZOS =M:•i=ViM~• (713) 528-9192 ROCK "N11 HORSt: Newest Women's Bar (Men Welcome Also) GRAND OPENING Saturday, March 15, 8pm-2am Western Band, Dancing & Hors'Devoures DRAFI'BEER 75¢ Happy Hour $1°0 Regular Well Drinks $150 Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-7pm Marion- Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4pm-2am Fri.-Sun. lpm-2am Narene Kee-owner Kelly-mgr. 5731 Kirby 520-9910 A void filled my heart when I heard you were gone But lovely memories quickly filled the hole-life goes on. Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice. a goner at circulation newspaper having. pubtished conhnu~ ously for 1 year or longer, is qualified 10 accept legal notices affecting the neW$­paper's c1rculat1on area of Montrose COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITIES EAGER BUSINESSMAN .king $12,000 2 year loan to- -standard print pre-established cleaning service in Montrose area Options include current interest and/Of' partnership For inquiries call 529-1336 and leave Mme and number with service CARS & BIKES Need a c.r? Bad credit C Cr ;k 529-- 3849 ·es. BMW 325, Red. $318 per month. Lee 975-1985 '86 Hondit Accoard XU. $228 per month Lee 975-1985 ·93 Volvo 240. $8295. Lee 975- 1985 ·94 Olds Cutlass, 20K miles, $7895 Lee 975-1985 '84 Chrysler Lazer. 18K miles. $7250 Lee 975-1985 MERIDIEN LEASING lee Borba. 975-198!'> SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE Five acres-Conroe area $500 and take o ver paymen ts Martin 862-9516 ~en1 ngs ~~~,;:8~~~~0~:9s~~l~~bdr. sum-ouPLEX Large two bedroom. West Gray area. al l appliances mclud•ng washing machine and dryer. $350/mo_ plus bills_ 526-4926 MONTROSE DUPLEX 2-1. hv1ng. dmdmg. breakfast. centrala/h. ceihng fans. hardwood 664-4211 MONTROSE DUPLEX Large 2 bedroom. central ath. washer/d­ryer connection. ftreplace. m1mbhnds. hardwoods Must see 510 W Saulmer $49Slmo 464-6197 EAGER BUSINESSMAN Seetung $12.000 2-year loan to open estat»ished cleaning service 1n Montrose area Options include current m1erest and or par1nerst11p For mqu1nes, call 529-1336 and leave name and number with service Special" $100 olf rent Montrose. 1ow deposit. bus line. pool. ¥ioell-mainta1ned Must see to appreciate 524-9351 MONTROSE APT J POOL s~~r~:l~-,~~1 ~!u~;~~o~nw~~r:.es~~~ ming pool for 1ummer Central AIC. GE apphancea. mm1-bhnds and more. 1 BR at $315. 2BR at $375 plussecunty deposit & electric 306 Stratlord 1t T• tt Discount on 1 yr Lease 523-6109 WOODLAND HEIGHTS Clean 1 bedroom garage apt $250 868- 3055 Roommate to share i-2 on Timmons Lane S 100 deposit. S225'month No pets or smok8fs S8f.ous calls only 850-0769 Evenings Burlington Apartments GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in Montrose Area. Small Community, Adults Only. Nice Pool, J acuzzi, Large Closets, Big Windows, Free Movie Channel. Well Maintained I and 2 Bedrm. Effective Rent from $249 3502 BURLINGTON 523-0249 DWELLINGS AND ROOMMATES Non-smokmg male to &hare Heights home, w/d. privacy. $235. uti0 1t1es. 863- 1510 EXCELLENT LOCATION $180/mo. for efltciency apartment Mont­rose/ lower W05the1mer area 523-4483 Roommate for 2 plus 2 apartment H-1gh­way 6 at Beechnut Washertdryer mcluded $175 plus 112 ulll1h•- Male or female. 561-5665. 1920 WEST ALABAMA APTS. 1920 w Alabama. 529-6798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GREENWAY PL.ACE APTS 3333 Cummins Lane. 6~3-2fl14 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Small quiet Montrose complex N('W pamt. new double door ce boxes. $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 pluselec Also ava1~ able 2 bdrm 529--8178. VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that houae or apar1ment through a Montrose Vo1ceClass1!1ed Call 529-8490 ~r:e~~'t?ueb1•1 ~~rr~~~:n~~~-~":,~CS:r~ or Visa Luxury Condommiums Now Leasing wtth option to purchase Great location Large