Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 154, October 7, 1983
File 001
File size: 12.96 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 154, October 7, 1983 - File 001. 1983-10-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/541/show/516.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-10-07). Montrose Voice, No. 154, October 7, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/541/show/516

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 154, October 7, 1983 - File 001, 1983-10-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/541/show/516.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 154, October 7, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 7, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Union Jack owner loses in court again news, p.5 How do you rate when entertaining? Roz Ashley's Quiz, p.14 SMU again denies recognition to gay group news, p.10 MONTROSE V D I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Oct. 7, 1983 Issue .. 154 Published Every Friday It was a "Salute to Mayor Whitmire" at the Montrose Business Guild meeting this past week and much City Council {present and hopeful) showed up Mayor, Council Candidates Woo Business Guild By Robert Hyde Houston Mayor Kathy Whitmire addressed the Greater Montrose Business Guild Tuesday night in a climax to an evening that saw the turn out of most of the area's politicians who are seeking the Montrose vote. Billed as a "Dinner with the Mayor/' over 150 people attended the event which was held in the banquet room at Birraporetti's at 1997 West Gray. After receiving a standing ovation late in the evening, the mayor said, "Th.is is a very special group to me." She said that Montrose had been her home for over nine years and that she can appreciate how moat of its residents feel they are different from the rest of the world. After winning the hearts of most guild members and their guests Mayor Whit­mire reviewed the issues that have con­fronted her since being in office. She remembered the problems caused by the country's economy and its resulting reces· sion which eventually hit Houston. Turning to the subject of weather, she recalled the tornadoes that swept through the city and finally Hurricane Alicia. "We were ready to start preparing for plagues of frogs and locusts," she said. Then jokingly she mentioned that after Hurricane Alicia her residing in Montrose might have had something to do with "why the debris got picked up in every other area of town first." Mayor Whitmire mentioned next that she was very proud that during her aClmin­istration she was able to keep the Ku Klux Klan demonstration under control. Then just as she waa patting herself on the back for that one, "a few months later, the police started marching in Houston," ahe said to house applause. Whitmire also touched on her plea to change the city's image. She said that ahe had received suggestions from putting jumpsuits on thecity's garbagemen to put­ting Perrier in the fountain in front of the Warwick Hotel. But ohe told guild members not to despair: "We'll soon be serving quiche in the police department cafeteria." The mayor then recalled briefly her elec­tion campaign of two years ago. She men· tioned how many of her opponents were against her because of her support from the gay community. She said that her oppooition had tried to defeat her because she wa1 suppoeed to be into kinky oex. "Bui it didn't work," she said. "They could see I was nothing but a CPA." On a more serious note, Whitmire said that "the City of Houston is a big busi­ness'' and that she is seeking to attract the beot people to do the job of running it. She mentioned that she was particu· 1arly proud of Police Chief Lee Brown. "You can do the right thing in govern· ment. It might not be popular at the time, but ultimately people will recognize the wisdom of the decision," she said. She stated that now even Houston's Policemen's and Patrolmen's Union sup­ported the chief. Whitmire said that when she hired Brown, he wanted to make "Houston the showcase in the nation for policing," and that is still his goal. In closing, Whitmire advocated the building of the downtown convention cen· ter "so we can compete in the convention market," she said. "Houston reaps the benefits; the visitors pay the bill ." The evening began with an address by Texas state Representative Debra Dan· burg who encouraged voting for Proposi· tion A which would authorize the City of Houston to build the new downtown con· vention center. "If you look at all the great cities of the world," she said, "it's the inner cities that make them greal Our inner city is an embarraHment." Dan burg feels that the center will help overcome this problem and believes that the new building would create new jobs due to restaurant, retail and entertain· ment expansion. There would be more shops, more theaters and more employees running them and receiving a higher rate of pay, she said. Danburg was followed by Anne Wheeler, who is running for Council-at­Large Position 1. "I'm very proud of the support I've received from tht Montrose area," Wheeler said. Wheeler focused briefly on Position 1 incumbent Jim Weatmoreland's high absentee record while in office. "He's miased critical votes," she said. 111 will be there every day working for your interests." Then the podium went to Nikki Van Hightower. Council-at-Large Postion 4 candidate. After mentioning her credentials as a women'• advocate, Hightower said that Houston's boomtown days are over and that Houston is no longer the mecca that it once was. "I would like to see the mayor and city council attract business to this city," she said. Hightower also supported the down· town convention center but added, "We can't do it with the convention center alone." She referred to San Antonio's River Walk and said that Houston could also benefit from such an area. "I would like to see us move ahead with our bayou beautification program," she said. Incumbent Eleanor Tinsley, Council-at· Large Position 2. followed Hightower stat· ing that she has had "the ability to work with a diverse group of people over my last four years in office. uover and over i hope I have proved to you the ability to confront the tough prob-lems of this city," she said. Tinsley then touched on the problem of the area's prostitution and mentioned that she sympathized with Councilman Grea· niao. "Combatting prostitution io hard to do constitutionally," ohe said. Tinsley also endorsed the down town convention center. "I know you prefer an Allen Parkway site," she said, 11but I feel the downtown site will be more beneficial to the city." Tinsley challenger Carolyn Day Hob­son followed the incumbent stating, "lean work with diverse people and get what I wanl" Hobson, an attorney who worked with the Federal Trade Commission in Washington. D.C., in its consumer protec­tion division, is a Texas Southern Univer­sity graduate and studied business law at the University of Houaton. A trial attor· ney for 10 years, she is interested in crime prevention and feels that Chief Brown is doing the best he can in this area. Hobson addressed Houston's lagging eeonomy and said that if elected, she would try to entice foreign businesses to this "international city" which would increase Houston's revenues and provide new jobs for ita citizens. "We can no longer depend on the oil and gas industry to support this city," she said. Hobson was followed by incumbent Councilman Jim Greenwood (Position 3). .. The thing I pride myself on the most is being accessible to citizens when they have a complaint." he said. Addressing the tranaportation issue, Greenwood said "It's important to solve our mobility problems in order to attract others to this city." Greenwood said that he supports the Metropolitan Transit Authority .an,d pointed out that maintenance on theoty.s buses has improved and that so has their being on time. . District D Councilman George Grearuas followed Greenwood and proudly acclaimed District C as .. the very beat dis· trict in the city," even though Montrose, itself, he mentioned, ia only 25 percent of the district. Greaniaa received applause from the crowd when he mentioned that he did not continued page 8 2 MONTROSE VOICE / OCT. 7 , 1983 What A New Downtown ·Convention Center Will Do For All Of Houston. It will create 9 ,900 permanent jobs. It will create 1,200 construction jobs. It will stimulate Houston's economic recovery by pumping over $4 30 million into our city every year and generating millions of dollars in new tax revenue. It will help Houston compete for millions of dollars in convention business we are now losing to major convention cities like Dallas, Atlanta and New Orleans. It will provide more money for the arts. It will provide more money for vital public services. And What It Won't do. It won't cost Houston taxpayers anything to build or operate because, by law; no property taxes, sales taxes or any other taxes which go into the general fund will be used. Visitors will pay to build and operate the center when they pay a tax on their hotel bills. It won't add to Houston's traffic congestion, because most convention delegates will fly into town and then use taxis or shuttle buses to get around. Vote For Proposition A. Houston Gets The Benefits. Visitors Pay The Bills. And Thats A Fact. POL ADV PAID FO• 8Y flUENOS OF THE DCJIWNT0"1\·s CONVL"(TION CENTH 921 MAIN ST SUITT 62S. HOU5TON, TEXAS 77002 OCT. 7, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 McConn to GPC: Withhold Support of New Convention Center By Robert Hyde Fonner Houston Mayor Jim McConn and School Board Position 4. candidate Her­bert Melkln addressed the Gay Political Caucus Wednesday evening. McConn appeared before the caucus to address the proposed downtown conven­tion center issue. Now employed by a Fred Hofheinz interest, McConn was intro­duced by GPC President Larry Bagneris as "being a friend of the gay community for several years." Bucking the current trend among most politicians to endorse Proposition A which would create an ordinance allowing the city kl build the center, McConn opposed the building, calling it "a bad idea for the City of Houskln." McConn said that financing would be a problem, regardless of statements being made by many center supporters that the entire cost of the facility would come from the hotel/ motel tax kl be paid by visitors. "How many free lunches have you had in your lifetime?" he asked the caucus. McConn said that Houston is ranked fifth among U.S. cities by convention dele­gates, a standing he does not consider unfavorable; and he feels that the city does not need another center at this time. "Right now, our Albert Thomas Con­vention Center can handle 90 percent of the convention and trade shows that exist in the U.S. today," he said, "and it's only busy 65 nights out of 365." The former mayor also mentioned that there is an additional one million square feet of space available in the Astrohall and Astro Arena. McConn said that even if the building were constructed, building the center downtown would be a mistake. He stated that there are only 3700 hotel rooms down­town (two hotels folded within the last eeven months) and 1750 parking places. And referencing to the current traffic con­gestion in the downtown area, he asked the caucus, "Do we need 60,000 additional people there?" McConn then mentioned that he had been asked to help bring the 1984 Demo­cratic National Convention to the city but did not find enthusiastic support in Hous­ton'• busineH community. He said that he approached former mayor and Chamber of Commerce president Louie Welch on the subject, and reported Welch as saying, .. My people would pay money to keep them out of here." McConn said that downtown businessmen were concerned over the huge problems with crowds the conven­tion would create. "Logistically it's a bad deal, financially it's a bad deal, and there is no need." McConn added. " I feel that private interests are involved," the former mayor continued. He stated that this was really the big isaue, and that Texas Eastern, who owns the land, is behind most of it. He stated that already tax coalition groups and air­port and Galleria businesses all oppose the building site downtown. "But that's not the whole issue," McConn said. He stated that only 6 percent of the resi­dents of Houston would ever set foot in the place. He also said that those in favor of the convention site project that the center will attract as many as 700,000 people to one event. "Las Vegas, which is the biggest convention site in the world, bas only attracted 400,000 to its largest conven­tion," he said. w·rhe whole idea reminds me of building a church for Easter Sunday without a preacher," he concluded. Later in the evening, Bagneris intro­duced Herbert Melton who is running for the Position 4 School Board seat. "He knows a lot about our schools-a lot about our problems" Bagneris said of the GPC-endorsed candidate. Melkln began his remarks by stating that he had spent 26 years in the Houston Independent School District as both a teacher and an administrator prior to his retirement in 1980. His grandchildren, friends and the media kept him in touch with the operation of the district since Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 then, and through them he has become more aware of HISD'a problems . Acknowledging that he retired too early, Melton said his primBJ'Y goal now is "to see that a great deal of humanization is brought into this district. It's being dehu­manized," he said. Melkln feels that teachers are being abused and that he wants them brought more into the decision-making process. He also said that he feels it's a shame that children with above abverage IQ's are outside the system "running the streets" because of poor administration. "We're losing too many talented youngsters because of social maladjust­ments," he said, feeling that HISD is responsible for many of the inequities of the system. "I know the value of people coming together for a common cause," Melton said. He then asked GPC members to inform him of any existing inadequacies within the system that should be brought to his attention. "I don't care if you don'tbave kids there, the schools belong to you," Melton con­cluded, referring to school taxes and com­munity representation. In other business, Bagneris mentioned that the caucus' primary function over the next few days will be to get people to vote. "We will concentrate 100 percent on voter registration," he said. Consequently, GPC members will be in many popular community establishments over this coming weekend encouraging voter registration. Calling the caucus members "the most astute political people in this community," Bagneris again urged GPC members to support Mayor Kathy Whitmire. ''There are a lot of people on the north side, east side and west side that hate Kathy Whitmire," Bagneris said, feeling that many prejudiced Houstonians still haven't forgiven her for appointing Police Chief Lee Brown. In a concluding remark, Bagneris said that the Montrose Symphonic Band, which willholdalaserconcertatNumbers Monday evening, is in great need of GPC patronization. Bagneris said the evening will also give GPC members a chance to drum up more support for Mayor Whit­mire. (. ~-WAIT~ f"IWSCE-·· C> 0 0 C> Montrose Mouth Sister Mary at the Tower Thursday night, the 13th, "Sister Mary Igna­tius Explains it All for You" opens in Hous­ton and it's Montrose Voice Night at the Tower Theater Dress up as your favorite religious character and get in free {an $11 .50 value) with the coupon on page 8 After the play, journey across the street to Mary's Bar {Didn't you always wonder who they named that bar after, anyway?) for a party and a cocktail on the house for eve­ryone in religious drag "Sis Mary Ignatius" is an off-Broadway smash hit that will play at the Tower through Oct. 23 -o- Greek Fest This Week, Art Fest Next Week. Westhelmer, between Bagby and Mont­rose, will be closed to traffic from 9am to 7pm for the Westhelmer Colony Art Festival to be held Oct 15-16. The City Council approved the closing last Tuesday. The cross streets of Taft and Stanford will remain open. Now, remember all that fuss that City Council used to give us about closing Wes­theimer. -C-Aii those cars this weekend blocking Yoakum-and extending to Westheimer and West Alabama-are from people going to the Greek Festival at the Greek Orthodox Church. -o- MCC Choir and Orchestra will make its second appearance in Houston during this Sunday morning's service at the MCCR, a follow-up to Houston's MCC musical visit to Dallas. Both choirs are known in each city for quality music and are getting a national reputation for works presented at national church conferences and district church meetings. -o- A Place in the Sun will kick off its fall season with a concert by internationally known minstrel Abraham Davidson next Friday, Oct. 14, 8pm, at Gracielynn Books. 