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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
File 020
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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 020. 1983-12-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-02). Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5351

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 020, 1983-12-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 2, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript Dec 2,1983 / Montrose Voice 19 Montrose Live 'Private Lives' Explodes with Talent and Laughter By Billie Duncan Drop everything next Tuesday night and go see Private Lives at the Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland. If you can't make it this Tuesday, go the week after. But whatever you do, do not miss the show. Noel Coward wrote the play over 50 years ago as a biting and humorous merry-go-round featuring two "regular" couples, but it works so well with an all- male cast that it is a wonder that the play is not done this way for gay audiences with regularity. Basically only some pronouns and two proper names seem to have been changed. For those who have not seen Private Lives before, the premise of the play is simple. Victor and Mandi Prynne are on their honeymoon. Elyot and Cyril Chase are on their honeymoon. Mandi and Elyot were once married to one another. The two new couples wind up at the same resort on the same day in rooms with adjoining balconies. From there the sparks fly, passions ignite and the play becomes a series of explosions alternated with sifting through the emotional rubble. This is a character comedy, with the revelations of the characters and their urbane and witty banter dominating the action. BILLIE DUNCAN PHOTO Ian Tanna (Elyot) and Jerry Garrott (Mandi) share a tender moment between barbs in "Private Lives" at the Pink Elephant John David Etheredge directed the production at the P.E. with a great sense of Btyle and an obvious love of the characters. His use of the tiny stage space is extremely creative, and his sense of the rythms of the play is superb. (Please note: this is done in the much larger expanded room of the Pink Elephant.) Bruce C. Herling is riotous as the pretty, but pouting Cyril, a boy who could tame lions with his ever-present handkerchief. Herling snaps, primps and pouts his way through his role with an air of total right- ousness. Joe Watts (co-founder of the Diversity Theatre, producers of the show) is perfection itself as the stuffy, pompous, pseudo- macho Victor. Actually, Victor is a loser in this play, but Watts plays him winningly. The two characters on whom the play focuses are Mandi and Elyot, however. Ian Tanna as Elyot is astoundingly varied within the perimeters of his character. Tanna's gamut runs from domineering stupidity to tender introspection with complete concentration and sensitivity. Now we come to Jerry Garrett as Mandi. Garrett w»uld-walkaway with this show if the other actors were not, as good as they. are. He is superlative as the bright, compulsive Mandi whose abilities to manipu late are only thwarted by his innate sense of honesty. Garrott's performance is one of those gems, one of those treasures against which a person can gauge any other performance. He is worth seeing again and again. Finally, proof that there are no small actors, only small parts: Jim Keel is Louis. Keel is a real scene stealer in a beautifully underplayed rendition of the disapproving "maid." As for the other production values, the sets were designed by necessity and the lights were not designed at all. The sound was good, however, with the talent on the tape provided by Tim Tavcar (vocals) and Mickey Rankin (piano). The players were dressed nicely. This is the first of a series of productions planned by the Diversity Theatre, which is dedicated to bringing to gay (or nongay) audiences the many facets of gay life as portrayed on the stage. If the following productions come near the quality of the performance of Private Lives, Houston may become known as the city for excellence in gay theatre. □ Duncan's Quick Notes "All artists have a hope. One is to become a big star. That is not mine. I think you are a star every time you step on stage." With that statement, Denise Le Brun somewhat illuminated what it is that makes her so very special every time she steps on a stage. The next stage upon which she will step is the Theatre One, 3517 Austin, in the opening of the Houston Community College Artist and Audience series. Her one-woman show will play from Dec. 7 through the 11th. _ FoTthose who have not been fortunate enough yet to experience Le Brun, here is a quick background: born and educated in France, friend of Edith Piaf, co- entertainer with Jacques Brel, international singer, presence on the American stage from New York to Houston to Los Angeles, with a year at the Dunes in Vegas. "Vegas?" said Le Brun, her musical voice lilting with the memories of France. "To start with, it's not a city. It is a mecca of show business." What of the American mecca of theatre, New York? "I think it