beaut iful swimming pool & Jacuzzi Controlled entry security. Remote controlled garage entry High efficiency AC & heatmg Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($150 deposit) Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 deposit) 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appointment 524-0830 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED HAIR STYLIST NEEDED Wdl establ1shec Montrose hair salon interv1ewmg stylist with following. Paid vacations. high commission. fully equipped salon 528-9600 David Hair dl-essei and manicurist lease or commission Private salon Centrally located Weal U : River OakSI Greenway Ask for Jolene 520-6600 SALON DAN I El Rent a cha1r 1n Houston·s best salon Be your own boss Call or come by 2431 B1ssonnet 52().9327 PERFORMING ARTS ~~:et ~~1~~e~t~~~:11 ~~~fshlr~~,~~t Base plus commission. Call Ms. Knipp after 11am. 526-5323 (MISC.) FOR SALE Used beauty equipment tor 1 persons :~:;,~dr~~~~.c~:~t~:~~~~s drr~s0 complete. 951-0650 leave message FOR YARD SALES See ads under ··vard Sales· et the end ol the Mr-· ·~· Cl.1 .-ihed MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS BODY MASSAGE Full body massage. Hot Otl m or out Bruce 622-0370 SUMMER·s COMING! SWIMSUITS! How do you look tn yours7 That bact? Over-e11ercising to change that Chances are you need a leg111mate massage. Bill O"Rourke. 869-2298. THE CADILLAC OF MASSEURS Body work al its best 0 of ET j713) 622-4530 TOP TO BOTTOM Relaxing and soothing dr>!;!p mu -:la mas­sage by bodybl. Ider 5~ ·2544 PERSONALS DOUBT YOUR LOVER? Electronic bugs. hstenmg dev1c• Kits, ~IQsB~a~~ggJ_2H~~~8cin~i~~ron1cs, GwM. 6"6'". 185. dark red/ green. 38.ever· yday guy. Just me seeks1ustyou ,perman­e n I lifemate GWM . 34 to 44, monogamous Reply Blind Box 281-8 c/o Voice MARCH 14. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 25 - GWM SEEKING INTELLIGENT LIFE College student m Clear Lake area desires to meet someone with a future I am 21. 6·4·, 1151bs. brown/ brown. Look­ing lor someone 2~30. possible student to professiOnal For honest relat1onsh1p Sorry no lats, femmes. or drug headl Send letter. phOne number and possible photo Reply Blind box 281-F c/o Voice - WANT TO BUY Working Dark Tower game or other fun games Must be working and with all parts Maybe we can trade. 952-7650 GwM. 45 years young. 5;9-··~ 180 lbs, bwn/bwn. non-smoker drugs. honest. tun loving. caring. masculine, attractive En1oy theater. dming out. entertammg and quiet times for two Seeking financial secure. stable. like-minded male2G-40for dating and possible relationship. Wnte. meet and see what happens. Reply to Blind Box 281-E c/O Voice MasCU1-1ne WM. 39. 5'1 t". 155. -Ff AJP~-Gr A. wants masculine WM. 28-45 not overweight ·maybe regular John 558- 8912 TRIM NY GUY '38, GWM. 5·5·· 160. brown'brown. pro­f• S&Onal. attractNe. outgoing EnJOVS Mm. music Seeks masculine sincere GWM over 30 for romance and possible re1att0nsh1p Hispanic engineer. or arch•· tect a ptus Reply with letter. photo and phOoe to Blind Box 281-S c/o Voice. TALL TEXAS COWBOY Handsome. 1nte111gent. sincere. GWM. 23 s·r. 195 Brown hair and mouS1ad"le.. See«s a special fnend(S) for dating and more Prefer someone who en1oys C& W dancmg. quiet times at home and has his ~~e~~~~~ir~0:~~~J~ro~=~:~~~ t1onship ouented and not interested In one night stands or shallow people Reply wi1h lelter. photo and phone No reply without photo Reply Blind Box 279--Dcio Voice or call 684-0911 Pharmacist needed lo meErt fur UH ad mis st0ns recomrneodat1on requirement Sin c8fe appt cant Please call Robert S 523--3751 920-2831 Thank for k!av1ng message GWM would 1ke to meet same 165 Iba, white well bu1ll. fun loving EnJOyS rnus1c art. and outdoor sports Call between the hoursof5-6pm Ask lorCharhe447-9171 GWM. 5'1~35, 155.