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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
File 006
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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 006. 1983-12-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5337.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-02). Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5337

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 006, 1983-12-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5337.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 2, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript DEC 2, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Congress Looks at Important Gay Issues By Larry Bush WASHINGTON—Congressional panels took up a variety of issues before their winter recess that have important implications for gay people, including hearing a proposal that the Equal Rights Amendment legislation be amended to bar civil rights for gays, a review of a Reagan proposal to subject nearly four million American workers to sporadic lie detector tests about their reliability, a revamp of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, and efforts to amend Administration proposals on "acceptable" charities to which federal workers may donate. The House Judiciary Committee heard testimony from anti-ERA crusader Phyllis Schafly of the Eagle Forum asking that the proposed Equal Rights Amendment include a new provision that would block any court from extending civil rights to lesbians and gay men. The ERA, which died at the Btate level only three states short of ratification in 1982, was reintroduced in the current congress to once again wend its way through the process. According to Schafly, the key reason for blocking civil rights for gays at this time i.s AIDS, and in her pitch she suggests that airline attendants who are gay be fired to insure the safety of any passengers who might accidently find the steward's blood in their food as a result of a cut during the microwave preparations. Congressional sources indicate that Rep. James Sensenbrunner will lead an effort to attach Schafly's amendment during the full Judiciary Committee proceedings. While the amendment is expected to fail, it is also expected to provide a forum for heated discussions of the "threats" gays present. Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Monlrose Voice Publishing Co CIRCULATION Monlrose Voice. 11,000 copies weekly Dallas Gay News. 6,000 copies weekly Austin/S»n Antonio Star, 4.000 copies biweekly lotal Te>aa area. 19,000 copies weekly, avo Contents copyright ®1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publisher Acel Clark Jeff Bray graphics Sonny Davis accounting Robert Hyde managing aditor Hollis Hood news editor Chuck Meredith sporfs editor Billie Duncan Peter Derksen Jon Cheetwood Joe L, Watts enlerteinment writers Lyt Harris advertising directo Mark Drago advertising Founding Member Greater Montrose Business Guild, Gay Press Association News Services International Gay News Agency. Pacific News Service Austin Bureau Capitol News Service Syndicated Feature Services A Writers: (San Francisco) Chronicle Fealures. United Feature Syndlcale, Jeffrey Wilson Randy Alfred. Stonewall Features Syndicate. Brian McNaught, Joe Baker POSTMASTER Send address corrections to 3317 Montrose #306. Houston, TX 77006 Subscription rate in US in sealed envelope. $49 per year (52 issues). 129 per six months (26 issues), or S1 25 per week (less than 26 issues) Back issues S2 00 each National advertising representative Joe DiSabalo. Rivendell Markelmg. 666 6th Avenue. New York 10011, (212) 242-6863 Advertising deadline: Tuesday, 5 30pm. for issue released Fn- Notice to advertisers Local advertising rate schedule Six-A was effective July 1, 1963 Rmponsibility: "Montrose Voice' does not assume responsibility for advertising claims. Readers should alert 'Monlrose Voice" to any deceptive advertising. In Rep. Jack Brooks' (D-Tex.) government operations committee, there was a furor of activity over new Reagan Administration proposals to tighten national security by subjecting any workers with access to classified documents to random lie detector tests. According to testimony at the hearings, about four million American workers—1.5 federal workers and 2.5 workers in the private sector contracting with federal departments—would be affected by the random checks. Each federal department follows its own guidelines on what constitutes "reliable" workers, with some publicly admitting that they want to know which employees are gay. Brooks' committee took a dim view of the Reagan proposal, as have senators in a counterpart committee, and it now appears unlikely that the proposal will swing into full effect without some changes. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) wrung changes out of a different Administration department in October. The Reagan Administration had announced earlier this year proposals to deny groups federal grants or contracts if they were doing "grass roots" lobbying with the money they received from nonfederal sources. That would have been an extension of the current rules, which bar the use of federal funds for any lobby purpose. The Reagan proposals were written by the Heritage Foundation, the think-tank Btarted by Joseph Coors of Coors Brewery, and was meant to "de-fund the left." However, the broadly written proposals also angered the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, as well as several major Defense Department contractors. Among other provisions, they would have had to build a separate building and hire a separarte staff for any work they were doing to affect public opinion. Several run-throughs were tried by the Reagan Administration to satisfy its Defense Department contractors while still gouging groups like Planned Parenthood off the lists, but Frank used his oversight subcommittee to keep the issue visible. In late October, the Reagan administration finally threw in the towel, accepting a vastly watered-down version of its first proposals. In a closely related area, the Administration also had sought to cut off the list of acceptable charities any group that it claimed was doing lobbying, again broadly defined to include such things as letting the public know of proposed rules changes affecting programs. Planned Parenthood, which has faced the strongest hostility of any group during this Administration, was once again the target. The rules change was particularly objectionable in the eyes of charities, because the issue was not federal tax dollars, but merely whether federal employees would be allowed to donate to such groups during the annual Combined Federal Campaign, which is the equivalent of the United Way for the millions of federal workers. Lower federal court rulings prevented the Reagan Administration from striking Planned Parenthood and similar groups, and Frank's subcommittee once again kept a close watch on the situation. Frank now says he believes the charities who would like information on how to be listed as an eligible group in the Combined Federal Campaigns of the future. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission officially is dead at the age of 27, a casualty of the Reagan Administration's proposal to rid the watchdog group of its watchdogs and replace them with lapdogs. The issue was an effort to replace three commissioners with Reagan appointees, following an earlier sweep through the commission that included firing the former Eisenhower cabinet officer then serving as the Civil Rights Commission chairman.. Congressional supporters of the commission, who point to the group's origins in 1957 as a key impetus for civil rights protections in the country, now are considering measures that would take the commission away from the President entirely and make it a congressional agency. Currently the commission is charged with answering to both congress and the President, with the president appointing commissioners and congress giving approval. Civil rights protections for gays have not been part of the commission's mandate since a 1977 ruling that the commission can not go beyond the charter provided by the 1964 civil rights act, as amended. Since the act has never been amended to include gays, the commission took a hands-off policy. One possible consideration for a congressionally-mandated commission, however, might be whether language would be added expanding the charter beyond the civil rights act itself to examine discrimination wherever it occurs. Atheist O'Hair Excommunicates Gay Atheists International Gay NewB Agency Madalyn Murray O'Hair, president of American Atheists, has expelled the oldest gay atheist group in the United States, the Gay Atheist League, from her organization and endorsed a splinter group called American Gay Atheist, because she says the former has violated the tenets of the organization. O'Hair, who gave a keynote address at GALA's convention in 1982, sent a letter to GALA saying that because of the schism between the two gay atheist groups, it is "obvious to all what we must do." Jeffrey D. Vowles, President of GALA, said he thought it preferable to "maintain a good working relationship with all anti- religious organizations, whether they describe themselves as atheist, agnostic, free thinker, rationalist, scularist or humanist." O'Hair accused the excommunicated group of requiring O'Hair's group to accept the religion of the religious mates of gay atheists. Vowles said that membership in his organization is on an individual basis, and that no inquiry is made "into the religion or lack of it professed by any member's lover or companion." Too Many Managers in Nation's Firms America's productivity gap is the fault of America's business leaders, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer. That's the message from University of Southern California Management Professor Warren Bennis. He says most U.S. firms are underled and overmanaged. There are too many "managers" who only try to do the right thing, he says, and too few leaders who do things right. Bennis says it's no wonder surveys show that, while most Americans are satisfied with their jobs, they don't believe how they do their jobs makes any difference.
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