704 Fair­view. Davidson, who has performed throughout Europe, will perform songs Inspired by his singing tour of Israel, they tell us. For more information, call 522-7695. -o- The University of St. Thomas will present a free guest recital by harpsichordist William Volker on Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 8pm, Cullen Hall, 4001 Mt. Vernon. For more information, cell 522-7911 , ext. 240. -o- "Egyptian Exiles," an exhibit of work by Colorado artist David Anderson, will be on display in the gallery of The Art Institute of Houston on Yoakum Oct. 10-28. The show will consist of several mixed media pieces, watercolors and drawings. For more infor­mation, call 523-2564 -o- NBC's popular Hiii Street Blues will open its season next Thursday on channel 2 focus­ing on a multiple slaying in a ga~ bar. A_n off-duty cop who was an eyewitness 1_s afraid to identify the psychopath respcns1- ble since it will expose his private life. -o- Choices, Houston's social alternative for lesbians, is having its October Bash at Nigh­tlife, 1322 Wasthe1mer, Oct. 15 at 8pm. In conjunction with their celebration, which will feature live entertainment and a guest D.J .. Choices will select the winner of its logo contest Entries must be submitted by Oct. 10. Prizes have been donated by several Mont­rose businesses. Joey Ftyer, Choices spo­keswoman, says the group is "'open to any women who wish to party with us, and wear your flashy trash." For more information, call Joey at 84CH!041 -o- What is being celled the "Sixth Official Mr. Gay Americe Pageant" Is being held this weekend In New Orleans at the St. Bernard Parish Cultural Center. More info available at (504) 522-3819 .... c CD (.) ·- ~ ·- MAGNIFIQ.i Professional Hair Design A new. full seNice salon. Magnlllque, has opened its doors in River Oaks Four sunny windows illumine every room ... A silver seNice for gourmet coffee and select teas China cups and saucers .. Goblets of chilled wine . Faclalists to tone and cleanse your skin to correct the effects of age and weather. Stylists to provide your fJl/ery need-to bring out your beauty, freshness, craziness. your eve<y fantasy. Please consider this your personal invitation to come see us and receive Linda "Lulu" Simpson announcH tr©~ ©IF trlXI~ IXl©IL~ ~~ lf;!J©W ©~~If;!] * 3 Plus 2 Revue Featuring Show Director Ron Sioux with Robbie Roberts & Tracey starring Champagne & Madeline Garrett Mitchel Sunday, 4pm John Hurley Friday thru Sunday 9pm till MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL, Bpm WEDNESDAY Steak Night, 7pm THURSDAY 109 TUAM 528-9128 le same ol' 2 Haircuts for the Price of 1 with this ad Jock Strap Contest, 9pm HOLE 2528 Klnaston at Westhelmer (one bl"'ock west of ShephElfd) HOURS Mon-Fri 10-.2 Saturday 7-2 Sunday 12-2 Houston 524-06 72 Axis or Eptslropheus Veteb<a promlnens - ""] fjfi ~>_, < 0 ~ 0 Body Magnificent Do YoU ever gei the tee1ing thal )'OUr Aectus at> domin•s IS In cont11c1 wi1n your GIUtHUS m11umus? PrOO.bly not. most of us a1e fTIOfe wnerested m now 10 1r1m tne wa1st11ne and pro1ect in a law areas. look Incl fee. belle• wtwe t\aVtnQ tun The Body Magnificent work.sr'IOP w:J oe presentea by ret1rea commande1 Heroen A Pruett R PT graou1te of L<WN Lll'IOI Unrye1s1ty ol Cahlornia Soec:1a1izee1 lfl SP1ne1 concs11ions •ncl in OfeYentlOl'I ol ti.ck 1n1ury He has studieo wi1n St•ntey V Pang H we1 as doing extens~ Resea1ch 11"1 ManU11 1 Ther•py A bool<1a1 W• De prewiaed '°' you Iha! 111ustrates lhrff "Trunk SuPDOft Exer· c1ses to oeveloo co1umn IUOOOM •nd warns ol lour PQPUltr e11.erc1Hs 1na1 may predtSoose you 10 blck pro­blems W11h 10.000.000 peop1e in the UMed States oa1ty seelung ueatment !or back probtems (th1t1 wUhOUI counting 1n ol us g0tng 10 gyms) ano 25.000 ~ going to surgery every yur lor back prob•ems c1n )'OU 1tto1a not to accepi tne Challenge ol ~arning mote IDOUI the care oi your DoO)"' HAPPY HOURS Mon-Fri 10-7 Saturday 7-7 CHILI COOKOFF COMING SOON .-..·_ -· (') C'D .::.:l. c C> ca w ~ ill ii: The seminar wrN give the lotlOWlng 1 Smpte reV1ew ol anatomy ol tne humlin """' 2 UnOerstanoing ol hOW It 1: wotks together 3 Know what ettect you1 WOik and piay his on ycur exercise program • Know the drtterence between tnOYlng 1 moun111n end a box Seminar Tuition $5.00 Saturday, October 15th . 10:00 A.M. This seminar 1s brought to you at this special low price Instead of the usual $75 00 per person by arrangement with the continuing education com· mittee of Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection. ~ COCCYX (""°KM) ..,~ a: < "" 3 5 Know some 11mp1e eKerc11e 11'\11 • owck doesn't neea 1ny 8QO.pmen1 Ind thl1 wi make you look and lee. beuer 6 Ha~ a chlnce 10 ask Questions and oe1 answers n11s very spec11 1 seminar has b9en put 1oge1ner tor Saturaay Oc1ober 15. 1983 and w1 start promplly at 10 1 m Ind end by 1 pm Wear comlortao1e c!otn1ng lhll )'OU can do a lew exe1c1ses 1n CoftM aoa pastry """' oe prCMded Join us 1na ~•rn aoout your Body Magnificent. Come find out Why sex may be one ol your best exercises 10 keep your Body Magnificent. DONATED BY LAMAR PROPERTIES Make check payable to: MCCR • Cont. Ed Fund. Seminar wfll be held et 1919 Decatur, Houston, Texas 77007 For Information calf 861 ·9149 Montrose Voice Th• Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright • 1963 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg pub'11hw edflor A.eel Clark gr•phica Jeff Brey gr~IU Sonny Davis •ccoontmg Robert Hyde m•n•ging ed11or Chuck Meredith 1por11 editor Jon Cheetwood Joe L Watts COnlflbuting writ~ Lyt Harris Mh-M~ltlg d1r.c;1or Mtrk Drago IKIWKl ,.t11g Jon Cheetwood cl ... lf*111dv..,ri11ng Founding Member· Gruter MontroN But1ne.. Guild, G• y PT'9MAuocl• t1on N•w• S«vk H lnl«Mtlon•I Gay News ... ~. PKiflC New1 Se<vlc< Au1t1n BIKH U C.pltol NMirt1 Sefv!Oe SyndK;1t«I F .. tu,. 5.,_.~, & Writer• (San Fr1nci1CO) Chronk:le FNtur•. Unit.ct FH!Ufl Syndlcllt1, JetfreyWlllon, Aandy Alfred, Stonewall FHIUrM Syndlc1t1, Brian McNaoght. J~ Baker POSTMASTt:R Send addNM COf!'Ktlon1 10 3317 Montro• 1309, Hou.ton, T)( 77008 SUNcrlptlon '''' In US In ,..i.d .,.~ 149 per YNr (52 1911JM1), $29 peflbC mc>f'llhl (2e laauM), or $1 .25 per week (IN1 lhlin 29 INUM) 8.Ck !MUN $2.00 HCh N1lron11 M1Wrt1'1ng ,,,,,_,,,;v. Jo. mS•bl.to, RRoendeu M•rk9tlng, SN 8th Avenue, New Yon: 10011, (212) 242-Qe3 Ad'l«t'-lng dHdllM Tueld.-y, 5 30pm, IOt isaue relMNd Fri­day ....... Not/« to «fv9rt/Hrs Loe.I •Mrtltlng nit• K n.di.lie Sb1-A w•etl«ti.,.Juty I. 1983 RMpon.lblllty "Montroee Volclti~ dOM not .uume ~· blltty l0t .ctwirtitlno ca.Im• Re-ni lhoukl •lert MMontroM YoloeM to ..,y dec:9ptlWI •dlo'ertl•ng OCT. 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 At the Greater Montrose Business Guild meeting (see story p . 1), City Council members and hopefuls gaue speeches, a11ked for support. (top row, from left) Anthony Hall, Debra Danburg (state representatwe from Montrose), Carolyn Hobson, An"" Wheeler, Eleanor Tinsley, Jim Greenwood and Nikki Van Hightower. (left photo) George Greania&, councilman District C, the one that includes Montrose. Longstaff Denied Citizenship by Appeals Court By Don Ritz Richard Longstaff, gay Texas business­man and owner of the Union Jack clo­thing stores in Houston and Dallas, has been denied U.S. citizenship by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals under a 1952 rul­ing that forbid non-citizen homosexuals to enter the U.S. Last week, the Court of Appeals in New Orleans by a vote of two to one affirmed a decision previously made in the Federal District Court. Longstaff has been previously denied citizenship twice by District Court Judge Estes. After the original denial of citizen­ship, Longstaff appealed to a higher court. However, the appelate court remanded it to the District Court and ordered a new investigation. Judge Eat.es denied citizenship to Long· staff on the basis of two issues. Estes claimed that Longstaff was in violation of Section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code, commonly called the "homosexual con­duct" law, and that Longstaff illegaUy entered the country. A law pa..00 by Congress in 1952 states that individuals with "psychopathic per­sonalities" are excludable and ineligible to receive visas to immigrate to the U.S. In 1965, thatlaw was amended to specifically include "sexual deviants." The Public Health Service has stated that homosexuality is not capable of mecli­cal diagnosis and it has not examined per­sons for the condition since 1977. Brian Bates, Longstaff'• attorney, said that the Fifth Circuit is stating that when Con­gress passed the exclusion law in 1952, "psychopathic personalities" was meant to be a legal term, not a medical term. Therefore, a medical diagnosis of "homo­aexuality0 ie not required. According to Bates, the Fifth Circuit ruled that Longstaff wasexcludableat the time of entry to the U.S. and, therefore, was not legally a permanent reeident. The iSBue of violation of the previously exist­ing Texas homoaexual conduct law was not the point in the appeals court decision. Recent decisions of homosexual immi­grations made by the Ninth Circuit and Second Circuit Courts of Appeals appear to be in conflict with the Fith Circuit Deci­sion. On th.is basis, Bates said that he believed there would be a good chance that the Supreme Court would hear the case if it's appealed. When Judge Jerry Buchmeyer of the U.S. District Court ruled that Section 21.06 was unconstitutional, it gave Long­staff new hope. Longstaff said, "I don't know whether or not I will appeal to the Supreme Court. Right now, I'm considered a permanent resident. I don't have to leave the country unless the Justice Department starts deportation hearings." AFL/CIO Endorses Gay Rights Gay rights in this country received a major hooet Oct. 4 when membeni of the 14 million-member AFLIClO passed a resolu­tion at their national membership conven­tion urging support and enactment of federal, state and local legislation to end dilcrimination based on ae.xual orienta­tion. Tanyan Corman, national field director of the Gay Rights National Lobby, said the resolution was introduced by John Sweeney, preaiden t of the Service Employees International Union. "The resolution is very comprehensive," Corman said, "and covers discrimination in housing, employment and personnel actions." The convention was being held in Holly­wood, F1orida. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 NGRA to Present Oral Argument in Military Case SAN FRANCISCO-The U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., will hear oral arguments in a case involving the rights of lesbians and gay men to serve in the military. This is according to National Gay Rights Advocate&, the San Francisco­based public interest law firm , which is malting a constitutional challenge to the Navy'• exclusionary policy. The military requires that all homosexu· als be discharged solely on the basis of their sexual orientation , without regard to an individual'• fitness to serve. Leonard Graff, NGRA legal director, said, "The Navy's mandatory discharge policy vio­late& the constitutionally protected rights of privacy, due process and equal protec­tion of the laws." NGRA Eucutive Director Jean O'Leary aaid, "The only legitimate qualification for serving in the military is the ability to do the job. The Navy's policy is an irra­tional diacrimination again1t lesbians and gay men." Stephen Bomse, a San Francisco law­yer, will present the oral argument. This case was chosen for a challenge becauae of Dronenburg's exemplary record over nine years in the Navy, said NGRA. He was an expert in Korean cryp­tology and was given a $12,000 re­enlistment bonus ahortly before the Navy discovered he was gay and discharged him. NGRA filed the lawsuit in the D.C. Cir­cuit because, by reputation , it is the most liberal. And, a victory in Washington would be of benefit to all service members, regardless of where they are stationed, the group said. The Navy's rationale for their position is that: "The presence of a (homosexual) member in a military environment seriously impairs combat readiness, effi· ciency and security." The District Court agreed in ruling that "maintenance of the effectiveness, discipline and morale of the nation'• naval forces is a legitimate Navy policy." The Navy's policy and its rationale are strikingly similar to its former policy with regard to blacb. aaid NGRA. Move Over, Foster Grant USA Today reports that Ray Ban Way­farer aunglaBSea, those black·framed shades made popular by Buddy Holly in the 50e, are all the rage once again. Bausch and Lomb reports sales have jumped from 18,000 pairs in 1981 to more than a quarter-million thia year. Spokes­man Lee Hill credits Tom Cruise, a charac­ter in the movie Risky Business, with the revival. He also notes that John Belushi wore them in his "Blues Brothers" act. And after Belushi's death, says Hill, "anything associated with him became a collectible." DWI CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH A.TI"ORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE. SUITE 318 (71 31 !523-!5006 NOT CUl'T llD 9V TD.d 8oAllt0 ~ Ll:GAL.. ._..(.J AUZ.-.'l'IOW •N No(y AJit<A NOW SHOWING ANYTHING GOES AHD A NIGHT AT THE ADONIS NER~'POWN GR~RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 Tuke off with Eastern and land on Broadway. Introducing Eastern's lively New York City for less than I Lo~e New York you can imagine. at Night Show Tours. Call your Travel Agent, or (Includes Advance Theatre Ticket Purchase) Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 in From the cozy off-Broadway Houston for complete details. theaters to the shining lights on Then take off for Broadway. the Great White Way, the stars e come out every night on stage in New York City. And now you can experience all the excitement of live theater and OCT. 