-brown/brown. mas· cul1ne. professional, en)Oys entertaining. travel, cand~l1t evenmgs, music and rom­ance But more 1mportant1y-shaung e•penences P.ease respond P Q_ Bo• 37333 Houston, TX 77236 FREE ACTION VIDEO filmed by amateur photograph• of y< and your lnend and lover For info, send phone number to Occupant. P 0 Box 42445, Houston 77242 WM w1lh large porno c01lect1on would like to meet others interested 1n a magazine exehange Let's trade the mags we·re11red of or rust share Jim. Box 219219-268 Houston. TX 77218 Researching possible story on Houston1- ~~·~~;n&-~6u~mJ:;~m the Gav Hairy mer\/ha1rtans adi;stlnfo -s20o Har. 59 West 1Clh NYC 10011 Gay wrest11ng1 Uncensored mlop1.1i:pa11 $300: NYWC. 59 West 10th. NYC 1001 GWM, STABLE, 36 A slim and homy bottom seeks non· smokmg top thru 40"s. who"s thick. hung and horny !or deep and satislymg safe sex. possible IOng-term relationship Repty Bhnd Bo..: 279-B c/o Voice GBF would 1ke to meet a f~sh. Quiet hon· eat. sincere, 3~40 Reply Bhnd Box279-L Clo voice GWM 35. '511' 155. br hzl. professional sincere YES• Air food and water extSt nuts Ide the Loop• Anyone else lwe 1n West Houston and want to meet others n Mem­unal area En1oy cooking mo-vtes theater. talking and iaugh1ng For tun frohc. fnendsh1p and a safe romp In •he hay reply Bt•nd Bo11 278-S cJo Voice PHONE SEX Our sef'YICe conneas Horney Guys 24 hrs •dav Dottnowfor essthan$3.SOan hOu• C4'5> 346-8747 OUR POLICY on Sexualty-Exphcit Ad\ter· t111ng The Montrose Voice does not bel•e'ile I hat humansengag1ng in consent· mg se11ual acts wtth one another is immoral Our readers are encouraged to ad11ertise here to seell relationships, encounters. adventures, etc All advert"S-- 1ng shoutd. howe-.-er not contam lan ~~!?!that would offend an unsuspecting A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston ena Frederick Brandt can show yOU how to have actJve tun or play passrve games with the personal ads In thar book ·c .. sS1f1ed Atta rs. they 11 tell yoo hOw to write an ad that realty stands out. what to exped when you place or respond to an ad. and eveo what all thOse funny little abbreviations mean Send $8 to "CltiSifiedAflarrs.· Alyson Pub. Dept P..5, 40 Plympton. St . Boston. MA 0211&(AISo included ..,.-111 be a coupon for SS off on yournexl Person.als1nyourch0- 1ce of 25 gay publ1cat1ons. tnclud•ng the Montrose Voice ) PLAY SAFE Sale sex IS tun. erotic Play safe for your sake. for yoor partners sake YARD & GARAGE SALES HAYING A YARD SALE? Anne. 1nce 1t here then stand back fur lhecrcwd Call 529-8490orv1srt the Voice et 408 A11ondafe to place your yard sale announcefT'lent ADS BY THE INCH In addition to o u r regu1ar classified rates of paying ··by the word.'" you can purchase space here .. by the inch." When buying by the mch. you can include special art, logos or fan cy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3- $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2"' $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2"' $29 3" $39 In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi<e 26 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 14, 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To oo..-ertise Ir> t is page. coll 529-8490 during buSinesS hOurs ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep it bstecl here'" the Montrose Voice whMe Hteralty thousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise yO\.lr professional service through a Vo+ceClass1!1ed Call 529-8490 :~er~~.~~~p~~s~ha~~n~~·s0" d~~~ MasterCard. Visa or Carte Blanche AIR CONDITIONING ALL PAINT & BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland. 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Taft, 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE NEARTOWN KARZ 1901 Taft. 524-8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Retr1ger111on. etec1r1cal 526-4617 AUTO REPAIR & BODY SHOP Servicing the area ltx years 2001 Harold 522-5255. 