Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
File 010
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 010. 1983-12-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5341.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-02). Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5341

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 010, 1983-12-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5341.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 2, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript munity, which is nice to look back on. It happened to a coalition of people. It wasn't just one group in charge of the event. It was all groups participating in it, with a couple of groups like GPC being the thrusting force in making it happen." Shiflett recalled other major events which occurred during his GPC presidential history. He is particularly proud of the national convention that "put the GPC on the national gay political map. Texas, as a matter of fact, was put on the gay political map by Houston representingTexas. California and New York finally started to deal with us. It (the gay movement) had been an east coast/west coast phenomenon up until that time. "Then we had to force our way to the decision-making table. They didn't really want to include us when we got there." But since then, all has changed, and Houston's position in the national gay momement has finally become entrenched in the east/west coast minds. "Texas is now looked at as the moderate voice of the gay community leadership," Shiflett said. "We don't tend to have the radical approach . We're pragmatic and even-keel down here." Shiflett is also proud of the municipal election of '79 that displaced Frank Mann, "the bigot of the century on City Council," with Eleanor Tinsley. He said Mann's three favorite words were "oddwads, queers, perverts," and that he prticularly delighted in telling Mann, "Little minds belong with little people, and little people don't belong in big places like City Council. We're going to unseat you." Consequently, the GPC fed Tinsley 200 to 300 volunteers, and "she swept by," Shiflett said. "That's when the GPC became popular. We were recognized. And gay baiting was used all over." Shiflett recounted the troubled years with the Houston Police Department and the confrontation with HPD Chief Caldwell, who would not acknowledge that the gay community had a problem with the HPD. But the police problem "being the one issue that brings the community together," GPC's work with the National Gay Task Force, which was invited to Houston, led to Operation Documentation which encourged the gay community to report actions by the police. Shiflett recalled the frequent bar raids, the beatings by the HPD, the shootings, the police cars parked in front of the gay bars with the cops inside waiting to follow people out and arrest them on DWI charges or for public intoxication, sometimes 10 at a time. But what was most important to him during his presidency was the sense of community and the pride he felt with so many other gay groups besides the GPC growing and forming in Houston. "So many more opinion leaders were available to work with, and the more groups that were out there, the more people you could put together for your efforts. You could work together. And that's what was so tremendous, because there really was a camaraderie and esprit de corps, and it was fun." Then Shiflett reflected on the highpoint of his two years as president of the GPC, that of organizing, watching and participating in Houston's first Gay Pride Week. "It was probably the most memorable event that I can remember during those two years of my being president, because it brought out so many more people. You could see the smiles on their faces as you drove down Westheimer in the parade. It was an incredible feeling just to see the sense of self-worth coming across the community. Overnight they had decided to come out of the closet! "It was very emotional. I would say our first parade had 12-13,000 people at it—an incredible leap in one year for a community, especially a gay community. "It was so satisfying to see the results of your efforts. But again, it was becauseeve- ryone was working together." Just prior to Shiflett's election for a third term, the GPC was at its peak of influence. "I had been responsible for bringing the gay community into the mainstream of politics and establishing its ability to perform and deliver what they say they can deliver. We were riding high on a crest of influence. "It was time for our community to realize that we could make a difference. And when we realized that we did make a difference, it reinforced our reason to exist and continue to build and gave hope to a lot of people that things can get done." (Next week, Shiflett discusses his resignation from the GPC and the forming of Citizens for Human Equality (CHE), as well as the political divisions within the community which could plunge it into a dark age without leaders, wherein the current GPC could become an extinct dinosaur.) Dec. 2,1983 / Montrose Voice 9 Inventory Liquidation Sale 20% to 50% Off on Slacks Jackets Sport Coats Sweaters Sport Shirts Active Wear Dress Shirts Ties Now Open Sundays Hours Tuesday-Friday 10 to 6 Saturday 10 to 5:30 Sunday 12 to 6 Located at Fountainview and Westheimer 5 blocks West of the Galleria TRAV€L CONSULTANTS IMffE. €< mmmMM L CCMIjM^ jtfindjomwner' 1Barefoot'Cruises Special Texas Departure January 31,1984 Call Bruce for Details Key West/Ft. Lauderdale extensions available Houston phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 250 DRAFT BEER The Only Bar in Town selling 250 Draft Beer ALL DAY, EVERYDAY Open Noon, 7 Days a Week, 528-6988 POOL & VIDEO GAMES 3012 MILAM off ELGIN 3 BLOCKS from WESTHEIMER Viecker- Zayne Collection Quality Professional Models • Escorts Office hours 2pm-2am (713) 526-1389 ^ ^HOUSTON Personal checks accepted
File Name uhlib_22329406_n162_009.jpg