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Contemporary Families Still Living By Victorian Expectations By Fran Dressman The rebellious teenager who doesn't want to follow in his father's footsteps. The working wife and mother whose husband complains because she's not dev­oting enough time to her duties at home. The powerless man: nagged by his wife, abused by his kids, ignored by ths boss. Sounds like scenarios for TV sit-coma on the trials of the contemporary family. But in this version, the men are wearing waist coats and the ladies hoop skirt.a, because these are pictures of life in the Victorian era. 0 People used to treat the Victorians with a snicker; thinking them all prudes, imposters and hypocrites, but recently we see that the i88ues and problems they faced are similar to those we face today," says Dr. Steven Mintz. parallele with our current situations are in women's right.a and child rearing. "We tend to think that the major strides in women's righ ta came about in this era," Mintz says, "but it is in the 19th century that the real improvements in women's expectations for self-fulfillment took place." Yet, for women to assert their independ· ence meant a family conflict. For example, when Catherine Sedgwick, the first Amer­ican woman of letters, told her family she wanted to be a writer, it caused a hugh uproar. It's the same today; reconciling personal independence with family loyal­ties. "Of course, their world was more diffi­cult to live in," Mintz says, citing the example of George Eliot, who lived with a man she could never marry, ca.using a huge rift with her family. "While both sets of needa are real, the individual's and the family's," Mintz saye, "it's clear one of the deepest sources of strain comes from the family denying women accees to their individuality." Child rearing during the Victorian era was an outgrowth of the more individual­istic society, Mintz says. The emphasis swiU:hed from physical to psychological means of discipline; parental expectations were used to shape a child's behavior. The belief then, as now, was in a society where people have to govern themselves and the techniques they used, and we still do, was to internalize discipline. The father's role was undermined and changed drastically in the Victorian era, too, Mintz says. "Earlier, the father's authority had rested in his ability to pass on land. With the losa of that due to indus­trialization, his authority became a moral one like it ia today, shifting from the prop­rietary to the psychological." Mintz undersoores the importance of studying the family because, '1ike any social institution, it has a hist.ory that we can use to better understand our own age." And, beaides drawing parallels with our own views of middle-cla88 family life and the Victorian view, Mintz also hopes his work will show that family problems can stem from forces outside the home. 'The problems of our culture: inflation, the media, the singles culture, all impinge on our families," the UH historian points out. .. When we take examples from the past, we can be objective about it and see that many of our family problems stem from our culture." Mintz,anaHist.antprofessorofhistory CLUB HOUSTON IS at the University of Houston-University : Park, has written A Prison of Expecta­tions (New York, University Press) in which he attempts to "penetrate the real­ity behind the 'walled garden' of Victorian family life." 0The emphasis is on 1expectations'," says Mintz. wl'he Victorians were people whose lives were dominated by very strict, self-imposed expectations of what family life should be." And, he says the early 19th century saw the creation of a public image of the family that is still with us today. "Even though family life is changing, when you ask peo­ple to define 'family,' they will give you the Victorian ideal: father as breadwinner, mother as homemaker and children as compliant. "One reason our divorce rates are so high is because of these high expectations. However, nowadays, when they can't be met, we just get a divorce, whereas the Victorians would have stayed together," says Mintz. Mintz says this fantasy was created by a group of artists and writers, and he pro­file8 five ~f them: Samuel BuUer, George Eliot, Catherine Sedgwick, Robert Louis Stevenson and Harriet Beecher Stowe. ''These five novelists were all rebels against Victorianism, yet their books did much to create the image of the era for eucceeding generations." The Victoriane saw their society being tom apart by industrialization and politi­cal democratization which brought about increased urbanization, materialism and questioning of religious and moral values, Mintz argues. "They were convinced the only way to save the old values was through the family, and it wae only within family bonds that people could find true fulfillment in the changing world." Two areas in which Mintz sees close pl• GENERAL REPAIR • AUTO ~ :D 0 z 0 ~ c z rr c 1J z Fal pecials ~ * 011 Change & Lube - ~ $1995 ~ :D z g * Tune Up from $3995 ~ ~ * Air Conditioning t; :!! Check & Charge $2180 ~ ~ 1411 TAFT ~ i5 522-2190 ~ e AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • ~ CLUB HOUSTON 2205 FANNIN 659-4998 JIEMllER CLUB BATH CllAllf 8 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 ANNOUNCING MONTROSE VOICE NIGHT AT THE TOWER THEATRE Thursday, Oct. 13 Come dressed as your Favorite Religious Charater to opening night of "Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You" and receive FREE ADMISSION to the show. An $11.50 value. Present coupon to Tower Box Office ------------------------- FREE Free Admission on Thursday, Oct 13, to anyone arriving at the Tower Theatre, 1201 Westhelmer. dressed as their Favorite Religious Character Valid Only on Thursdf~Oct. 13, Limit One Coupon Per Person. Subject to Seat Availability ~ The STRATFORD ~onBaldwin Condominiums as individual and private as you are. Wt of/tr JD• tlx pmary and Jt<11r11y yo11 dim.and, at a /met yo11 can afflml. Tht Stratford •B11/tlui11 rondmmnu11111 , 18ntu:lytonJlrJlfltdl»#.i/N/111.Y) btdroo• Jt• tlJ art rta.Jonably prutd star11•g al 153,90(). Each 111111has11 privau patu)lbal{'fnJ., and mdfr1d11a/ J/Dra d OJ#J 111 tht ((Jt'tf'td park1" arta /Id En.JOY tbt taJJ ""nl 11 a ttnlrally lfXdttd hst 1116 and IU'O rtduYJO<i 111ndtrlu Jiil.i aJJf'Oll au·ay. L«attti 1n rM Montrost arra , put of/T11am, and con­t-' tn1t1t1 to dou:ntf!U71 Ho1111on, tht Stral/ord on Baldum condomu1111111J art not rommon, thty art a.r md1i1dual a.r )Oii art. pltaJt ronta{f: Laymon • Finger. Inc. ,,5 S1JMth p,", Dal! Bltd • S1111r 16! ·fl. "''"" ·r,,.,,,J .. ~or· 11116!1-HDO Montrose Business Guild continued from page 1 receive the Policemen's and Patrolmen's Union endorsement for councilman because he feels that "being in control of the police department is necessary in a well-ordered government." The concilman then touched home for many guild members when he addressed the AIDS issue. Stating that he is on the board of Houston's KS/ AIDS Foundation, he said, "The money will be spent as effi· ciently as po88ible." Greanias was followed by District C opponent Mary Lou Rumfollow who stated .. I work on 'it can't be done' issues." A busineBBwoman, Rumfollow feels that council members are lacking expertise in handling cash flow and inventory control. She concluded her remarks by stating that the city needs to overcome "the two­horse- town mentality we've been fighting for the laot 100 years." Then District D Councilman Anthony Hall preceded Mayor Whitmire to the podium. Seeking Council-at-Large Pooition 4, Hall said, allu<ling to his present position, "We don't have to be confined to the neigh· borhood we grew up in." Referencing hie 10 years as a public ser­vant, Hall said he wanted the a~large position to "give me a chance to addre88 the global iBBues that face our city." Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montross #306 Houston, TX 77006 •All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Vodka, 1.75 liter, $7.69 McCormick Blended American Whiskey 1.75 liter $9.89 750 ML $4.49 Jamie '08 Scotch, 1.75 liter, $11 .79 Hallgarten Liebfraumilch, 750 ML, 3 for $7.00 1402 Welch at MAsTv~~AcARo Waugh Drive AMERICAN EXPRESS 529-9964 CanCrusher Comoration We Pay Cash for Your Trash*! •Trash by Can Crusher's definition is aluminum cans only. Can Crusher Corporation is a full-service recycling company paying market prices for aluminum cans. Our hours are a.m to 7pm Monday thru Friday and 9am to 2pm on Saturday FREE COFFEE TO CUSTOMERS Help America j 201l·r· Recycle and Make Sliver Spring Money Too! .;; ~ .;; The Can Crusher Corp. also offers a full - service pickup recyci ing program for bars I 'lllashlngton restaurants &. industry. Call 864-2223 for details. 2011 Silver SL " 'Risky Business' Films By Jack Sturdy Risky Business is being marketed with a tantalizing but misleading ad campaign that does not do the film justice. Screenwriter/ director Paul Brickman has carefully crafted an exquisite slice of upper-middle-class suburban Americana. Joel Goodson (Tom Cruise) is a bright, thoughtful, well-spoken model son whose American dream is acceptance into an Ivy League college. Joel has channeled all of his energy into that pursuit. Risky Busi­ness is the exploration of a week-long chaotic upheaval that results when he denies his goal. Brickman has written a complex, mul­tifaceted, frequently moving film. It begs comparison to Mike Nichols' The Gradu­ate and rightly so. Joel Goodson, like Dus­tin Hoffman's Benjamin Braddock, is a young man whose well-ordered life is forever altered by an affair with a woman. In 1967, it was an older woman; in 1983, it is a high-priced call girl. The result is almost as emotionally shattering. And, since the 16-year lapse between the two films has seen a dramatic shift in young American thought, Joel embrace& the very ideals that Benjamin rejected. That philosophical difference is nicely delineated in a fast-food palace, where Joel is debating pragmatism versua ideal­ism. After an envious discuasion of the lucrative starting salaries of Ivy League grads, the question becomes moot-all the classmates opt for the money. Joel rune afoul of his goal when his par­ents take a vacation. They entruat him with the expensive house and all of its trappings , including Daddy's new Porsche. Joel has been advised to use his own judgment, but in his father's words, "It's my houe~you live by my rules. And don't drive the Porsche." So ingrained is Joel with upper-middle­clasa tradition that even hie nightmares focus on his failure to live up to the burden of parental and peer expectations. It is his best friend Miles (Curtis Armstrong) who unleashes those nightmares as reality when he phones a call girl to "service" Joel. Joel's feeble protests dissolve into acquiescence when Lana (Rebecca De Mornay) arrives. But her evening of pas­sion is expensive. She solves Joel's cash shortage by purloining an ornamental crystal egg, which has to be returned before hie parents' homecoming. Tracking down Lana is easy compared to the diffi­culty of retreiving the egg. Her former pimp has gotten possession and ia reluc­tant to part with it. The "risky" business of the title is not only Joel's emotional involvement with Lana, but a business deal they set up to match his friends with hers. The film's ending is a bit of a stretch but consistent with the oarents' staid standards. There are so many good technical things going on in Risky Business that it ia easy to gloas over the few flaws. Brick­man's direction, particularly for a firat film, is moody and unerring in pace and timing. Bruce Surtees' cinematography ia excellent, combining aome of the best camera work with the moat innovative pehlpectives to be seen in a 1983 film. Tan­gerine Dream'a music melds perfectly with the mood of the film, enhancing both. The film belongs to Tom Cruise in the acting arena. His previous work in Taps and The Outsiders comes full circle here. His performance ia layered with nuance and articulate style-Oscar nomination material. Risky Business is sometimes funny, sometime& thought-provoking, always entertaining. It is definitely a umust see." Sturdy is the film reuiewer for "The Weekly News" published in Miami.@1983 Stonewall Features SyndicatP OCT. 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 HIGH RISE LIVING IS AFFORDABLE! The EXECUTIVE HOUSE al 230 West Alabama is having its Fall Move-In Special. For this month our prices have dropped: Unfurnished Efficiency Apartments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $375 Unfurnished One Bedroom Apartments ........... . ..... . .... $475 EXECUTIVE HOUSE offers: • Paid Utilities • Security Building • Dry Sauna • Covered Parking Garage • Sun Deck • Gymnasium • Swimming Poof• Free Cable Television •Laundry Facilities EXECUTIVE HOUSE is 2 blocks from Main Street, 3 blocks from Wesl· heimer and 4 blocks from Montrose. We are close lo everything in the Montrose area. Call 529-8707 for appointment THE OFF-BROADWAY SMASH HIT! Li' big it, and the TOWER THEATRE Present A self-righteous sister encounters four of her alumni who expose just how her teachings have affected their lives TOWER THEATRE OCT 13 - 16 and OCT 20 - 23 Tickets to all shows available at all TICKETRON and TICKETMASTER outlets including all Joske·s. Sound Warehouse. and w Tower Theatre ORDER BY PHONE I CALL TELETRON (713J 526-1709 CHARGE TO MASTER CARD OR VISA THE TOWER THEAmE 120 I Westheimer - Secured Parking Available 10 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 SMU Refuses Again to Recognize Campus Gay Group By Dou1 Weatherford DALLAS-Once again, the Southern Methodist University Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization (GLSSO) has failed in its attempt for recognition by the Student Senate, this time in a close 16-151088. Prior to the public debate and vote, the eenate held a private meeting to hear argu· menta pro and con; each side was given separate 45-minute presentations. By holding such a non·public (and evidently unprecedented) meeting for the senators, it wae hoped that debate during the public meeting might be limited (a spring gather· ing laeted four hours), and tempera might be somewhat more calmed than was the cue before. It was difficult, surely, for the various senators to ignore public com­ments by some of the more esteemed alumni of the university-including former U.S. Rep. Jim Collins-expressing concern that SMU might sanction such an organization, but the senate members were careful to remain publicly mute on the eubject prior to the meeting and at least give an appearance of open­mindedne88. There was still controversy surrounding the vote this time, however, 88 former senator Ted Brabham had sent approxi· mately 1000 letters to SMU alumni urging their expreBSions of disapproval of GLSSO to the school administration. GLSSO faculty advisor Campbell Read termed the letter "inflammatory," but the fact remained that there did not appear to be the strong organized opposition to the .,-oup this time around. (The petition cir· culated laat apring eventually contained about 2500 signatures of opposing atu­dents). Also thia time, cameras and recording equipment were barred from the meeting chamber, evidently in hopes that there would be Iese disruption from roaming media persona and le88 temptation from some senators and membera of the audience to grandstand. GLSSO had once again received a posi­tive recommendation from the SMU Organizations Committee. There was some discuBBion about allow­ing