526-1940 AUTO SALES. LEASING FAMILY MOTORS 5210 Buffalo Spee<Jway. 667-6804 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-19~ SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see ·Cars & Bikes on "Montrose ClaSS1hecr page AUTO REPAIR WHEELS AND TRIMS T ·tops. hubcaps. wheel covers. tires Insurance claims welcome 50'll. olf deductible 681·5345 Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or1 Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electncal Repair 526-3723 2716 Taft WEST GRAY AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Gray. 528-2886 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS ·--------, I Super Head I Dino's Barber Shop I I 302 W 11th at '!'ale I (Heights) 863-1520 I I Haircuts $6 & up L _ ~~ .'.:'.,1_:~d~s _ _J Tommy·s Barber Shop Hair cuts $1000 House calls $15.00 & up For into 528· 8216 Dales B8rber Styling. 940 H~ghls B-tvd 868-4784 BOOKKEEPING CONSTRUCTION / CONTRACTING BHr HouM Leveling I FoundeUon Co. 681-5345. Midtown Air 521-9009 HSK CONTRACTING S:>G-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DA TING SERVICE MkHown CrHllon• Unique Glfb •nd ServlcH 521·9009 OENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Houston. TX 77006 Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appointment (713) 524-0538 DOG GROOMING INNER CITY DOG GROOMING 801 Richmond Monday-Friday 7 30am·6 30pm Easy drop ofl and pick up Call 520-7687 EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL 2525 Univernty {Village) 528--1589 & 4414 South Main. 523-5109 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FUNERAL DIRECTORS -SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE 1:111111rn FUTONS For the REST ol your tile• Cu,tom made. 1~cot1on. 526--0911 GIFTS. PARTY GOODS Midtown CrHllon• Unique Gitt. and Servk:H 521·9009 TIS THE SEASON 1966 w Gray (R1over Oaks) 52(}-5700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOURMET FOOOS Your mother used them Your grandmother used th1 Smee 1868 quality Watkins Spices and home products Free catalog. Herbs Spice Rack. 314 fowler. 713-B61· 164. GOURMET SHOPS SAY CHEESE 3626 Westhe1mer (Highland V11 ge>. 621 1825 GYMS OLYMPIA FITNESS 6 RACKETBALL CLUB 8313 SW Fwy. 988·8787 HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPS CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #10. 661·2321 HOME AIR CONDITIONING Midtown Air 521·9009 TIME FOR Ale REPAIR? $25 plus parb. CALL 643..0398. LIQUOR LIQUORS "DELIVERY SERVICE·• WAUGH DRIVE LIQUORS 1402 WELCH at WAUGH 529-9964 DORIS and ROGER-ORIGINAL OWNERS M/V/AMEX MEDICAL CARE STEVE 0 . MARTINEZ. M.D. 2801 Ella Blvd suite G. 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS DR. C.E. FONTAN I ER Diseases of the Colon & Rectum * Colonoscopy * Hemorrhoids * Constipation * Rectal Bleeding Medical & Surgical management 872-7676 Answered 24 hours 210 West Greens Rd. Houston, TX 77067 MOVING MOVEMASTERS Bm1 tc Vr i.a. MC. AMEX welcome 192: Wes h4 rrr-1 r 63f'-'6555 PEST CONTROL RESULTS PEST CONTROL & SANITATION 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALL' Pnnhng and developing enlargements 1umbo prints, Mm Kodak paper 2615 Waugh Dr 520--1010 PRINTlflG RINN"S SPEEDY PRINTING 1617 W Alabama. 527.0027 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAX PREPARATION TAX RETURNS-ACCOUNTING 0111 Roberts CPA. 871-1329 TIRES ••• 529-1414 fl; .. ~ ~ TME 11flf l'UlCE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview J Blks West of Montrose TRAVEL BED AND BREAKFAST San Francisco. Los Angeles. San Diego Prvate homes Details Bay Hosts. 1155 Bosworth. SF. 94131: 415-334·7262 TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travelarrangments All services FREE Open Monday through Fnday 9am-5.30pm 2029 Southwest Fwy Houston. TX 77098 (713) 529-8464 VACATION IDEAS? See "Vacations· following On the TJwn' on the previous page TYPING TYPING Resumes Tax Services, Bookkeeping Work overloads Tutoring, l.B.M. compatible 522-9005 VIOEO VIOEOSCOPE 2016 Montr058. 