represents well the United States." Los Angeles: "To live in a city where you depend on a car.... Well, I'm a Parisian!" However, she now resides in Houston. Denise Le Brun has lived in more American cities than most Americans. "I have been where my shows took me." Actually, she did not plan to come to this country and spend years traveling around and singing. "I came to visit for three weeks," explained Le Brun. Then she smiled. "I didn't know the country was so big." She first entered the country in 1969. She's still finding new places to explore. When she got here, she spoke not a word of English. She had studied German and Italian in school, so she figured that English would not be that difficult. "I thought it would take about Bix months." She laughed. "It took much longer than that" Her gauge for success in the language was simple. "I knew I could really speak English when I could understand the jokes." So now the United States is as much a home to her as France, and she likes having two countries. "It's like having two husbands. I'd like to have two husbands. Three. Four!" As for her current show, she feels that an English-speaking audience would not be up to listening to two hours of songs in French. "I don't want to sing to an elite. I want to sing to people who have been working all day." • • Le Brun i«- a- strange -combination-of- thingB, both emotional and physical. She is a tiny woman who has a commanding BILLIE DUNCAN PHOTOS Wild and wonderful hair styles dominated the "Illusions a head" fashion show at Numbers Motorcycle madness was the theme of the final creation in "Illusions a head" ■Thes^jvidfionul-Prvnrh singer hemse Le Brun talked about discovering America presence without being overbearing. She is expressive but not effusive. She is more like a well than a fountain. No matter how much she gives, there is always a secret place kept deep inside. She is the perfect choice to kick off HCC's new program of entertaining artists. For reservations or information, call 630-7264. Another interesting artistic experiment came off last week. And it was quite successful. "Illusions A Head" took to the Numbers stage on the 23rd. It was a fashion and hair show that featured the present, the past and the future, as envisioned by Ken Powers and a gaggle of merchants and hairdressers. The show was to start at 10pm, so most patrons expected a show by maybe 10:30 or 11pm. A large crowd waited considerably longer, while the lasers cut through the smoke and the liquor flowed. Zardoz finally stepped to the microphone to start the show (Now, please, that really is the poor child's name. I know. I asked. Would they lie to me?). Soon we were off to see the first wizard, Antonio Amico. who designed the gowns for the first section: the present. Amico has an eye for the glamorous and the glitz. Bette Midler or Roxie Starr would feel equally at home in his creations. The second section was the past, with clothes from Stop the Clock. This was a delightful section with a variety of 50's looks from the racks of recycled clothing available at Stop the Clock. Finally, the future was revealed. Very revealed. The first models to emerge were basically nude with strategic bands of colored cellophane wrapped around their young and nubile bodies. Then from the fog and colored lights, another image emerged. A massive black and silver machine—motorcycle at least, monster at most—pulled on to the stage. Seated in the passenger position was the occupant of the coup de gras: a studded black leather skirt and hooded top that Mary's Cassandra would kill for. The audience screamed their appreciation, and the show was over. Later in the dressing room, producer Powers explained with a sense of astonishment that six hairdressers had been involved in the hair designs for the show with "no problems." The six were Powers, Susan Van Doom, Annette Noland, Joni Punam. Jeff Lee, and Antonio Amico. All thehair styles in the show were a lot of fun. So were the food trays in the dressing room provided by Baja's (everything they say about starving journalists is absolutely true). I was having such a good time finishing off the food trays that I asked when another fashion and hair show was planned. Powers stood silent for just a moment, then muttered, "Oh, God!" and walked away. A lot more goes into putting these shows together than anyone can imagine. And while we're on the subject of shows, the Ripcord seems to be thinking of having a couple of shows in the next month or two. The tentative dates are Dec. 12 and New Year's Eve. Rumor has it that Vickie Vagina, Clare Clitoris and the Rev. Mother Christine will appear. One never knows what to expect from the Ripcord, does one? One more note. Kindered Spirits continues its tradition of fine live music every week. Linda Christian has the Wednesday spot, while the incredible talents of Harriet Reynolds fill the room on Thursdays. Harriet, by the way, is part of Alexandra Haas' group that just closed at Rascals. Herhonesttwrformance-.^harmoniee and song writing abilities add immeasurably to an already fine act.
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