for alternative methods of voting by the senators, with the suggestion that a secret ballot would allow for those voting not to do so under the pressure of imme­diate public scrutiny. But under the parlia· mentary guidelines which were being followed, no motion to this effect was allowed to be put forth. In their arguments asking for recogni­tion, GLSSO spolr:esperaons avowed'that such recognition would not imply that either the senate or the univeraity endorsed the group's lifestyle or goals. But, said co-chairperson Leslie Cooper, the group waa greatly needed by gay stu­dents who faced ·~nnumerable odds" in coming to terms with their personal sexu· ality and relationship to their fellow atu· dents. AJJ another put it, GLSSO is a group where individuals can find friendship, security and understanding, helping peo­ple to gain a "positive feeling about them­selves and the school." In trying to argue that fear of ouch an organization is based on ignorance and prejudice, it was pointed out thatSMU has recognized other organizations which are not directly related to or taken from orthodox Methodist doctrine, such aa an aBBociation of Islamic students. In his remarks before the crowd, former Dallaa Gay Alliance Preaident Don Baker, an SMU alumnus himself, emphasized the sense of "alienation, sense of hurt (and) sense of isolation" felt by many students when faced with situations like the back­lash against gay students which baa foJ. lowed on the heels of last spring' a attempt to gain formal recognition for GLSSO. And as one senator said in support of the group, "It would be nice if we could merely say everyone has equal rights, and that would make it 10. But it isn't so, and we all know it. We can keep fighting until one group is silenced-someone will have won at the expense of someone else. But wouldn't it be nice if we could all live in the same community with a free exchange of ideas?" Arguing against the group, one senator said all arguments which appeal to the emotions should be discounted and at the same time wondered if this were truly a student organization rather than some­thing organized as a result more offaculty initiative. The senator labelled the group hypocritical and called into question the members' commitment to the school, cit­ing remarks GLSSO c<rchair Robert Rios had made which were published in the Sunday, October 2, Dallas Timea Herald, stating he had wanted to do something which would "shake (SMU) to the very core of its existence." It was also asked whether the group was using the SMU community for the overall enhancement of the DaUas gay community. Once again, it was stated that the aims and purposes of such a group were incom· patible with Methodist church doctrine and Christianity in general. And someone even concluded that GLSSO's requirement to hold open public meetings, as would be the case if it were a recognized group, would drive some gay students farther underground, rather than risk being seen "coming out" in public. Another senator expressed that he saw recognition as a "privilege" and not a ''right," though there was no indication that Gl.SSO lead­ers saw the matter differently; and yet another senator stated that recognition Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montross #306 IDlght lead some alumni to withdraw financial support of the university, though when asked if anyone had stated categorically that he would atop dona­tions, the senator said only that some had said they would "consider it." Most of those who rose to speak in sup­port of GLSSO in the senate were careful to qualify their remarks by stating that they did not agree with the gay group's lifestyle or social and academic goals, but that they felt they were in no position to be judge­mental, insofar as the group's right to exist and be recognized went. Concerns were expressed 88 to future funding of the group's educational activities (social activities would continue to be internally funded), but some thought the freedoms of u:pression and assembly were also major queetions here, and that the university set­ting should be aa flexible as possible in meeting the various needs of the students. As one senator stated, "We don't want to be elitist and unaccepting of reality, because gays are here and always wilJ be." But in the end, the result was effectively the same as last spring, albeit with a much closer vote than anyone had predicted. In a 15-15 tie, the deciding "no" vote was cast by Student Body Vice President Tom Davey, as presiding officer of the assem· bly. Later at a news conference, Davey said he felt he had to vote the way the student body majority felt on the issue and wanted him to vote. It is generally accepted that the majority of SMU atu­dents oppose recognition of GLSSO. Yet 88 one spokesman forGLSSO said, if the U.S. Congreaa has only voted as its majority of constituents felt-voting by public opinion poJl-we would never have had the Civil Rights Act of 1964 nor any number of other unpopular measures which are necessary for some minority not to be oppressed by the overwhelming majority, and the advocacy of which requires courage and leadership . .-~.ll r ~ JJ( V ,C DIXIE LAND JAZZ RECEPTION -l t TO SALUTE S ! ANNE WHEELER FOR CITY COUNCIL Thursday, Oct. 13, 5:30-7:30pm, Four Seasons Hotel, 901 Austin D $100 SPONSOR o $25 FRIEND D $15 GPC Here is what former presidents of the Gay Political Caucus had to say about Anne Wheeler: "Ann has always been a friend of the gay community. From our first battle in convention politics to riding in every Gay Pride Parade. And now she needs out helpr' Steve Shiflett. president '78 & '79 "This is our most critical race. There is absolutely no alterna­tive. Jim Westmoreland is com­pletely unacceptable. If we don't rise to the occasion, we lose this vote on City Council." Lee Harrington, president '80 & '81 Make checks payable to Anne Wheeler Campaign, 804 Waugh Drive. Houston. Texas 77019 (No corporate contributions) "At a time in our nation's history, when thousands of people are out of work, Jim Westmoreland refuses to attend the City Council meet­ings. I know we can get better representation for our tax dol­lars. Let's support a real friend, a good tax conseNative and a social liberal." Larry Bagneris Jr., president '82-present Commentary A Messy Divorce in Dallas By Joe Baker I'm so glad to hear that Henry and James are getting a meBBy divorce. Dr. James P. Grigson, the "hanging psychiatrist," had been earning quite a bundle-in the six figures neighborhood-by working for Dallas District Attorney Henry Wade as a professional witneBS. It was his job to help the homophobic D.A. send bad guys up the river. He would tell jurora that the defendant was not crazy-just a disgusting criminal. It didn't make any difference what kind of trial was going on, the expert witness Grigaon could always be counted on totes­tify the aame-the same as Henry Wade's position happened to be. What an astounding coincidence it alwaya was. One, two, three ... 3,456 times in a row! Wade used Grigson when he and the State of Texas were being sued last year during the Section 21.06 trial. Grigson took the stand and made a fool out of him­self by saying all kinds of nasty things about homosexuals. It didn't matter to him that the American Psychiatric Asso­ciation years earlier had determined that homosexuality was not an illness and not something people chose for themselves. Grigson testified that we were sick, sick, sick. Just like Wade wanted him to. Although he didn't say homosexuals were "not crazy," he did agree that we were criminals. Up the river with us all! It was so nice to see the Henry and James Show lose that one. But back to the divorce. Just like how lovers do sometimes, Grig­son betrayed Wade. He not only bit the hand that was feeding him, bu the also got 41involved" with another man. Naughty, naughty. Grigson made the mistake of testifying for Sheriff Don Byrd. He supported our "But-I-Only-Had-Two-Beers" Sheriff dur­ing his trial on drunken driving charges. The "hanging psychiatrist" said Byrd probably had suffered a stroke the night he wrapped his car around a telephone pole or whatever-and that's why he was giving people the false impression that he had been tipping more than just a few. Well, you all know that Byrd beat the rap. That did not please Wade who was prosecuting him. He wanted him sent up the river with the rest of the bad guys and the queers. So now Wade has decided that he is never going to use Grigaon as his expert witness again. He says his office will no longer vouch for Grigson's veracity under oath. What? Dear me. After all these years­and all the people Grigson helped Wade send up the river-we are being told that his testimony is not reliable. How can you say that, Henry? What are all the "not crazy criminals" up the river going to say? Well, all I've got to say aboutthisme88 is that I've always thought both Grigson and Wade were the crazy ones. Gue88 we all know for sure now. I SEE THERE is a new course being offered at Southern Methodist University this falJ . It's on maaculinity. U any college students ever needed that course, it is those at SMU. Maybe if a few of them take the course, they will start acting like men instead of little boys-and realize they don't have to be afraid of the gay students on campus. The course is being taught by Dr. Wil­liam Beauchamp, an openly-gay faculty member. How ironic! POP SINGER BARRY MANILOW thinks it'e more than his voice and songw­riting ability that made him ~ pop'!-l~r. It'a his looks and manner, Manilowsftld in a recent magazine interview: . Women are impre88ed with h1e ~~:m­threatening image. They know that if I took them out to dinner, it would bea glass of wine in front of the fireplace after-wards," he said. I'll say. I sure wouldn't expect anything ELSE of him! DON'T FORGET it is now illegal in Texas for those who know they have gonorrhea or syphilis to expose someone else to their disease. The crime is punishable by up to one year in prison and a $1000 fine. Our state legislators never cease to amaze me. Do they really think people run around knowingly infecting each other? Or maybe it is I who is naive. Anyway, I can hardly wait until the police departments start making arrests. There's going to be some interesting trials coming up. I can just imagine what the testimony is going to be like. OCT. 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 • •\l•MjJLe 520-0554 "THE ULTIMATE BAKED POTATO" 416 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 OUR SPUDS ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD! Tuesday & Wednesday's Movie Oct. 11 & 12 Mr. Magoo Fe1tlval "Mr Magoo at Sea" plu1 "Mr. Magoo's Favorite Heroes" Wednesday, Oct. 12 Taco Night-6pm Maria's own Special Recipe! Everyday Special 1/2 price drinks to •II arnvmg at Mary's on a motorcycle! HAPPY STH ANNIVERSARY TO GERIATRIKSI LINGERIE & PAJAMA PARTY Every Friday, 7am-Noon First drink free to all in proper attire PARKING IN SIDE LOT 5PM- 8AM WEEKDAYS, ALL DAY WEEKENDS (TOW AWAY ZONE OTHER TIMES) AFTER-HOURS NIGHnY 1022, WESTHEIMER Home of Houston Motorcycle Club 528-8851 MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD 12 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7 . 1983 Of Divine Thunderbolts and Popcorn Bowls Dateline S.F. By Randy Alfred INTERPRETING AIDS: Newspapers and other media hereabouts have been making much of a study that shows whe-­reas 30 percent of gay men interviewed had reduced or stopped high-risk sexual behavior since learning about AIDS, 62 percent had continued or increased .. at least one high-risk behavior with new or anonymous contacts." Here's the catch: psychologists Leon McKusick and William Horstman and psychiatrist Arthur Carfagni conducted their research in April. That's just about the time many gay leaders abandoned their previous reticence about making explicit recommendations favoring sexual moderation. In other words, many gay men were just getting the word when this study was done. My bet iA another third of all gay men have modified their behavior in the past two months. I hope 80, anyway, and I hope the other third acts soon, too. VULTURES: Randy Schell of Commun­ity United Against Violence has this chil­ling tale. Members of the anti-gay, born-again , rightist-Christian group S.0.S. were planning to go into AIDS wards in San Francisco last summer to proselytize and tell those patients they were suff'ering the wrath of the Lord. Fortunately, CUAV alerted the hospi­tals, and they will not allow any proselyt­ism or other unwanted and unsolicited religious visits. Thank you. HANDS OFF: Unfortunately, AIDS is not our only epidemic. Many gay men are being laid low by various intestinal paras­ites. Rimming and other, even indirect, oral-anal contact are definite no-no's if you want to avoid these diseases. Have you ever wondered about the pop­corn bowls in gay bars? I have. I asked two physicians about them, and both minim­ized the poBBibility that many cases of par­asite diseases are transmitted by dirty hands in those bowls. Rimming and the sucking of unwashed penises inserted elsewhere are their main concerns. Nonetheless, they both acknowledged the possibility of more casual transmis­sion. Personally, I've foresworn those pop­corn howls. I've seen too many men walk out of rest rooms in gay bars without washing their hands. JUST AROUND THE CORNER: 1984, that is, and with it the Democratic National Convention comes to our fair city. When the Demos announced they would meet here, Mayor Dianne Feinstein said she'd given her word there would be "no demonstration by the homosexual community nor any other major demon­stration." The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California feared "the mayor was taking the 1984 part ... a little too seriously," according to a report in the ACLU News. Executive Director Dorothy Erlich asked the mayor to clarify her remarks. Erlich wrote the mayor. "The right to demonstrate is one of the most precious rights that Americans enjoy. We do not understand how the City of San Francisco can guarantee the absence of major dem· onstrations unless it is intent on violating the First Amendment, or no one is inter­ested in carrying out a major demonstra­tion." The mayor responded promptly: "I never intended, nor could nor would impose, any restriction on lawful aSBem­bly and full speech. Your fears are unfounded about the 1984 Democratic National Convention. I . .. can assure you it will succeed with respectfortherightsof all who are involved." Leave the loop night. Tuesdays. BWOD: Herbert Perkins, M.D., scientific director of the Irwin Memorial Blood Bank here, favors the screening of potential donors to keep AJDS-contaminated blood out of the supply. Irwin asks about AIDS symptoms and / or multiple sexual partners with any of the high-risk groups. Surprisingly, Perkins reports that Irwin has had to tum away only 16 applications out of 50,000 in the first five months of this year. He believes this is due to the educa­tional efforts of gay organizations and publications: most likely turnaways are staying away on their own. Perkins also notes that blood supplies are above normal at Irwin. He credits this to the publicity aboutAJDS. He thinks it's reminded other donors that if they want a safe blood supply, they'd better come in and donate themselves. This is apparently not the case in other cities, where confused would-be donors fear