529-5544 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VIDEOTAEND 1401 Cahlorn1a. 527-0656 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay video service 1420Westhe1mer 522-4485 479-0771 Singers • Dancers Musicians • Actors • Etc. Personalized Tapes of Talents Montrose Voice Classified Advertising [.':~::;1e:,:,"g',~,~':~~=~~~nl:i~hfie~e::,=:,'~~7;;r""' F0tr~ul•rd• l•yecM' mg THE HEADLINES: Headline words 1n bold type, centered. are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can also a.ppear withm the text or at the end of the ad. and arealso$1 per word, w1tha m1n1mumof$3per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 4()¢_ (Additional regu1_ar words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Word• not 1n all caps are 55¢: each. Add1t1onal BOLD WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1honal word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 4()C THESE THREE LINES All CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each add1t1onat word l1keth1s 1s 40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE :THIS IN TEXT ARE SSC EACH AddHlon•I bold words llke this In IHI 1re SSC each. ADDITIONAL BOLO, ALL CAPS, WOADS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 7De EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Aun the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes dunng the run, pay for the full run in advance, and deduct 15% Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number. We'll ~~;~du~n!~a~~,'gf7':c~<k~::~:f~~;re!atci~~~~~~~~ :d~ubis~~1~~~b~~e~a~i~1~ forwarded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad in or phone it in You can pay by check. money order. M~stercard, Visa. American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper Ads received rater will be placed in the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number. c!o Montrose Votce. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028. It will be for­warded. unopened. to the advertiser Enclose no money. ADDITIONAL NOTES: A "word '" is considered anything separated by "spa­ces.~ except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment is a recognized word if it stood on its own. A _complete phone number including area code, 1s 1 word City. state and zip 1s 3 words bold line bold line text words bold llne Use additional paper If necessary CATEGORIES: D Announcements D Accomodat1ons (~edging for Houst?n visitors) D Cars & Bikes ~ ~~~7:,~~~~tsf~~~~ ~::,~~~nBs1~~~i~;n;~r: D Models, Escorts. Masseurs D Personals D Pets o Rides D Travel D Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTEO AD UNDER _ IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY, OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $ 1 each (minimum $3 per line) regular words in text at 40¢ each· ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLO ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in it mailed to me. $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times weeks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) o Also, I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged. as indicated below) an additional D $29 for 6 months or D $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged: _ METHOD OF PAYMENT D Check enclosed D Money order enclosed o Cash o VISA charge D MasterCard charge D Diners Club charge o Carte Blanche charge D Amerctan Express charge D Bill me If charging, card expiration date Credit card number - Signature Name _ Address - Phone(s) for verification of ad, if necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 52~8490 weekdays 1Qam-5.30pm MARCH 14, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 27 .,. MONTROSE RESOl_TRCES ~TE:-NAT ORGANiZATiON~ Bar Owner1 A.Mn ol T• !BOAT), 720 Brazos"' 02 Aull1n, /512} "72·3333 AIDS ActoOfl Cour'IClllFec»r•IOl'I ot AIDS Rei.1ed Org..,1ut•ons. 1115:.t. lnoepeno.,,ct1 A11 SE W81hington, OC 20003. (212J S.7-3101 G1y & lftb_, Prws Aun. P0B A. 01<1 OWJI- SI• ~Yo"-.NY10011.(212)999-e622 Gay Roghtt Nlll Lobby. POB 1892. Wuhington. DC 20013.(202)5'8-1801 HurMn R•ghlt c.rnP91gn Fund, POB 1390. W•lh­~ ton. DC 20013. !202) 5-66-2025 Intl GI)' Ann. RFSl. Bo• 350. 5-10125 51ockholm. Swedefl_ phoM •"&-88" 80 50 L9n'lbdl Lllg•I D•tenM, 132 W 43r<I. N- York. NY 10039.(212}9«""'88 LWb•ntG1y R1ghl1 Advoe91 ... POB 822. AOAhn 78767 NII Aun of 8us11"11U Couneq. Box 151,.5. S1n FrMOIOO. CA 94115. ("15) 1116-6363 NrltA.MnolG1y 6 lHbo1nDlmoCkit>t.. 17 .. 2 Miii A11SE. W""•ncJIOl'I. DC 20003. (20215"&7·3l<M NII Gl'y Helillh EOue Fo1.mdlt•on. POB 7&f ~ .... YOO. NY 10038. f2t2) 563-6313 Of DI' G._.berg {713)523-521)1 N•I Gly Rlgtlts AdYOC ... ~ C.tro, 5#1 Flln­C191 », CA M11 ... <"1~) 163-3624 N.11 GI)' hlil Force 1NGTF), 80 SUI A ... N- van. NY 10011 !212)741.fleOO NGTF'1 er.,..,., 100) 221-rou fowtlldlt N­Yort. Sii.ie) Ru,.1 Coeltlon. elO Wllllr·Z1ngN. eo.. 611. 81urn. TX7662'1' Tx Gly'l..C-"n Tull Force. P08 AK, Denton 78201.{8111387.a2.e USTr ... t4•Tr1n-l.lllCont1etS..:: 1017·8 E Pike. INtt'!: 96122. _!?~~4-8266 Hairy men/ Hatrlans adlist lnlo $2.00 Hair, 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 --ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your hstmg. We list here each week name of organization. address. phone. ~~!8~f ~~~~? ~!~~: f,"~~ir~:·1n an,~ incorrect. mat I correct mlorma11on to ~he Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY Aid tor AIDS POB6&l1". 77~ 52'·-6o1f An-A C.iie11.1 Chor~.-o.l - ), 11 ct;f • POe 6673". 77296 APii.ce u,tt;"e Sun. sn- iets Aci.u. 1236 W Gray. fii,..5.jzs AIDS Hotline. 529-3211(Gii5,,., Chbolird) Am9nW. Gey A1,....1s~P0866111-11266- 527. 11255 Astro -A .. ooo ... ~Y for Iha Desi 520--0734! !TY) Avoodafe Assn, POB 8$)5A 7729& meet1 7 30pm 2"d Thurs Women I Chril\l•n Cl! 110 P•Cdic ,A.i.u.la.i,o, W, omyn1 Magui,.., &oo F.WFwy •335. B.VOU B·1u s"7ngers. A.obert Moon ow 209 Sir al· lord. 86&-3084 Benno Memo-nal uruted Met'rioaist Church ,..-'° H•rold. $28-1017 s11c 10 ~ Sun. Gay PT!Oe Wffk p1ncske t>te.klut t 1em-3pm Jun28. G8Y PriM Week pet sht>w "pm Jun 28 Choices Unlomoted. 529-32111G8L Sw1tt.hbo•rd) tl'lr•tian Church ol the Good Sl'lepherd. 1707 Montrme 1111c 1pm Sun Bible study 1 JOpm '""~ Ci1urch of Cnn1111tn fl•th, UMO Wnthe1mer 529-80'.JS hCS 10 45am 6urt Bible1tucfy 7 -.:lpm Wed: R ... Chns A Ric:•. p111or Church jfihiAock.~~ ... ~Sun o Wilm Ci 1111ns t,:,r Hot 'll!n Eq1.1111h1y !CHE . P@ 'KM~ 17253.&80-33A$.937~ mee12ndlues.2A14 Gr1rnercy c...a. Leib.in Mo1n.r1 Group, SISHI .. 73-'HOI rneett 2nd & Ath Thun. O.gnlty Ctr C..Jppen. 3'2=6502 - L:iit •5'1. o:an.n -Butfer-prft. -me9t1 -it Brllos Rrver Bottom, Z<IOO 8rNOt. 528-9t9Z CcintTi111ee tor ~bbe: Health AwlteneH. Poe XMS. 77253, 521-6333. 522-SOM "'Sfl9r1ng Group tor the Worned Weir' meet Fn 7_.,m Montrose COUl"ISeltng Ctr ~~C)P(;a' ~iii#~~~~mnmee C Com.fitft,rty GO'spet Cir 3207 Montrose, 521· 051 Svcs 11..n Sun. 7:30ptn Thurs ~r.:a~r~!v'~~~l1~F~~9::Y ~.!~:1~ & Blodgetl CoUpJff Oay°Pr1do WHk pet lhPw Aprn Jun 28 Ber1~Ctlurch ._.1s11 Hotlrne, 229-1505 mo Comn mee ol GPC. 526-813-4 ... rma S!ud'y Group. '06 AlfOnd•le. f.24-955" Diana Fo!.W1tlsttort 2 JO M11et1. 1 .2~791 g;Yi"~&c'r~t::':ci'a. v~:"s.~· 528· ESOPS Pn .. ate p;o!•sionat Soc •I C'utt 961· 9876 fed--..ai of.. iii C'Mrll•• un.&.d lo;- ~•I Servi- ~=.~~~kJi°t:~;'=':.~~~mM:!!.t?!; C·JfUC Montroee Cou...iing Ctr 11tunQn.,,-Ct1ui'ch.52lOflnn1n 5:Z.1511 , .. c 111S.m Sun Fionirun.-1. Joe s20-8oi9 oi·s.111ii00r ·m. 1288 runs Sun. Tues & Thurs Memor11I Park TlllWllS Ctr. Gay Pru'9 Week sporU day (lent.­lt11e) Jun21 G•y & Alroe Sh.