contracting AIDS by giving blood. (No way: blood banks uee diaposable needles.) Irwin and other blood banks are also concerned about a flood of requests to have designated family, friends and clubs build up private supplies for their own use. Perkins says this "creates an absolute nightmare logistically," does not ensure safety, is opposed by the American Associ­ation of Blood Banks and will not be done by Irwin. Finally, Perkins reminds that although evidence indicates that AIDS can be trans­mitted by blood and blood products, it appears to be only slightly infectious. Thousands of people who received blood and blood product.a from the same supp lies as those that infected a few did not con­tract AIDS themselves. Some people seem to be susceptible and others not. SILVER LINING: Thomas A. Ziegler wrote to the San Francisco Chronicle to suggest the current pubJic hysteria about casual contact with gay men might result in a decrease in fag-bashing. Maybe. Those punks should at least be afraid to draw blood. Art Hoppe, the San Francisco Chroni­cle's resident satiriest, had an answer to Rev. Jerry Falwell's claim that AIDS, herpes and veneral diseases are the Lord's judgement on society. Sure, Hoppe opined, and the common cold is an affliction for forgetting your galoshes, tennis elbow for a bad backhand, childhood diseases for being childish, heart attacks for eating too much salt, athlete's foot for hanging around locker rooms, and rickets, con­sumption and pellagra for being poor. All the Lord's vengeance. Finally, suggested Hoppe, headaches are a form of birth control, and given all the aforesaid retribution, a divine thun­derbolt should hit the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. Oh yes, as long as Fal­well want.a to close gay bathhouses, why not include the back seats of automobiles? A.B.l UPDATE: I told you a few months ago of Assemblymember Art Agnos' new strategy to pass Assembly Bill 1, which would ban anti-gayemploymentdiscrimi­nation through California. Agnos wanted to round up the three R's: rural, religious and Republican support. It'• worked 80 far. The Assembly passed the bill, 41-36, a bare majority of its 80 members, in June. In July, the Senate Judiciary Committee passed it, 6-4. Action on the Senate floor is awaited soon. Meantime, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Oakland Tribune have joined the Los Angelea Times and the Sacramento Bee in endorsing A.B. 1. Alfred'• column originates at the "Sen­tinel, » a San Francisco gay newspaper. C>/983 Randy Alfred, a ll rights reserued. ai TRAV L CONSULTANTS 'TI'~&~[L ~~ ~MEXICAN Fi! ~REPRESENTATIVES, INC. ~ ~ PRCfFNTS ~ ~~ rtex~co 1j SUAJAJER · FALL 1183 ~ I • ~ 12Fll02•"9' I CANCUN IXTAPA . . . . . . 1239 COZUMEL 1245 MAZATLAN . . . 1259 ~ PTO. VALLARTA 1249 GUADALAJARA 1229 ~ ~ ACAPULCO .. . 1249 MERIDA ...... 1219 ~ ~ MEXICO CITY . 1239 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ u= Call Bruce Woolley at (713) 529-8464 or lBl lBl Toll Free at 1-800-392-5193 ~ ~ 2029 Southwest Freeway, Houston ~ ~~'TI'&[?!]~ ~~~~~'TI'&mTim.&• Well Drinks & Long Neck Beer Opening till 8pm 7 Days a Week Proudly Presents Their Newest Musical Comedy ilver ere en If you loved "Silver Screen ( The Way It Wasn't), you'll really love "Revenge of the Silver Screen" SH 0 w TIME s Thursday-8:30PM Friday-8:30 & 11 PM Saturday-8:30 & I IPM Sunday-8:30PM Doors Open 7PM Happy Hour till 8 :30PM ONE FREE DRINK WITH THIS AD (Pr...,t at tM door Good Thurs ·Sun only Llm•t 1 per customer J Premiering Oct. 3 BREL/PIAF Ruth Hastings & Co. *Back oy Popular Demand * 3 Weeks Only Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday Nights thru Oct. 19 showtime Spm reservations requested 2700 ALBANY-Open 7pm-2am-528-3611 (adjacent to Officer's Club) 14 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 How Do You Do at Entertaining? Quiz Massages By Roz Aahley by Teal Are you lazy? Or when you give a party, do you try to impress everyone with your gourmet cookery? Do you shake with nerves, or is the event your chance to show off your crystal and sterling? What is your real goal when you enter­tain your frienda? ls it fun for them or just your scene for cruising? How well do you do at entertaining? Find out. Take this scientifically formu· lated quiz, scoring points for your answers according to the chart which follows the last question. Circle each answer that moat truthfully completes each numbered question. Skip the items that don't apply to you. Some of the items in the quiz will have more than one answer that you want to choose. Just select one, and don't worry about it. This quiz i1 like entertaining in a way; you'll enjoy it more if you just relax. 1) What do you need most when you give a party? a) Interesting guests. b) Good recipes. c) A caterer. 2) Your hor d'oeuures are made of: a) Crabmeat. b) Caviar. c) Leftovers. 3) Giving a party is an opportunity for you to: a) Cook a delicious meal. b) Reciprocate. c) Come on to a hot-looking guest. 4) You have invited aom.e guests to dinner. What ckaning preparation.s haue you done? a) I cleaned the entire apartment. b) I cleaned the dining room. c) They're lucky I cleaned the chicken. 5) You love French: a) Cooking. b) Wines. c) Anything. 6) You generally entertain on: a) A boat. b) A beach. c) A budget. 7) You serue cake from: a) A silver cake stand with a doily. b) A napkin. c) A Sara Lee tin. 8) Your entertaining consists of: a) Preaaed duck and plum wine. b) Canapes and aperitifs. c) Pretzels and six· packs. 9) The main thing at your parties is: a) Making fondue. b) Making noiae. c) Making out. 10) At your .r]arties, what do gueats do after dinner? a) Dance. b) Lioten to classical music. c) Diaheo. Who Will Guard the Guardians? More and more busmessee are discovering their security guards are really security risks, reports the Wall Street Journal. The number of private security guards in the country is now over one million, and a lot of bad apples are turning up in uniform. As many as 20 percent of the guard applicants in California have criminal records, and nearly 5 percent of those hired are ex·felone. The result: an upsurge in robberies, excessive force and unjustified killings. Experts say part of the problem may be the low wages and high turnover. One Memphis firm has disarmed all but 1 percent of its guards. Others are tighten· ing up on testa, background checks and training procedures. We're True to Our Brands American society bas changed a lot in the last 60 years, but American brand name loyalty hasn't, reports Advertising Age. Alm08t every one of the 25 moat popular brand names in 1923 is still number one today. The list include• Kodak cameras, Del Monte fruit, Wrigley chewing gum, Gilette razon, Lipton tea and, of course, Coca-Cola. Among those that have slipped: Palmo­live aoap, Colgate toothpaate and Criaco oil-but they're all still in second place. 11) When you prepare drinks, you mix with: a) Perrier. b) Pellegrino. c) Tap water. 12) What <W your guest& bring to your dinners? a) Wit and charm. b) Flowers and can· dies. c) The food. 13) Your after-dinner coffee is made from: a) Fresh·roasted beans you've just ground. b) Whatever brand was on sale. c) Neacafe and hot tap water. 14) When unexpected guests arrive, you serue them drinks and then: a) Ruo to the deli. b) Prepare BOme food. c) Water the BOup. 15) At your parties, you can count on the guests being totally blitzed out on: a) The food. b) The other guests. c) Wha· tever drugs are bandy. Now, to get your Entertaining Score, add up the points for the answers you chose. 1) a-6, b-5, c-0. 2) a-5, b-5, c-0. 3) a-6, b-3, c-2. 4) a-6, b-3, c-0. 5) a-5, b-5, c-5. 6) a·5, b-5, c·5. 7) a-5, b-0, c-0. 8) a-5, b-5, c-0. 9) a-5, b-0, c-2. 10) a-5, b-5, c-2. 11) a-5, b-5, c-0. 12) a-6, b-5, c-0.13) a-5, b-2, c-0.14) a-5, b-5, c-0. 15) a·5, b-5, C·2. Your Entertaining Score: 14-33-Do people give you Iota of excuses when you invite them over? 34-54-You're a little bit lazy. Are you sure you finished the teat? 55-71>-Elaa Maxwell still lives! Giving a party? Just say when! Ashley is a personal counselor. e19s3 Stonewall Features Syndicate. If you are an avid fan of THE FAR SIDE cartoons, you'll have to have ............ ~ Gary Larson's newest collection And if you missed his first best seller, you'd better be sure you have .. Order now if you love humor that starts from Performed by a European­trained technician. Specializing in Sport Massage, Accupressure & Reflexology. Bodybuilders Preferred. By Appointment Only. 868-9271 Mon-Fri after 6 Sat & Sun after 12 noon and remains firmly footed in left field! -Pl-ea-se- se-nd- m-e-, -----------------~ __ copies of The Far Side at S3.95 each. __ copies of Beyond The Far Side at S3.95 each. Total amount enclosed . onclude S1 for postage and handling per book ordered.J Mall to, Far Side BOOks, c/o Montrose ~e 4400 Johnson Drive, Fairway, KS 66205 <Make chedcs payable to Universal Press Syndleate> ......... . -__-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_- -_ ..., _______ ..... ____ .., ___ Cr-" conil ----------- .".".."."..".,'".,' ____ =._--.-~-~--,....,-::,- .-.. :-------------~ "Pull out, Beltyl Pull out1 .. . You've hit an artery!" Do Palimony The Law Agreements Negate Love? By Henry Walter Weioo When. Maureen came to see me, she explained that ohe truly and deeply loved the young graduate student, Stacy, who had been living with her for the previous oix months. Still, ohe thought it would be a good idea if Stacy and ohe entered into an agreement spelling out their obligations to each other, or more particularly, Mau­reen's obligations to Stacy. Maureen, at 29, had just inherited sev­eral hundred thousand dollars from an uncle. She stood to inherit even more from her parents, but they didn't like the idea that the family fortune might pass into some non-family lesbian's hands. Mau­reen loved her parents, and her desire to have an agreement with Stacy was in part motivated by the wish to satisfy her par­ents' concerns. Maureen gave me the details, and I pre­pared an appropriate agreement. The most important concern was a provision that, in the event of a break-up of the rela­tionship, Maureen would pay a stipend to Stacy for six months to give her sometime to get on her feet economically. Mean- The French Have a Word for It The French are notoriously touchy about foreign words creeping into their lan­guage, says the Philadelphia Inquirer. But an updated dictionary has given the okay to two American words which appar­ently have no French equivalents. The two contributions from this side of the Atlantic: Hfast-food" and "porno." while, Stacy waived all rights she other­wise might have had to get a portion of Maureen's estate. The details of the economic quid pro quo among two people in their 20s seemed to me most unusual. Still, I complied with the client's wish. The Lee Marvin case was front-page news at the time, and palimony was a fresh concept receiving plenty of media attention. A year later, I bad another call from Maureen. The romance was over, and she and Stacy were going their separate ways; it was time to implement the provisions of the carefully worked out agreement. This I did ao quickly as possible. Before long, the two women were living their separate lives. Stacy got the decreed stipend for oix months, gave up all other claims against Maureen, and there was even an element of civility and friendliness in the break-up. The agreement, entered into when things were good between them, gave the two women a framework for diSBolving their relationship. Neither could feel she was being taken advantage of by the other, since rights and obligations had been spelled out at a time when each had a substantial concern for the other. After the break-up, Maureen was older, but not necessarily wiser. Last year, she met another graduate student, Louise. This time, though, it may well really be love: Mureen won't think of entering into another living together agreement! C!/983 Henry Walter Weiss, a New York City attorney. His column appears here periodically and in other gay publications. Letters and questUms from rea<krs are welcome. Write 4519 Lincoln Bldg., 60 E. 42nd St., New York, NY 10165. a Qighthea/l.ted g~t sto~e * stootng * ffie QaJtgegt Seddy CBeaJt CoQQection in uUontftoge Come cpQay with CUs 696 <JJo.wl~D.lllP-<JJous!Oll. ~e~as 77006-529-8299 OP<"• vlAooday IMu Qotu;rlay 11cu..?poo -:J1111ays tie 9poo OCT. 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 16 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 Hail to the Chief! By Peter Ha rrison Sometimes I wonder if rm gay or not. Oh, no, don't be dull. I'm not talking about those silly moments of mine when a cute clerk aaya °Can I help you?" and I respond, "Oh, yea, more than you know!" or when my roomie comes in to find me licking the television monitor during a football huddle. No, friends and readers, I am undoubt­edly and linnly (how firmly you wouldn't believe) homosexual. What I'm worried about is my "gayne88," the way I live up to what bu been set as a kind of gay norm. Now, we all know that the beat sources for descriptions are those who are not immediately involved in the phenomenon. The great tradition of American journal­iam says that only "disinterested" observers can tell you what's going on. So, no gay man can tell you what being gay ia all about. I figure the beat and moot illumi­nating source for a report on what "gay" is would come from an adveroary. Say.Jerry Falwell and the fundamentalioto. "Gay" people, according to them, are unpredictable, flighty, undependable and totally given over to their pleasures. "Gay" people love comfort, a bit of swank and ignore the needo of those about them. "Gay" people are irresponsible, with no concern for their jobe; they will toss it all over for a few momenta of pleasure. I'll tell you, that's bad news for me. Right now, I'm sitting in a room full of books carefully marked, looking at a calendar that lists my preuing deadlines and worrying about bow I'm going to pay thiA month'• electric bill. Shit! If I'm gay, whett!'I all thie fun I'm supposed to be having? I must be doing something wrong! The only conclusion I can draw from all this is that I'm a rotten queer, and my lover, after rousing himself from a moment of shared ecstasy, agrees. We don't even have enough crystal to set pla· ces for more than two guests! Failure stares us squarely in the face. Now that realization might have soured us on the entire gay movement. We know, as well as anyone, that most of our friends are in the same position. We all try to live as well as we can, getting our moments of Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose 11306 Houston, TX 77006 pleaeure when they come, grabbing our opporturutie1. But let'• face it. We're hope­leoo bourgeoia. We pay our billo. We go to work in the morning. American lives, and in the great scheme of thingo, who can blame him? What'• 50 American civilians, when we're so often talking about thousands, millions, in any kind of nuclear confrontation? Ron wanted to otoy in Santa Barbara until Sat­urday and respond to the question then. Nancy doeon't care. Why ohould ohe? She has her new china, her designer gowno. Let the Secretory of Agriculture worry about food 1tomp1 and all that merde. Santa Barbara, with cool ocean breezes, is a lot more comfortable than hot old humid Waohington. All thooe boring senatoro and State Departroent people could certainly wait a few dayo. N'o big deal. What an inconvenience! A few damned touriste and a representative, lots of Koreans and a downed airliner. Boring. Commentary Boring. Boring. Not nearly enough to interrupt a week of horseback riding and get-back-to-earth country living. The Prez and Nancy just want to get things into their proper perspective. I oay hurrah for that. lfthemoralioto are going to stick us into a neat cubbyhole of sensual pleasure, I can't think of anyone better to be otuck with than the Preoident of the Uruted Stateo and his lovely wife. AB I said, I'm a rotten queer, worried about billo and anxiouo to live honeotly. I need oome kind of role model to follow. What could be better than the Presi­dent? "Hail to the Chief1" Harrison lives in New Jersey. His column appears here and in other gay publica· tiona. CJ983 Sronewa/I Features Syndi­cate. 1$·-----oi'E"N- : •~ s1A~~ I ITHE 11t\E PLACE I I I I I I I I 1307 FAIR VIEW 3 BLOCKS WEST OF MONTROSE PilllllBORI8 Aurora 1'281117/IRJll Aurora E78-141Cooper 4 Ply L78-Ill/Cooper 4 Ply or 811.JB+F.E.T. 114./U+F.E.T. 84.84 + F.E.T. 41.70+F.E.T. 10% Off Regular Price of Any Tire m Stock With TIU• Ad ', - 1 = llDl 529-1414 L~- - -----~- All of that would have been moat depre88ing to me, if I hadn't realized that the great gay label wu being realized by at leaat one peraon in thie republic. No, not Charle• Neloon Reilly, not Calvin Klein. It'• far better for uo than that. The beat and fineot example of gay life in the United Statee today ia none other than our beloved preoident, Ronald Wil­oon Reagan. Now I'm not eaying that Ronnie prowls the corridoro of the Wuhington, D.C., YMCA, u others in government have done. I'm making no comment.a at all on hia sexuality, whatever exist.a of it now. But "oexuality" bu little to do with being gay in the mind.I of the fundamentolioto. lt'o "lifeotyle" they're after, the freedom to be and act ae one wan ta to. AB they persi1t in telling uo, it'• the devotion to the Chris­tian ideal that mattero. Appearing thru Oct. 15 SAMANTHA SAMUELS I know I'm not the ideal, on any account. I've been too buoy paying my billo and worrying about keeping the lighto on and food on the table to take "idealo" into account. But what about the Preoident? Well, let'• oee. An airliner carrying 50 AmeriCBD8 was ohot down by the RUB­oian. o on a Wedneoday. Ron and Nancy were at their ranch in California. They like it there. Ron wasn't about to give up hio oimple pleasureo of riding aod ranch­ing for aoything IO unimportant as 50 li 1•1•1 • •• ...H!L 2702 Klrby - 524-6272 Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 ~~ --N-U-f-/B-E--P-S- ---------------------------~ PREfl/ERES P'::IROTECHN/[5 f/ULTl-lf/RGE 0 i SRTURDR'::J OCTOBE,'( BTH ...: t 0 2LRSER5 SRI OCT.8 NO CO~'ER 9Pfl-7 7Pfl SUN.OCT9 NO COi/ER 6Pfl-9Pf'l FREE BEER I'/ ULT/-f/EDIR ENTERTR I Nf'IENT l/IDEO 18 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 Cabaret: The Revenge of the Silver Screen By Jon Cheetwood Irreverence i.o being di.ohed out in hysteri­cal helpingo again at Risky Business, 2700 Albany, in their newest a how, "Revenge of the Silver Screen." This is the natural sequel to their previous ehow, ''The Silver Scn!en (The Way It Wasn't)." Spoofing the movies adapte perfectly to Risky Bueineaa' special musical review format, utilizing the comic u well as muai· cal talente of the troupe to their crowd­pleaaing maximum. The succeas of the club's first swipe at the movies haa prompted them to get even more cockey; and through their braveness they are giving audiences their tightest, funnieet, moat muaically aatiafying show to date. These folks have real show biz balle. Their latest show is a go-for-broke proposition, and Risky Business is win­ning! Moat of "Revenge" is built around out­landish okite containing three to four aonga. Co-director Andrea Modisette is Gloria Swanson a la Carol Burnett in a routine featuring auch songs as "Food, Gloria's Food" which has singing vegetables that could have escaped from a Fruit of the Loom commercial. It's sort of like seeing Sunset Boukuard on acid. Another routine has Maria Von Trapp getting acquainted with Montrose and the varioua motley characters that might befall her there. Perhaps it ia because TM Sound of Mu.aic is such a natural target for farce that the club i.o ao 1ucceaafully mak­ing mincemeat of any sentiment we may have for that revered monument to sac­charin. Snow White gete a oimilar fate in the hands of Rieky Buaine81, as they give the word 111now" a more up to date connota­tion. You can imagine what they do to the dwarfs' names! Jenny Welch is flaw leas as the trilling Snow White in looks and manner. Ma. Welch, aa well aa Michael Jones, are newcomers to the cast and add greatly to the eatabliehed talents of the club. Delores Garcia ia back from New York after a two-show absence with her knock­your- socks-off voice, and she is in top form with "Houston Light.a," a local pride vari· ation of "City Lighte," and with the "The World Goes Round." Then complete with full Carmen Maranda regalia, she chugs around the stage in obscene pumps sing­ing about her "Tutti Fruitti Hat" and bow 1he likes us uVerrrry Much." This number is pricele88 in it'a taclrinesa and a real show stopper. Costumer Johnny V, an escapee from Suzie Cnamcheeae, baa outdone himself here. He may have redefined the word "ouUandiah" with bis vegetable and Car­men Maranda costumes, not to mention Maria Von Trapp'• studded nun's habit. Thanks to the effort& of the new musical director Art Yelton, the show is brimming with lively enaemble numbers with beauti­ful and clever arrangements. Mr. Yelton did a particularly fine job on the "Jazz Hot" medley which closes the first act with musical flare and aplomb. The current cast assembled by Risky Busineas has a great capacity to deliver the humorous extremes necessary for this production, aa well as the musical integ­rity that makes it truly fine entertain­ment, and you can feel the camaraderie working among these eight talented per­formers. If ever directors Jay Martino and Andrea Modisette bad a conecience batUe with taste for this ehow, Jetit be know that taste lost. But the audiences have won! It's simply one of the best entertainment buys in town. ·~-........._... __ NOT JUST ANOTHER 24 HOUR RESTAURANT ONE'S A MEAL is practically a monument. It was the FIRST all-night restaurant in the city . .. and because of its excellent location on the edge of River Oaks, ONE'S A MEAL became a favorite stop for later dining for a lot of Houston's finest citizens. ONE'S A MEAL IS AGAIN OPEN 24 HOURS ... offering the same FAsr, FRIENDLY SERVICE-but with one important change-the food is BEITER THAN EVER. just taste those hot scrambled eggs with chili-it's a Hous­ton tradition-served with hash browns or fries, hot biscuits, gravy and coffee! Or sample a 0 E'S A MEAL Cheesburger Deluxe- large-size, juicy burger with melted cheese and fries; or any of the complete ONE'S A MEAL dinners! WE ARE OPEN RIGHT NOW 2019 WEST GRAY 523-8432 (in the River Oaks Shopping Center ONE'S A MEAL-SO GOOD!! YOU'LL WANT TO STAY LATE MORE OITEN o Cabaret: Ruth Hastings & Co. By Jon Chutwood If you love the swirling Juab melodies of J acquea Brei and the -mingly boundleaa emotion of Edith Piaf, these arti.ote are given jubilant homage in the hands of Ruth Haatinge, Barry Lloyd and Craig JeBSup. These three consummate per­formers have been singing beautiful har­monie1 together in Europe and throughout the United States for seven years, and their mastery of the material ia evidenl All of the captivating Brei/Piaf tunes you have loved are here. From the humor of "Madeleine" to the lusty high drama of ''The Port of Amsterdam" to the bitters­weetneH of "Old Folks," the delivery of these 1ong1 is always exquisite. Ma. Haatingo proves herself to beagood actreBS, indeed, as is neceBSary when interpreting Brei/Piaf material. Her hio­trionic skills are most palpable in numben like "No Love, You A:re Not Alone" "Marieke" and "Next." While she never 'attempts a Piaf impersonation dur­ing numbers like "Milord" and "No Regret.a,'' the epirit of the artist comes resoundingly ~rou~h . ,, The group gives La Tendresse, sung in the original French, the joy and verve of a Poulene Poulenc Symphony, and "Carou1el" remain• the breathtaking musical trip it should always be. If you are familiar with Brei/Piaf, don't aaeume it will be a predictable evening, however, although it would be fine if it were, because the group io enhanced by a clever script and some not so familiar tunes. There i1 one aung by Craig Je88up, Montrose Live for example: "If I Could be Cute in a Stupid-Aas Way." The entertainer& are showcased beauti­fully in the performance-oriented facilities at Risky Busine88. This room gives enter· tainera more performing advantages than any other on the Houston circuit today. There are no bad sight.-lineo, and they have a lighting oyatemcapableofthelight cues which add BO much to a performance. This is a truly entertaining evening full of wonderful songs. My vote for a local Brei/ Piaf repertory company would have to go to Ruth Hastings & Co. They will be playing at Risky Business through October 19 at 8:00 p.m., Monday through Wednesday. o Cabaret: Samantha Samuels By Jon Cheetwood Samantha "Y~u know her, you love her" Samuels has lighted on her Houaton roost (RaecaJ'a piano) again, fresh from an engagement with Joan Rivers. Out of the steady fare in Houston'• club circuit these days, Sam may be our moat consistently satisfying visiting performer. Sam always seems to have done her homework. Her vocal material is alwaya updated and her patter current and natu­ral, making her performance fresh, no matter how big a Sam fan you may be. And she atayo fresh by telling new and funny stories. She baa a wonderful one about trying to catch aome raye around a pool in Palm Beach dreaaed in otiletto heels and a strap­leea evening gown. Sam haa become quite a etoryteller from when I first knew her, and ahe'e getting quite good at it. What next, Sam, the lmprov? Adding to her ability to stay fresh is Sam'a ability to surprise. I mean "sur­prise" in the moat eubtle ways-nothing big or shocking-an unexpected hand movement or change in countenance-a subUe flash of gesticular wit to keep you on your toes and delighted. Sam has mixed the old favoriws with her newer offerings. She opened with "I'm Coming Home Again,"-a terrific song by litU .. known wriwr Bruce Roberts. Why this song has yet to become a hit I couldn't say, but maybe Sam will be the one to pull it off. She certainly has the voice to do it! Sam is comfortable with all kinds of music, from a jazzy '4Moondance" to the simplicity of a remarkably unpretentious "You'll Never Walk Alone." But she has a special flare for that which is more dram­atic- like her beautiful Piaf medley or "Just Another Viait to Hollywood," a tren­chant new number by her manager/ director/ friend Swven Shore. She also makee wonderfully effective use of a aong from the short-lived Broad­way show 11Ballroom," and another called "Mama Don't Leave Me" that probably has to be reheareed during a therapy ses­sion. Samia not afraid to show us how she feels. She is never self-indulgent sharing herself with us. Sam has brought a musical treat other than her voice with her this time. Her pianist, John Arber, is one of the best musician& we've seen in Houeton cabarets. He can wrap her in music the way ehe deserves to be. o Laser Concert at Numbers Scheduled This Monday The Montrose Symphonic Band and Numbers II will present a laser concert Monday evening, Oct. 10, 8:00 p.m., at 300 Westheimer. Entitled "In and Out of this World/' the program will feature selec­tiona from Star Wars and Close Encoun· ters of the Third Kind. The community band desperately needs your aupport in order to join Dallas' Oak Lawn Symphonic Band and seven other gay community bands from across the nation next summer at a mass concert in the Hollywood Bowl during Los Angeles' Gay Pride Week. For more information, contact Elroy Forbes at 524-0409. o Theater: Grand's Finale By Joe L. Watts The University of Sl Thomas' Drama Department has opened its 83/ 84 season with the southwest premiere of Grand's Finale by New York playwright Casey Kelley (who was in the audience on open­ing night). Going with the aBBurnption that the play'• the thing, hopefully mean­ing script, this one falls short. An old-fashioned family comedy with four-letter words, Grand'• Finale is about an eccentric Louisiana family trying to deal with memories of their very influen­tial grandmother, referred to throughout the play simply as "Grand." The family consists of a very mixed lot. Mama, an airhead who hides and avoids everything, still bakes "'tomato soup cake" (a weird concoction that Grand used to prepare). Dad, an outspoken old koot, sits on an intertube and trys to "put him­self in balance" by lying on his back with his legs in the air. His idea of a chat with one of his grown children is his doing all the talking and expressing his worldly "theories" on everything. Their four children consists of Lee, a would-be writer who lives in New York and is home on a visit; Ray(theoldestson) who jokes his way through life telling us that 0 the truth is overrated"; Sister Ralph (who Grand always wanted to be a nun); and finally Shrimp, the youngest and wackiest, who is etill dumpy from all the cookies that Grand fed her. Grand still doesn't have a headstone after three year& after asking in her final reque1t that her family give her one of real distinction, "the best in town." Also she told Mama (her daughU.r) "the moon that shines on my unmarked grave will never shine on your smile." But Lee is out to prove Grand wrong. In a pow-wow with her brothers and sisters, she relates that "Grand is sucking our eoula out from the grave." Lee feels that Grand hasn't left them, and she is deU!rmined to break the tie that binds for herself and all her fam­ily. Grand'• Finale does have it.a warm spots in spite of being very trite: the local convenience store is called "the quicky bag;" Shrimp wlls Lee "that wriU!r's must wll all; they must be emotional flashers;" Mama, after bearing that Grand's grave has been desecrated, reply& ''You name a cemeU!ry Hyde Park and silly things are bound to happen;" and Shrimp, afu.r hear­ing Mama repeat for the 90th time how Grand would rollover in her grave if she knew how the family was acting, shout.a back, "Well, maybe we should have buried her on a spit." Ms. Kelly has used an in wresting device in her play. Several times during the pro- 402Lovett 527-9866 OCT. 