-rl,\g e7per~e iGASEI.~ 1311. 528-0881 G8Y & Lesb;ln Afeh.;;;o1h.tt11t•la ol l/H Inc ~~7i6:e~S6.~7f'OM~ 1113 ·w9s1he1m• aay-&L.t);;;;s!Udenl A .. n II uorH: 80x3i4 "800 CllOOun. 529-3211 (G&l Sw1tchbo•rd) a.y 6 LesblaliSw1~rd. POB 86591. 11266. 52&-3211 1nlorm•hon. counseling. referu11 lTY, AIDS Hotline G.Y -As11ns i Fr1.-icll. -i8s.-3633 or Gu Sw11chbolitd GIYFlii,,.l.32i7F1nnon. 528-0111 GAL H1spamC1 UMldOi. P08 ii<J921. i12eo. 521 • 36"1 meet• 7pm 2nd Mon. 011~nity Ctr. Gay Pnoe WMll ... ent Jun 27 G.-y,;;u·rM. Altial.ce, sao-9.48i G.YP9op1e 1nctW;;t1•"5cienCe~ Boit 811-ee ... latflt 77'01.aes.-264.:r Gay Po1ttia1 C.ucus <GPCJ. POB 66664 7726. 521-10(0" rneets3217Fannon1st&3rdWlld.C9"· d1d1te sc,.....ng mid-March. mernbenh1P Deld­lme M•r 3 for ~·1 c-.ieu• endol'Mment1 Apr 2. primary •ledlOft May 3. Gay Pnde Weell com mumty aw•rd• d1nl'let' Jun 27. Gay Prldll Week Spotts Pll'k Rlilly Jun 28 iHQU) .Gay Pnde Week Coinm11tff. P08 eei21 n266. Stln Ford 523-7644 or C.thy Len11hlin ~~,f,~yb•t.~;fr~~~~~~-t~~: commemor1t1on of raid on Mary·s (lantal 111•) Jun 20: Sports Cly! Omner (teot111 .. e) Jun 21. Walk for Umty (tenllt,..e) Jun 22: DJ Spmoll (ten11· hve) Jun 22. Montrose Art Alh1nceeh1bit 7 30- 11pm Jun 23. -The Group .. h~• lhHler presentation Jun 2". 01y ol Remember•nce {tent111 ... ) Jun 26. Gay & Lesbian H1sl)ln1CS Un•· dos eYent Jun 27. GPC community '"''"'' du'lner Jun 27. Ber1t1g C""-ireh l)lnclkebrelll.l•t 11•m-39m and pet ShO* Apm Jun 26. Greater Montrose Bu11ness Guild bu11rieu budding workshop & tr•M l•ir ~le.nlltrYel 9 30llm·3 )()pm Allen P•rk inn Jun 28. MontrOM Symphonle B•nd concert (tent11111e1 Jun 26. Lowe1 W•th•mer-Wsugh Or Pl'•da 5 30prn Jun 29 GPC Spotts P•rk R•llY Jun 29 GiffterM~trc.e BUSiness GUtid. Pt1yli.F rye ~'!: ~~- ~~~;:.1::.,.?i,;;, ~~ pherd. board meet1ng2ndor3rdThur$. t.i•.,_. bu•ld•l"lg workShop & trade l•or Henlsl"'9J t30llm·3 30pm Allen P•rk Inn Jun 28 The GrOl.op" lh•ter workshop, Joe W8tti'522- 22CM mealt 7pm Thurs. D1gmty Ctr. 3217 Fin­~ Gay Pr.O. Week p.._ntat1on Jun 2" H&r.111,,.1tch ProductlO,.. 2615 W1ugh Or •2i&. 77006 lesb•an concerts, free m111hng hst .H.o.m. ophlle lnter1s•th Ath1nce. 729 M•-;;Of~S2J. Hou Ar .. G&l Eng1,,;.fl& SC'oent';ii"s. POB 66631. 77006. A39-1879 meet• 7pm "th Tuell Hou Bar Owners Assn !HOBO), c108razo.R111er Bottom, 2'll0 Brazos. 528-9192 meets 2pm 2nd Wed Hou eo;mumtYCi°"'ns.· SQ.83.. ,- - Ho1• Council ol Clubs. 526-~ - - Ho.I o.u.-p;O.f ..o n1i.. 52»922. ~w meat• 7 30pm 2nd Tu• HOO-Fi~P.. o.;.-dw•tker ~-·~ 2776ettM(ip.m tb.Ga.,.. 11u~oe.1es. S1..e e~on 1ao.- 9'4$: rnftts 7 30pm 1St $.at ~ G_., S11-denb~S.~ W3098 Hou lnter-f1•1h Al.I •nee cont•c.t rtirough lntegnty'!::'® HD&. Motorcycsielub,I. oMary• •022We5tl'let' """526-8851 Hou No 11 Profes•o~ts. P-OB 38<IO. Humb e 773"7 B •t 82l-7126.: meet 7:30pm 2nd $a1 Hou- Outdoor GrOUP(t-iOGJ 521·3&11 ot Jim 88().3144 =~T&o/'~~·~~=~:~!: Ct• ~~m-lT=~Ho=1 ~~~~~&':1 ~ML)TUAL TENNiSeYents&tisnnUltl-;-·UsGay Open~ N11!•onsl Tennis Tournament May 2A-2e. San Fr•ne'9C:O, Gay Pnde We9k 1ports a..,.-1ten.­tat1Ye) Jun 21) l·H nc. POB 1eQ'1~7J222~6!M-ii32. 52'9-101A •tfihated groups are ln11!1'9CI. e·usrno't A Paae& in the Sun. Montrose A rt Alhance, G&L Arch'"" ol T•. G&L S*rtchbo8rtt, Montrose Symptlofllc a.no: boarel mNC 73Cll)m1st Tnun f11.,1ec11oc• '1orw) edUCm:K>NI lorurn 7 30pm 3rd Thurs 1t.g·e~ &pea....,.· Bure-.i. P08 S91 Beitaire 774(11. 689-'°64 •nteQnty,1'fou 1 Ep1scOpa.an; --p:oe 66o0&. 77266, 52A-1489" meets 7:30pm 2nd & Ath Mon, Aul"r HoUle. 6265 M1rn 1ntefad(O...--COgrcuP1.P09.18CM111222894-- '''2 KPfT--R.idiO.-FM-90. A19"iO..ett8'11d.. ~2&--400C ~:1rw.~h·n 1 s=:':;":n,~ ~~ ~: 90~"' KStAIOs Foun<1et1on. 3317 Mori°rose eo. 115S 77006, 524-207 Jerry KNif.Ti8n c • .arF """°" 77~._.1>6 Krew.otHY<1ra.811Gfa~cS:&11M•c•f2& 032 Lambdli Ctr Gr( A1cot1oia & A .. non •21<1 Jo AnM. 521-1772 Lnbt11n1Gay ~Ol;ree s~c. Un...er1rly of HOU "eoo Calhoun bo• 309. 