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 ceedings when a scene doesn't go well or someone's feelings are hurt, one of the characU!rs will ask for a replay, and the scene will run again, but smoother the second time. In spiw of some fine parts, the acting does not come together to make a whole. Sam Havens has directed his student cast with evenne11 and some flair, but the uni­versity element is in the air, noticeable mostly due to the aging processes required for Mama (Allyson Wilkinson) and Dad (Craig Lowe). Honorable mention must go to Kathy Brooks as Shrimp. After writing her obitu­ary, she decides to become an actre11 and gives a wonderful imitation of Katherine Hepburn, delivering her lines with a zing. Also Katie Kirkendall as Lee shows much promise and comes off as a smooth and natural actress. John Bos has done his homework and provided a homey, comfortable set. Grond'• Finale will play in Jones TheaU!r on campus through October 8. YEAR ROUND GROUNDS MAINTAJNANCE INSECT CONTROL FERTILIZING W~r LANDSCAPING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE CALL DAVID WORTHY • (713) 529-0027 Fall Specials Mon-Fri/Two ForOne Lunches/ Plate Special or Soup&Sandwich. Dynasty on Wed. Nights Mon. Dinner $ Chicken Fried SteaJ< 5.95 20 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 Sports o Tennis Singles Championships Moue Into Semi-Finals Last Sunday it was the quarter-final matches at MacGregor Park. This Sun­day, it's the semi-finals. The Championship Flight saw No. 1 seed Tim Calhoun move as expected into the semi-finals with his 6-1, 6-1 victory over Jon Colbert. After three rounds of play, Tim has only lost three games. No. 2 seed Jan Mauldin had to postpone her match with Don Smith until later this week. Seeding held to form as No. 3 Ron Landrum defeated Victor Chapman 6-2 6-2, while No. 4 Jim Kitch quickly elimi'. nated Mike Green 6-1, 6-0. Jim has lost only all games after three rounds of play, and four of those were to Beaumont's "dark horse" Harold Hope, considered a strong contender to win Level I. Level I will see Hope-who eliminated Tom Cardinale 6-2, 6-0-meeting the winner of the Randy Dickerson (No. 2 seed) and Lester Vela match. What might be considered an upset, Anni Alabanza defeated No. 1 seed Donny Kelley 6-4, 6-3. Anni and Donny had not played.recently, so the No. 1 seed designa­tion might have been in error. Anni also improved his Challenge Ladder ranking four notchea with his victory over Donny. David Garza defeated Robert Arriaga 6-2, 6-0 to earn the match with Anni for one of the finalist slots. Level II saw No. 1 seed Danny Caoillas move into the semi-finals with a 7-5, 6-2 win over Jim Flanagan. No. 2 seed Rich Corder won over Mario Durham 6-2, 6-4. Thomae Cortez played Terry Rich in a rematch of last year's Level m finalists, and thi1 time he prevailed 6-4, 2-6, 6-3. Terry bad to complete lut week'• match with Kim Holmqui1t earlier in the day Sunday, winning 6-1, Hi, 6-3, oo that might have taken itstoll aaTerryreturned to the courta to face Thomas after only a short reat (the luck of the draw, I guess they say). Mark Dingman won the other semi-final elot with a 6-3, 6-3 victory over Richard Pregeant. Level ill No. 1 seed Eddie Chavez rolled 6-1, 6-3 over Manuel Murillo, while No. 2 seed Jerry Robinoon had to postpone hia match with Lary Barton. Julia Collier aur­vived a marathon match with Sandra Giv­ena 7-6 (7-4 tie breaker), ~. 6-4. Kim Holmquist rested a moment after complet­ing her match with Terry, and polished off Rick Martinez 6-1, 6-0. o Montrose Tennis Challenge Ladders September challenges completed with Julia Collier winning the marathon over Sandra Givens, which also counted as their Singles Championship match. Vic-tor Chapman completed his defense againat Donny Kelley 6-4, 6-3. Terry Rich held off Kim Holmquist 6-1, 1-6, 6-0, but she got on the ladders with a victoryofS-1 , 6-0 over Rick Martinez. Mark Dingman finished off newcomer George White 7-5, 6-3, so George can go ahead and take up the bottom of the ladders and start work­ing his way up from there. Matchea to count for October challenges were Harold Hope taking over the top 10 ranking No. 9 of Mike Green, 6-4, 7-6 (7-2). Th.is is two matches in a row for Green to fall to newcomers-by tiebreakers. He has a challenge-back with Victor Chapman ocheduled to try to get some revenge this coming Sunday. Eddie Chavez held off Rick Martinez 6- 1, 6-2. Rich Corder did the same to Mario Durham by twice the score, 6-2, 6-4. Rich went ahead and took on Jim Flanagan and held the newcomer back by 6-4, 7-6 (10-8). Watch these guya, Rich! Thoma• Cortez took a giant step up three ranks with hio 6-4, 2-6, 6-3 victory over Terry Rich. MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bowling STANDINGS Following Sept. 29 competition 1 D•ddy & the Oykettee 2 Keutfm•n's KooKlel 3 Swab'm 4 Rockett• .. 10" HIGH GAMES Em~ Weetbrook 221 SteYe Stapleton 210 Lynn KeUy 201 IGH SERIES Erniti Weetbtook 609 Lynn KeUy 528 MSA Women's Softball League RESULTS Sunday, Oct. 2 River Rats 13 Double R scu 7 VoiC4 Cyanide 7 Voice Special Blend 8 M1rlon & Lynn'• Reneg•dee 8 Cyanide Marion & Lynn's 5 High Ho- Roge 10 ·-- Klndrid Spiritt 16 Roge STANDINGS fo-llowin.g.. .O. ct. 2. ... Oiv1•ionl Kindred Spirits 3 1 750 scu 3 1 .750 Roge • 2 .887 Renegadel 3 2 600 Cyanide 3 2 .600 Montrose Voice " 5" .083 DNlaion II MCCR 3 0 1.000 River Rats 3 0 1.000 Special Blend 3'• 1" .887 High Hope1 2 3 .500 Marion & Lynn's "' 2" 000 Double R 0 • 000 1 0 0 8 ANTHONY 0cv,,. HALL ~~ He was recommended to the GPC as the best candidate in this race by its ONn Political Action Screening Committee. although he was not endorsed by the GPC CITY WIDE POS. 4 As our friend, he deserves our continued support Paid fer ~ Hlthor¥ Hal b City Councl Com'nltt• 2113 Marl. Houllcr\ t..aa non J.E Mic::ldle*ot'l 9' y.....,.. Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat OCT. OCT. 7 8 OCT. OCT. OCT. OCT. OCT. 9 10 11 12 13 For •dd1Uontil ln form• llon or phoM numbeft for events II t ied below, looll for the 1pontonng organ ~ a tlon under "Organ lHl lOns~ In the Montroee Clanlllecl Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY-MONDAY: Family & Friends international conven­tion, New York -.FRIDAY-SATURDAY: Greek Festival, Greek Orthodox Church, 3611 Yoakum -.FRIDA Y: Committee for Pub­lic Health Awarene88's 0 Shar­ing Group for the Worried Well," 7-Spm, Montrose Coun­seling Center, 900 Lovett llSA TU RDA Y & SUNDAY: Texas Renaissance Festival continues near Plantersville, also running Oct. 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30 & Nov. 5 & 6 llSATURDAY: National AIDS vigil, Washington, D.C. llSATURDA Y-MONDA Y: Dallas Invitational Columbus Day Bowling Tournament llSA TU RDA Y: Deadline to register to vote in Texas November elections -SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGre­gor Park -SUNDA Y: Dallas' MCC Choir & Orchestra concert at Houston MCCR, 1919 Decatur !IMONDA Y: Columbus Day rlMONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meete 6:30pm, Mont­roee Couneeling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 !IMONDA Y: Montroae Sym­phonic Band Laser Concert, " In and Out of this World," Numbers II, 300 Westheimer, 8pm !IMONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain • TUESDAY: Montroee Sym­phonic Band meet& at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm • TUESDAY: Lutherano Con­cerned meet& Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Wauf{h TUESDAY: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meete • TUESDAY: Houston Data Profe88ionals meet 7:30pm, East Room, Holiday Inn Cen· tral, 4640 South Main • WEDNESDAY: Montrose Chorale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-!0pm • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio ehow 7:~9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 1 WEEK: A Place in the Sun concert by Abraham Davidson, 8pm Oct. 14, Gracie­lynn Books, 704 Fairview m!N 1 WEEK: Westheimer Col­ony Art Festival, 100 to 1100 blocks Westheimer, Oct. 15-16 m!N 1 WEEK : Choice'• Leo­bian Mothers' Group meet& 6:30pm Oct. 15, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 • IN 1 WEEK: Choices October Bash at NighUife, 1322 Wes­theimer, Oct. 15, 8pm • IN 1 WEEK: Choices meets 12:30pm Oct. 16 m!N 1 WEEK: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Caucus meets Oct. 16, 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin tiN 1 WEEK : Families & Friends of Gays meets 2pm Oct. 16, Presbyterian Center behind 1st Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main tiN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus meeta 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm Oct. 19 •IN 2 WEEKS: Full moon, 4:45pm, Oct. 21 • IN 2 WEEKS: Montrose Clinic open house, 104 Westhei· mer, Oct. 23 m!N 2 WEEKS: "Zap Clap Revue Two, Too" benefit for Montrose Clinic & KS! AIDS Foundation Oct 24 & 25, Numbers, 300 Weetheimer m!N 2 WEEKS: Houston Area Gay & Leebian Engineers & Scientists meet 7pm Oct. 25 mIN 2 WEEKS: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets 7pm Oct. 25, Bering Church , 1440 Harold tiN 8 WEEKS; Capital Hallo­ween Invitational Bowling Tournament, Oct. 29-30, Washington, D.C. ~!~ii WEEKS: Halloween , m!N 8 WEEKS: Greater Mont­rose Business Guild meeta 7:30pm Nov. 1, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei­mer m!N 8 WEEKS: National Asoo­ciation of Business Councils 3rd annual national conven­tion , 11Future Links," opens Los Angeles Nov. 3, to Nov. 6 MONTROSE V D I C E OCT. 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 • IN 4 WEEKS: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm, Nov. 5 Montrose Classified m!N 4 WEEKS: Election Day in Texas, Nov. B m!N 6 WEEKS: Veterans Day, Nov. 11 • IN 6 WEEKS: Thanksgiving, Nov. 24 • IN 7 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 9th National Conference, "The Challenge of 1984: Together We Can Make a Dif­ference," San Diego, Nov. 25-27 m!N 11 WEEKS: Christmas, Dec. 25 m!N 16 WEEKS: Gay Pre88 Association Southern Regional Convention, Jan. 27-29, Hous­ton • IN 80 WEEKS: First primary party election• in Texas and party precinct conventions, May5 •IN 81 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 m!N 82 WEEKS: Texas Sena· torial District Party Conven· tions, May 19 • IN 84 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, June 2 m!N 86 WEEKS: Texas Demo­cratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston • IN 86 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anni­versary of Stonewall uprieing, June 15-24 m!N 41 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San Francisco, July 16-19 m!N 46 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Francisco • IN 46 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens in Houston Aug. 28, last­ing to Sept. 2 NOTICE BUSINESS OWNERS· The Monll'OM Votce llltl tr.. ..ch week In lhe Montroee Cletalfled bt.111· neu ettab111hmentt M!'Vlng u d .. tributlon points fof the Voice •nd community org&nlza· tio .. .e.l.n.d.l.C.M..M. .I Nt rie*'t lee MofltroeeYo6cecHttrf­DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES FEMALE PROFESSIONAL Desires to share with same lovely home, furn ished, maid, cable. Rent $325, utilities paid. River Oaks Cen­ter area. 523-3223. RESTAURANT OWNER Wishes to share ranch-style home in Richmond City. 3 bedroom. Rent $225 plus th ird utilities. Call Grand Cenlral Pipeline. (713)523-3223. ROOMMATE WANTED G/W/M to share 2 bedroom 2 bath apartment. $275+ 1/2 bills. Call 5~ 9094 after 6 p.m. Available Oct 30. SHARE LARGE HOME Stable, responsibkt G/W/M seeks same to share home (lots of privacy), 5 minutes from downtown. $275+ ulilities. (713)522-5502. ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT Hardwood floors, AC, W/D, covered parking. Near Allen Parkway and Montrose. $385+ electric. 692-2714. REMODELED MONTROSE DUPLEX Live in a tum-of-the-century atmos­phere combined with contemporary conveniences. 11-foot ceilings, tile and wood floors, large windows, new kitchen, striking bath, celling fans. $600. 522-9042 MONTROSE DUPLEX Large 2 bedroom. Nice kitchen. $500+ electric and gas. 957-3000, 524--0037. The Voice has more news, more Houston readers, more Houston advertising GALLERIA/MEMORIAL BARGAIN 1/1 condo, conveniently locataed, landscaped courtyards, pools, covered parking, security, decorator touches, cable, HBO, all utilitles paid. $425/month. Call'Lucllle 781- 5509 or Bonnie 84()-7207. GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE (A gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make this year. 523-3223. - Marry Roger?! I'd never sink that low more than a few hours! MONTROSE LUXURY DUPLEX One bedroom, newly remodeled, central AC, fireplace, carpeted_ See to appreciate . $450+ utilities . (713)524-9568. 421 W. Pierce UPSTAIRS DUPLEX Super Heights area. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, central air and heat, security fence . 88()-1869 LARGE EASTWOOD DUPLEX 2/1 upper unit with terrace. Super 1atue reduced to $395. Also availa­ble spacious Montrose stud io duplex with lots of charm at 1947 Richmond. Rent negotiable at $600. Must see to appreciate. Both units have hardwoods and lots of win­dows Rent + utilities. 960-9759. Gary Larson's Cartoons­Exclusive in Houston in the Voice EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED CAREER RETAIL SALES Galleria area store needs expe­rienced salesperson full time. Cus­tomer oriented , self-starter, articulate, detail person , neat appearance and handwriting. $800 a month + insurance paid. 528--5513 for Interview EARN $6-$10 HOUR We desperat8'y need many ambi­tious people for telephone sales work. No experience necessary. We train men, women and students are welcome if qualified Full-part time Days and evenings. For immediate work, call Mr. Zion, 953-0201 The Voice has more news, more Houston readers, more Houston advertising GAY BARS HOUSTON e Are-2212 Co~1311 -• B•'•-«l2 L.O¥ett 527-18(111; d.,lng. ...... e llttuoe RIYW Bonont-2400 8nize9-521- f112: 0CM.mlry ., 22 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7 , 1983 " I presume you're Dr. Livingstone .. . I mean . · .. Presumably, you're Dr. Livingstone ... No, wait ... Dong! I've screwed it up!" } "t_.4 ~-- .. :~ ~ J -< ( ..... t<~ .~~~ ·:~. . ,"-'~~~ -cl'B'-~---Jl!,~w~~v~~~~,J~ " You call that mowin' the lawn? . . . Bad dog! ... No biscu it! . .. Bad dog!" "My turn" ... Well, I'm originnlly from the shores of the upper Nile and ... saaaaaaay . . . Did anyone ever ten you your pupils are ROUND?" The Far Side by Gary Larson Primitive fandan go " Saaaaay . .. I think I smell PERFUME! ... Have you been over al the Leopard Woman's again?" e 8ri.r Peich-2294 w. Holcom~8 e C.tcft.1 Oilco---4te5 Martin Luth« King 641-2521 • Chicken Coop-535 W•th.imw-526-2240 .e..C.(.l.9.9 2631 Rlcf'lrnond-!2&-2259 diKO with e 01rty S.lly'I 220 Avondllle-529-7525 •Dou.,._ R SM>on 5731 Klrby--521-14+4 e E/J°l- 1213 Rlchmond-527-9071 e flllte-101 1 Bell--659-0453 country • Galleon- 2303 Rtchmond- 522-7&1& e Hoi.-109 Tuam-528-9128 e J R 'l--808 Pacilic-521 -2519 e Jutt Marion & Lynn'a-817 Falrview-528· 9110 tnblan • Lazy J - 312 Tuim-528-1343 e Loi.'1 0.pot-2327 Grant-53-8342 e Memortal Parti Motel Stir 50 Waugh Or 111-1311 e Midnlla Sun 534 WHlhalmer 526-7519 d*'°· shOw• • Miu Cha11otta'a- ·911 W Drew 52&-&&40 country e MonltOM Mining Co.-806 Paclftc 5.29-7488 e Nighl Ut.--1322 WMtheimer 528-7151 .e,.N.u.,r nbeni 2-300 WMthelmer-52&-M51 e Ottic.r'1 Club-2700 Albl.ny-523-40&( e OM on OM-1018 W. Gray-62&-8503 e The Outla...-1419 Richmond~ • Pink El.phant-1218 Leeland-&5t-OOMI' with "'""' eRucall-2702 Kirby 52~272: dining, llYa -~ e Rlch'.-2401 S.n Jacinto e Rlpcord-715 Falt\IW# 521-2792 • Rllky Buaineu 2700 Albany 528-3811 e Taxu A~ 1318 WMttleimer 521- ><75 e Troplcana SWlm Club-2114 Pac4tham e Twfna 535 W•t'*mer-520--02« lalbi•n dloco ew• Pt9yland-3012 Mlta:m-62MIMS ALEXANDRIA-BEAUMONT e Sundowner-497 Crock~3919 GALVESTON-e Fly-2101 O'ii-~9642 e Rol»rt'1Lar1n.--21J1<ampnar 7~ e TramfYIC)9-«27 W lnn l.-7~12'7 LAFAYETTE-e Fant .. y 1-408 Maurie• (WlndWood Shopping Ctr )-232-0338 LAKE CHARLES-e Paragon-1SCl1 BrOMl--433-9389 'Montrose Live' each Friday in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment ORGANIZATIONS SlLECT!D NATIONAL OAOAHIZATIONS-Gay Pr..- ANOCtation-P08 33805. W.ntng10n DC XI033-(202) 381-2...xl Gay AJghtl NllioNll Lobby-P08 llln, W.nington. DC :!0013-(2021 541901 Humtn Alghtl c.n>pa1gn Fund-POB 1398. W•l't­lnglon. DC 20013-(202) 542025 Lambd• L. Oef9,.._132 W 43n:I. New YOfk. NY 10038- (212) ~ M~1• Furid tor Hum•ri R•9ht1 (0.y Pr .. • AHoclat1on)- POB 33605. w .. hlrigton, DC 20033- (202)387'2430 NalloMI AMOC•ttJOn of au .. ,_. Couricll1- Bo11 15145. San Fraric:leco. CA 94115-(415) l!Jas-&363 National AMOC!tUO!'I ol G1y & La.bl•ri DtmocraUc Clubl--1742 M ........ Se. WnhlrigtOfl. DC 20003- !202)547·311M Nt\IO!'I .. Gay Rtghtl AdYoail•· -540 C .. tro. Seri FrlOCllCO. CA94114-!415) 1183-3624 N1llOr'lll Gay Tlllk Forc.---tO 5th Av, New Yotk. NV 10011 - (212) 741 -5800 NOTf"• Cr111ll•ne--(IOO) 221·71M4 (outaic:te New YOf'kSllt•I T•1t• Gayl\...Wri TIU for~ AK. Dentorl 19201 -(81 7) 387-«Z19 A C.P911.- ch0fu9=.(Mon1ro.a1 chufCh- ol et1011 - n1-929S A -P1;c;-;;;"u;e-~o Gi..:iivnn eoo; •. 704 F•lrw'*W ·-522-78'15 M.lbgroup ol llH Inc. con­certi 7pm TUM ACU:i="123e:W Gray--~s2~.~...,~. --­AIDSHoii~ Cio Gay s.:itehbOl.-ii""- 52i=3211 Americtin Gay At~tt$~7-Me0 Amerie•n lulharmen (IOCl•I ckJb) mMIS II o.n.rent Orum, 1732 W•IM!mer- 528-8621 dub nlghl Wed ~1nbOWAm.nc.-s~9451 (\IOloa).520- 0552 (TTY) Ctti1:9nl lor Hurmin Equality !CHE)-tl09 F111nin 11301-238-eeetl bolrd mMt 2fld Tu. Coll •5'• (IOCl•I club)-meetl •I Brua. R..,.r Bottom. 2.00 Bruo.-528-9192 CommlttM for Public HN!th Aware,_-POe 3045, n2S3-528-&33, 522-SOM MSM.rin9 Group tor the Worried Weir meet Fri, 7-&pm, MontroH CounMling c.nter Community Gospel C9nter-1100 Montroae- 52H018 Crlll1 Hotllne-221-1505 Oi•l·.Oay-Athe19t-•57-eefl0: Amerle11n Gay Athellll Diana Foundatlon-2700 MalOrl-524-5791 ~~,-~;~:~. ~~1~ ~e~ ~?a~ 7.30pm Sat F1mlU .. & FrlM<tl ot Gay•~: meat 2pm 3rd Sun 11 PrMbytarlanC.ntar. •1 Oakdale, behind First Preebytllfian Church. 5300 Main 111 Urlit.,ian Church 5210 F.,nln-529-1571 Mrvica 1115am Sun Frontrunners-529-1281 G1y & AIM Sharing Experience (GASE) 528- 1311, 52&-09t1 Gay & l. .. blan Arch\vee of Tuu: affiliate of llH Inc G1ySwitchbQ.ard- POe3e2•. 77253 529--3211 lntormltlon, counMling. raferrel1, TTY. AIDS Hotllne Greatar MontrOM Bullneu Guild-contact through MonlrOM Voice mMll 730pm. 111 Tu ... community room, Uberty8ank.1001Wee­thelmer GrMl'llpolnVFM1990 Aru Far-Away Frlendl 121'""811 .H.o.m..o.p.h.l ltl Interfaith AIUanc.--729 Man<>f =~.~~~ ~~=.~~:" a HOYiton Community Clowna-ee2-131• Houlton Data Protenlonelt mMll In Ent Room_ Hot.day Inn c.nw.1. 4MO S Maln-523- 8922 mMt 7._.,,. 2nd Tuet HW11on Motorcycta Club {IOClal club)-e/o M1ty'1. 1022 Wnlheimet-528-8851 Hou1ton Nor1h Prolaallonall-POB 3840. Hum- ~ !{~;6~!!_ ~:.~~~1'°""~~==--=""'-11'°'32.=---s=-,._ 7014 1fflll1ted group1 trl Interact, Grllcialynn Ga11ery·1 A Pl~ In the Sun, MontrOM Art ~~~~~,!{ ~!n~~ns~~~:=~~~~~~!~ roee Cloggers, board mMt 7 30pm 111 Thu,. ~~~~ locatlont), education1l lorum 7 30pm 3'-d lngeraoll SJ>Rii;lf9' eurMu-POB 391, Bell1lr1 77 401-669-4064 ~~~=er~ 2~T:O:. Autry Houle. 8205 Main, & 4th Tuel et varied locatlona ~ educltlonal aubgrOYp of l/H Inc POe 18041. 77222-529-7014. 54-1732 iKPF-fRftdi°- FM·I0-419 LO't'ltt Blvd 529- ..aoo· ·wi1c1ti ·n Sletn .. gay nacho ahow Thurs. ~~~~'°s°"•o"'~'°•"'"°'•on.,.--,1'°00~1~.w~.~ ,..,-_=,'°'11"°'03,--- 524-AIDS "Zap Clap Revue Two. Too .. benefit Oct 2'-25, Numbers. 300 W•thelmer Lambd1 B1cycltl Club-01v1c1 IS82-o458. Carol ~975 Lamwac.n19'Gar Alcoho~n~121.i JoAnnia-521·9772 L•blan Mother'I 1Ul:19roup ot Choic.; m..ls 1a1 end 3rd S.1, 8 30pm. 210 Falrtlew. apt 1 Lutherana Concemed--meea 11 Grace Lutn. ren Church, 2515 Waugh-521--0863. 453-114-3 mMI 2nd I 4th TUii ewnlng1 • Metropolitan Community Church ol theR•ur­rectlon (MCCR)-1919 Oecatur-lfl1·9149 pot­luck dinner 7 30pm 111 Sat monthly; MIVIOU 10'.•Sam & 715pm Sun & 715pmWed; memblf- ~f~\~:"a ~:'~:pm Tu ... ld1JC11t1on MontrOH Art AIU1nc.._s21-2~1- 1flillate l/H Inc; m"t 2nd Thuf9 MontroM Civic Club.: ... NMl10'llfn AMociatiol'I e MontroM CHnk: 1°' W•thelmer-Si.5531 open WMl!nlghtl e-10pn; women'• emphui1 program 1·5pm Sun. open nou .. Oct 23; MZap Clap Revue Two. TooM benefit Oct 24-25, NumlMrs. 300 w .. tn.imer Montroee CounHlinQ Center toO Lovett lf203--529..0037 AIDS victim 1upport group mee11 8.30pn Mon Montroaa Singers-cart Lawrence 77'-3591 ~= ~ldret'learHI Mon l\W, Bertng Church, MontroM Tennll Club-Rich at 52+-2151 play Sun, hm, MecGritgOf Ft.nt ~~~. .~ :1~~~11 :.i:=m Bowl, ~~~l~mN~~.(~4tr~':~!:;'!~23 MSA/Grealtr HOYiton (M9n·1 ) Sottball-523- ll802dey.523-0413..,. MSA/Women'a Softball Lugue-728-9371 MSA/Volleyblll 8110·2930. gamH 7:30pm Tu., Gregory-Uncoln ICt'lool, 1101 T1tt MontroH Symphonic Band-maetl 11 Bering Church, 1uo Harold-627-9689: mMt 7:30prn Tuel, affthate llH Inc MontroH Walch 1Ubgroup NMrtown Aaoc Mua1ang1 (90Clal club)-meetl 11 tn. Barn. 710 Paciflc-528-9427 club night Thu,. NMrtown Auociallon (MontrOM Civic Club)­mMts at Bering Church. 1440 Harold-522- 1000' meet 7pm 4th TUM Ne'# FrMdorn Chri1t1an Church-912 W llth- 591-1342. MrYIC*S 1o.tn Sun. 7 l()pm Wed Perk Paople-cfo N"rtown Community Flrehol.IM-741·2524 .P.u,, y Liblfaclon POe 800083. n2e0-523- R;Cr;;tiOnal Land Fund Commln-Mu1t1ng Clubpro~I Rice Univ G1yll.nblan Support Group-52•· 0724 Teu1 Bay ArH Gaya-332-3737 mee1 Thurs evening T111u Bay,., .. Gay YOYth 332.3737 meet ~ -~ THH Hum1n Rlghla Foundation-1915 Commonwulth-522·2824 T•UI Rldetl-e/o Mary'1. 1022 WMtn.lmer 5211-81151 Unitlrlan/Unl....,..llat Gay C.UcU1-e/o 11t Unllarlen Church, 5210 Fannln-520-97117, 528- 5842 meet 3'-d Sun 1ttarnoon1 W•layan Fellowlhlp--864-aa9til W-.~1mer - Cok>ny Artt Auociauon 1001 W11lt'leimer 1187 F .. 11val. lOG-1100 blocJi;s w .. thelmar. Oct 1~111 W<>meri'a L~ Alhance-4-~C~h<IMa-52~=-,_....= CONROE- ~:~:~a=~;-Jan11(409)756- Conroe Ar .. L .. biana.:.::K1thy 11 (4o9)758-90lllll mMt llpm 2nd & 4th Fri MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: o $2 for up to three bold capital words and c 30¢ for each remaining regular type word. Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other rates. Advertisers who wish something different should consider run­ning a dlsplay advertisement. a Deadline for all advertising Is 5:30pm Tues­day for newspaper released mid-day Friday. a Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad Is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mall or picked up at our office. a Deduct 15~ if you runthesamead4 weeks or more and pay for the full run In advance. c Bring or mall your Montrose Voice Classified to: 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Use this form or blank sheet of paper («ldttional f9f1U/ar, lower C41H WOl'dl, 30rt Heh} Addr ... ------------~-------- ~u=k°6':9~~ ~~~. -. .-,-..,-.,-mai~~~~~c-;.,;:.,:::,..c.=,-.:-,.,-w-.-. --- (19d1tCMdl ------------ Hp der. _____ _ LAKE CHARLES- 01Qn1ty-Rt 1, Bo• 21ec. Longv1119, LA 70852 PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS SINCERE AND HONEST G/W/M, 56, masc., straight­appearing, warm personality, dependable, good sense of humor. Not Into gay scene. Seeks loving 1- on-1 relationship. Write ad 154-A c/o Montrose Voice. BUYING GAY BOOKS Also "Honchos," paperbacks. Hard­core preferred. Daniel. {713)526- 9112. VIDEOCASETTES WANTED Rocky Horror. E.T., offbeat films. Erotica. Gay parades. Will pay, duplicate, return same day. Daniel. (713)526-9112. UNCUT? INTERESTED? Information. Correspondence club. TB Enterprises, POB 72010, Corpus Christi, TX 78472. CHUBBY WANTED Businessman, white male, attractive, 35, 5'10", 170 lbs., black hair, brown eyes. Would like to meet white, chubby straight-looking male. 250 lbs. or more. For friendship and fun. Please no fems, beards or long hair. Visit Houston occasionally. Inter­ests include open variety. I'm open­minded, sincere and give a lot of myself. You won't regret you met me. My home is your home in New Or1eans. Write ad 151-C, c/o Mont­rose Voice Will answer all BODY MASSAGE In or out. Bruce, 521-2009 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e Cklb Hou110n Bath•-2205 Fennln-65._.9911 •French Ou1rt1r TtMlter-3201 l.oul1lan1- 527-0782 • Mldlowne Spa-3100 Fannln-622-2378 e 230ll Club-2308 Gene1..e-52M1235 RESTAURANTS e 8a)a·1-402 LO't'ltt-527-teee • Ctl~--13 Rlchrnoncl-.522-2385 • Frank l• '1-Monlro11 al We1th1lmer-529- 7 ... • Oyro Gyroa Sandwich Shop-1538 W•lhetmet'-528--4&55 e Hou11olP ... -3112K1rby~18 • Hou• of Shilt! Kabob 2042 M1ooa11 521- 0518 e ll"..-1303 w .. 1M1m«-52&-a823 • Old Houston 0.,...,-914 W All.bama-524- 23111 e Pertly'• Richmond •I Klrby-524-0075 e Ruc11s-21'02 Kirby-524-6272. ~ e spud-U-Like-418 Wnthe•mer-520--0554 • Star Plua-2111 Norfolk-623--0900 • Stuk ·n· Egg-4231 Mon1rOM-.52'-t135 • T1m·1 CoffM Shop-1525 Wnlh•lmer-529- 2289 • Tropicane Swim Club-2114 P.ckham SERVICES, ETC. ATTORNEY Jerry Garrett, 4803 Montrose, Suite 11 , 526-5237. ATTORNEY AT LAW Injuries, property damage, busi­nesses, wills and estates Jack Withem. 462-8887. K A P AUTOMOTIVE Car repairs, tune-ups, brake jobs, clean-ups, inside and out. By appt. 285--1 811. CARPET CLEANING 524-2442. MASSAGE Chuck. 521-3496. PATRICIA ANN! O'KANE Attorney at law, 526-7911 . DENTIST Ron Peters, DDS. Exam, X-ray, cleaning $25. Open evenings & Sat­urday. 523-2211 . Offer expires 1111183. MOVEMASTERS Hauling, packing, supplies, too 1925 Westhelner, 521 -3155- OCT_ 7, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 ~-----------'---- LICENSED MASTER MASSEUR Full body massage. In or out. Chase 527-0S76- Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 e Ft1nctK0'1 Hair O.l;n 901 Riehmond 523--0438 e Hou1ton Gu.t HouM lodg1n9-10ll Avon· ~520-9787 e !ctinhOW91" Beauty Sct'lool-327 w .. tneimer- 520-7972 .e.l..9.g end1 Hair Delign-906 W•thelmar-527· e l.lone! Hair O.i9n-3220 Yoakum-526-4494 e Montro11 Hair O.ign-1004 C.lilornla-522- 2822 • Montroea VOie. .-pap.r-3317 MonttoM 1306-02H480 e NN11oWn Garage-1901 Tatl-523-2794 e PrMi. P'oltll Sy11em1 mail box• 1713 w .. tMl.rMf-62t-3020 ~~· BaJbw Stlop-2154 F'ortlrnouttl­• Tr...-.1 Col'llUltlintl-2029 SW Fwy-62t-M&& • Travel lnnOW1tlon•-150I W Alabame­Montrme TniMI Club 523-3051. oommeraal accounta 523-es35 SHOPS & STORES ADULT MOVIE ARCADES Mags, films, novelties, video. 4330 Richmond, 877-0244. 5200 Tele­phone, 649-9322. 76371h Longpoint, 957-9148. 9927 ltvingtcn, 691-8232. All locations open 24 hours. • All-Star Adult Newa 1..07 Richmond 528- 8405 e AntlqUti Comer-11121 Waethalmer-522-«>117 • Aaytum Adult Bookator.-1201 Richmond • Safi Part Adult Bookacor..,_1830 W. Alab&lna e Cobwitb Uquo,. 2038 W11thlllmer-.52&- 2'00 e eut FloWers 5015 Montrow--522-1n5 By Tycho e er.m.t1ka ;tfta-3224 Ye>Mu~7 • Goot•·.-1004 C.titomia 524-555.5 eGf~nn Booka-704 Fatrv--522-7895 • Gr..t•nva Plua-t411 W•the•mer~1ea e Kirby Newttand--311.5 Klfby-520-0246 .•,.o_n, .B.o.y l LNlh« Goodl-912 Weethelmer • Old En9lilh Furniture-1138 W Gray 521· ""' e RKOrd Aadt muM: 3109 S. Shephlifd 524- 3602 e Studz Aclull Newa 1132W. Alabama e Tl.C-eo:z W Alabarne-524-5880 e Tett Automot~1.w1 Teft-522·2190 e Tn. TI,. PIM»-1307 F•rvi9w-529-141• .• .U..n t0nJacitdothlng-1212WestMtmer 528- e Up One WHtern/LHlh•r BRB. 2400 Btuoe-524-5737 e w111r.m.r FMll Mattet 1733 W..tt.fmar .e,.W_ .,.,t .tl,e imet lnl.,IOnl 1727 Wuthetmer TRAVEL CHEAP AIR FARES Lowest air fares between any 2 cit­ies. Gay tours, hotels, cruises, etc. Grand Central Pipeline Travel Co. (713)523-3223, 1115 Ba1kdull, Hous­ton 77006. TRAVEL KEY WEST Free brochure and map included Accomodatk>ns, restaurants, shops, bars Write Key West Business Guild, POB 1208-M, Key West, FL 33040 (305) 296-7535. Fortunes For Friday ev&nmQ, OctobfN 7, 1983, lhrouoh fflday ~nmo, October 14, 1983 ARIES-You're learning about the law of give and take right now. It won't be a hard way to learn the lesson, since things between you and your lover have never been easier. But then for you, the initiator of the zodiac, learning the simplest things is always a wonderful surprise. TAURUS-Commitment is the key word. How you handle this will effect your life for some time to come. The question is money, and that remains in the picture for a whlle. You'll need to find the final answer before a real commitment can be made. GEMINI-You may meet someone with a more holistic or spiritual outlook than your own. This person may serve as a mirror for your personal understanding. Don't wear dark glasses. Let yourself see and be seen. A brilliant new you could emerge from this intense reflection. CANCER-You're still getting ready for some kind of new beginning, and as you withdraw from the social scene, it's Important that you explain the reasons to those around you. By doing that, you'll learn from someone very close what this need for solitude is all about. LEO-This passion that's burning so hot and long is, of course, turn­ing your life around. The air is clear, the birds are smging, you see yourself in a bright new way. It feels so good to get up In the morning! Almost as good as it does to go to bed at night! VIRGO-In your sign all week: Venus and Mars. Mercury /eaves Virgo Saturday evening. You're going to have to bend with the wind a bit in order to keep future plans on course. So don't get locked into anything so tightly that you can't move around. Reserve some elbow room, and listen to what an older man has to say to you. LIBRA-In your sign all week: Pluto and the Sun. Mercury enters Saturday evening. A friend may become a lover. and someone who has been little more than a sex object may surprise you with the ability to be a good friend. Roles reverse and people do all sorts of unexpected things. Sounds like a lot of fun to Tychol SCORPIO-The Moon is In your sign until Sunday afternoon. Saturn 1s in your sign all week. It's a good thing you've got someone in your life that you can really talk to. Your reecent tendencies toward manipulation are obliterated by one more gentle than you. You'll learn something special about how to be with others. SAGITTARIUS-In your sign a// week: Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. The Moon passes through from Sunday afternoon to Tuesday night. Where are you going, all of a sudden? I think I'll call upaSagittarian and come along. Spontaneity and creativity go hand in hand, making this traveling time more exciting. You're off at the drop of a hat, and lucky Is anyone who's off with you. CAPRICORN- The Moon Is in Capricorn from Wednesday morning to mid-day next Friday, the 14th. All of that discipline you've observed over the past few weeks is paying off. You're feeling fit, both mentally and physically, and after a dose of hard work, you're ready, willing and able to play hard. tool Very hard! AQUARIUS-Always a bit of the radical or revolutionary, you may find yourself in a bit of a clash with someone whose views are more conser­vative than your own. Teach Ing by example seems to be the way to go on this one. Don't let business take you away from new-found friends. PISCES-You could be a haartbreaker without .... en knowing tt. Get smart and look around. Someone who regards you as a very special role model may be confused by your recent actions. Take time to explain yourself. Step down trom the clouds for a while. •1-.3 STOHEWALL FEATURES SYNOtcATE 24 M~ONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 7, 1983 SELECTION A SPECIAL SERVICE FOR SPECIAL PEOPLE VIDEO DATING COMES OF AGE Offices Now Open at 4200 Westheimer suite250 (713) 961-9876
File Name uhlib_22329406_n154.pdf