7700<I. 7A9-t253 mfftt 230pm 111 .. nate Tues, Spndletop Room 2nd !loot, Un1...,,1tyCtr Let UI Efl18rts1n You WHkend. pro,ec of Hou Covni II of C Jb9, 5~ The 11111 f°hurch fi2f.rvo. 522--7695 aves 2~mSun ~;.,ng~.te:.c,~rct11n!7J.~f: \t-~l ~~ -~"- Lone ~tar Nudist G;.oup POB-740572. 7~4 lower W•n*m.-Pottt:e &ii>&.rtion. 802 w •. lhetm9r, 529-3100 LUthefft-c O'N:-errled.fneets st Grace Lutn1"9n Cl'lurch. 2!-15 W1111gh 93\o0648 meee 3rd Tues ewen1nge McAd(if).Ho,,,_ cloKS-A1osF~°'1.3317 MontroM eox t155. 524-2,.37 t..fa1~~·;;~~3~1 ~-l~':~~ meetsb;..weekly ::~:O:::c9::~~~~P:~:,.i;:~:·~· h.ick d•nn• 7 30pm 1•t Sat monthfy. l'ICS 10 AS.m & 7 15pm Sun & 1 15pm Wed. member' ~.:S.:1':~ ~=,:..3 0pm Mon. •c1Jc8110n Metropohl.1n Pen1eco11•1 Church. ie&-0280 ~•~or~· Benng Ac!1111t1• Bldg Mulberry 1'HouJ-M81-foPQi.111n W•nd EnMmbie. 521-"i&il Meet1 St Stephens EptSCOpe.1 Cl'lurch. 7 XI W•d M~Ar1 Alh&n"Ce 5'-~"-- 5332 affll••t• l'H inc. m.-1 2nc:I Mon. Gay Pnoo WeeltPh•blt7.l0-11ptnJun23 MofllrOHBui~n.sGu11d ... G• .. tarMo,.rOM­Bu• Guikt M°'*i:.stichurctaotCtiret. lfooMOntrme 11. 9286: s~c 11sm Sun MontroMC.v•c Club '"Nffrt0wn Assn MontrOM Ci 1c. 803 H1 ... t~. 528-5531 open Mon Tl.It'. Tl ur$ &-9pm ~--rc;;couniry c1oQge..,-'5&ie61 meet J: lOpm Fn MCCR Cl'turch 1919 Deeltur. Wnt ....,dHo 5r"7"730pmFeb238RB.7pmM11r2 krnctr9d 5'1<ftts "Clogg11"1g •I 11 s Belf 10 "Spm Feb 28, 9 30pm Mir 1, 8pm M1r 5 The a.,n Mont-rOse COUf'Wfmg Cir. 900 Lo..e(if203 529- 0037 AIDS 111t:t1m support group 6 30pm Mon Women·• Support Group 7pm Tues MontrOM S.ngen. g•y men·• chorus. M1h 526- 3610 MOn1roffS0'11>a1t LHgue POB 22272_ 77227 52A-31U Gay Pnde Weett sportSdlY (tent•lt.,•) Jun 21 MOni:;o;;--s,pO,t, Assn (MSA)- see spec1hc sub­group. GIY Pnde Week sports d..,. !lent•l1ve) Jun 21 Mom;;;SeSYmPhonic 81n<1. Poe 66613 77266 527-tM!>A ,,_, 7 30pm Tues. Oignoty Ct• 3217 Fsnl'lln. •flil•et• l'H l,nc, 0.y Pride Week concert tentatlwl Jun 28 MORE 526 MOR~E~s'-'~=,,,,~,~,'°""'~-.m~oU!Pi= 1:1ent natrnent pgm, pr0f9CI Mon!roMCounHt· 1ngCtr MS... Mon N•gr..tso.;1ing. p1.,. siao.um LI,... 820C lkMSmatn SI- fi2-A5g7 G-, Pnde Wwtr; •PCWts cJ.y ~tentet 11e1 Jun 21 ~:-Zt"';' ,N;t,"~·~;;;~~Ji~~m'1!4.:Se 8200 &.-.neon. Gay Pnde Week 1ports a..,.­rt.,.. t1!1119) Jun 21 MSA fiOot (e~"atci.IL:Hgu.. Oebb.e $co1l9f'3- ,1511 or Oannrs Lord &eCH752 GIY Pnoe Wffli; sportsd..,. ctent•tn1•) Jun21 MS.Ai-Voh)'Ml'f"Ma~- g._m;.·7pm Tues G'890'Y-l1nco1n school. 1101 T•fl.. G..,.­Pricle Weell sports day (tenll!• .. e) Jun 21 Mor.trosew11ch °Wbgr01Jp Ne.rtown Ai•" NlitionaiGsy HeitfhEduC9t10r.·Found.i1on. 523- 520< =~~h?;~:~=.'.°Pcfe0=2~~~d .. ~es- ,;;;;:ip,,.n -Assn ,M-ori~oiiC. .. ~c-ClubJ. 1ii3 Westl'leimer- meet 7pm "th Tues NeartO<Wn -Bus1"8U -Atlitnee. 529-7010 rT!eets rpm 2nd Wed. L Mrty Bank. 1001 W•tt:•mer N~.,.. Fre-edom C'~en Ch1.11eh. 829 Y•le---e&3- 71 SW"S tOam Sun &.r.wi«• Anony"1au1 C..)-Motitrose Cou~ Ing Ctr 900 low.rt Peggy st 526-AOt5 meets 8pm&ln.. '4onlrCMColll'IMMgCtf 66pmWed, &tring Church 1"A0 H.lrokl ~ & Froendl of lesbl1ns & Gays P9l'efltt FLAG I 464-4663 meets 2Pm 3rd Sun Prestiy tertan Ctr 41 Oekd.ie P•rk P.op1e. c...;i Neertowf"! Commuru!Y F_. flOI.-. 1•· 252 .. Pll -.,. L fKIOn. Pf e l600CJ6.:i. t7260 156 A76 Presbyt.rtarns for l•b an1G.., Concerns PYabr•Wt Ct1 A1 ()ekdale. 526-2584 mMtS 1 'JOpm 2nd ues Pres1oan11 l. ;.11> (past Pf'Dldents C;P<.1 PNI ...... ..,7296 523-«124 .R,e_cre ehonel L.lnd Fund Comm :tee. ~111'1egades Renegeo. meet• al Ille Si"rn. 710 Pac lie 5 .. - 9'21 club night Thurs AiC9unt¥G.., Leitn8nSu'PPortGroup ;n.. il.11 G8L Switc ... bOard) Aottol<o l'lapel 1<1er.1 Su Ron 52•983G $t..M1t1 Ill f. C~tng for .. lhr .. ter ng f'IM.lllS, 522-508' Society lor 2nd s.tf (Tn-"EUJ. Gu1t c.;.s1 Trsn..-lita Ches>* P
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